Faculty of Health and Life Sciences Version 1 Date 18/11/2013 Module Handbook



Download 194.42 Kb.
Date18.08.2018
Size194.42 Kb.
#61832
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences

Version 1



Date 18/11/2013


Module Handbook





Module Name: Social Work Practice 2







Module Code: UZVRBS-40-2







Module Leader Name: Adrian Vatcher / Celia Keeping



2013/14
Aim of the Handbook

This handbook should tell you most of what you need to know about the module but do ask for help if you need it. You should also read the Programme Handbook (available in the programme site on Blackboard) and student information on the UWE website at http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students. It is particularly important that you are aware of the university assessment regulations. Detailed advice on these is available at http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/academicadvice.aspx.

It is your responsibility to ensure that you are familiar with these and know how to hand in work and get your results.

The handbook is a guide for students in the Department of Health and Social Sciences. The information in the handbook can also be found in a number of other electronic or paper sources and the document provides links to the definitive data sources wherever possible.

Please note that the electronic version of the handbook made available on Blackboard will be kept up to date and students will be notified of any significant changes. Paper copies will be distributed to students; and to practice supervisors, educators and tutors. Students should remember to refer back to the electronic version to ensure that you are working with the most up to date information.

Contents


1.Module team contact information 3

2.Module specific information 4

80 day placements start 9

5. Submission and assessment 15

6.Reading strategies 20

7.Communication 21



1.Module team contact information 3

2.Module specific information 4

80 day placements start 9

5. Submission and assessment 15

6.Reading strategies 20

7.Communication 21




  1. Module team contact information


Module Leaders: TEL E-MAIL

Adrian Vatcher 0117 32 88842 Adrian.Vatcher@uwe.ac.uk

Celia Keeping 0117 32 88584 Celia.Keeping@uwe.ac.uk

The module leaders are responsible for the overall running of the module. Students, supervisors and practice educators who have queries arising from individual placements should refer in the first instance to the relevant Practice Tutor (see below). The module leaders can assist if the practice tutor is not available.



Practice Tutors:

Claire Cooper To be advised clairecooper2003@yahoo.co.uk

Gill Ince 0117 32 88766 Gill.Ince@uwe.ac.uk

Celia Keeping 0117 32 88584 Celia.Keeping@uwe.ac.uk

Sarah Leigh 0117 32 88757 Sarah.Leigh@uwe.ac.uk

John O’Gara To be advised jog97green@aol.com

Sue Walton To be advised Susan2.Walton@uwe.ac.uk

Placements Co-ordinator - Social Work:

Sarah Davies 0117 32 88943 Sarah9.Davies@uwe.ac.uk

Sarah is responsible for co-ordinating the matching of students with practice learning opportunities and systems relating to the management of these. Please contact her for information about these processes.

We will communicate regularly with students about progress in matching you to placements and if you need any further information about this you should seek it from the module leaders rather than Sarah. Students who think that a placement offer is problematic in some way should contact their academic tutor (not their practice tutor), or the module leader if they are unavailable.



Social Work Placements General Administrative Assistant:

Kathy McPherson 0117 32 88793 Kathy.Mcpherson@uwe.ac.uk

Please contact Kathy for basic information relating to placements and placement offers. Kathy will send out paper copies of the module handbooks and assessment guidelines, and portfolio binders. She can provide additional copies on request. Kathy will also assist with queries relating to the payment of practice learning fees.

Practice supervisors and educators will find electronic copies of supporting documentation for the placements on our practice support net at http://hsc.uwe.ac.uk/net/mentor/default.aspx and then follow the links to Social Work and Social Work Practice 2.


  1. Module specific information

The formal document providing the academic framework for this module can be found at http://info.uwe.ac.uk/modules/displayentry.asp?code=UZVRBS-40-2&rp=listEntry.asp

This module is centred on your completion of a sustained period of learning in a practice setting. For most students this will be a period of 80 days. For a few students, who have joined the programme at Level 2 and who did not undertake a placement at Level 1, this will be a period of 100 days. Further details of the practice learning timetable are given on page 7.

The practice learning team

Each student will work with a practice educator linked to the placement who will help you think about and develop your practice, and to develop evidence of your practice. If the educator is not themselves based in your placement agency (is ‘off-site’) you will also be linked with an on-site practice supervisor. They should be your first point of reference for any query concerning the operation of the agency and your role as a student within it.

You will also be supported by a practice tutor from the university who will either be your academic tutor or a visiting lecturer. Whichever it is, they will work with you both in this placement and your next one. You, your practice educator and your practice tutor comprise a practice learning team. Assessment of your practice learning is conducted jointly by all members of the team.

Your practice tutor should be the first point of reference for any query about your participation in the module (rather than your role within the agency). If they are unavailable then please direct queries to Celia Keeping or Adrian Vatcher as the module leaders.



Teaching before placement and work-based learning days

As well as a practice placement, the module provides three workshops to help you prepare for it, and three sessions to help you think about the links between research and practice. It is also the location for Level 2 academic tutor groups. Once your placements begin there will be three work-based learning days which will give you an opportunity to share experiences and consolidate learning. You will be encouraged to bring examples of practice to tutor groups. There will also be opportunities to focus on specific practice skills.

We have arranged that the module Refining Skills and Knowledge for Practice will run alongside the first part of the placement. The intention is to help you make

active links between theoretical and practice learning. This means that on three Tuesdays up to the middle of March you will be at the university to take part in that module.



Student support

Academic tutors who are not placement tutors will also be available on work-based learning days, and will continue to be your first point of reference for issues concerning your participation in the wider programme.

If you have an impairment, or consider yourself disabled, you may already have agreed an access plan for placements. An access plan sets out arrangements needed to ensure you have equal access to your practice learning opportunity. If a plan has not already been agreed with you, or if think it should be changed, you should discuss this with your academic tutor or a student adviser well in advance of the placement. Students should let their placement tutor know as soon as possible if their access needs change during the course of the placement with a view to reviewing and revising the action plan. Further advice on disability services at UWE is available at http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/studysupport/disabilityservices.aspx

The programme is aware that students who are carers, black, disabled, gay or lesbian, may experience discrimination or oppression both in the University and in the practice setting. In some practice agencies there are groups where staff can take their concerns about these matters and students may seek to take part in these. The programme is exploring ways to ensure that all students have positive learning opportunities, within the framework of the university’s equality strategy. In the meantime, if students become concerned that they are not being treated fairly in their practice settings, they should discuss this with their practice or academic tutor, or the module leader – whoever they feel most confident in – and they will explore ways to address this.



Blackboard

The module is supported by Blackboard. A selection of materials will be available on the module site as well as links to websites and databases. However, you are expected to search independently for up to date information using web sites, books and journal articles through the library. There is a module discussion board where you can discuss placement experiences with other students and tutors and post useful links and articles to help each other.



Students’ Health and Safety while on Placement

This is a particular concern of the Faculty. Specific consideration should be given to this issue in drawing up the initial practice learning agreement and in arranging induction. You should be advised about:



  • the agency’s general health and safety policy

  • how this applies in the particular setting in which you are placed; and of

  • your own and others’ responsibilities.

In particular you should know what assessment of risk in the practice learning setting has been carried out, and what you should do if you have reason to believe that an aspect of the work carries particular risk.

Please note that the university does not offer students manual handling training and so you should not be asked to undertake any manual handling tasks (which involve the lifting of any heavy or awkward loads, and including physically assisting people to move) unless the agency provides the appropriate training.

The practice learning team is asked to advise the module leader of any injury or accident to the student that occurs during the period of practice learning – including any that the agency would formally record and certainly any that is required to be reported to the Health and Safety Executive under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR).

Difficulties on placement

If there are difficulties on placement that make it difficult for a student to continue the student’s practice tutor or the module leader should be contacted as soon as possible. The notes of guidance on ‘Managing Difficulties’ in the Practice Learning and Assessment Guidelines set out the sorts of difficulties that can occur, the processes for dealing with them and the implications for assessment.



  1. Practice Learning Timetable


Start and finish dates

For students required to complete 80 days of practice learning the placement will normally begin on Monday 24 February 2014 and end on Thursday 10 July 2014.

For students required to complete 100 days of practice learning the placement will normally begin on Wednesday 29 January 2014 and end on Wednesday 23 July 2014.

Students for whom part-time placements are arranged will have placement dates agreed individually with the placement, the practice tutor and the module leader.



Pattern of attendance, teaching sessions at UWE and practice learning days

Apart from the three weeks in which students attend teaching for the module ‘Refining Skills and Knowldege for Practice’ (see below) most students will complete 5 practice learning days each week during the placement. Students completing 100 day placements will attend Wednesday to Friday only from 29 January to 21 February, and in the same pattern as other students after that.

Before the placement starts, the module provides three sessions to help you think about the links between research and practice, and three workshops to help you prepare for it. There will also be 3 work-based learning days at UWE while on placement. The work based learning days are on Tuesday 25 March, 29 April and 3 June. The 3 work-based learning days count as practice learning days.

(The module is also the location for Level 2 academic tutor groups, and you will have an opportunity to meet your academic as well as your practice tutor at the work based learning days.)

Refining Skills and Knowledge for Practice (RS&K) will run alongside the first part of the placement. The intention is to help students make active links between academic and practice learning. This means that you will be at the university to take part in that module on three Tuesdays up to the middle of March. The dates are 4, 11, and 18 March. Teaching days for RS&K will not count as practice learning days.

Students will be required to take part in a short assessment interview for RS&K on either 9, 10 or 11 April. This should not require them to be away from the placement all day. However, as it will be an opportunity for students to link their theoretical and practice learning, the time taken for the interview will count as part of a practice learning day.



Leave days and preparation for RS&K assessment

Students are entitled to take 10 days of leave from the placement in addition to the four bank holidays that fall in the period of the placement. These should be taken by agreement with the placement agency. A further 2 days has been set aside for students to prepare for their assessment interview for RS&K. These will need to be taken before the assessment. Practice supervisors and educators are asked to ensure that students are able to take this leave in good time.



None of these 12 days count as practice learning days

The structure of a practice learning day, workload and study time

Normally you are expected to work hours that are typical in your placement agency and in any case not less than 7 and not more than 7.5 hours per day. Compensation arrangements for days longer than this should be noted on the placement calendar which will be given to you. Any expectation of work at evenings or weekends should be agreed before the start of the placement and identified in the placement learning agreement.

All students are required to undertake at least 200 days of practice learning in order to qualify. It is in relation to a working day of between 7 and 7.5 hours that this requirement is calculated. The programme may be required to provide evidence to regulatory bodies that students complete the required number of days and so students should complete and practice educators should sign the placement calendar clearly indicating how the required number of practice learning days has been achieved.

Your workload should be planned to take account of the fact that you are a student, and ensure that you will have time to prepare for and reflect on practice, as well as practice. You should therefore have reasonable time to research issues relevant to the practice you undertake and to prepare evidence for the portfolio. Exceptionally, it may be appropriate in some circumstances for students to complete this work away from the placement, for example where there is no quiet space available. However, this should be clearly agreed with the practice educator in advance and should generally not be more than half a day each week. There is no entitlement to study leave.

Delayed and interrupted placements

If a student has started their placement late, or for any reason has interrupted their placement, then the tutor and student will need to discuss the situation and work with the module leader to adjust any of the above dates (including submission dates) to ensure equity of treatment. A note of revised dates will be formally recorded and circulated to the practice learning team and other relevant personnel by the module leader.



TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT TIMETABLE FOR

SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE 2 2013 - 2014

Mon 30 September

Library Workshop

Introduction to the module




Tues 8 October


Research Workshop

Academic tutorial groups




Tues 5 November

Year Meeting

Academic tutorial groups




Thurs 5 December


Preparation for placement workshop

Practice tutor groups




Weds 22 January

Research Workshop

Academic tutorial groups




Weds 29 January

100 day placements start

Mon 3 February


Preparation for placement workshop

Year meeting

Preparation for placement workshop


Thurs 20 February


Preparation for placement workshop

Preparation for placement workshop




Mon 24 February

80 day placements start

Tues 25 March


Work based learning

Practice tutor groups




Tues 29 April


Work based learning

Practice tutor groups




6-16 May

Interim reviews (all students)

Tues 3 June


Work based learning

Practice tutor groups




Weds 11 June

Deadline for assignment submission (all students)

Fri 11 July


End of Year Event - Evaluation

GDP groups

Planning for next year


Fri 11 July


Deadline for portfolio submission

(students completing 80 days of practice learning)


Thurs 24 July

Deadline for portfolio submission

(students completing 100 days of practice learning)




4. Assignments

There are two components of assessment for this module.

Component A: Portfolio of practice based work

Component B: Progress file of Personal and Professional Development – 2000 word assignment.

To pass this module you must complete both components.

COMPONENT A: PORTFOLIO OF PRACTICE BASED WORK

You must submit a Portfolio of Practice Learning. The purpose of the portfolio is to help you develop and demonstrate safe and effective practice, and to reflect on your learning, through a collection of evidence which illustrates it. To complete the practice component of this module successfully you must show both in your practice and in the portfolio that you are competent in required units of the National Occupational Standards. When you are in the practice learning setting you will have many opportunities to provide evidence to help you achieve what you need to.

The assessment of your practice skills is a continuous process and you will work together with your practice educator and tutor as part of a practice learning team.

There will be an interim assessment point halfway through the placement and a final evaluation meeting at the end. Detailed guidelines for this component of assessment, marking criteria and the assessment process are provided in the Practice Learning Assessment Guidelines and Resources Handbook.



COMPONENT B: PROGRESS FILE OF PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL

CONTENT

The assignment for this module is a 2000 word critical analysis and evaluation based on a direct observation of your practice that provides:

a) A critical discussion of how you used theory and knowledge to inform, structure and evaluate your practice during this observation.

b) An analysis of the issues which raise ethical complexity (for example service-users’ rights to take risks in their life)

c) A discussion of how you used your professional status, power and authority.

For further guidance please see ‘Questions and Answers’ on page 14 of this handbook.

STRUCTURE

The assignment should be structured under the following headings:



Preparation and context (approx 350 words)

This section should provide a brief outline of the agency and the legal and policy context within which you are working and clarify the relevance of this to the practice being observed. It should also set the context for the piece of practice observed i.e. who the service users or carers are, how long the agency and you have been in contact with them, the purpose of the intervention.



Application of theory and knowledge (approx 650 words)

This section should explain the main theoretical approach you planned to use, why you thought this would be appropriate and how it worked in practice. (In this section we suggest you focus on a specific method of intervention, for example, assessment, crisis intervention, cognitive behavioural theory, group work, empowerment theory etc.)



Evidence of Value base demonstrated through addressing ethical complexity and appropriate use of power and authority (approx 650 words)

In this section you need to explore some of the ethical issues, such as balancing risk and rights, differences in service users’ and carers’ views, needs and expectations of service users in the context of resource constraints and competing legal considerations. It is also crucial to reflect on your values with particular regard to how you used your power and authority, how you supported the empowerment of users and carers, and the way in which user and carer perspectives informed your approach in the situation observed.



Evaluation and conclusion (approx 350 words)

In this section you need to explore how your practice and understanding of yourself as a professional social worker has developed though undertaking and critically analysing this piece of work.



FORMAT

  • Your assignment should be word processed in 1.5 or double line spacing, using 12 point size font.




  • Please put your student number on each page, but do not put your name on your assignment, other than on the top right hand corner of the submission front-sheet. Please number the pages of your work.

REFERENCING

  • You are expected to refer to literature that you have used to inform the discussion in your essay. You should cite the sources in the body of the essay, and include a final reference list. You should use the UWE Harvard Referencing system. A guide to referencing can be found at: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/studysupport/studyskills/referencing.aspx

WORD COUNT

  • You should provide a word count on the title page of your assignment. The word count includes everything in the main body of the text (including headings, tables, citations, quotes, lists, etc). Appendices and reference lists are not included.

  • You can submit work that is 10% over the limit without penalty but if your assignment is over 2,200 words the marker will stop reading once the word limit has been reached and nothing further will be taken into account in the allocation of marks. If your word count is found to be clearly inaccurate it may be treated as an assessment offence. Information about the university policy on word count given at http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/aboutus/policies.aspx

CONFIDENTIALITY

The contents of this assignment should protect the confidentiality of service users and others in keeping with the Faculty advice set out in Appendix 1.



PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism means using the work of others without acknowledging your source. This could be direct copying, paraphrasing without referencing the original source or collusion with a fellow student. Please be aware that plagiarism will always be treated as an assessment offence even if it is done unintentionally. Advice on understanding plagiarism and how to avoid it is available at

http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/studysupport/studyskills/readingandwriting/plagiarism.aspx

READING DRAFTS OF COMPONENT B

Your academic tutor (whether or not they are your practice tutor) may read passages of text or plans of work (amounting to no more than 20% of the word limit – in this case 400 words), in order to support student learning, but they will not normally read whole drafts of work. (“Draft” is taken to indicate a piece of work that is almost finished and has recognisable structure and content)



If you would like to arrange this you need to:

  • Plan if and when you are likely to want feedback and check that your tutor is likely to be available.

  • E-mail your tutor with the section or plan your want them to look at. This needs to be at least 2 weeks before the submission date.

  • Indicate anything your particularly want feedback on e.g. critical analysis, structure etc.

  • Tutors will give feedback with 7 working days.

  • If you know your tutor will not be available contact the module leader.

Further Guidance Component B – Progress file 2000 word assignment

What style of writing should I use and what should I say about myself?

You need to write in the ‘first person’ so use I. You also need to consider your own identity and how, for example, your own gender, age, ethnicity, status impacted on your relationships, in particular, with service users and carers.

Do I need to use references?

Yes, you must include references to theory or any research you undertook to inform your work. A reference list must be attached.

Will the person marking my assignment take into account what is in my portfolio?

NO! It is very important to remember that your assignment will be marked anonymously and by someone who is not familiar with your placement. Your tutor will not be the marker. The assignment needs to stand alone as this is how it will be marked.

Can I draw on other evidence in my portfolio?

If this is helpful yes, for example you might discuss how learning from a previous encounter informed some of your action but do focus on one piece of work. It may also be helpful to refer back to your anti-oppressive action plan when you are looking at the ethical dilemmas.

What support will I have?

Your tutor will be able to read and give feedback on a detailed plan or a section (up to 600 words). You can arrange a face to face or telephone tutorial with your tutor.

Can my practice educator advise?

You will discuss the direct observation with your practice educator and can use the feedback you are given in the assignment to help you evaluate your practice. However, to ensure that students get similar levels of support practice educators are asked not to comment on drafts of the assignment. This is because tutors are fully briefed on the assignment requirements and are more familiar with marking arrangements.

Do I put the assignment in my portfolio?

You can include the assignment in the portfolio or use it to provide additional evidence of your ability to meet any of the key roles. But remember that if you do include this piece of work in your portfolio you must also submit it to UWE separately as advised in this handbook.





5. Submission and assessment


COMPONENT A: PORTFOLIO

Practice Learning Agreement

This should be drafted with your practice educator at the start of the placement and the draft sent to your tutor for comment within three weeks of the placement start.



Interim Review Meeting

The date for this will be individually negotiated in each practice learning team. However, it is likely to take place between Tuesday 6 and Friday 16 May 2014.

Practice tutors will read portfolios before the interim meeting and will bring written feedback on the portfolio evidence to that meeting to help inform the discussion. Your practice tutor will arrange that you submit the portfolio either directly to them or to the Student Administration Team at 2B24 at Glenside for them to collect. Although there is no formal penalty for not submitting a portfolio in advance of the interim meeting, if you do not the meeting may have to be postponed so that your practice tutor can take part properly informed.

Practice educators will have seen evidence as it is being compiled but may also need to see the collection of material you include in the portfolio so please ensure you negotiate time for your practice educator to do this and to complete and sign any relevant forms, before you pass it to your practice tutor.



Final placement evaluation meeting

For students completing 80 days of practice learning the final evaluation meeting should take place between Monday 30 June and Thursday 10 July 2014.

For students completing 100 days of practice learning the final review should take place between Monday 14 July and Wednesday 23 July 2014.

Practice tutors will read portfolios before the final meeting and will bring written feedback on the portfolio evidence to that meeting to help inform the discussion. Your practice tutor will arrange either that you to submit the portfolio directly to them, or to the Student Administration Team at 2B24 at Glenside for them to collect. Although there is no formal penalty for not submitting a portfolio to your tutor in advance of the final review, it is important that you submit the portfolio so that a final review meeting can be held before the final submission deadline.

Practice educators will have seen evidence as it is being compiled but may also need to see the collection of material you include in the portfolio so please ensure you negotiate time for your practice educator to do this and to complete and sign any relevant forms before you pass it to your practice tutor.

Assessment

The practice learning team will seek to agree a pass or fail recommendation at the final meeting. It will usually be clear well in advance of this meeting what this decision is likely to be.

Situations of disagreement will be passed to the Practice Quality Panel for review and comment, following final submission of the portfolio. However, the primary responsibility for this decision rests with the practice learning team.

Only in exceptional circumstances agreed with the practice learning team (for example, where a final observation has had to be rearranged) will it be possible for students to provide additional evidence for the portfolio following the final evaluation meeting.



Final submission

Please note that submission of the portfolio to your practice tutor before the final review is not the final submission of the portfolio for the purposes of university regulations. At final submission the portfolio should include a full record of the final review meeting and the practice learning team’s final assessment decision. Please note that there is no 24 hour late submission window for practice portfolios.



For students completing 80 days of practice learning the deadline for final submission of the portfolio is Friday 11 July 2013 at 14:00

For students completing 100 days of practice learning the deadline for final submission of the portfolio is Thursday 24 July 2013 at 14:00

Portfolios should be submitted by one of the following means:

  • to the Student Administration Team at 2B24 at Glenside;

  • in the red submission box in A Block (or, at weekends, in the Library). If you submit your portfolio in the red boxes, you should put it in a large envelope or bind up the portfolio so that the contents do not fall out as it drops into the box.

  • By posting it to:

The Student Administration Team, Glenside Campus, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, UWE Glenside Campus, Blackberry Hill, BRISTOL BS16 1DD. If you are submitting by post the envelope must have a postmark showing the submission date and you should also have proof of postage.

Delayed and interrupted placements and changes to submission dates

If your placement starts late, or for any reason is interrupted, then you will need to discuss the situation with your tutor and work with the module leader to adjust any of the above dates (including submission dates) to ensure equity of treatment. A note of revised dates will be formally recorded and circulated to the practice learning team and other relevant personnel by the module leader.



Moderation and notification of results

Practice tutors will return all portfolios (including final evaluation forms) to the university after the final meetings and a sample will be read by members of the practice quality panel for moderation. In the light of moderation the Panel may ask the practice learning team to review the decision. This review may consist of a meeting with members of the panel to discuss any issues identified.

A sample of portfolios is sent to the external examiner. Results are then subject to confirmation by the Field and Award Board and a final mark will be released to students via the UWE portal in mid June 2014.

Notification of portfolio results

The decision about component A, your practice and portfolio is made and recorded at the final training team meeting. Written comment on your portfolio will be provided by your practice tutor at that meeting. You will not receive further comments on it. If following moderation by the Practice Quality Panel there are any queries then individual students will be notified. A sample of portfolios is sent to the external examiner. Results are then subject to confirmation by the Field and Award Board and will be released to students via the UWE portal in September.



COMPONENT B: PROGRESS FILE

Form of submission

The assignment should be submitted in paper copy either to the submission boxes in A Block at Glenside, or by post to the Student Administration Team, Room 2B24 Glenside Campus, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Glenside Campus, Blackberry Hill, BRISTOL BS16 1DD. In either case it should be accompanied by a coursework cover sheet available from myUWE. If you download a cover sheet from here, it will include a bar code which will be scanned by the Student Administration Team when they receive it, and will generate an electronic receipt. If you use any other front sheet, you will not receive a receipt.

If you are submitting your coursework in the submission boxes please ensure that the work is secure and placed in a plastic wallet. If you are submitting by post the envelope must have a postmark showing the submission date and you should also have proof of postage showing that it was posted before 2:00 pm on the relevant date.

Submission date

For all students (whether completing 80 or 100 days of practice learning), and who start their placement on time and whose placements have not been interrupted, final submission of the progress file should be made by 2pm on Wednesday 11 June 2014.



Delayed and interrupted placements and changes to submission dates

If your placement starts late, or for any reason is interrupted, then you will need to discuss the situation with your tutor and work with the module leader to adjust the submission dates to ensure equity of treatment. A note of revised dates will be formally recorded and circulated to the practice learning team and other relevant personnel by the module leader. Portfolios and progress files will almost always be submitted at the same time.



Marking criteria

The assignment will be marked using the Departmental marking criteria, which have been introduced in your GDP sessions.

You are expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of relevant law, policy, social work methods and approaches to practice. You also need to show how your practice has been informed by relevant research.

You should also show your awareness of service user and carer perspectives, indicate how you have worked within the HCPC Guidance on Conduct and Ethics for Students, and how you have applied principles of anti-oppressive practice. You should discuss how you have managed the tensions, ethical dilemmas and value conflicts that arise in practice.

You should show that you can critically analyse your practice and apply relevant experience, literature, theory and research to inform your practice. You should show that you are able to critically reflect on and evaluate your personal and professional development.

The assignment should be structured and presented logically and coherently, demonstrating your ability to identify your sources of information. All sources, including policy documents and legislation, must be correctly referenced and noted in the reference list.



Please note that it the marks for this assignment which will contribute to your final degree classification. As this is a 40 credit module this means that it contributes significantly to that classification.

Marks and feedback
Written feedback on the assignment will be provided individually within 20 working days (excluding student vacation periods) following the deadline for submission of the assessment concerned. Where the period is longer than four working weeks students will be informed of the deadline for the provision of feedback and rationale for the extension. Outcomes which have not been confirmed by an examining board shall be considered as provisional.

Date for return of marks and feedback

For assignments submitted on 11 June, feedback will be available for collection from Glenside reception on 9 July 2014. Dates for return of marks for assignments with later submission dates will be communicated to you separately.


MyUWE is used to communicate provisional marks, provide cover sheets for assessments and to submit work.
  1. Reading strategies


As each practice learning situation is different you will need to talk with your practice educator about reading that is particularly useful for your practice learning in relation to the setting you are in. All the books that are on the list for Refining Skills for Knowledge and Practice and the chapters and articles that were provided are very relevant for this module too. In addition the reading lists provided in other module hand will be useful. However there are some books that you may like to buy:

Adams, R. Dominelli, L & Payne, M (eds) (2009) Social Work: Themes, Issues and Critical Debates (2nd edition) Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan

Adams, R. Dominelli, L & Payne, M (eds) (2009) Critical Practice In Social Work Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan

Adams, R. Dominelli, L. and Payne, M. (eds) (2009) Practising social work in a complex world

Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. 2nd ed.

Banks, S. (2006) Ethics and Values in Social Work (3rd edition) Basingstoke, palgrave macmillan

Beckett, C (2006) Essential Theory for Social Work Practice London, Sage

Braye, S. & Preston-Shoot, M. (2009) Practising Social Work Law Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan

Brown, K and Rutter, L (2006) Critical Thinking for Social Work Exeter, Learning Matters

Doel, M (2005) Using Groupwork London, Routledge

Jones, K. Cooper, B. and Ferguson, H. (2008) Best Practice in Social Work: Critical Perspectives Basingstoke: Palgrave

Lishman, J (ed) (2007) Handbook for Practice Leaning in Social Work and Social Care: Knowledge and Theory London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

Lomax, R. Jones, K., Leigh, S. and Gay, C. (2010) Surviving your Social Work Placement Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan

Long, L. Roche, J. & Stringer, D (2010) The Law and Social Work: Contemporary Issues for Practice (2nd edition) Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan in association with Open University Press

Payne, M (2005) Modern Social Work Theory 3rd ed, Lyceum Books

Seden, J (2005) Counselling Skills in Social Work Practice Buckingham, Open University Press

Thompson, N. (2011) Promoting Equality: Working with Diversity and Difference Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan

Thompson, N, 92010) Theorising Social Work Practice Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan

Trevithick, P. (2005) Social Work Skills: A Practice Handbook Buckingham, Open University Press

Wilson, K. Ruch, G. Lymbery, M. Cooper, A. (2011) Social Work: An introduction to contemporary practice (2nd edition) Harlow, Prentice Hall

It is also important to keep up to date with law and practice issues. The two journals that are most easily accessible are Community Care and Care and Health. Social Care on line is useful to find up to date research on specific topics include http://www.scie-socialcareonline.org.uk/search.asp

The British Journal of Social Work and the Journal of Social Work Education can be accessed on line through the UWE library catalogue.


  1. Communication


Throughout your time with us, you will receive regular communication from your module leaders, and also administrative staff, and it is your responsibility to ensure that you read everything that you are sent, and act upon it where appropriate.

The main communication channel used is the Blackboard for all the modules you are currently studying. Blackboard provides the main communication channel for module specific information and these too should be checked regularly for new content and announcements.

Please see http://info.uwe.ac.uk/myUWE/guidance/default.asp for further information on all aspects of your myUWE portal.

APPENDIX 1: MAINTAINING CONFIDENTIALITY IN ASSESSMENTS & ACADEMIC SETTINGS
The Confidentiality National Health Service Code of Practice (DH 2003) services all professional regulatory bodies. It provides guidance to the NHS and related organisations on patient confidentiality issues. Its intention is to present a consistent message on issues around the processing of patient information. Specific regulatory professional bodies also give clear statements in their codes of conduct on the importance of maintaining confidentiality (NMC 2008; HCPC 2008).

Looking after the information you hold about patients - If you handle and store information about identifiable, living people – for example, about patients – you are legally obliged to protect that information. Information Commissioner’s Office ICO (2009)

It is important that health and social care students undertaking an educational programme that will lead them to professional registration are aware of the codes that will govern them once qualified as registered practitioners. Confidentiality is an essential element of the codes of conduct that govern and protect the public (NMC 2008: HCPC 2008). The School of Health and Social Care at UWE considers it vital that students are conscious of the importance of maintaining confidentiality in the practice settings, in assessed work and on university sites. All students must recognise that they may be privy to confidential information and that any information or confidence must not be disclosed in the public domain, unless you are concerned someone may be at risk of harm (NMC 2008; HCPC 2008). It is important that students recognise that in any work submitted (assignments; projects; case studies; portfolios; presentations; examinations; reports) and in class based reflections that they must not identify any person or organisation.



A breach of confidentiality is the inclusion of names images or registration details e.g. hospital number in student work (including appendices) that would allow an individual or area to be identified. This includes service users, carers, colleagues or organisations.

Exceptions to these would be signatures of clinical staff who sign official documentation for students in placement areas. Acknowledgement of staff who have supported students in either the workplace or university (as long as names only are included, not job title or workplace) or family/friends.

As your programme of study ask that student’s link theory to practice and practice to theory, discussions and assessments are often based on real events and people.

To avoid a breach of confidentiality


  • Use of pseudonyms (which should be identified as such) and generalised terms e.g. social worker, nurse, health centre, practice area, young man.

  • Avoid the inclusion of documentation, either original or photocopied, that might reveal the identity of an individual or organisation e.g., referral letters, medical imaging records, assessment records, prescription charts, unless these are anonymised

  • (Exceptions to this are documents or cases that are now in the public domain e.g. Baby ‘P’; Shipman enquires).

  • Remove names on x ray films or other imaging records; use blank charts or pseudonyms on charts.

Frequently asked questions

Q Can I refer to agency documentation?



A Only if it is in the public domain

Q I want to reflect on/share an experience from my placement in class can I do this.



A Yes you can discuss your placement experiences as long as you do not identity the area or client, you will also need to adhere to the ground rules agreed at the beginning of the session, module or programme.

Q Can I print off discussion from online discussion boards such as Blackboard?



A Without the agreement of the group this would be a breach in the groups confidentiality, group name and individual names would need to be anonymised

Q How can I anonymise my work?



A Identifying headings and names should be physically or electronically removed. Simply blacking out with for example a marker pen often allows the identifying to remain discernible.

Q My group wants to set up a group on a social networking site.

A Social networking sites such as Face book and my Space are all in the public domain and you could be breaching expected standards of behaviour if posting inappropriate comments about placements, colleagues.

The School of Health and Social Care considers all breaches of confidentiality to be serious and as a result will take the following action:



First Occasion: Once a serious breach of confidentiality has been noted the marker should report this to the personal tutor and module leader, email to be sent to student requesting a meeting to discuss the breach, breach documented in student feedback and account of meeting held in student file. Dependent on the perceived seriousness of the breach it may be referred to the professional suitability panel this decision will be made by the Head of Department.

Second Occasion: Once a second serious breach of confidentiality has been noted the marker should report this to the personal tutor and module leader, email to be sent to student requesting a further meeting to discuss the breach, breach documented in student feedback and account of meeting held in student file. Breach documented in student file, discussion of the breach referred to professional suitability panel, breach documented in student file.

References:



  • ICO (2009) Data protection – looking after the information you hold about patients, Available online, http://www.ico.gov.uk accessed 11.11.09

  • Department of Health (2003) Confidentiality code of practice London

  • Health and Care Professions Council (2008) Standards of conduct, performance and ethics London

  • Nursing Midwifery Council (2008) Standards of conduct, performance and ethics for nurses and midwives London




Version 5.1 26/06/13


Download 194.42 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©www.sckool.org 2023
send message

    Main page