Unit III: Resolving Conflicts



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Unit III: Resolving Conflicts

  • “All Summer in a Day”
  • By Ray Bradbury
  • (1920 - )

“All Summer in a Day” by Ray Bradbury

  • I. Terms:
  • A. Setting of story:
  • 1. Venus
  • 2. 2101 (future)
  • 3. rains all day
  • 4. sun shines 1-2 hours every 7 years
  • 5. people live in underground cities and tunnels
  • 6. all children are born on Venus except Margot
  • 7. Sun is most important setting element
  • B. Major characters in story: Margot
  • 1. other children tease Margot because they are jealous (indirect: other children tell us how they feel she is different)
  • 2. pale hair and lips washed out from the rain (direct characterization)
  • 3. does not speak to others much
  • 4. Margot remembers the sun because she lived in US in the state of Ohio until age 4 and has lived on Venus for 5 years

“All Summer in a Day” by Ray Bradbury

  • C. Minor characters:
  • 1. William (indirect)
  • 2. other children in class (direct)
  • 3. teacher (indirect)
  • D. Atmosphere: the feeling that a reader gets from a short story
  • E. Atmosphere of story: rainy, gloomy, loud, continuous rain; children in awe of sun
  • F. Onomatopoeia: words that say the sound they say
  • G. Onomatopoeia of story: rain sounds like bullets and hammering, or thunder!?
  • H. Theme of story: Imaginary worlds can be anything we want. Don’t take anything for granted!
  • I. Conflict of story:
  • 1. Margot vs. rain (internal)
  • 2. Margot vs. children (external)
  • 3. Margot vs. children (internal)

“All Summer in a Day” by Ray Bradbury

  • J. Climax of story: Margot is locked in the closet
  • K. Resolution of story: The children remember Margot and let her out
  • II. Meaning of the title: “All Summer in a Day”
  • A. All of their summer is in one day in 1-2 hours
  • B. All of Margot’s summer shows in her eyes and hair and lips in one moment when she thinks the sun will shine, then she fades again!

“The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes (1880-1958)

  • I. Terms:
  • A. Theme of poem: The dashing, dangerous, and romantic don’t always win in the end.
  • B. Speaker: the imaginary voice assumed by the poet; the character who tells the poem/story
  • C. Speaker of poem: the poet, Alfred Noyes is the speaker
  • D. Narrative poem: a story told in verse, and it has all the elements of a short story
  • E. Alliteration: the repetition of initial sounds to draw attention to sounds, ideas, ideas, or words, to create musical effect
  • F. Alliteration of poem:
  • 1. “…ghostly galleon…” (line 2)
  • 2. “…road was a ribbon…” (line 3)
  • 3. “…coat of claret velvet…” (line 8)

“The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes (1880-1958)

  • II. More Poetry terms:
  • A. Imagery: a word, or phrase that appeals to one or more of the senses
  • B. Imagery of poem: ghostly trees blowing, purple foggy moors, and the English countryside, in the darkness with sound of horses approaching, and isolation
  • C. Onomatopoeia: the use of words that imitate sounds
  • D. Onomatopoeia of poem: “tlot-tlot; tlot-tlot” (line 67-68)
  • E. Repetition: the use of more than once, any element of language, a sound, word, phrase etc.
  • F. Repetition of poem:
  • 1. “the highwayman came riding—riding—riding”
  • 2. “a jeweled twinkle, a-twinkle”
  • 3. “blackeyed daughter”
  • 4. “by moonlight”

“The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes (1880-1958)

  • III. Yet more poetry terms:
  • A. rhyme scheme: a pattern of rhyming words in a poem
  • B. rhyme scheme of poem: aabccb
  • ddeffe
  • **the pattern shows the use of end rhyme
  • C. metaphor: a comparison of two unlike things NOT using “like” or “as”
  • D. metaphor of poem:
  • 1. “wind is a torrent of darkness: (line1)
  • 2. “moon was a ghostly galleon…: (line 2)
  • 3. “road was a ribbon…” (line 3) set the mood of eerie, mysterious, foreboding on the English moors
  • 4. “when the road was a gypsy’s ribbon..” (line 39)
  • E. stanza: a formal division of lines of poetry
  • F. stanza of poem: the poem is a six-line division called a sestet

“The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes (1880-1958)

  • IV. Elements of Literature
  • A. Plot of poem: (summary) the highwayman plans to steal gold and then return to Bess at the inn in the moonlight
  • B. Setting of poem: at an English inn during the night on the moors (countryside)
  • C. Conflict of poem: the highwayman and Bess vs. Redcoats (external)
  • D. Climax of poem: Bess warned the highwayman by shooting herself
  • E. Resolution of poem: the highwayman avenged Bess’ death and was killed
  • F. Characterization of poem: the highwayman is daring, stylish, outlaw, and Bess is beautiful, and the landlord’s daughter (direct)

“The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes (1880-1958)

  • V. More Elements of story:
  • A. Symbol: one thing stands for or represents something else
  • B. Symbol of poem: colors = different colors evoke certain responses
  • Red = repeated and used in this poem
  • 1. “coat of claret velvet…”
  • 2. “red-lipped daughter…”
  • 3. “dark red love-knot…” (this symbolizes a special way to braid hair that said you were in love)
  • C. suspense of poem: “moonlight” is repeated to show wild, crazy, or “love” behavior
  • ********the italic stanzas at the end are set apart from the rest of the poem for the epilogue or closing to show that the love between these two continues even after they’re dead.

“The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes (1880-1958)

  • VI. Notes:
    • A. The highwayman is a dashing, romantic figure, like Robin Hood
    • B. Bess and the highwayman have a signal to meet
    • C. The highwayman is the robber, thief, yet he is loving, caring, and honorable. The Redcoats are supposed to be the heroes who save others, but they are rude, and crude.

“The Dying Cowboy” Traditional Folk Ballad (author unknown)

  • I. Poetry terms:
  • A. Theme of poem: It is difficult to know where life’s choices may lead, but people can try to weigh the possible outcomes of each decision—think carefully about where they may lead!
  • B. Speaker: the imaginary voice assumed by the poet; the character who tells the poem
  • C. Speaker of poem: a cowboy on a cattle drive
  • D. Setting of poem: the lone prairie on a cattle drive in the American West
  • E. Stanza: a formal division of lines in a poem
  • F. Stanza of poem: a division of a four-line poem is called a quatrain
  • G. Rhyme scheme: aabb
  • ccdd
  • ******using end rhyme in which the ends of the lines rhyme

“The Dying Cowboy” Traditional Folk Ballad (author unknown)

  • II. More terms:
  • A. refrain: the indented stanza is the refrain, or repeated at intervals. The first line is the same each time but the other lines change
  • B. symbol: one thing stands for or represents something else
  • C. symbol of poem:
  • 1. the lone prairie stands for their lives, lonely and isolated
  • 2. the dying cowboy, the man, stands for the truly dying occupation of a cowboy, who is hard to find in the real world
  • D. suspense of poem: the cowboy dies on the prairie with coyotes, rattlesnakes, etc. and will the prairie get his body too?
  • E. Conflict of poem: burying body on prairie vs bury body at home
  • F. Resolution of poem: bury the body on the prairie due to the cattle drive

“The Real Story of a Cowboy’s Life” by Geoffrey C. Ward (1940- )

  • I. Terms of Essay:
  • Theme of essay: Trail drives were and are dangerous, but had many tasks: manage the cattle, cross rivers, deal with the elements, and people just to survive.
  • B. Suspense of essay: the constant danger for the cowboy; the guns used to intimidate settlers who wouldn’t let them cross
  • II. Facts & Notes:
  • A. There were 4 uses of the saddle:
  • 1. chair,
  • 2. workplace,
  • 3. pillow,
  • 4. tying post for lasso
  • B. Most common cause of death for a cowboy is dragging during a stampede
  • C. Trail bosses took away the guns and set rules for behavior to avoid problems and death
  • D. Songs were sung to the cattle to sooth them and settle them
  • E. Cattle drives had many challenges of nature (dust, rivers, storms etc) and people (settlers who charged tolls)
  • F. A cowboy’s life is one of long hours, discomfort, danger, challenge, and solitary at times, away from family


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