Revising High School Grading Requirements Revision of Rule 6A 09981, F. A. C



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Revising High School Grading Requirements

Revision of Rule 6A-1.09981, F.A.C.

What is the Purpose of this Rule Change?


  • Senate Bill 1908 (2008 Legislative Session) requires a significant change to the way high schools are graded beginning with the 2009-10 School Year.

  • In addition to the vital foundation of assessment results in Grades 9, 10, and 11 (Science), the law requires an equal focus be placed on:

  • Access to rigorous, accelerated coursework, as well as performance in rigorous, accelerated coursework.

  • College Readiness

  • Graduation rates for all students as well as those academically at-risk.

Why Change the Way we Grade our High Schools?


  • Over the past decade, Florida has shown tremendous progress in the foundation skills of reading and mathematics proficiency through Grade 10

  • The percent of students achieving a level 3 or above on the FCAT Reading test was 47% in 2001 and 2002 and increased to 50% in 2003; to 52% in 2004; to 53% in 2005; to 57% in 2006; to 58% in 2007; to 60% in 2008; and to 61% in 2009. The percent of students achieving a level 1 on the FCAT Reading test was 32%in 2001and decreased to 31% in 2002; to 29% in 2003; to 27% in 2004; to 26% in 2005; to 22% in 2006; to 21% in 2007; to 20% in 2008; and to 18% in 2009.

  • The percent of students achieving a level 3 or above on the FCAT Math test was 50% in 2001 and increased to 51% in 2002; to 54% in 2003; to 56% in 2004; to 59% in 2005; to 61% in 2006; to 63% in 2007; to 65% in 2008; and to 67% in 2009. The percent of students achieving a level 1 on the FCAT Math test was 29%in 2001and decreased to 27% in 2002; to 24% in 2003; to 22% in 2004; to 20% in 2005; to 18% in 2006; to 17% in 2007; to 15% in 2008; and to 14% in 2009.

Why Change the Way we Grade our High Schools?


  • State and national expectations are rising for our high schools

  • In 2007, 54 percent of high school graduates who enrolled in community college required remediation in at least one subject.

  • The high school accountability system demands:

  • More rigorous standards and assessments

  • Alignment between high school and college readiness and high-skill/high-wage employment

  • Focus on access, rigor, and readiness

Timeline


Task

Completion Date

Develop models

Completed in Summer 2008

Vet with External Stakeholders

Began in Fall 2008

Regional Rule Development Workshops

May 2009; Three Held Across the State

Rule Adopted by the State Board of Education

September 15, 2009

Release New School Grades for High Schools

Fall 2010



New Component #1:
Graduation Rate


Graduate Rate Methods

Students Not Included in the Calculation

Graduates

Non-Graduates

For use in 2009-10 and 2010-11
National Governors Association (NGA) Rate

Students who transfer to:

  • Other schools (public, private, or Dept. of Juvenile Justice facilities);

  • Home-education programs;

  • Adult education programs

Deceased students

  • Standard Diploma recipients

  • Special Diploma recipients

  • Dropouts

  • Certificate of Completion recipients

  • GED recipients

  • Continuing enrollees who are not on-time graduates

For use beginning in 2011-12
New Federal Uniform Rate
*Note: If federal requirements for the uniform rate change in the interim, Florida’s federal uniform rate calculation will be adjusted accordingly.

Students who transfer to:

  • Other schools (public or private)

  • Home-education programs

Deceased students

  • Standard Diploma recipients

  • Dropouts

  • Certificate of Completion recipients

  • GED recipients

  • Continuing enrollees who are not on-time graduates

  • Special Diplomas

  • Transfers to Adult education programs or Dept. of Juvenile Justice facilities who are not standard diploma recipients.



New Component #2A:
Participation in Accelerated Coursework

Proposed Calculation:


School Year

Numerator

Denominator

2009-10 and 2010-11

11th-12th graders who took an accelerated exam or dual enrollment course AND 9th-10th graders who passed an accelerated exam or dual enrollment course during the academic year (weighted)


All 11th-12th graders

2011-12

All 9th-12th graders who took an accelerated exam or dual enrollment course during the academic year (weighted)


All 11th-12th graders




  • For a school to receive credit for participation in an accelerated course that ends in an exam (e.g., AP, IB, AICE), the student must take the exam.

  • For dual enrollment, a student must earn a grade in the course for a school to receive credit for participation.

  • For industry certification, a student must have taken an industry certification exam on the SBE approved “Industry Certification Funding List” for the year.

Acceleration Participation
In the formula, schools would earn weighted credit for the number of exams/courses a student takes. Below is the proposed weighting system to accommodate multiple exams or dual enrollment courses taken by students:


Weight

Participation Outcome

1.00

1 Exam/Course Taken

1.10

2 Exams/Courses Taken

1.20

3 Exams/Courses Taken

1.30

4 Exams/Courses Taken

1.40

5 Exams/Courses Taken

+ 0.1

For Each Additional Exam/Course Taken

  • No cap is proposed for participation. That is, following the logic above, schools will earn an increasing amount of credit for those students who take increasing numbers of accelerated courses/exams. For example, the student who takes 7 exams/courses will be weighted at 1.6; a student who takes 8 will be weighted 1.7; and so on.

Acceleration Participation – EXAMPLE
John Doe completes 3 Dual Enrollment courses; 2 AP exams; and 1 industry certification exam. Here are his results:

Accelerated Exam/Course

Exam/Course Taken

Dual Enrollment Course 1

1

Dual Enrollment Course 2

1

Dual Enrollment Course 3

1

AP Exam 1

1

AP Exam 2

1

Industry Certification Exam

1

Total Exams/Courses Taken

6

His Weight in the Formula

1.50



New Component #2B:
Performance in Accelerated Coursework

Proposed Calculation:


School Year

Numerator

Denominator

2009-10 and

2010-11

Number of successful outcomes in accelerated coursework (weighted) by a student (9th through 12th grade)

All 11th-12th graders who took an accelerated exam or dual enrollment course AND 9th-10th graders who passed the acceleration during the academic year

2011-12

Number of successful outcomes in accelerated coursework (weighted) by a student (9th through 12th grade)

All 9th-12th graders who took an accelerated exam or dual enrollment course during the academic year.



New Component #2B:
Performance in Accelerated Coursework

Weighting Proposal for Performance


  • Measure will be based on credits earned.

  • Depending on their score on AP, IB, and/or AICE, students will receive weight in the formula based on the number of postsecondary courses for which the student earns credit as determined by the Articulation Coordinating Committee’s Credit-by-Exam Equivalencies List. (http://www.fldoe.org/articulation/pdf/ACC-CBE.pdf)

  • Successful completion (a “C” or higher) of a Dual Enrollment course leads to students earning credit in one course.

  • Successful passage of an Industry Certification exam.

New Component #2B:
Performance in Accelerated Coursework

Successful Outcomes are defined as:

AP


Score

Outcome

Score of 3

1 Successful Outcome

Score of 4 or 5

1 or 2 Successful Outcomes (depending on ACC Credit-by-Exam Equivalencies)

IB


Score

Outcome

Score of 4

1 Successful Outcome

Score of 5, 6, or 7

1 or 2 Successful Outcomes (depending on ACC Credit-by-Exam Equivalencies)

AICE


Score

Outcome

Passing Score on an AS Level AICE Exam

1 Successful Outcome

Passing Score on an A Level AICE Exam

1 or 2 Successful Outcomes (depending on ACC Credit-by-Exam Equivalencies)

Dual Enrollment


Score

Outcome

Passing grade of “C” or higher in the course

1 Successful Outcome

Industry Certification


Score

Outcome

Earning an industry certification by exam

1 or multiple successful outcomes based on statewide articulation agreements

(http://www.fldoe.org/workforce/dwdframe/artic_frame.asp)




Acceleration Performance


In the formula, schools would earn weighted credit for the number of successful outcomes a student earns. Here is the proposed weighting system to accommodate multiple successes by students:

Weight

Performance Outcome

1.00

1 Successful Outcome

1.10

2 Successful Outcomes

1.20

3 Successful Outcomes

1.30

4 Successful Outcomes

1.40

5 Successful Outcomes

+ 0.1

For Each Additional Successful Outcome

  • No cap is proposed for performance. That is, following the logic above, schools will earn an increasing amount of credit for those students who successfully complete increasing amounts of accelerated coursework. For example, the student who earns 7 successful outcomes will be weighted at 1.6; a student who earns 8 will be weighted 1.7; and so on.

Acceleration Performance – EXAMPLE


John Doe takes 3 Dual Enrollment courses; 2 AP exams; and 1 industry certification exam. Here are his results:

Accelerated Course

Score/Grade

Successful Completion

Dual Enrollment Course 1

C”

1

Dual Enrollment Course 2

C”

1

Dual Enrollment Course 3

D”

0

AP Exam 1

2

0

AP Exam 2 (in English)

4

2

Industry Certification Exam

Passed

1

Total Successful Completions

 

5

His Weight in the Formula

 

1.40


New Component #3:
Postsecondary Readiness

Proposed Calculation


Numerator

Denominator

Number of students scoring “ready” on SAT, ACT, and/or CPT any time during their high school careers

On-time high school graduates who scored a Level 3 or higher on the 10th Grade FCAT in Reading or Mathematics (depending on component)




  • Separate Measures for Reading and Math.

  • If student takes multiple tests (ACT, SAT, or CPT), the student’s highest score by subtest is used.

  • The scores used to define “ready” are set in State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.0315, F.A.C.

  • This measure will be based on all on-time standard high school graduates beginning no later than 2011-12.

New Component #4:
Graduation Rate for At-Risk Students


  • Track the 4-year high school graduation rate of students who scored a Level 2 or lower on both FCAT Reading and Mathematics in 8th Grade.

  • If a school does not have at least 10 students in that subgroup, the school’s overall graduation rate will be substituted for this measure.

New Component #5:
Growth or Decline in components


  • Schools earn an escalating number of points based on the magnitude of their improvement.

  • Additional points would be awarded based on the number of points the school improved (growth from prior year); up to 20 additional points.

  • Schools will lose 5 points if a component declines by at least 10 percentage points.



  • EXAMPLES

  • GROWTH: A school’s acceleration performance improves from 25% to 32%; the school earns an additional 7 points resulting in a total of 39 points (32 + 7).

  • DECLINE: A school’s acceleration performance declines from 30% to 20%; the school would lose an additional 5 points resulting in a total of 15 points (20 – 5).

Additional Requirement – At-Risk Graduation Rate


  • Law stipulates that in order for a school that earns enough points for an “A” to be awarded an “A”, the school’s at-risk graduation rate must meet a certain threshold to ensure “adequate progress.”

  • Recommended Threshold:

  • 75%; or

  • 1 percentage point improvement over the prior year if percentage is within 10 points of the target

  • 5 percentage point improvement over the prior year if percentage is beyond 10 points of the target

  • This requirement is akin to the current learning gains requirement for the Low 25%.

New High School Grade


  • 50% on FCAT Components

  • 800 Points Possible

  • 50% on New High School Components

  • 800 Points Possible

  • TOTAL POINTS (FCAT + New High School Components)

  • 1600 Points Possible

  • Grade Scale

  • A >= 1050

  • B 990 to 1049

  • C 870 to 989

  • D 790 to 869

  • F < 790



FCAT Components
(50% of the Grade)


READING

MATH

WRITING

SCIENCE

Performance

100 possible pts.

Performance

100 possible pts.

Performance

100 possible pts.

Performance

100 possible pts.

Learning Gains

100 possible pts.

Learning Gains

100 possible pts.

TOTAL FCAT POINTS

800 POINTS

Learning Gains of Lowest 25%

100 possible pts.

Learning Gains of Lowest 25%

100 possible pts.

PLUS 11th and 12th grade retakes for possible bonus points (10) – High schools earn ten bonus points when half of all 11th and 12th graders retaking the FCAT meet the graduation requirement.

New High School Components
NEW 50% (with points possible)


GRADUATION

ACCELERATION

READINESS

GROWTH/DECLINE

Overall Rate

200

Participation

200 (in 2009-10)

175 (in 2010-11)

150 (in 2011-12)

Performance on Reading

100

For each component schools may earn up to 20 additional points for GROWTH

(40 points for factors worth 200 points)

At-Risk Rate

100

Performance

100 (in 2009-10)

125 (in 2010-11)

150 (in 2011-12)

Performance on Math

100

For each component schools may lose

5 additional points for DECLINE

(10 points for factors worth 200 points)

Total Graduation Points

300

Total Acceleration Points

300

Total Readiness Points

200

Total NEW HIGH SCHOOL Points Possible

800

  • All components are percentages. Those components weighted twice as much as others reflect a calculated percentage that is doubled (e.g., School X has a 75% graduation rate – School X earns 150 points (75*2) for that component).

  • All component values are capped at their maximum values. That is, if a school earns points in excess of the total for a particular component – through the growth adjustment or the escalating weights in the acceleration components – the school will receive the maximum points for that component.



Sample New High School Grade Calculation

New High School Components: Graduation Rates – Sample School


Component

Prior Year (PY)

Current Year (CY)

Points Earned

(CY + (CY – PY))

Overall Graduation Rate

65%

68%

(68 + (68 – 65)) =

71

At-Risk Graduation Rate

57%

57%

(57 + (57 – 57)) =

57



New High School Components: Acceleration Participation –
Sample School


 

Number of 11th and 12th Graders

Number of Students who took 1 Acceleration Exam or Course

( # x 1.00)

Number of Students who took 2 Acceleration Exams or Courses

(# x 1.10)

Number of Students who took 3 Acceleration Exams or Courses

(# x 1.20)

Number of Students who took 4 Acceleration Exams or Courses

(# x 1.30)

Number of Students who took 5 Acceleration Exams or Courses

(# x 1.40)

Rate

Current Year (CY)

400

30 x 1.00 = 30

20 x 1.10 = 22

30 x 1.20 = 36

10 x 1.30 = 13

5 x 1.40 = 7

(30+22+ 36+13+7) / 400 = 27%

Prior Year (PY)

350

15 x 1.00 = 15

10 x 1.10 = 11

15 x 1.20 = 18

5 x 1.30 = 6.5

3 x 1.40 = 4.2

(15+11+ 18+6.5+ 4.2) / 350 = 16%

Points Earned

 

 

 

 

 

 

(27 + (27 – 16)) = 38



New High School Components: Acceleration Performance –
Sample School


 

Number of Students who completed Acceleration

Exams or Courses

Number of Students who passed 1 Acceleration Exam or Course

( # x 1.00)

Number of Students who passed 2 Acceleration Exams or Courses

(# x 1.10)

Number of Students who passed 3 Acceleration Exams or Courses

(# x 1.20)

Number of Students who passed 4 Acceleration Exams or Courses

(# x 1.30)

Number of Students who passed 5 Acceleration Exams or Courses

(# x 1.40)

Rate

Current Year (CY)

95

15 x 1.00 = 15

8 x 1.10 = 8.8

20 x 1.20 = 24

8 x 1.30 = 10.4

1 x 1.40 = 1.4

(15+8.8+ 24+10.4+1.4) / 95 = 63%

Prior Year (PY)

48

9 x 1.00 = 9

7 x 1.10 = 7.7

11 x 1.20 = 13.2

3 x 1.30 = 3.9

0 x 1.40 = 0

(9+7.7+ 13.2 +3.9+ 0) / 48 = 70%

Points Earned

 

 

 

 

 

 

No Growth

No 10 point decline

63



New High School Components: Postsecondary Readiness –
Sample School


 

Percent “Ready” in Reading

Percent “Ready” in Math

Current Year (CY)

62%

50%

Prior Year (PY)

61%

45%

Points Earned

(62+(62-61)=63

(50 + (50 – 45) = 55



New High School Components
NEW 50% (with points possible) –Sample School


GRADUATION

ACCELERATION

READINESS

 

Overall Rate

71 * 2 =

142

Participation

38 * 2 =

76

Performance on Reading

63

 

At-Risk Rate

57

Performance

63

Performance on Math

55

 

Total Graduation Points

199

Total Acceleration Points

139

Total Readiness Points

118

Total NEW HIGH SCHOOL Points Possible

456



FCAT Components (50% of the Grade) –
Sample School


READING

MATH

WRITING

SCIENCE

Performance

46

Performance

74

Performance

82

Performance

40

Learning Gains

51

Learning Gains

75

TOTAL FCAT POINTS

485

Learning Gains of Lowest 25%

50

Learning Gains of Lowest 25%

67



New High School Grade –
Sample School


  • 50% on FCAT Components

  • 485

  • 50% on New High School Components

  • 456

  • TOTAL POINTS

  • (FCAT + New High School Components)

  • 941

  • Grade

  • A >= 1050

  • B 990 to 1049

  • C 870 to 989

  • D 790 to 869

  • F < 790




  • School Earns a “C”



Other Changes to
Rule 6A-1.09981

Other Changes to
Rule 6A-1.09981


  • Cell-size criteria for science and writing in School Grades

  • Updated procedure for determining percentage of students proficient in writing

  • Inclusion of Florida Alternate Assessment results for students with disabilities in calculating learning gains for reading and math


Cell-size criteria for science and writing in School Grades


  • The minimum cell-size for the writing and science components for school grades will be reduced from 30 students to 10 students.

  • If a school has fewer than 10 students with writing (or science) scores, the school will receive the district average for writing (or science).

  • Prior to this proposed rule change, schools with fewer than 30 students received the district average in writing and/or science in lieu of the school’s actual performance.

  • This will increase the number of schools whose actual writing and science performance will be reported as part of School Grades

Updated procedure for determining percentage of students proficient in writing


  • Beginning in 2009-10, FCAT writing essays at grades 4, 8, and 10 will be scored by one reader (as opposed to two, as was done in prior years).

  • A score of 3.5 in writing in grades 4, 8, and 10 will no longer be possible.

  • To accommodate this change, the average of the percentage of students scoring a 3 and above and the percentage of students scoring a 4 and above will be used for the writing component of school grades.

Inclusion of Florida Alternate Assessment results in calculating learning gains


  • Section 1008.34(3)(b)(1)b, Florida Statutes, requires that learning gains for students seeking a special diploma, as measured by an alternate assessment tool, shall be included in School Grades no later than the 2009-10 school year.

  • The Florida Alternate Assessment has nine separate performance levels, ranging from 1 to 9, with 4 or higher equaling proficient.

  • Propose defining a learning gain as an improvement in performance levels or the maintenance of a proficient level.


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