Invasion: Middle School Paired Passage Extended Writing Mini-Unit



Download 3.01 Mb.
Page1/2
Date25.04.2017
Size3.01 Mb.
#18014
  1   2
Invasion: Middle School Paired Passage Extended Writing Mini-Unit
Man and the natural world have often been on a collision. As man continues to invade on the habitats of other creatures and plants, many animals, insects, and plants have either been totally destroyed or forced to change their natural environments. The changes on ecosystems often have deadly consequences. Below are two informational writings that examine what happens when man forces creatures out of one habitat into another or when people have different views on the topic.
Read both selections paying close attention to how each writer feels about what happens when creatures are forced to change their habitats. Pay close attention to the words that the writer uses, the evidence and supporting details that prove a point, and the structure of the texts. As you read, think about what ideas, facts, or details from the text you might use to explain the viewpoints. You will read two texts. Afterwards, you will answer three selected response questions and one short construction response question. These questions are to help you think about what you have read. Finally, you will be asked to compose one extended writing about what you have read. These are the titles of the texts:


  1. “Alien Invasion”

  2. “Home on the Range”

READ the PASSAGES.



Three Selected Response Questions
1. What is the purpose of the article, “Alien Invasion”?

  1. To point out that invasive species come from many different countries

  2. To argue that invasive species are a serious problem that must be solved

  3. To describe the damage that invasive species cause in Australia

  4. To suggest that invasive species can be stopped only with the government’s help

2. What is the purpose of “Home on the Range”?

  1. To inform people about two opposing views

  2. To convince people to take a particular point of view

  3. To describe recent scientific discoveries

  4. To challenge a common belief

3. Which statement below best describes the relationship between the central messages of both texts?

A. The main idea of both texts is that all species cause devastating problems when they are relocated into other areas.

B. Both authors believe that the solution is simple when faced with endangered species or relocation of species.

C. Both authors offer specific examples to present the information.

D. Though one author offers a balanced view and one does not, both authors understand that the problem with invasive species or endangered species potentially brings about negative consequences.

Short Constructed Response
Describe a similarity and a difference on how the two articles approach the subject of invasive species. What central idea is in each article?

Extended Writing
Compare and contrast each author’s point of view on bringing non-native species into a different environment. Focus your discussion primarily on the supporting details, paying close attention to each author’s choice of words and how those words impact the tone of the writing. Notice the way each author structures the article. Connect all the ideas to the central idea the author is communicating.
In your extended writing response, be sure to:


  • Introduce your central message

  • Include discussion of both passages

  • Mention the titles of the articles

  • Begin with a suitable introduction

  • Support your thesis with relevant evidence from the texts

  • Organize the evidence

  • Give commentary on the evidence showing how it supports your thesis

  • Establish and maintain a formal style provide a concluding

  • Check your work for correct grammar, usage, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation

Answers to the Three Selected Response Questions

1. What is the purpose of the article, “Alien Invasion”?



  1. To point out that invasive species come from many different countries

  2. To argue that invasive species are a serious problem that must be solved

  3. To describe the damage that invasive species cause in Australia

  4. To suggest that invasive species can be stopped only with the government’s help

Though all four answers have some truth, B is the answer that can be inferred from the thesis statement in the fourth paragraph of the article. A is a simple fact and is made clear from reading the article, but the article’s purpose is not simply to prove this fact. C is information understood from one example offered by the author and does not encompass a central idea. D is not addressed adequately within the article to be a central idea.

2. What is the purpose of “Home on the Range”



  1. To inform people about two opposing views

  2. To convince people to take a particular point of view

  3. To describe recent scientific discoveries

  4. To challenge a common belief

A is the correct answer because the organization of the article is balanced and is non-persuasive. The article does not promote belief of one side of the argument over another, so B is incorrect. Scientific discoveries are not the focus of the selection, so C is not the correct answer. Common beliefs are not identified, explained or challenged, so D is not correct.

  1. Which statement below best describes the relationship between the central messages of both texts?

A. The main idea of both texts is that all species cause devastating problems when they are relocated into other areas.

B. Both authors believe that the solution is simple when faced with endangered species or relocation of species.

C. Both authors offer specific examples to present the information.

D. Though one author offers a balanced view and one does not, both authors understand that the problem with invasive species or endangered species potentially brings about negative consequences.



The authors both indicate an understanding of the problem of alien species, so D is the correct answer. A is not correct because neither author states that all relocated species cause devastating problems. The solution to invasive species is not presented as simple, so B is incorrect. Though both authors offer examples, using examples is an organizational strategy and not a central idea, so C is not the best answer.


Invasion: Learning Targets (From Seventh Grade CCGPS)
ELACC7RL1 and ELACC7RI1:

  • I can cite evidence from the text that supports my analysis of what the text says explicitly.

  • I can cite evidence from the text that supports my analysis of what the text infers.

ELACC7RL2 and ELACC7RI2:

  • I can determine the theme or central idea of a text.

  • I can analyze how the theme is conveyed through details in the text.

  • I can provide an effective summary without adding my opinion or personal details.

ELACC7RL4 and ELACC7RI4:


  • I can analyze how figurative and connotative language can help shape the meaning of a passage.

  • I can analyze how words can help show an article’s point of view and tone.

ELACC7RI5:

  • I can analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.

  • I can analyze how major sections of a text contribute to the development of ideas.

ELACC7RI6:

  • I can determine the author’s purpose in a text.

  • I can analyze how the author distinguishes his or her point of view from that of others.

ELACC7RI9:

  • I can compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres.

  • I can analyze how an author uses evidence to shape key information.

  • I can analyze how an author uses interpretation of facts to shape key information.

ELACC7W2:

  • I can write an informative text to express my ideas.

  • I can write an informative text where my ideas are organized so that readers can understand them.

  • I can write an informative text where key content is analyzed.

  • I can introduce a topic clearly, letting my reader know what is to follow.

  • I can choose appropriate facts, concrete details, and quotes to support my ideas.

  • I can write a conclusion that follows from the ideas developed in the essay.

ELACC7W4:

  • I can write clearly and coherently.

  • I can develop and organize information in the appropriate style for the assignment.

ELACC7W5:

  • With support from my teacher and my peers, I can make my writing stronger by planning, revising, and editing.

  • I can rewrite when necessary.

  • I can even try a new approach to generating good writing.

Invasion: Reading / Writing Strategy to Prepare for Extended Writing Prompt
With your students, read and discuss the initial information given with the readings (top half of “Invasion: Middle School”). Have the students read the passages, using the reading/thinking strategy suggested for each text in the section called Preparation Activity. You may choose to create your own strategy.
Before tackling the writing, have the students respond to the three selected response (multiple choice) questions. One question is asked about each text and one question combines the texts. These questions are designed to begin the thinking process for the students as they work toward the Extended Writing. As a group, you may wish to talk about the answers and why they are the best answers. The Short Constructed Response is also designed to help the students organize their thoughts before the Extended Writing. Have your students compose these sentences now; however, they may wish to revise their response later in the writing section.
After finishing the initial reading, the selected response items, and the short constructed response, begin with the 5x8 card activities. You may wish to give students an opportunity to reread before they begin writing. Students will be writing the body paragraphs first, then the introduction, and finally the conclusion. The directions for generating information and peer revision are basically the same for each step of the process. The card strategy is a gradual release model, helping students internalize how to approach longer texts and paired passages.
Note: In the strategies below, the Reading directions are written to the teacher. The Writing directions are written to the student.
I. “Alien Invasion”
Alien Invasion” Preparation Activity
Reading Step One: Have the students read the article silently or read it to them, as necessary, explaining vocabulary or difficult ideas. Have the students read the article again, with a partner, underlining key ideas, definitions, and words that seem specifically positive or negative. Students should also annolight (annotate and highlight) the various invasive species mentioned in the text.
Reading Step Two: As a class, create a blank template for a graphic organizer that gives the important details for the four invasive species discussed in the article and for words that show the article’s attitude toward these invaders. Have reading partners complete the chart using the article. Discuss briefly.
Reading Step Three: Have students put the article aside and compose several sentences using information from the article to explain why the invasion of alien species is a problem.
Alien Invasion” Writing Activity
Writing Step One: At the top of a 5x8 card, write one sentence in which you give the title of the text and a brief explanation of the article’s central idea about invading species (topic sentence). Next, choose one example of an invasive species mentioned in the article and paraphrase or use a brief quote from the article to explain the problem created by the invader. The paraphrase or quote should point to specific words that show the author’s attitude about the invasive species. (Remember, do not quote an entire sentence; put just the important words inside a sentence of your own. Be sure that sentence is a complete sentence with a subject and a verb. Also be sure to use quotation marks correctly.) Follow the paraphrase or quote with an explanation of the author’s view of the problem in your own words (commentary). You may wish to discuss a second invasive species using the same format of paraphrase/quote and explanation. End the paragraph with a sentence describing the difficulties the invaders have created in their new, non-native environment.
Writing Step Two: Trade cards with your partner. Read your partner’s card. Turn the card over and add any details that could be included in the information to make your partner’s evidence and commentary more clear. When all partners are finished writing, return the card.
Writing Step Three: Read the comments on your own card. Did your partner write any information that you think you need to include? If so, take time to add it to your paragraph on the front of the card.
II. “Home on the Range”
Home on the Range” Preparation Activity
Reading Step One: Have the students read the article silently or read it to them, as necessary, explaining vocabulary or difficult ideas. Have the students read the article again, with a partner, underlining key ideas or definitions and annolighting (annotating and highlighting) the various invasive species mentioned in the text. Students should pay attention to the positive and negative words that illustrate the article’s attitude toward these possible invaders.
Reading Step Two: Using partners or trios, have the class create two-color T-Charts to list reasons for “Just ‘Plain’ Smart” [Do point out the pun and the punctuation!] and “Bad Idea!” In one color, students record the idea from the article in no more than four words. (The idea from the article can be a paraphrase or a quote. Use quotation marks when necessary.) Below the idea from the article, in a second color, the students should explain why the idea is important (inference/analysis). Again, attention should be placed on the choice of words in the article.
Reading Step Three: When teams are finished, have a class discussion using the T-Charts. Encourage students to pay special attention to the explanation of the ideas from the article.
Home on the Range” Writing Activity
Writing Step One: At the top of a 5x8 card, write one sentence in which you give the title of the text and a brief explanation of the story’s central idea (topic sentence). Give the important idea from the “Just ‘Plain’ Smart” section of the article, using a paraphrase or a quote. The paraphrase or quote should point to specific words that show the author’s attitude about the idea. (Remember, do not quote an entire sentence; put just the important words inside a sentence of your own. Be sure that sentence is a complete sentence with a subject and a verb.) Next, explain in your own words why that idea is important. Repeat this process for the section entitled “Bad Idea.” Finish the paragraph with a sentence that shows the relationship between these two sets of ideas.
Writing Step Two: Trade cards with a member of your group. Read your partner’s card. Turn the card over and add any details that could be included in the information to make your partner’s evidence and commentary more clear. When all members of the group are finished writing, return the card to your partner.
Writing Step Three: Read the comments on your own card. Did your partner write any information that you think you need to include? If so, take time to add it to your paragraph on the front of the card.
III. Preparation Activity for Comparing and Contrasting “Alien Invasion” and “Home on the Range”
Reading / Thinking Step One: If time has elapsed between the initial reading/writing of the 5x8 cards, reread the texts either orally or silently. Divide the class into groups of four, trying to mix up teammates from the previous groupings. Give each group the questions below and have them discuss/answer briefly on paper each question, pulling evidence from both texts. After group discussion, pull the ideas from the class together.

  1. What is the central message of each text? How are the central messages alike/different? What proof can you offer to support your choices?

  2. How does the overall structure of the text, “Alien Invasion” support the attitude (positive or negative) of the article? Give specifics.

  3. How does the overall structure of the text, “Home on the Range” support the attitude (positive or negative) of the article? Give specifics.

  4. How do word choice and structure play a role in creating the point of view in both articles?

As a class discuss one final question.

  1. How do the texts apply to today? What are examples of invasive species in our area? What can be done to minimize the effects of these invaders?

The discussion for questions one, four, and five are important; they will be the keys to writing the next two 5x8 cards.
Writing Activity for Introducing “Alien Invasion” and “Home on the Range”
Writing Step One: At the top of a 5x8 card, respond to the following prompt in no more than two sentences:
Describe a similarity and a difference on how the two articles approach the subject of invasive species. What central idea is in each article? “
This is the Short Constructed Response prompt that you answered earlier. You may wish to change what you wrote using the ideas generated in the class discussion of question one.
Writing Step Two: Skip several lines on the card. Write one sentence about invasive species and their effects on an ecosystem (hook). Give an example of an invasive species in your area using an idea generated in question five of the Preparation Activity above (background). In one sentence introduce the titles of the two articles you have read, explaining that the articles discuss the problem of alien invasion (acknowledgement of sources). Finally, shorten the two sentences at the top of the card to one sentence and write it as the last sentence in this paragraph (thesis).
Writing Step Three: Trade cards with a member of your group. Read your partner’s card. Turn the card over and add any details that could be included in the information to make your partner’s evidence and commentary more clear. When all members of the group are finished writing, return the card to your partner.
Writing Step Four: Read the comments on your own card. Did your partner write any information that you think you need to include? If so, take time to add it to your paragraph on the front of the card.
Writing Activity for Concluding “Alien Invasion” and “Home on the Range”
Writing Step One: To begin the conclusion, create one short sentence that summarizes the attitudes in both articles about alien invaders (recap of thesis). Next, choose one example (that you have not already mentioned) of an invader from “Alien Invasion” and how that invader has hurt an ecosystem. Then, choose one animal from “Home on the Range” and explain how relocating that animal might help or hinder an ecosystem. Keep both of the sentences short. Now, using a transitional phrase, return to the example of the invasive species in your area, making a statement about why it’s important to be aware of the problem of invasive species (broader implication).
Writing Step Two: Trade cards with a member of your group. Read your partner’s card. Turn the card over and add any details that could be included in the information to make your partner’s evidence and commentary more clear. When all members of the group are finished writing, return the card to your partner.
Writing Step Three: Read the comments on your own card. Did your partner write any information that you think you need to include? If so, take time to add it to your paragraph on the front of the card.
IV. Writing the Final Essay
Writing Step One: Line up your cards so the Introductory card is first, “Alien Invaders” is second, “Home on the Range” is third, and Conclusion is fourth. This is basically your essay.
Writing Step Two: Read the cards carefully, adding transitions where needed, and making sure that sentences with quotes in them are actually complete sentences. Add any other ideas you have gathered during the process that support your thesis. Be sure to read for grammar, usage, capitalization, spelling, and punctuation.
Writing Step Three: Type your essay to prepare for peer editing or to hand in! Congratulations on a job well done!