Rose state college



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Date:

September 12, 2018


ROSE STATE COLLEGE

Division Course Syllabus




Division

Humanities

Course Prefix and Number

ENGL 1113

Course Title

English Composition I

Semester and Year Submitted

Revised Fall 2018

Credit Hours

3

Prepared by

Antoinette Castillo, Sandra Keneda, Theresa Walther

Hours Per Week: Class

3

Lab

0

Course Description (as it appears in Catalog)

ENGL 1113 is the first in a two-course sequence that integrates critical reading, thinking, writing, and other communication skills to prepare students to compose texts in both academic and professional career situations. In this first course, students will closely read and analyze texts focusing on cultural issues in both essays and other forms of rhetorical situation so that they may more thoughtfully reflect on their own culture and use the intellectual skills gained from that reflection in complex composition.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 0131 with a grade of C or better; successful completion of ENGL 0133 with a grade of C or better and concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0143, or satisfactory assessment score for ENGL 1113.








Text(s):

Title

The Practiced Writer (in D2L, and available in print at the Rose State Bookstore) & Rose State Reader (in D2L)




Author

Kevin Caliendo & Rose State Writing Program faculty


Publisher



Rose State College Humanities Division




Copyright Date

2017

2013








Reading Level

varied

Supplemental Materials: (Other books, audio visual aids, etc.)









Outline for Remainder of Syllabus:
Rationale:
Students entering college, no matter how strong, need additional help developing the critical thinking skills necessary to write for all academic and other rhetorical situations. English Composition I, 1113, focuses student writing by critically analyzing written and visual texts to develop compelling arguments. Students will write documented essays using appropriate research citation styles. Students are also required to write other formal and informal assignments.

Expected Outcomes:


The student will demonstrate the ability to recognize and use the conventions of academic and formal communication, with emphasis on composing three-to-five-page essays in which the following are used appropriately: the writing process for planning, inquiry, thesis, drafting, revising and editing; rhetorical situation appraisal to employ ethos, pathos, logos and the conventions of standard English; recognition and avoidance of logical fallacies; effective use of major argument conventions, emphasizing position/major claim, supporting sub-claims, evidence, reasoning (warrants), refutation of counter-arguments; research methods emphasizing source evaluation; and document construction to become proficient in moving between APA and MLA style format.
The student will demonstrate the ability to recognize and use the communication and thinking skills needed to succeed in continually evolving work environments, with emphasis on the following: the connection between academic and professional career rhetorical situations, incorporation of multimedia elements, providing digital access to audiences of the student's own completed texts, PowerPoint presentations, electronic communication forms such as email, phone texts, proposals, resumes, letters and reports.
The student will demonstrate the ability to use the reflective thinking skills needed for self-authorship through questioning and reframing of existing paradigms, with emphasis on the following: analyzing and discussing literary fiction and nonfiction, as well as visual texts, to critique the underlying assumptions, intentions, and values concerning cultural expressed in those texts. This process will include extensive examination of alternative points of view, including critical examination of the evidence and arguments supporting each one.

Methods of Instruction:


Becoming proficient with the technical skills of English is largely a matter of practice. With this in mind, class time will be heavily focused on activities, both in groups and as a class, that provide the necessary practice. Students will also frequently be given activities to complete outside of class, including online exercises and other optional Internet and computer-based instruction. Individual conferences with students are encouraged. Methods will vary by professor but may include lecture, class discussion, PowerPoint presentations, and audiovisual aids. Professors are encouraged to communicate the importance of class attendance to students and use the Early Alert system when needed.

Assessment (Including Critical Thinking Measurements):

To shape the content of student learning and essays, the course professor will incorporate a balanced combination of literary nonfiction and fiction texts from the course textbook or free online sites. These will be 6-12 separate texts and will focus on development of student academic voice, cultural and global awareness, and personal transformation.


25% Credit for the course grade will encompass work relevant to the three course "Expected Outcomes" above as the individual professor determines to be most effective. This work usually includes scaffolding assignments to help students with specific skills and assignments to help students further develop their individual voice as writers.
40% Credit for the course will be from two formal documented essays, emphasizing argument, each essay requiring three to five content pages and incorporating three to five sources.
25% One multimedia argument that requires 5% more content or effort on the part of the student than the two short documented essays completed for section III above. (See section 8d in the Keys to Successful Writing course textbook on multimedia argument if needed.) The assignment will incorporate visual argument, either through subject matter, format, or both. Some part of this assignment will be submitted on the RSC electronic platform in a forum in which it may be viewed by a larger audience than just the course professor (for example, the course discussion or blog areas).
10% During the class's scheduled final exam period, the student will complete the Humanities Division ENGL 1113 Final Exam. Professors may find information on these exams either in the Humanities Hub D2L site or from the writing program administrator. These essays will be submitted to the Humanities Division office along with final course grades. Note: Students must take and pass the final exam under proctored conditions in order to pass the class.

Learning Outcomes:


Unit One: (Learning Outcome 1)

The student completes an initial assessment to check for accuracy of student placement and semester planning. (The initial assessment will assess grammar, punctuation, spelling, and mechanics as well as the student’s ability to write a five-paragraph essay in order to refer students who need more intensive review in these areas to the Tutoring Center, Writing Center, Composition Workshops, and/or ESL Workshops to meet needed skill level. (Students may also be advised to re-take the placement test to ensure accuracy of placement.)




Unit Two: (Learning Outcomes 1 & 2)

Demonstrate understanding of the components of a rhetorical situation and be able to assess various types of rhetorical situations.

Read, analyze, and discuss—verbally and/or in writing—several literary nonfiction, fiction, or visual texts to critique the underlying assumptions, intentions, and values concerning the workplace environment as expressed in those texts. This discussion will include extensive examination of alternative points of view, including critical examination of the evidence and arguments supporting each one.

Demonstrate specific understanding of rhetorical situations involved in career professional contexts by evaluating and creating texts such as PowerPoint presentations; electronic communication forms such as email, phone texts, proposals, resumes, letters, and reports.

Identify the important elements of the research process, including the steps involved and how to avoid both intentional and unintentional plagiarism.

Recognize the elements of APA documentation and practice using them.



Unit Three: (Learning Outcomes 1 & 3)

Read, analyze, and discuss—verbally and/or in writing—several literary nonfiction, fiction, or visual texts to critique the underlying assumptions, intentions, and values concerning culture and identity as expressed in those texts. This discussion will include extensive examination of alternative points of view, including critical examination of the evidence and arguments supporting each one.

Identify criteria that can be used to evaluate a primary or secondary research source's credibility.

Practice locating and evaluating research sources to identify two to three credible sources.

Practice identifying and using the writing process, including planning, inquiry, thesis, drafting, revising, and editing.

Compose a three-to-five-page essay that employs the conventions of formal academic communication and APA format and documentation while synthesizing material from the sources identified in numeral 2 above in this unit.




Unit Four: (Learning Outcomes 1, 2 & 3)

Read, analyze, and discuss—verbally and/or in writing—several literary nonfiction, fiction, or visual texts to critique the underlying assumptions, intentions, and values concerning consumerism in society as expressed in those texts. This discussion will include extensive examination of alternative points of view, including critical examination of the evidence and arguments supporting each one.

Practice identifying and using the basic components of argument: claim, evidence, reasons/warrants, and anticipated objections rebuttal.

Practice identifying elements of ethos, pathos, and logos in various rhetorical situations.

Practice identifying and avoiding logical fallacies in various rhetorical situations.

Identify the major differences between APA style and MLA style format and documentation.

Practice using MLA documentation.

Practice locating and evaluating research sources to identify two to four credible sources.

Compose a three-to-five-page argumentative essay that demonstrates the ability to use Toulmin-method argument, avoid logical fallacies, and demonstrates effective use of ethos, pathos and logos. The essay will employ the conventions of formal academic communication and MLA format and documentation while synthesizing material from the sources identified in numeral 6 above in this unit.
Unit Five: (Learning Outcomes 1, 2 & 3)

Read, analyze, and discuss—verbally and/or in writing—several literary nonfiction, fiction, or visual texts to critique the underlying assumptions, intentions, and values concerning the American Dream as expressed in those texts. This discussion will include extensive examination of alternative points of view, including critical examination of the evidence and arguments supporting each one.

Identify and practice using methods by which to research and evaluate visual arguments and visual evidence.

Identify and practice methods required for documentation of included visual elements from other sources in the student's work in order to avoid plagiarism.

Compose either a three-to-five-page documented essay that includes visual argument elements such as hyperlinks and graphics, or an equivalent multimedia text such as a formal blog, video, brochure, magazine, etc. that further explores issues raised in the class texts, writings, and discussions. In forming this project, particular emphasis should be placed on identifying how the skills involved will be relevant to the student's future academic studies or career professional field.

Post the completed discourse project (from numeral 4 above in this unit) so that digital access is provided to audiences beyond the course professor.



Unit Six: (Learning Outcomes 1, 2 & 3)

Introduce topic possibilities offered by the Humanities Division Final Assessment, and review argument composition and documentation strategies needed to write the required essay under pressure during the final exam. Emphasize that no notes or outside research beyond what is provided in the exam itself are permitted.

Administer the final assessment. Usually, this is done during the scheduled final exam period for each class; however, students in online or hybrid classes may take the exam any time period the professor stipulates during the college designated final exam schedule week. The exams are provided for students in the LRC Academic Testing Center, but professors must pick up their own classes' work and grade them.

After the professor grades the finals, s/he will turn them in to the Humanities Division when submitting final class grades. Reminder: Students must take and pass the final exam under proctored conditions in order to pass the class.




AA 4 10-12-2009-pg of 5


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