The Boy in the Striped Pajamas -john Boyne



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The Boy in the Striped Pajamas -John Boyne-

  • Young Adult Book Talk Poster
  • Brenda Nicole Fuller
  • LIST 5325, 5326
  • M.Ed. with Literacy Emphasis
  • Reading Specialist, MRT, ESL
  • IRA, TESOL
  • Certified in Elementary Education 1-8;
  • Special Education PK-12; Early Childhood Education PK-KG

Academic Honesty Statement   I have read and understand the UTA Academic Honesty clause as follows. “Academic dishonesty is a completely unacceptable mode of conduct and will not be tolerated in any form at The University of Texas at Arlington. All persons involved in academic dishonesty will be disciplined in accordance with University regulations and procedures. Discipline may include suspension or expulsion from the University. “Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts.” (Regents’ Rules and Regulations, Part One, Chapter VI, Section 3, Subsection 3.2., Subdivision 3.22).” Further, I declare that the work being submitted for this assignment is my original work (e.g., not copied from another student or copied from another source) and has not been submitted for another class.  “Signature” (Typed name):  Brenda Nicole Fuller Date:    09/30/08

Background Information

  • I taught 5th-6th grade life skills special education for two years at Wylie Middle School (Abilene, TX). Then I taught self-contained special education for three years and resource for one year in Mesquite ISD. I am currently not teaching.
  • Certifications Sought: Master Reading Teacher, Reading Specialist, ESL
  • I have used many trade books in the past. I think it is good to expose children to the expository texts and trade books. I try to use the trade books as often as possible.
  • There is a nice variety of trade books in the library. The library has books for science, social studies and for many other topics. I think that these books appeal to children, often, because of the bright pictures or photographs in the books. They are relate to the stories about real life. I do not think that all teachers use trade books as much as they could.
  • Reflection and Connecting to Standards
  • I completed the required reading and this power point for LIST 5325, in the fall of 2008. This activity demonstrates my understanding of the role of a reading specialist/ master reading teacher. I also understand how diversity is a part of our classrooms and teaching. It shows that I can effectively use trade books and young adult literature in the classroom and find age-appropriate activities to enhance the learning.
  • This activity reflects my understanding of the following IRA standards: IRA2003.1.1.CTC (Classroom Teacher Candidates: Know foundational theories related to practices and materials they use in the classroom.), IRA2003.1.3 (Demonstrate knowledge of language developments and reading acquisition and the variations related to cultural and linguistic diversity.), IRA2003.1.4.RS (Are able to determine if students are appropriately integrating the components (phonemic awareness, word identification and phonics, vocabulary and background knowledge, fluency, comprehension strategies, and motivation) in fluent reading.), IRA2003.2 (STANDARD: INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES AND CURRICULUM MATERIALS -- Candidates use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction.), IRA2003.2.1 (Use instructional grouping options (individual, small-group, whole-class, and computer based) as appropriate for accomplishing given purposes.), IRA2003.2.1.CTC (Classroom Teacher Candidates: Match instructional grouping options to specific instructional purposes that take into account developmental, cultural and linguistic differences among students. They model and scaffold procedures so that students learn to work effectively. They provide and evidence-based rationale for their selections.), IRA2003.2.2 (Use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, and methods, including technology-based practices, for learners at differing stages of development and from differing cultural and linguistic backgrounds.),
  • Standards Continued
  • IRA2003.2.2.CTC (Classroom Teacher Candidates: Plan for the use of a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, and methods, including technology based practices. Their selections are guided by an evidence-based rationale and accommodate the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of their students.), IRA2003.2.3 (Use a wide range of curriculum materials in effective reading instruction for learners at different stages of reading and writing development and from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds.), IRA2003.2.3.CTC (Classroom Teacher Candidates: Plan for the use of a wide range of curriculum materials. Their selections are guided by an evidence-based rationale and accommodate the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of their students.), IRA2003.3.1 (Use a wide range of assessment tools and practices that range from individual and group standardized tests to individual and group informal classroom assessment strategies, including technology-based assessment tools.), IRA2003.3.1.RS (Compare and contrast, use, interpret, and recommend a wide range of tools and practices. Assessments may range from standardized tests to informal assessments and also include technology-based assessments. They demonstrate appropriate use of assessments in their practice, and they can train classroom teachers to administer and interpret these assessments.), IRA2003.4 (STANDARD: CREATING A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT -- Candidates create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments.), and IRA2003.4.1 (Use students' interests, reading abilities, and backgrounds as foundations for the reading and writing program.).
  • Standards Continued
  • The following TEXES standards were also met: TX-TEXES.ESL.EC-12.I.1.3s (S: use the interrelatedness of listening, speaking, reading, and writing to develop ESL students English language proficiency;), TX-TEXES.ELA.4-8.1.5s (S: provide oral language instruction by modeling and reading aloud using language structures and pronunciations commonly associated with academic English;), TX-TEXES.ELA.4-8.1.7s (S: provide instruction that interrelates oral and written language to promote students reading proficiency and learning (e.g., preview-review, discussion, questioning);), TX-TEXES.ELA.4-8.3.9k (K: instructional strategies and practices for promoting student word analysis skills and reading fluency;), and TX-TEXES.ELA.4-8.4.2s (S: use a variety of instructional strategies to enhance students reading comprehension, including helping students link the content of texts to their lives and connect related ideas across different texts).
  • As an educator, it is my responsibility to bring the most effective instruction to my students and I am more capable of doing this by constantly remaining a learner in my field. By using supplementary materials in the classroom, the lessons are improved and the knowledge strengthened. I plan to use trade books when I am back in the classroom to boost the level of skills and expose the students to more ideas and people. It is important to remember the past and help the students to learn from it and never forget. Diversity education is vital to the growth of the students.

Bibliography Boyne, J. (2006). The Boy in the Striped Pajamas: New York: David Flicking Books, Random House, Inc. Age/ Grade Range (according to www.amazon.com): Young Adult

  • http://www.amazon.com/Boy-Striped-Pajamas-John-Boyne/dp/0385751532/ref=pd_bbs_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1222733381&sr=1-1
  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780385751896
  • John Boyne was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1971. He studied at Trinity College, Dublin (English Literature), and the University of East Anglia, Norwich (Creative Writing). He has published six novels and seventy short stories. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas has sold over three million copies and is currently being made into a movie.
  • About the Author
  • John Boyne
  • http://www.johnboyne.com/biography.html

Sites With Information About the Book

  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/results.pperl?title_subtitle_auth_isbn=the+boy+in+the+striped+pajamas
  • This is the publisher’s site and it lists the book and the book (with the movie tie-in). This site gives a brief description of the book and pictures of the cover. This site lists the book as: juvenile fiction, historical, and Holocaust.
  • http://www.johnboyne.com/
  • This site is the author’s site. On the first page, the categories are: home (guide to the site), reading (what he is reading), fiction, biography, blog, non-fiction, film, and an area to contact the author. There are some short stories that you can watch on “real player.” If you go to his blog or the film section, there is more information for the movie that is being made based on this book.
  • http://www.amazon.com/Boy-Striped-Pajamas-John-Boyne/dp/0385751532/ref=pd_bbs_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1222738578&sr=1-1
  • This site has a summary, reviews (editorial and customer) and information on the audio download of the book.
  • Editorial Reviews
  • From School Library Journal
  • Starred Review. Grade 9 Up–Boyne has written a sort of historical allegory–a spare, but vividly descriptive tale that clearly elucidates the atmosphere in Nazi Germany during the early 1940s that enabled the persecution of Eastern European Jews. Through the eyes of Bruno, a naive nine-year-old raised in a privileged household by strict parents whose expectations included good manners and unquestioning respect for parental authority, the author describes a visit from the Fury and the family's sudden move from Berlin to a place called Out-With in Poland. There, not 50 feet away, a high wire fence surrounds a huge dirt area of low huts and large square buildings. From his bedroom window, Bruno can see hundreds (maybe thousands) of people wearing striped pajamas and caps, and something made him feel very cold and unsafe. Uncertain of what his father actually does for a living, the boy is eager to discover the secret of the people on the other side. He follows the fence into the distance, where he meets Shmuel, a skinny, sad-looking Jewish resident who, amazingly, has his same birth date. Bruno shares his thoughts and feelings with Shmuel, some of his food, and his final day at Out-With, knowing instinctively that his father must never learn about this friendship. While only hinting at violence, blind hatred, and deplorable conditions, Boyne has included pointed examples of bullying and fearfulness. His combination of strong characterization and simple, honest narrative make this powerful and memorable tale a unique addition to Holocaust literature for those who already have some knowledge of Hitler's Final Solution.–Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
  • http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0385751532/ref=dp_proddesc_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_B.htm
  • Editorial Reviews
  • From AudioFile
  • In this Holocaust novel, Bruno leaves his wonderful Berlin home with his parents because of "the fury." Boyne's depiction of time and place becomes real with Michael Maloney's characterization of this displaced 9-year-old, who rapidly goes from excited confusion to indignant anger. Maloney's narrative bits are a calm counterpoint to the bewilderment of the protagonist, who finds himself at "Off With," where he is surrounded by people dressed in striped pajamas. Maloney continues to dramatize Bruno's moods as he makes friends with a young prisoner and observes the cruelty of a controlling soldier. Making Bruno real is crucial to our acceptance of his innocent horror, essential to filling in all the author doesn't say, and necessary to establishing the emotional balance we need to hear this disturbing story. S.W. © AudioFile 2007, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.
  • From Booklist
  • Gr. 7-10. Some of the most thought-provoking Holocaust books are about bystanders, including those who say they did not know what was happening. This first novel tells the bystander story from the viewpoint of an innocent child. Bruno is nine when his family moves from their luxurious Berlin home to the country, where "the Fury" has appointed Bruno's father commandant. Lost and lonely, the child hates the upheaval, while his stern but kind father celebrates his success because he has learned to follow orders. Bruno can see a concentration camp in the distance, but he has no idea what is going on, even when he eventually meets and makes friends with Shmuel, a boy from Cracow, who lives on the other side of the camp fence. The boys meet every day. They even discover that they have the same birthday. It's all part of a poignant construct: Shmuel is Bruno's alternative self, and as the story builds to a horrifying climax, the innocent's experience brings home the unimaginable horror. Pair this with Anne Frank's classic diary and Anita Lobel's No Pretty Pictures: A Child of War (1998). Hazel Rochman Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
  • http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0385751532/ref=dp_proddesc_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books
  • Editorial Reviews
  • Review
  • "Certain to be one of the publishing sensations of 2006." -The Observer (U.K.) "A memorable and moving story." -The Oxford Times (U.K.) "A small wonder of a book." -The Guardian (U.K.) "A book so simple, so seemingly effortless, that it's almost perfect." -The Irish Independent "An extraordinary book." -The Irish Examiner --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
  • http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0385751532/ref=dp_proddesc_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books
  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780385751063&view=quotes
  • Awards
  • Best-seller
  • 2 Irish Book Awards
  • Bistro Book of the Year Award
  • 2007 National Book Critics Circle Award
  • Salon Book Awards
  • Internet Movie Poster Awards
  • Library of Congress- Original Publication Date
  • LC Control No.:2005033596
  • LCCN Permalink:http://lccn.loc.gov/2005033596
  • Type of Material: Book (Print, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
  • Personal Name: Boyne, John, 1971-
  • Main Title: The boy in the striped pajamas : a fable / by John Boyne.
  • Edition Information:1st American ed.Published/Created:Oxford ; New York : David Fickling Books, 2006.
  • www.loc.gov
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_9p.htm
  • “Auschwitz-Birkenau, Nazi Germany's largest concentration and extermination camp facility, was located nearby the provincial Polish town of Oshwiecim in Galacia.”
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_D.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_3.htm
  • Summary
  • Set in the 1940’s, during the Nazi occupation of Germany, Bruno finds himself at “Out-With.” He is uprooted from his fancy home in Berlin and moves to a house he does not find suitable. This house is outside “Out-With,” where his father serves as Commandant. Bruno hate living here and finds himself looking out the window for adventure. He sees a community inside the fence and wonders why he has to be outside the fence all alone and there are so many people inside of the fence.
  • One day, Bruno goes exploring and meets Shmuel, a small Jewish boy inside the fence. The boys begin to talk and discover that they share a birthday. They vow to meet there each day and talk. Bruno sneaks some food for Shmuel on most days. Bruno does not understand how they can be the same age and look so differently. Shmuel is thin and his head is shaved, while Bruno is not. Bruno also does not understand why Shmuel has to be on the other side of the fence because they could have more adventures if they were on the same side.
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_9a.htm
  • Summary Continued
  • Bruno must keep his new friend a secret because he had been told to stay at the house. His father would not approve. His sister, Gretel “a Hopeless Case” almost finds out about Shmuel and Bruno pretends that he is imaginary to keep his secret. Bruno tells Gretel that he is lonely and invented someone he could talk to.
  • The family still has servants and Bruno treats them kindly and cannot understand why Father’s guests are allowed to treat them so poorly. Bruno does like the “Fury” or Lieutenant Kotler and how mean they are to other people. All of the problems started when the Fury came to visit and Father was promoted to Commandant. Bruno wishes they had never come to “Out-With.” Bruno is continually counting down the days until he can return to his happy life in Berlin.
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_7.htm
  • Summary Continued
  • One day, Shmuel is in Bruno’s home to clean the dishes because his hands are small and can get inside easily. The Lieutenant leaves for a moment and Shmuel asks Bruno for some food because he is hungry. Bruno hesitates but then gives him some of the food from the fridge.
  • As Shmuel is finishing eating, Lieutenant Kotler returns and wants to know is Bruno had given the food to him. Bruno is scared and lies, saying that he has never seen Shmuel before. Shmuel is punished upon returning inside the fence. Bruno feels guilty for not standing up for his friend.
  • When Mother has had enough of “Out-With”, Father decides that she and the children are to return to Berlin. Suddenly, Bruno is torn. He misses his old home and his old life, but he does not want to leave his best friend, Shmuel. Will he ever see Shmuel again? Bruno does not even remember his old friends anymore and only cares about this one new friend. Now he is sad to leave.
  • The night before Bruno is to leave for Berlin, he meets Shmuel to go exploring inside the fence.
  • Personal Response
  • Although, I found the story predictable, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas was a beautiful and powerful story. I could not put the book down and read it in an afternoon because I drawn into the story of Bruno and Shmuel. The language in the book tells the story but is not graphic in nature. The Boy in the Striped Pajamas shows war and loneliness through the eyes of a child. It also shows the importance of friendship. This book speaks to your heart. Bruno and Shmuel will capture you and not let go until their story is told.
  • I found it interesting that Bruno thought his life was rough and unfair and even tells Shmuel about the hardships. Bruno does not realize until later that Shmuel is not happy in the fence. Things are not always greener on the other side of the fence. Bruno focuses on himself most of the book. I do not think he was being self-absorbed, instead he was being a child. Shmuel did not have that freedom.
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums2/album.htm
  • Personal Response Continued
  • Bruno was so innocent amidst all of the violence right outside of Auschwitz. I was surprised that he never figured out what was happening right in front of his eyes. I had not considered the German children and how they were influenced by the war. Before reading this book, I usually only thought about the Jewish victims. The friendship between Bruno and Shmuel was beautiful and showed the love of children. Both of the boys needed each other. In their eyes, they were the same and not Jew or German or separated by a fence. In their hearts, there were no fences.
  • “The Holocaust was the systematic annihilation of six million Jews during World War 2. In 1933 approximately nine million Jews lived in the 21 countries of Europe that would be military occupied by Germany during the war. By 1945 two out of every three European Jews had been killed by the Nazis. 1.5 million children were murdered during the Holocaust. This figure includes more than 1.2 million Jewish children, tens of thousands of Gypsy children and thousands of institutionalized handicapped children. Nazi persecution, arrests, and deportations were directed against all members of Jewish families without concern for age. Plucked from their homes and stripped of their childhoods, the children had witnessed the murder of parents, siblings, and relatives. They faced starvation, illness and brutal labor, until they were consigned to the gas chambers.”
  • http://www.oskarschindler.info/Holocaust/index.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_7.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_C.htm
  • Justification for Use
  • This book would be applicable to 6th grade and above. This book covers the events of Nazi Germany, through the eyes of a child. The actions are not described graphically, but in enough detail for the reader to know what was going on. I think this book would be a wonderful unit to tie into a history lesson. It is above the level I would usually be teaching, but it I moved to middle school, it would be perfect.
  • The students would gain another perspective to the Hitler’s atrocities during World War II. The story is told from the point of view of a young German boy. The students could also identify better with the character and his situation because he is a child. The way the story is told is perfectly suited for young adults and is a “gentle” version of the war. The students would also gain understanding of the war and empathy for the victims, as well as learning the power of friendship and an open mind.
  • http://www.photographs.dk/

Sites With Information About the Book

  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/results.pperl?title_subtitle_auth_isbn=the+boy+in+the+striped+pajamas
  • This is the publisher’s site and it lists the book and the book (with the movie tie-in). This site gives a brief description of the book and pictures of the cover. This site lists the book as: juvenile fiction, historical, and Holocaust.
  • http://www.johnboyne.com/
  • This site is the author’s site. On the first page, the categories are: home (guide to the site), reading (what he is reading), fiction, biography, blog, non-fiction, film, and an area to contact the author. There are some short stories that you can watch on “real player.” If you go to his blog or the film section, there is more information for the movie that is being made based on this book.
  • http://www.thefilmfactoryireland.com/boy/
  • This site gives further information about the upcoming movie.
  • http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=striped+pajamas
  • This site lists books that are related to the topic of the first book. In this case, there is a list of young adult literature about the Holocaust.
  • http://www.amazon.com/Boy-Striped-Pajamas-John-Boyne/dp/0385751532/ref=pd_bbs_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1222738578&sr=1-1
  • This site has a summary, reviews (editorial and customer) and information on the audio download of the book.
  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780385751063&view=tg
  • This site has reasons to teach this unit and offers suggestions. It gives additional books to use when studying the Holocaust. There are also ideas for discussing and writing, as well as vocabulary. This was one of the best teaching guides for this book. Below is a sample of the questions and ideas:
  • “TEACHING IDEAS The Boy in the Striped Pajamas is presented as a fable. Have the class identify the literary elements of a fable. Ask them to make note of these elements as they read the novel. Ask students to read about “The Final Solution” (www.ushmm.org/outreach/fsol.htm). Have them consider the following questions: • What factors contributed to the Holocaust? • What were Hitler’s motives? • Who were his victims? • How many people were murdered? Then ask students to stage a debate about the importance of studying the Holocaust. DISCUSSION AND WRITING *Discuss the relationship between Bruno and Gretel. Why does Bruno seem younger than nine?
  • *In a traditional fable, characters are usually one-dimensional. How might Bruno and Gretel be considered one dimensional? • At age 12, Gretel is the proper age for membership in the League of Young Girls, a branch of Hitler’s Youth Organization. Why do you think she is not a member, especially since her father is a high-ranking officer in Hitler’s army? • What is it about the house at Out-With that makes Bruno feel “cold and unsafe”? (p. 20) How is this feeling perpetuated as he encounters people like Pavel, Maria, Lt. Kotler, and Shmuel? • Describe his reaction when he first sees the people in the striped pajamas. What does Gretel mean when she says, “Something about the way [Bruno] was watching made her feel suddenly nervous”? (p. 28) How does this statement foreshadow Bruno’s ultimate demise? • Bruno asks his father about the people outside their house at Auschwitz. His father answers, “They’re not people at all, Bruno.” (p. 53) Discuss the horror of this attitude. How does his father’s statement make Bruno more curious about Out-With? • Explain what Bruno’s mother means when she says, “We don’t have the luxury of thinking.” (p. 13) Identify scenes from the novel that Bruno’s mother isn’t happy about their life at Out-With. Debate whether she is unhappy being away from Berlin, or whether she is angry about her husband’s position. How does Bruno’s grandmother react to her son’s military role? • When Bruno and his family board the train for Auschwitz, he notices an overcrowded train headed in the same direction. How does he later make the connection between Shmuel and that train? How are both trains symbolic of each boy’s final journey? • Bruno issues a protest about leaving Berlin. His father responds, “Do you think that I would have made such a success of my life if I hadn’t learned when to argue and when to keep my mouth shut and follow orders?” (p. 49) What question might Bruno’s father ask at the end of the novel? • A pun is most often seen as humorous. But, in this novel the narrator uses dark or solemn puns like Out-With and Fury to convey certain meanings. Bruno is simply mispronouncing the real words, but the author is clearly asking the reader to consider a double meaning to these words. Discuss the use of this wordplay as a literary device. What is the narrator trying to convey to the reader? How do these words further communicate the horror of the situation? • When Bruno dresses in the filthy striped pajamas, he remembers something his grandmother once said. “You wear the right outfit and you feel like the person you’re pretending to be.” (p. 205) How is this true for Bruno? What about his father? What does this statement contribute to the overall meaning of the story? • Discuss the moral or message of the novel. What new insights and understandings does John Boyne want the reader to gain from reading this story? • Ask students to discuss the differences in a fable, an allegory, and a proverb. How might this story fit into each genre?”
  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780385751063&view=tg
  • Justification for Use Continued
  • 6th Grade ELA TEKS addressed during unit
  • (1)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to adjust fluency when reading aloud grade-level text based on the reading purpose and the nature of the text.
  • *Students will be reading this book orally and silently.
  • (2)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to: (B)  use context (e.g., cause and effect or compare and contrast organizational text structures) to determine or clarify the meaning of unfamiliar or multiple meaning words; (10)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A)  summarize the main ideas and supporting details in text, demonstrating an understanding that a summary does not include opinions; (D)  synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres.
  • *Students may encounter words that they are unfamiliar with and must use context clues to help them (“Fury” and “Out-With”).
  • (3)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (C) compare and contrast the historical and cultural settings of two literary works
  • *The students will make inferences throughout the story and at the end. They will make predictions for the story. The students will also compare and contrast two young adult books on World War II.
  • 5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the similarities and differences in the setting, characters, and plot of a play and those in a film based upon the same story line.
  • *Students will be able to compare and contrast the movie to the book and check the movie for accuracy.
  • 6th Grade TEKS Continued
  • (6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: (A)  summarize the elements of plot development (e.g., rising action, turning point, climax, falling action, denouement) in various works of fiction; (C)  describe different forms of point-of-view, including first- and third-person; (11)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to: (A)  compare and contrast the structure and viewpoints of two different authors writing for the same purpose, noting the stated claim and supporting evidence
  • *Students will summarize the story and support with text details. They will also look at the story from both Bruno and Shmuel’s point of view of “Out-With.” They will also be able to look at the situation from different character’s point of view. They will compare two different books, as well.
  • (17)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to: (A)  create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about a topic that: (i)  present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs; (ii)  guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence; (iii)  include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and (iv)  use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs; (B)  write informal letters that convey ideas, include important information, demonstrate a sense of closure, and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); (C)  write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding; and (D)  produce a multimedia presentation involving text and graphics using available technology
  • *Students will write letters from Bruno to Shmuel and vice versa. Students will also write about the book, creating a report.
  • 6th Grade TEKS Continued
  • (23)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A)  follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources (e.g., reference texts, periodicals, web pages, online sources) and data from experts; (C)  record data, utilizing available technology (e.g., word processors) in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data (e.g., charts, diagrams, timelines) into written notes. 25)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that: (A)  compiles important information from multiple sources; (B)  develops a topic sentence, summarizes findings, and uses evidence to support conclusions; (C)  presents the findings in a consistent format; and (D)  uses quotations to support ideas and an appropriate form of documentation to acknowledge sources (e.g., bibliography, works cited).
  • *Students will research a figure from the time period (that you have chosen and approved). They will create a research paper and presentation for the class.
  • (26)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to: (C) paraphrase the major ideas and supporting evidence in formal and informal presentations.
  • *Students must actively listen to the story during oral reading and be able to explain events, characters, relationships and plot in the story.
  • State and National Standards and Justification
  • IRA2003.2 (STANDARD: INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES AND CURRICULUM MATERIALS -- Candidates use a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, methods and curriculum materials to support reading and writing instruction.
  • *Oral and silent reading; large group, small group and individual reading of the book; study guides; a variety of activities and instruction throughout unit
  • IRA2003.2.1 (Use instructional grouping options (individual, small-group, whole-class, and computer based) as appropriate for accomplishing given purposes).
  • *Students will be grouped according to the purpose of reading that day: large group, small group, partners or individual.
  • IRA2003.2.2.CTC (Classroom Teacher Candidates: Plan for the use of a wide range of instructional practices, approaches, and methods, including technology based practices. Their selections are guided by an evidence-based rationale and accommodate the developmental, cultural, and linguistic differences of their students.
  • *Students will have access to computers and other technology during the unit.
  • Standards and Justification
  • IRA2003.2.3 (Use a wide range of curriculum materials in effective reading instruction for learners at different stages of reading and writing development and from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds.
  • *Will have tools for assistance for those students that need it
  • IRA2003.4 (STANDARD: CREATING A LITERATE ENVIRONMENT -- Candidates create a literate environment that fosters reading and writing by integrating foundational knowledge, use of instructional practices, approaches and methods, curriculum materials, and the appropriate use of assessments.
  • *Research based strategies are used in planning this lesson, including knowledge of ELL students.
  • TX-TEXES.ESL.EC-12.I.1.3s (S: use the interrelatedness of listening, speaking, reading, and writing to develop ESL students English language proficiency.
  • *Unit will involve all areas and will help ESL students grow academically as well as in their English acquisition.
  • Standards and Justification
  • TX-TEXES.ELA.4-8.1.7s (S: provide instruction that interrelates oral and written language to promote students reading proficiency and learning (e.g., preview-review, discussion, questioning).
  • *Questioning, prediction, book walk and discussion will all be used to guide the students through the book and have the most effective lesson.
  • TX-TEXES.ELA.4-8.3.9k (K: instructional strategies and practices for promoting students word analysis skills and reading fluency.
  • *Because text is fairly easy and straightforward, it will be good practice for fluency.
  • TX-TEXES.ELA.4-8.4.2s (S: use a variety of instructional strategies to enhance students reading comprehension, including helping students link the content of texts to their lives and connect related ideas across different texts).
  • *Writing, comprehension questions, extension activities (writing letters), compare and contrast characters and different books on the same topic will all be use in this lesson.
  • "Then the march starts: Barbed wire to the right and left and two dozen Ukrainians with rifles at the rear. They came on, led by an exceptionally pretty girl. I myself was standing with Police Captain Wirth in front of the death chambers. Men, women, children, infants, people with amputated legs, all naked, completely naked, moved past us. In one corner there is a whimsical SS man who tells these poor people in an unctuous voice, "Nothing at all will happen to you. You must just breathe deeply, that strengthens the lungs; this inhalation is necessary because of the infectious diseases, it is good disinfection!" When somebody asks what their fate will be, he explains that the men will of course have to work, building streets and houses. But the women will not have to work. If they want to, they can help in the house or the kitchen. A little glimmer of hope flickers once more in some of these poor people, enough to make them march unresisting into the death chambers."
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_2.htm
  • Applications to the Classroom
  • Listening/speaking activities
  • Students will listen to the story and interpret the story.
  • Students will listen for character traits of Father, Mother, Bruno, Gretel, Lars, Maria, Shmuel, Lt. Kotler, and the “Fury.” Then they will compare and contrast the characters.
  • Students will listen to music( range of material, Tchudi & Mitchell, 140) from the era and decide if the music was influenced by the happenings of the war.
  • Students will discuss in groups how each of the boys felt in the story. How are they alike and different in their feelings?
  • Students will look at pictures of Hitler’s art and discuss in large groups (Tchudi & Mitchell, 140) and then in small groups. They will first discuss whether or not the like the picture. Then, what was he trying to show in his paintings? Were they used to influence people to the Nazi cause? Or did the paintings have nothing to do with his hatred of the Jews?
  • Reading
  • Students will read this book and Anne Frank. Other books about the Holocaust could be used, depending on your preference. I think this book would supplement Anne Frank and show another side. Students could compare characters, plot, themes, and the books as a whole. If a third book is read, then the students could look for similar themes across the books.
  • Before reading, introduce the vocabulary words (Tchudi & Mitchell, 162-164). Discuss them briefly. Using the new vocabulary in the book, students will create a dictionary to define the new terms after reading each section. This could be done by writing the definitions in a list or it could be more artistic and shown on a poster board. The students could share what they have learned about the new vocabulary words in groups or with the whole class.
  • Students will do a mini-research project on genocide. (The teacher will choose the topic. If genocide is not appropriate, chose war, Word War II, Holocaust, concentration camps or focus on a certain historic figure.) They will define genocide and then gather information about it. They will search for other examples of genocide. What have we learned from the past? What can be done to assure that genocide does not continue?
  • Reading Continued
  • Students will search the internet and newspapers for stories of survivors of the Holocaust. First, they will create a list of ten survivors with short summaries about those people. Then they will create a biography of the survivor and share it with the class. They will connect the survivor to the lessons from the unit (war, genocide, concentration camps, etc). They will also reflect upon the survivor’s life.
  • Students will look at the summaries for other young adult books dealing with the Holocaust. These books include: Number the Stars, The Cage, The Book Thief, Hitler Youth, Night, The Devil’s Arithmetic, and Yellow Star.
  • Writing
  • After reading this book, the students will watch the movie. Then they will write a summary of both and check the movie for accuracy. They will discuss the mental images while reading. Did the movie have the same idea or were they different from how they viewed the book?
  • The students will write a paper about the war, from a certain character’s point of view. After doing this, then students can be paired or grouped with someone that wrote from other perspectives and they can share their stories.
  • Students will write letters from Bruno to Shmuel and vice versa. What would they say to each other? What secrets would they share?
  • After reading the final chapter, have the students write about how Bruno and Shmuel felt in the last chapter. How did Bruno’s parents feel? Do you think their pain even compared to that of the Jewish people?
  • Look at the Nazi propaganda (school appropriate) and evaluate his persuasive techniques. Approach this with great care. What made people believe in Hitler’s message? How did he convince other’s to follow him. Do you think that the followers had a choice? Or do you think if they did not follow, they would be killed? Why is it important that people are informed of Hitler’s methods? What should we be aware of, in our leaders?
  • Writing Continued
  • Students will do a book report, with visual guides for the class.
  • Students will view pictures from the Holocaust and will write about how it makes them feel. How do you feel for the people in the picture? Do you identify with anyone in the pictures? How do you think they are feeling? Why? What might the story be when that picture was taken? (www.ushmm.org and http://www.photographs.dk/)
  • Using the identification cards from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, students will take a journey of a real person from the Holocaust. Pass out the identification cards and have students look at the front. Write down the name of your person and any first impressions. Students will then write their name on a piece of paper and place their person on a board that says “survived” or “died.” Then in small groups, the students will read about each person and find out the stories. Then there will be another chart with “survived” and “died” on it and they will place there cards in the appropriate place. Make sure that the numbers on each side reflect the true statistics. For example if 1 out of 3 survived, then that should show with your class. This is a pre-writing activity, using a graphic organizer (Tchudi & Mitchell, 318). This will be used before the next activity.
  • The biography of a survivor will be written from their point of view. Pretend that you are this person. Tell about their life before the Nazi invasion, during, and after. Were they captured? Where did they go? How did they feel?
  • Book List
  • These are additional books to use during a Holocaust unit. Some are young adult books, some advise the
  • teacher, and the others could be used as supplements in the classroom.
  • Scorched: A Collection of Short Stories on Survivors- Irit Amiel, Riva Rubin
  • The Hiding Place- Corrie Ten Boom
  • Schindler’s Legacy: True Stories of the List Survivors- Elinor J. Brecher, Steve Post and Actual Survivors
  • (audio book)
  • Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young girl- Anne Frank, Otto H. Frank, Mirjam Pressler, Susan Massotty
  • I Have Lived a Thousand Years: Growing Up in the Holocaust- Livia Bitton-Jackson
  • Your Eyes In the Stars- M.E. Kerr
  • Children of the Flames: Dr. Josef Mengele and the Untold Story of the Twins of Auschwitz-
    • Lucette Matalon Lagnado, Sheila Cohn Dekel
  • Five Chimneys: The Story of Auschwitz- Olga Lengyel
  • Number the Stars- Lois Lowry
  • Fire in the Hills- Donna Jo Napoli
  • If I Should Die Before I Wake- Han Nolan
  • Mara’s Stories: Glimmers in the Darkness- Gary Schmidt
  • Yellow Star- Jennifer Roy
  • The Cage- Ruth Minsky Sender
  • Night- Elie Wiesel
  • Briar Rose- Jane Yolen
  • The Devil’s Arithmetic- Jane Yolen
  • Survivors: True Stories of Children in the Holocaust- Allan Zullo, Mara Bovsun
  • The Book Thief- Markus Zusak
  • http://www.pbs.org/search/search_results.html?q=Holocaust&btnG.x=10&btnG.y=8
  • Holocaust shows
  • www.history.com
  • History channel to view stories and connecting links.
  • www.ushmm.org
  • Information about the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC; victims; survivors; photographs
  • http://www.ushmm.org/education/foreducators/
  • Guidelines for teaching about the Holocaust; on-line training; personal stories and identification cards
  • http://www.auschwitz.dk/id17.htm
  • This was the best place to find a list of photographs and it was the easiest to navigate.
  • www.children.nazis.dk/
  • Slideshow of Holocaust photos
  • The Holocaust Websites - Crimes, Heroes And Villains www.auschwitz.dk www.oskarschindler.com www.emilieschindler.com  www.deathcamps.info www.auschwitz.dk www.oskarschindler.info/ www.fatherkolbe.comwww.canaris.dk/ www.mengele.dk/ www.shoah.dk   www.annefrank.dk
  • Supplemental Material: Holocaust Related Links
  • http://www.emilieschindler.com/Schindler/Album1.htm
  • Supplementary Materials
  • Movies, Documentaries and Informative Links
  • Schindler’s List
  • Anne Frank
  • The Boy in the Striped Pajamas (due to be released soon)
  • NOVA Online: Holocaust on Trial http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/holocaust/
  • American Experience: America and the Holocaust http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/holocaust/
  • PBS: World War II on PBS: Nazis and the Holocaust http://www.pbs.org/wwii/holocaust.html
  • Auschwitz: Inside the Nazi State: Understanding Auschwitz Today http://www.pbs.org/auschwitz/understanding/informs.html
  • List of Holocaust resources on PBS http://www.pbs.org/search/search_results.html?q=Holocaust&btnG.x=10&btnG.y=8
  • In 1944 the Nazis decided to exterminate the children of the orphanage La Maison d'Izieu. 44 little children were deported to Auschwitz and murdered immediately upon arrival. ************************************************************************************************************** Eleven-year-old Liliane Gerenstein was sent to her death a few days after she wrote this letter to God: 
  • "God? How good You are, how kind and if one had to count the number of goodnesses and kindnesses You have done, one would never finish. God? It is You who command. It is You who are justice, it is You who reward the good and punish the evil. God? It is thanks to You that I had a beautiful life before, that I was spoiled, that I had  lovely things that others do not have. God? After that, I ask You one thing only: Make my parents come back, my poor parents protect them (even more than You protect me) so that I can see them again as soon as possible. Make them come back again. Ah! I had such a good mother and such a good father! I have such faith in You and I thank You in advance."
  • http://www.photographs.dk/letter/
  • Student Interview
  • Since I am not teaching this year, I interviewed an eighth grade student, Ashley. Ashley is an A-B student in Royse City. I had Ashley read a couple of chapters and tell me what she thought. She said that the book was like reading Anne Frank, except easier to read and understand. Ashley asked about “Out-With” and what Bruno meant by that. She seemed to enjoy reading the book. I think she may finish reading it on her own. She said that this book could be read in small groups so that that have “time to talk about it.”
  • Teacher Interview
  • I interviewed Eric Brattin, a six grade language arts teacher at Seabourn Elementary. He has been teaching for two years. There are about 250 books in his personal library. He has all genres and books that range from second grade through high school level to account for the different levels of his students. The students read for one hour a day in his class. Between 15 and 45 minutes are set aside each day for silent sustained reading. He uses trade books often in his classroom. Mr. Brattin feels that trade books are very important to the overall education of his students.
  • Librarian Interview
  • I interviewed Colleen Duke, the librarian at Seabourn Elementary School in Mesquite, TX. This is her second year as librarian. Before becoming a librarian, she taught fourth grade for four years. I chose her because I decided to focus my unit on sixth graders.
  • 1. Mrs. Duke informed that she orders Bluebonnet books, which are designed for kids in each grade.  These are 20 books picked by teachers and librarians as the best in Texas.  The kids vote for their favorite and a winner in chosen in January.  She also uses the Lone Star reading list and Tashays for 6th grade.  She also orders copies of all Newbery books.  Others that some librarians use are Coretta Scott King Awards books and Caldecott winners.  These are all go to books for 6th graders.”
  • 2. She makes a special display or does a lesson with or on the books.  Kids immediately want those books.  She did that with Bluebonnets this week (September 30, 2008).  Even sixth graders were excited.
  • 3.  “Graphic novels are a huge trend right now.  These are comic book like novels.  They can be about anything.  Kids of all ages cannot get enough of them.  The Clique series is very popular as is Twilight.  Kids like books with characters they can relate to. Since our students’ lives are not perfect, they want books with imperfect characters.  Sixth grade is when the desire to read goes down so we have to hook them.”- Colleen Duke
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_3.htm

Webliography

  • http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0385751532/ref=dp_proddesc_0?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books
  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780385751063&view=quotes
  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/results.pperl?title_subtitle_auth_isbn=the+boy+in+the+striped+pajamas
  • http://www.amazon.com/Boy-Striped-Pajamas-John-Boyne/dp/0385751532/ref=pd_bbs_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1222738578&sr=1-1
  • http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=striped+pajamas
  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780385751063&view=tg
  • http://www.photographs.dk/letter/
  • www.loc.gov
  • http://www.thefilmfactoryireland.com/boy/
  • http://www.johnboyne.com/
  • http://www.randomhouse.com/teens/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780385751896
  • www.amazon.com
  • www.ushmm.org
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_9s.htm
  • Webliography Continued
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_B.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_D.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_C.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.net/Schindler/Schindler.html
  • http://www.deathcamps.info/photos/Album1.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.info/Holocaust/index.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_9s.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_2.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_7.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_9p.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums4/jpg_9a.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_1.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_3.htm
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums2/album.htm
  • http://www.emilieschindler.com/Schindler/Album1.htm
  • http://www.photographs.dk/
  • Tchudi, S. & Mitchell, D. (1999). Exploring and Teaching the English Language Arts:
  • United States: Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers, Inc.
  • http://www.oskarschindler.com/Albums5/jpg_1.htm
  • Remember for the children.
  • "I hated the brutality, the sadism, and the insanity of Nazism. I just couldn't stand by and see people destroyed. I did what I could, what I had to do, what my conscience told me I must do. That's all there is to it. Really, nothing more." - Oskar Schindler
  • http://www.oskarschindler.net/Schindler/Schindler.html http://www.deathcamps.info/photos/Album1.htm


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