Writing Center Application



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Writing Center Application

Submit to the writing center front desk (Library 220) or via email (writing@plu.edu) by 5pm Friday, Nov 13th


Name __________________ Date ____________ Email ________________ Phone _______________

Education

Year in school __________ Hours completed ( ) Major(s) ____________________________


Cum. GPA ________ GPA in Major(s) _________ Vocational Objective ________________
Do you plan to graduate from PLU? __________ Expected Graduation Date ___________
List writing courses you have taken and, if a PLU course, provide the instructor’s name:

______________________________________________________________________________________

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Personal Information

List extracurricular activities in which you plan to participate during the school year:


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Will you be holding any jobs during the school year? If so, please explain:

Currently, WC consultants work between four and twelve hours per week, though needs could change. What range of hours would you be willing to work? Min: Max:


Note: all consultants are required to take EDUC 497 (Rogers) for 0-1 credit hours. This course will support training and development. Additionally, new consultants will have orientation and training obligations throughout the semester.
Work Experience (Please list all relevant work experience.)
Employer Phone Type of Work
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Have you used the Writing Center for your own work?

Please provide the name of one PLU faculty reference who can attest to your writing abilities:
Do you have high level proficiency writing in a PLU offered foreign language? If so, please attach a short statement about your language experience, as well as the name of a PLU language faculty reference. Foreign language proficiency is not a requirement for employment in the PLU Writing Center.

Writing Center Application (continued)
Please submit the following materials in a folder with this sheet on top (this side face down):
A. Submit two pieces of academic writing from college coursework that total no more than 15 pages. The pieces should reflect your writing at the university level. At least one piece should incorporate source material and coordinate that material with a reference or Works Cited page. Please include a description of the assignment with each piece of writing.

B. Please type a brief essay (1-2 double-spaced pages) telling us about your tutoring or counseling experiences (if any, formal or informal), your reasons for applying for this position, the contribution you can make to the Writing Center, and any other information that will help us understand your qualifications.

C. The Writing Center prioritizes higher order writing issues, meaning we will address a paper’s sense of purpose before its style and correctness. To give us a sense of how you understand writing and how you will give feedback, we want you to imagine that someone has brought you the attached draft and asked you for help in revising it. The draft was written in response to the Writing 101 assignment provided below. Begin by carefully reading the assignment and draft. In one or two double-spaced, typed pages, explain how you would approach a conference with the writer of this paper. Do not mark comments on the draft; however, you may mark specific places in the draft with numbers and/or letters to make it easy to refer to them.


Watchmen Essay Assignment

Make an assertion about the graphic novel Watchmen and support it using the theory of comics presented by Scott McCloud in Understanding Comics.


For this assignment, you must:

  • Support your claim using a clear explanation of some part of McCloud’s theory of comics and specific examples from Watchmen. You may draw on other outside texts for support if you wish, but this is not required.

  • Be sure that your claim is specific enough that support from these two sources will be sufficient to make your case. Be sure the claim is insightful enough to require explanation and support but not so far fetched that it cannot be persuasive.

  • Write 3-5 pages in MLA Style (with Works Cited page) in 12pt. Times New Roman font. Images used for support should not be counted as part of your length.



D. Please rewrite the following paragraph with corrections:
I read three essays four articles and a whole book man was I tired of researching. My teacher, Dr. smith, wanted us to write what he called an annotated bibliography a very boring thing to do. For each source not just the articles I had to explain how I would use them and I had to summarize it also. Well I was in Portland Oregan at the time believe me it wasn’t easy staying focused on work. Because they wanted me to go out and play Frisbee with them my friends kept say get your nose out of that book.
Watchmen Essay

In the graphic novel, Watchmen, you can get a lot out of the story by images substituting for words. Moore and Gibbons do a great job of formatting the right text with the connected imagery to describe what is going on in the story. After spending time in the book, Understanding Comics, by Scott McCloud, it really showed me the hard work that Moore and Gibbons went through in order to make such a successful graphic novel. McCloud demonstrates that comics aren’t just sequences of pictures with words thrown into bubbles but it’s an art, and often is more difficult than just writing everything out like a normal novel. He tells us how pictures and words can be combined to make something very special.

A particular part in chapter 2, pages 14 through 15 in Watchmen caught my interest in as to where the scene could not have been described with the same intensity or meaning if it were to just use words. Nor if Moore and Gibbons didn’t use the techniques explained by McCloud in Understanding Comics. When Blake fires his weapon at a pregnant woman, Jon says “Blake, don’t…” then it switches to the next panel and it’s zoomed in at Blake’s gun that is being fired and Jon says hopelessly “…Do it.” (Moore and Gibbons 14-15 Chp. 2).

When the author zooms and focuses in on something, it tips the reader off that there is something important about that object and/or something with that object either is or is about to happen. “You coulda changed the gun into Murcury or the bottle into smowflakes! You coulda teleported either of us to goddamn Australia…but you didn’t lift a finger! You don’t really give a damn about human beings…you’re driftin’ outta touch, Doc.” (Moore and Gibbons 15, Chp. 2). This is after the seen where Blake shoots the pregnant woman and he tells Jon that he was just as much to blame as he was for the woman and her baby’s death. This is when you start to see that Jon is losing interest in human beings.



Jon is originally a human scientist who turns into a blue, Godlike alien named Dr. Manhattan. As a human scientist he falls in love with Janey Slater. One day Jon gets stuck in the I.F. chamber and gets electrocuted into pieces. He returns to Janey as a blue superhuman the ability to do just about anything. He leaves Janey and begins seeing a girl named Laurie. In chapter three on page five in Watchmen Jon duplicates himself so his attention can be focused on work while pleasing Laurie. Laurie figures out what he is doing and leaves him. Dr. Manhattan loses touch with the human experience and begins to lose compassion for them. There is proof that he loses compassion for people when he doesn’t stop Blake from murdering the pregnant woman mentioned earlier. In chapter nine, Laurie and him go to Mars and he forgets that humans cant breath with no oxygen. It’s true that pictures speak louder than words as Laurie lands on Mars and struggles to breathe on pages two and three in chapter 9. In chapter six of Understanding Comics McCloud talks about showing and telling. He explains that pictures and art shouldn’t have to be two totally separate things when we read or write, and in fact he says “the earliest word’s were, in fact, stylized pictures.” (McCloud 142). He talks about balancing out the purpose of words and pictures. He shows a chart on page 147 in chapter six about the picture plane. Pictures are used for resemblance much more than for meaning. When writing comics we should try to push the purpose of pictures further away from just resemblance and closer toward meaning. When Laurie and Jon travel to Mars, there is no words said, but before anyone says anything is, we already know what the conflict is. This supports McCloud’s point that he makes about words being interpreted for meaning and resemblance. Jon heals Laurie and gives her the ability to breathe. They begin to talk and Jon starts to finish Laurie’s sentences and thoughts. She gets frustrated and they progress to talk about humanity. It gets to the point where Laurie is asking him if it even bothers him that there is possibly going to be nuclear warfare that could make the human population extinct. Jon responds, “All of pain and conflict done with? All that needless suffering over at last? No…no that doesn’t bother me.” (Moore and Gibbons 10, Chp. 9). My red world here means more to me than your blue one.” (Moore and Gibbons 9, Chp. 9).

The main point of all of this is that Watchmen is a great book and proven by McCloud, an extraordinary work of art. The way that it is written lines up in key areas of Scott McCloud’s points in Understanding Comics is something to take note of. Jon or Dr. Manhattan turns from a caring young scientist into a Godlike American hero, than into a Villon that the world must unite and try to fight. Jon was never really a Villon but he does become less caring toward the human race. He was manipulated and tricked into believing that he had caused all these people harm and it would be interesting to know if that was a big reason why it seemed he didn’t care for the human race anymore or if it was a scientific matter that was determined in the I.F. chamber. I think Jon believed it was scientific and no one could out smart him but in the end he realizes that it would be best for him to leave earth because it was the only way to solve the peoples peace problems. Jon and his uniqueness along with many other original characters used in Watchmen is one of the reasons this book is so successful. After reading McCloud’s Understanding Comics I have a new appreciation for Watchmen, and now have the building blocks of what it takes to write a successful comic.

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