Old mill high School fall 2013 ap comparative Government and Politics course syllabus pride old Mill High School students are productive, respectful, involved, determined, and empowered. Teacher name



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OLD MILL High School

FALL 2013

AP Comparative Government and Politics
COURSE SYLLABUS
PRIDE

Old Mill High School students are productive, respectful, involved, determined, and empowered.
TEACHER NAME: Mr. Mathias Miller

ROOM #: A230
Planning Period and Time: 2A and 4B Phone: 410-969-9010

Email: msmiller@aacps.org

School website: www.oldmillhigh.org
Course Overview/Description

Advanced Placement Comparative Government is a college-level introduction to the structures, processes, actors, and issues of world governments in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in Comparative Government and Politics. To understand what happens in politics is to relate theory to practice. We will be studying the United Kingdom, Russia, China, Mexico, Nigeria, Iran, and multinational institutions such as the European Union Students will also learn to compare and contrast political institutions and processes across countries and to derive generalizations. Students should be prepared to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to comparative government and politics in an attempt to describe comparative political concepts, institutions, processes, and generalizations.


Course Content:

  • Introduction to Comparative Politics 5%

  • Sovereignty, Authority and Power 20%

  • Political Institutions 35%

  • Citizens, Society, and State 15%

  • Political and Economic Change 15%

  • Public Policy 10%


Course Readings:


  • Course Text: Each student will receive a copy and will be responsible for chapter outlines, vocabulary, and objective questions for every chapter covered.

Haus, Charles 2011, Comparative Politics: Domestic Responses to Global Challenges, 7th edition. Wadsworth-Cengage Learning. US.



  • Supplemental Activities and Readings: For primary source documents (mainly constitutions) and contemporary essays by premier thinkers, the required supplemental readings have been copied for the student. It is expected that students will keep a careful notebook that includes all of the photocopied readings, handouts, class notes, quizzes, vocabulary, and homework assignments.

Wedding, Ken 2006. Advanced Placement Comparative Government and Politics.

Center for Learning: Villa Maria, PA.

Wood, Ethel 2005. AP Comparative Government and Politics: A Study Guide 2nd Ed,

WoodYard Publications: Reading, PA.




  • Current Events: Readings will primarily include clippings from major newspapers and magazines including The Guardian, The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Economist.


Major Assessments and Assignments

Throughout the semester, students will complete a variety of assignments and assessments. The assessments include, but are not limited to the following:


Assessments (85%)
1. Exams – there will be one exam per unit of study. Each exam is modeled after the AP Exam and will include multiple choice and essay section. Essays are graded with the College Board Rubrics. Successful performance on the exams will demonstrate mastery of course standards.
2. Projects – projects will completed in conjunction with core concepts and relevant countries studied (often with current events taking place in relation to the before-mentioned).
21st Century Skills Assessments (15%)
3. Little Reading Quizzes (LRQs) – there will be daily reading quizzes which will assess your reading comprehension, academic diligence and your general understanding of the required reading. Quizzes will be used to monitor the student’s progress towards meeting the standards of the course.
4. Classwork and Homework – Every class will require reading from either the Hauss text or from the Wood text in order to be prepared for class. Reading about current events will also be required--students who stay up on current events simply do better on the test. While there won’t be any information on the AP test about anything that’s happened in the last 12 months, you can still use the most up to date events on your written portion of the exam. read any international news. CNN International, The Economist, the New York Times, Al Jazeera, and the BBC all have comprehensive international websites.
Class Materials:

Texts


3 ring binder

blue/black pen (please no other colors!)



What the Teacher Will Do to Support the Student:

  • Create engaging and rigorous learning activities that help students build his/her understanding of US history and social studies skills.

  • Ensure students have pre-reading activities to help with comprehension and purpose.

  • Chunk reading into manageable amounts and include time in class to debrief outside readings.

  • Provide and explain rubrics for essays and other assignments.

  • Spiral necessary skills for successful essay writing and provide time for editing and revising writings in order to meet standards.

  • Provide additional help to revise essays and receive support for other assignments and assessments so that students meet course standards. This will be on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 2:15 – 2:50 and other times by appointment.

  • Notify parents at any point during the marking period if a student is in danger of failing or dropping 2 or more letter grades



What the Student will Do to be Successful:

  • Complete all assignments as required. During reading, students will take notes on their readings and may have to reread sections in order to fully understand them. Students must be willing to merge their reading notes with their classroom notes in order to understand the course content.

  • Outline, write, edit, and revise essay assignments so that they meet the rubrics.

  • Take advantage of opportunities for additional help. Students should attend these sessions with rough drafts or specific questions so that the teacher can most effectively help the student.


What Parents Can Do to Support the Student:

  • Ensure that student has supplies and that they complete homework and study for tests.

  • Encourage student to seek additional help when it is needed.

  • Check Parent Connect regularly to monitor student grades.

  • Contact teacher with any questions about assignments, grade, or other issues in a timely manner.

SEMESTER OUTLINE/PACING

UNIT

TOPICS OF STUDY: COURSE STANDARDS

MAJOR ASSESSMENTS


Unit 1: Introduction to Comparative Politics

(10 classes)




  • The purpose and methods of classification and comparison

  • Concepts of State, Nation, Regime, and Government

  • Contrast and Compare Process and Policy

  • Introduction to conceptual studies

  1. Sovereignty, Authority, and Power

  2. Political and Economic Change

  3. Citizens, Society, and State

  4. Political Institutions

  5. Public Policy




Reading Quizzes


Vocabulary Quiz

Unit Test on or Around

9/10



Unit 2: United Kingdom and the European Union

  1. classes)




  1. Sovereignty, Authority and Power: Constitutionalism, Legitimacy, Liberal Democracy, Unwritten Constitution

2. Political and Economic Change: Thatcherism and Blairism, and the Evolution of the Coalition

3. Citizens, Society, and State: Clevages, Race, Ethnicity, and Political Parties

4. Political Institutions: Monarchy, Parliament, the Prime Minister (State vs. Government), Quangos

5. Public Policy: NHS, N. Ireland, EU, Immigration, Terrorism, Devolution, Big Society

Reading Quizzes

Vocabulary Quiz

Unit Test on or Around: 10/14





Unit 3: Russia

(10 classes)




  1. Sovereignty, Authority, and Power: Oligarchs, Post-Communism, 1993

  2. Political and Economic Change: G8, Chechnya

  3. Citizens, Society, and State: Lack of Civil Society

  4. Political Institutions: Pres/PM, Duma, Illiberal Democracy, Politburo

  5. Public Policy: Glasnost, Perestroika, Regionalism



Reading Quizzes

Vocabulary Quiz

Unit Test on or around 11/12





Unit 4: China

(9 classes)



  1. SAP: egalitarianism, Confucius, fangshou

  2. PEC: Nationalism, Marxism, Maoism

  3. CSS: gaunxi, nomenklatura, protests, civil unrest

  4. PI: parallel hierarchies

  5. POLICY: pollution, population, migration, price priming

Reading Quizzes


Vocabulary Quiz
Unit Test on or around 12/19


EXAM REVIEW

2 weeks





  • review conceptual studies

  • practice multiple choice questions

  • practice FQRs



Finals Week



1/21--/1/24

Unit 1: Introduction to Comparative Government

Essential Unit Questions


  • What is politics?

  • What is the purpose of government and politics?

  • What are the methods of comparison and classification in politics?

  • What are the key concepts of study in comparative politics?

  • What is political science/comparative politics?

  • What are common policy challenges?


Domain to be Assessed

  • The purpose and methods of classification and comparison

  • Concepts of State, Nation, Regime, and Government

  • Contrast and Compare Process and Policy

  • Introduction to Conceptual Studies: (1) Sovereignty, Authority and Power, (2) Political

and Economic Change, (3) Citizens, Society, and State, (4) Political Institutions, (5) Public Policy
Major Assignments and Class Activities

  • “What do you know” Pretest

  • Shrink the Earth to 100

  • Create a Country Using the Concepts Glossary

  • “The Global State of Democracy,” Larry Diamond

  • “What Democracy is… and is Not,” Schmitter & Karl (Annual Editions 06-07)

  • Debate: Is Democracy Good For Every Country?

  • Wood: Concepts and , pg. 12-78



Unit Skills

  • Analysis and interpretation of charts, graphs and other data


  • Comparison and contrast and developing generalizations

Major Assessments


  • Released Free Response Questions

  • Vocabulary Quiz Chapter

  • Reading Quizzes

  • Unit Assessment


Unit 2 & 3: Evolving Democracies and Supranationalism - A Study of the United Kingdom

the European Union, and Euroskepticism
Essential Unit Questions

  • What is the sovereignty, authority, and power of the UK and European Union?

  • What are the main political institutions of the UK?

  • What is the role of citizens, society, and the state in the UK and the European Union?

  • What are the historical examples of political and economic change in the UK?

  • How is public policy initiated and designed in the UK?


Domain to be Assessed

  • Sovereignty, Authority and Power: Constitutionalism, Legitimacy, Liberal Democracy, Unwritten Constitution

  • Political and Economic Change: Thatcherism, Blairism

  • Citizens, Society, and State: Cleavages, Race, Ethnicity, Political Parties

  • Political Institutions: Monarchy, Parliament, the Prime Minister (Head of State/Head of Government), Quangos

  • Public Policy: National Health Service, N. Ireland, EU, Immigration, Terrorism


Major Assignments and Class Activities

  • Compare and Contrast Prime Ministers v. Presidents (Head of State v. Head of Government)

  • Examine the role of Parliament v. Congress

  • Great Britain’s Constitution – Analyze the British Constitution (or lack thereof)

  • The European Union and the Euro – Economic Activity on the European Union Website

  • Comparing Legislatures, The Center for Learning, Ken Wedding

  • Comparing British Political Parties, The Center for learning, Ken Wedding or Online Activity

  • “A Constitutional Revolution in Britain?” Donley T. Studlar, Annual Editions

  • “The British General Election of 2005” Donley T. Studlar, Annual Editions

  • Current Events Readings on the UK

  • Research statistics from CIA fact book

  • Haus Text, The United Kingdom (p. 65-99) / The European Union (p. 173-193)



Major Assessments

  • Vocabulary Quiz

  • Wikipedia Edits

  • Vocabulary Quiz

  • LRQs

  • Reading Quizzes

  • Unit Assessment(s)

  • FRQs to Study

  • 2004 FRQ Question #1

  • 2002 FRQ Question #4

  • 2006 FRQ Question #6

  • 2003 FRQ Question #4

  • 2000 FRQ Question #3


Unit 4: A Changing World-- Russia

Essential Unit Questions


  • What is the sovereignty, authority, and power of Russia?

  • What are the main political institutions of Russia?

  • What is the role of citizens, society, and the state in Russia?

  • What are the historical examples of political and economic change in Russia?

  • How is public policy initiated and designed in Russia?


Domain to be Assessed

  • Sovereignty, Authority and Power: Oligarchs, 1993 Constitution

  • Political and Economic Change: G8, Chechnya

  • Citizens, Society, and State: Lack of Civil Society

  • Political Institutions: President/PM, Duma, Illiberal Democracy, Politburo

  • Public Policy: Glasnost, Perestroika, Regionalism


Major Assignments and Class Activities

  • Compare and Contrast Communism v. Democracy by comparing the Declaration of Independence with the Communist Manifesto

  • The Political Development of the Former Soviet Union/Russia

  • Characteristics of Russian Leaders, The Center for Learning, Ken Wedding

  • Nomenklatura and Elite Recruitment, The Center for Learning, Ken Wedding

  • Current Events Readings on Russia

  • “What Does Putin Want?” Peter Lavelle, Annual Editions

  • Research statistics from CIA fact book

  • Haus text: Russia, p. 221-257

Unit 3 Exam on a Changing World- Russia


Major Assessments


  • Vocabulary Quiz Chapter 12

  • Chapter Outline 12

  • Student Presentations: Russia

  • Reading Quizzes

  • 2006 FRQ Question #4

  • 2004 FRQ Question #4

  • 2001 FRQ Question #1



Unit 5: Communism’s Last Gasp, or Totalitarianism 21st Century Style?
Essential Unit Questions

  • What is the sovereignty, authority, and power of China?

  • What are the main political institutions of China?

  • What is the role of citizens, society, and the state in China?

  • What are the historical examples of political and economic change in China?

  • How is public policy initiated and designed in China?


Domain to be Assessed

  • Sovereignty, Authority and Power: egalitarianism, Confucius, fangshou

  • Political and Economic Change: Nationalism, Marxism, Maoism

  • Citizens, Society, and State: gaunxi, nomenklatura, protests, civil unrest

  • Political Institutions: parallel hierarchies

  • Public Policy: pollution, population, migration, price priming


Major Assignments and Class Activities

  • “Newly Industrializing and Less Developed Countries,” Ethel Wood, AP Comp. Gov. and Pol.

  • CHOICES Curriculum for China (history, politics, and future), Brown University

  • Lessons of the Chinese Experiences, The Center for Learning, Ken Wedding

  • Parallel Heirarchies, a Study in Single Party Domination

  • Research statistics from CIA fact book

  • Hauss: China pp. 261-293


Major Assessments

  • Vocabulary Quiz

  • LRQ

  • Wikipedia Edits

  • FRQ Review

EXAM REVIEW – 2 Weeks

Final Exam will consist of a cumulative multiple choice test that covers all units and a written section completely dedicated to topics covered in China’s Unit






  • 2001 FRQ Question #3

  • 2000 FRQ Question #2

  • 1999 FRQ Question #3

COURSE AND CLASSROOM EXPECTATIONS/POLICIES
Tardiness:

Learning can only take place when students are present in class and ready to learn and teachers are ready to teach!

Teachers will consider a student late once the late bell rings and a student is not in the classroom.

Tardiness is a cumulative offense. Consequences for tardiness to any instructional period, including returning from lunch will be as follows:



# Late Consequence

  1. Warning

  2. Warning

  3. Tuesday/Thursday Detention

  4. Friday Detention

  5. ISS will be assigned for the next A/B Day

  6. Appropriate disciplinary action will be taken

Additional Tardiness – Administrative Intervention

MUSICAL LISTENING DEVICE POLICY:

Musical listening devices will be permitted in this class if the student follows the established rules for this class. Musical listening devices are NOT to be used during warm-up time, notes, tests/quizzes or when the teacher is giving directions. This includes having earbuds/headphones removed from the ears during those times. Please refer to the green/red classroom sign, located on the front chalkboard, to determine if musical listening devices are allowed to be used at any point during the class period. Musical listening devices are to be kept at a low volume so that the student can still hear instructions from the teacher. Violations of any of the above stated rules will result in Bag and Tag. CELL PHONES ARE NEVER ALLOWED IN CLASS AND ARE ALWAYS SUBJECT TO BAG AND TAG.

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Please sign and return to Teacher.

I acknowledge that I have read and understand the Course Syllabus and will comply with the expectations/policies as stated, along with the policies/regulations of AACPS, specifically regarding the Academic Integrity policy and new grading policy.

Class ______________________________________________


Period/Day _____________

Student Name (Print) _______________________________________________________

Student Signature _______________________________________________________
Student Email ___________________________________________________________

Parent Signature _______________________________________________________

Parent Email: ______________________________________________________

Parent Cell Phone: ______________________________________________________





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