The Assessment Forms



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The Assessment Forms

Several forms are provided here that you might want to use. They were designed to give you a quick and convenient way of getting varied forms of information at different points in the semester.


Feel free to use them or not, as you please. If you use them, you might duplicate them as is, edit them, combine them with other forms of assessment, whatever. Similarly, you can ask that students sign their names or ask for anonymous responses.
Baseline Forms

These forms were designed for use at the beginning of the semester with the hope that they would give you useful information, start students thinking about relevant issues, and provide a basis for dialogue. You might want to distribute some of them when you first meet your students in order to provide a background for your first conferences and/or class sessions.


Form SBG. College Goals. These items are taken from a questionnaire used twenty years ago in a College Board study of all first-year students at Bucknell and eight other colleges. They cover a range of goals and provide you with an opportunity to compare your group with others.
Form SBO. Foundation Seminar Objectives. These items were adapted from the Common Learning Agenda document that created our current program of Foundation Seminars. Thus, they provide a basis for communicating what is supposed to be distinctive about Foundation Seminars and/or opening a discussion of the program.
Form SBS. Skills and Work Patterns. This form asks students to evaluate themselves with respect to academic skills and work patterns that we see as central for first-year students. It provides a basis for group discussion and understanding of individuals.
Form SBE Expectations. Here the focus is on what students expect to do with respect to the time they will put in on their courses; the grades and class standing they expect, and their career aspirations. It provides a way of communicating faculty expectations about "work load," of revealing individual and group expectancies, and helping students begin to face up to the reality that not all of them will be in the top quarter of their class here.
Midsemester Form

Form SMF. Midsemester Feedback. This form was designed to give you a quick and simple way of seeing where your students stand during the semester. It is particularly relevant for instructors since they serve as academic advisers to their seminar students.

End-of-Semester Forms

Form SEO. Seminar evaluation. This form asks the student to evaluate the seminar in relation to faculty objectives for Foundation Seminars. It parallels Form SBO above.

Form SES. Self Evaluation. This form asks the student to evaluate herself/himself in relation to skills, work patterns, and faculty objectives for Foundation Seminars. It parallels Form SBS.
Form FEO. Faculty Evaluation of Seminar. This form was designed to enable instructors to evaluate their seminars in relation to the objectives for Foundation Seminars. It parallels the student forms, SBO and SEO.

Form SBG. College Goals

Student FN Date

Which of the goals for college listed below are most important to you? Check about 2 or 3 that are particularly important.




  • Liberal education. I see college as my great opportunity to read a lot, exchange ideas, learn about the significant cultures of the world, and generally become an aware and more sophisticated person.




  • Intellectual skills. I don't want to just learn a lot of facts in college; to me it's very important to learn how to deal with those facts. For example, learning how to reason, evaluate information, and construct a defensible argument are high priorities for me.




  • Moral values. I am especially concerned about ethical, moral, and religious issues. In the next year or so I would like to get a better sense of my own values in this area.




  • Social awareness. I am very interested in community and social problems and would like to learn more about what's going on in the world. The opportunity to get personally involved in some sort of significant community service or environmental project would be important to me.




  • Creative talents. I like to express myself creatively. I already have some talent in an area of interest to me (for example, theater, music painting, crafts, writing) and want to develop it further in college.




  • Physical development. I am an active person. I like sports and other outdoor activities. Developing my talents and interests in this area is important to me.




  • Leadership training. Extracurricular activities appeal to me because they are a good way to get a lot out of your education; especially learning how to organize resources, work with others, and take the lead in achieving an objective. I hope to participate fully in this aspect of college life.




  • Personal relations. I would very much like to develop a meaningful relationship with another person while I'm in college. If it's lasting, good; if it's not, that's okay too.




  • Social competence. In the next few years I would like particularly to develop more skill and confidence in dealing with different kinds of people. I think the social side of college is very important.




  • Professional training. My main goal in college will be to get training for the work I want to do, or make the grades I need to get into a good school after I finish here.




  • Practical skills. I view college as a place where a person can learn practical skills valuable throughout a lifetime. I am especially interested in developing specific skills such as foreign language competency, computer programming, reading and math skills, good work habits, etc.




  • Career exploration. I am not at all sure what I want to do for a career. To me it seems important that I get a better sense of direction, and I hope to do that in college.



Form SBO. Foundation Seminar Objectives

Student FN .

Bucknell's Arts and Science faculty decided to require Foundation Seminars in order to foster the objectives listed below.

Which of these objectives are most important to you? Put an "M' next to those.

Which of these objectives are least important to you? Put an "L" next to those.



Are there any of these objectives that you don't think you understand? Put a "?" next to those.

The Objectives


  1. encourage students to reflect on the nature and character of the undergraduate years in relation to life-long learning




  1. promote active learning and responsibility....encourage students to become accountable for their own learning




  1. stress responsibility for one's behavior, in general and in an academic context




  1. emphasize collaborative learning as a dialogical social enterprise and a communal effort, requiring respectful consideration of multiple viewpoints




  1. incorporate creative problem-solving, i.e., posing problems/questions and assisting students in working toward solutions




  1. foster intellectual development through reading, speaking, listening, and writing.




  1. improve students' ability to analyze and interpret materials they encounter, to synthesize and communicate the results of their studies, and to create works of their own




  1. increase the student's capacity for critical (or higher-order) thinking, characterized by analysis, reflection, and judgment, and complement it by the creative dimensions of imagination and insight




  1. develop skills necessary for intellectual endeavors, e.g., teach information-retrieval skills through library instruction, and assignments addressing computer literacy (e.g., word processing, simulations, use of a database, or analysis of data will be included)




  1. encourage students to realize the limitations of a single viewpoint through exposure to different perspectives, interdisciplinary perspectives and multiple perspectives within a discipline




  1. develop the capacity to evaluate alternative perspectives by understanding the nature and uses of evidence and practicing well-reasoned and persuasive argumentation.




  1. emphasize the interconnectedness of knowledge;




  1. initiate an educational process that will expand and deepen as students pursue their disciplinary breadth and depth requirements and, hereby, provide a launching point for a student's Bucknell educational experience.

Form SBS. Skills and Work Patterns

Student FN Date

Where do you think you stand now in relation to the skills and work patterns that Bucknell courses will call for? For each item below indicate how you think that Bucknell faculty would evaluate you in relation to the standards that they set for first-year students. Use the following scale (using intermediate ratings such as 3.7 and 2.3 if you want):


4.0 Excellent 2.0 Satisfactory

3.0 Good 1.0 Unsatisfactory




  • Reading Comprehension. Understanding and recalling college-level readings.

  • Reading Speed. Reading rapidly enough to finish assignments in a reasonable time.

  • Critical Reading. Evaluating college-level readings with respect to such matters as their internal consistency, how well arguments are supported, and what biases they contain.

  • Expository Paper Writing. Writing papers that analyze and explain.

  • Essay Exam Writing. Writing essays under exam conditions. Staying calm enough, using your time wisely, organizing your response.

  • Library Skills. Finding and evaluating library sources skillfully and efficiently. Using tools such as the computerized catalog and data bases. Seeking help from librarians appropriately.

  • Lecture Listening Skills. Understanding and recalling the main content of college lectures.

  • Discussion Skills. Skillful listening and talking during class discussions. Not talking too much or too little. Questioning and disagreeing without attacking.

  • Quantitative Skills. Working with numbers.

  • Computer skills. Using the computer for word-processing, making graphs, and other basic academic tasks.

  • Perspective Taking. Understanding points of view that contrast with your own, e.g., those of people with different backgrounds and values.

  • Reading Assignments. Keeping up with reading assignments. Making appropriate notes and thinking about the material as you go along. Staying focused with minimum distraction.

  • Class Attendance. Coming to class regularly and on time. Remaining alert and awake and staying focused with minimum distraction.

  • Writing Assignments. Getting clear on the nature of the assignment early. Starting to work well in advance of deadlines. Preparing drafts enough in advance so that you can get help and revise.

  • Preparing for Examinations. Starting your exam preparation enough in advance so that you can get help on confusing material and avoid "all nighters." Being organized. Reviewing efficiently.

  • Time Management. Balancing academic demands with others so that you not only deal with everyday requirements, but can deal with special tasks such as exams and papers.

  • Overall Attitude. Getting involved in your education and working to learn, rather than playing a game of trying to get the highest possible GPA with the least work and involvement.

Form SBE. Expectations

Student FN Date

Hours

Faculty commonly expect you to spend an average of about 2-3 hours working outside of class for each hour in. With four courses meeting 12 hours this implies about 24-36 hours of work outside of class for a total academic work week of 36-48 hours.



How many hours do you expect to work on your courses in an average week? hours

Where do you think the other time go? Specifically, about how many hours per week do you expect to spend on:



_____ paid work _____ community service

_____ informal socializing _____ creative activities (music, theater, art, etc)

_____ organized athletics _____ other

Grades

How important will your grades at Bucknell be to you?



___ extremely important ___ moderately important

___ important ___ unimportant if at least satisfactory
How important will your grades at Bucknell be to your parents?

___ extremely important ___ moderately important



___ important ___ unimportant if at least satisfactory

What Grade-Point-Average (GPA) will you try to attain in your first semester? ____

What's the lowest GPA that will make your parents cheerful? ____

What do you expect your class standing to be based on first-year grades?



____ top quarter ____ next to bottom quarter

____ next to top quarter ____ bottom quarter

Career

How specific are your career plans at this point?



___ highly specific, I have a definite idea of what I want to do

___ moderately specific, I have few concrete ideas, or a general picture

___ not at all specific, I have no idea what I want to do

At present what careers are most attractive to you?
Do you expect to go to graduate school?

___ definitely yes

__­_ probably yes

___ probably no

___ definitely no

Form SMF. Midsemester Feedback

Student FN Date

This form is designed to see how things are going for you at this point in the semester and, with luck, to help them go better.



Your Bucknell Experience Overall

How do you rate your Bucknell experience overall so far? (10 = wonderful, 0 = terrible)



your rating: ______

What has been best about it?

What has been worst about it?

Your Courses In General

How have you found your courses overall so far? (10 = wonderful, 0 = terrible)



your rating: _____

What has been best about them?

What has been worst about them?

Our Foundation Seminar

How have you found our seminar so far overall? (10 = wonderful, 0 = terrible)



your rating: _____

What has been best about it?

What has been worst about it?

To Your Foundation Seminar Instructor

Any questions, comments, suggestions for me?



Form SEO. Foundation Seminar Objectives

Student FN Date

How successful was your Foundation Seminar in achieving the following objectives? Please rate it for each objective from 0 to 10, using the following guidelines.



10 = completely successful

8 = highly successful

5 = reasonably successful

2 = somewhat successful

0 = not at all successful

Which 2 or 3 objectives do you think should have been emphasized the most in your seminar? _________

The Objectives

  1. encourage students to reflect on the nature and character of the undergraduate years in relation to life-long learning




  1. promote active learning and responsibility....encourage students to become accountable for their own learning




  1. stress responsibility for one's behavior, in general and in an academic context




  1. emphasize collaborative learning as a dialogical social enterprise and a communal effort, requiring respectful consideration of multiple viewpoints




  1. incorporate creative problem-solving, i.e., posing problems/questions and assisting students in working toward solutions




  1. foster intellectual development through reading, speaking, listening, and writing.




  1. improve students' ability to analyze and interpret materials they encounter, to synthesize and communicate the results of their studies, and to create works of their own




  1. increase the student's capacity for critical (or higher-order) thinking, characterized by analysis, reflection, and judgment, and complement it by the creative dimensions of imagination and insight




  1. develop skills necessary for intellectual endeavors, e.g., teach information-retrieval skills through library instruction, and assignments addressing computer literacy (e.g., word processing, simulations, use of a database, or analysis of data will be included)




  1. encourage students to realize the limitations of a single viewpoint through exposure to different perspectives, interdisciplinary perspectives and multiple perspectives within a discipline




  1. develop the capacity to evaluate alternative perspectives by understanding the nature and uses of evidence and practicing well-reasoned and persuasive argumentation.




  1. emphasize the interconnectedness of knowledge;




  1. initiate an educational process that will expand and deepen as students pursue their disciplinary breadth and depth requirements and, hereby, provide a launching point for a student's Bucknell educational experience.

Form SES. Self-Evaluation

Student FN Date

Where do you think you stand now in relation to the skills and work patterns that Bucknell courses call for? For each item below indicate how you think that Bucknell faculty would evaluate you in relation to the standards that they set for first-year students. Use the following scale (using intermediate ratings such as 3.7 and 2.3 if you want):


4.0 Excellent 2.0 Satisfactory

3.0 Good 1.0 Unsatisfactory



  • Reading Comprehension. Understanding and recalling college-level readings.

  • Reading Speed. Reading rapidly enough to finish assignments in a reasonable time.

  • Critical Reading. Evaluating college-level readings with respect to such matters as their internal consistency, how well arguments are supported, and what biases they contain.

  • Expository Paper Writing. Writing papers that analyze and explain.

  • Essay Exam Writing. Writing essays under exam conditions. Staying calm enough, using your time wisely, organizing your response.

  • Library Skills. Finding and evaluating library sources skillfully and efficiently. Using tools such as the computerized catalog and data bases. Seeking help from librarians appropriately.

  • Lecture Listening Skills. Understanding and recalling the main content of college lectures.

  • Discussion Skills. Skillful listening and talking during class discussions. Not talking too much or too little. Questioning and disagreeing without attacking.

  • Quantitative Skills. Working with numbers.

  • Computer skills. Using the computer for word-processing, making graphs, and other basic academic tasks.

  • Perspective Taking. Understanding points of view that contrast with your own, e.g., those of people with different backgrounds and values.

  • Reading Assignments. Keeping up with reading assignments. Making appropriate notes and thinking about the material as you go along. Staying focused with minimum distraction.

  • Class Attendance. Coming to class regularly and on time. Remaining alert and awake and staying focused with minimum distraction.

  • Writing Assignments. Getting clear on the nature of the assignment early. Starting to work well in advance of deadlines. Preparing drafts enough in advance so that you can get help and revise.

  • Preparing for Examinations. Starting your exam preparation enough in advance so that you can get help on confusing material and avoid "all nighters." Being organized. Reviewing efficiently.

  • Time Management. Balancing academic demands with others so that you not only deal with everyday requirements, but can deal with special tasks such as exams and papers.

  • Overall Attitude. Getting involved in your education and working to learn, rather than playing a game of trying to get the highest possible GPA with the least work and involvement.

Form FEO. Faculty Evaluation of Seminar

Instructor FN Date

How successful was your Foundation Seminar in achieving the following objectives? Please rate it for each objective from 0 to 10, using the following guidelines.

10 = completely successful

8 = highly successful

5 = reasonably successful

2 = somewhat successful



0 = not at all successful

Which 2 or 3 objectives did you emphasize the most in your seminar?

The Objectives

  1. encourage students to reflect on the nature and character of the undergraduate years in relation to life-long learning




  1. promote active learning and responsibility....encourage students to become accountable for their own learning




  1. stress responsibility for one's behavior, in general and in an academic context




  1. emphasize collaborative learning as a dialogical social enterprise and a communal effort, requiring respectful consideration of multiple viewpoints




  1. incorporate creative problem-solving, i.e., posing problems/questions and assisting students in working toward solutions




  1. foster intellectual development through reading, speaking, listening, and writing.




  1. improve students' ability to analyze and interpret materials they encounter, to synthesize and communicate the results of their studies, and to create works of their own




  1. increase the student's capacity for critical (or higher-order) thinking, characterized by analysis, reflection, and judgment, and complement it by the creative dimensions of imagination and insight




  1. develop skills necessary for intellectual endeavors, e.g., teach information-retrieval skills through library instruction, and assignments addressing computer literacy (e.g., word processing, simulations, use of a database, or analysis of data will be included)




  1. encourage students to realize the limitations of a single viewpoint through exposure to different perspectives, interdisciplinary perspectives and multiple perspectives within a discipline




  1. develop the capacity to evaluate alternative perspectives by understanding the nature and uses of evidence and practicing well-reasoned and persuasive argumentation.




  1. emphasize the interconnectedness of knowledge;




  1. initiate an educational process that will expand and deepen as students pursue their disciplinary breadth and depth requirements and, hereby, provide a launching point for a student's Bucknell educational experience.


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