Post-tenure Review



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Post-tenure Review

Nicholas S. Hill, Professor

August 6, 2012

Nicholas S. Hill

Assistant Prof. 1/86-7/92

Associate Prof. 7/92-7/96

Professor 7/96-present

Teaching: 25%

Research: 75%

Extension: 0%



Research:

Fescue endophyte and toxicosis

Endophyte survival

Alkaloid metabolism/transport

Animal reproduction



Fusarium Head Blight

Analytics (ELISA) and implications for breeding

Develop QTL’s for molecular analysis (NDSU/USDA)

Pasture-based Dairies

Pasture systems modeling/gaming

Fate of nitrogen

Carbon dynamics



Grazing Management

Validation of systems modeling/gaming



Corn!!!

Fescue Endophyte and Toxicosis

Endophyte survival during seed storage in different cultivars of tall fescue containing endophyte AR542, and in Jesup tall fescue containing endophytes AR542 and AR584.

Seed survival of Cycle 1 (C1) Jesup tall fescue populations with endophytes AR542 and AR584 compared to the parent populations (C0), Flecha with AR542, and Jesup with its wild type endophyte when stored for 22 months at 30oC.

Seed survival of Cycle 1 (C1) Jesup tall fescue population with endophyte AR542 compared to the parent population (C0), Flecha with AR542, and Jesup with its wild type endophyte when stored for 22 months at 30oC.

Seed survival of Cycle 1 (C1) Jesup tall fescue populations with endophytes AR542 and AR584 compared to the parent populations (C0), Flecha with AR542, and Jesup with its wild type endophyte when stored for 22 months at 30oC.

Seed survival of Cycle 1 (C1) Jesup tall fescue population with endophyte AR584 compared to the parent population (C0), Flecha with AR542, and Jesup with its wild type endophyte when stored for 22 months at 30oC.

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In vivo transport of fescue-derived ergot alkaloids into the circulatory system from different gastric sources.



In vitro transport of lysergic acid (L) or ergovaline (R) across ruminal and omasal tissues

Aerial photograph showing land use conversion from row crop to MiGD farms.

Pasture-Based Dairies

The southeast represents 32% of the nation's population and is growing at a rate faster than the national average yet has the lowest per capita milk production.

Population trends of dairy cows on pasture vs. total cow numbers in Georgia. Similar trends are occurring in Missouri and North Carolina.

Total soil carbon (a) increased across the MiGD chronosequence with the greatest increases occurring between 3 and 5 yrs since conversion from row-crops. These C increases were limited to the upper 40cm of the soil, with minimal change occurring at depth. C is isotopically enriched in the surface horizons (b) consistent with increased carbon inputs from roots (or manure) inputs. Reflection of these same trends in the clay fraction (c) and (d) suggests new carbon additions become rapidly associated with soil minerals.

Using Durana White Clover as a Living Mulch/N Source for Corn Production

Establishment Methods Weed Counts

Clover Suppression SPAD Readings

N Dynamics Stand Counts



Plots received 0.75 lbs/A ai Roundup 5 days prior to picture (30 DAP)

Plots received 0.75 lbs/A ai Roundup 12 days prior to picture (37 DAP)

Biomass relationships between corn when no-till planted into Durana clover (band sprayed)

Clover re-growth within a canopy of maturing corn on July 29

Teaching:

Crop Science CRSS 2010/2010L (yearly)

Forage/Pasture Management CRSS 4260 (even years)

Terror in the Food Supply (yearly)

Teaching:

Crop Science CRSS 2010/2010L (yearly)

1) Great professor, and a fun class. Dr. Nick made a otherwise boring class into an interesting one with his enthusiasm and his great personality. I also like his grading style and his fairness. One of the best if not the best professor I have had while at UGA, too bad he doesn't teach in my major.

2) Nick is an excellent teacher who's always willing to answer questions and provide help to students inside or outside of class. He's one of those teachers who truly wants every single one of his students to succeed and even provided job and internship opportunities occasionally. He's an excellent teacher who I would love to have another class with.

3) Enjoyed the material in the course by did not like the essay tests

4) One of the best, most useful courses I have had the opportunity to take at UGA. The professor was able to present the information in a way that was easy to understand and also showed us how relevant the material was to our future careers.

5) The tests covered only a relatively small amount that was covered in class, and it was hard to study for the test. also, while fill in the blanks test your knowledge more that multiple choice tests, at the same time, the questions were so focused on one certain thing, rather than testing the knowledge of all the subject material learned in class.

Teaching:

Forage/Pasture Management CRSS 4260 (even years)



1) Great class and Great teach. One of the best teachers I have had.

2) Loved this class, I learned a lot and it opened my mind to the possibilities of utilizing exclusively forage in an animal production system. I had always thought that grain was necessary because that's how the industry was introduced to me.

3) Using pop quizzes as a tool to gauge students comprehension of the covered materials was a weakness in the course, especially since they accounted for 50% of the grade. Overall I really enjoyed the course

4) Very interesting class with one of the best professors I've ever had

Teaching:

Terror in the Food Supply (yearly)



1) A lot of the material that we covered in class seemed like it was a little bit too in-depth. I wasn't aware that there was as much biology and other science related material included in this class. The instructor was very enthusiastic about the material and introduced examples that were useful to help understand the material better.

2) Great course. Every person of every major should take it. Very informative.

3) Great course. I have learned so much about our agriculture and all the threats associated with our food supply. I would recommend this class to anyone interested in what they are eating and how it gets from the farm to the dinner table.

4) Awesome class!!



5) Dr. Hill does a marvelous job with this course. There is no other professor that could do it justice.

6) Excellent!

7) I loved the class. Nick does an amazing job at explaining things that may not be clear to those who are not ag. majors and to those of us that are ag majors. This class is required for my certificate and I am so glad that I took this class.

Grants

Pasture-Based Dairies

USDA/SARE $249,534 (PI) 14,200 (Co-PI)

NZ Dairy Systems LLC 249,480 (PI)

Greenstone Grazing LLC 186,310 (PI)

USDA-NASA 561,000 (Co-PI)

Corn Research

Pennington Seed 3,800 (PI)

GA Corn Commission 8,768 (PI)

Teaching

USDA-HEC 147,047 (PI)



Total $1,420,139

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