Windward Community College Self-Evaluation Report of Educational Quality and Institution Effectiveness


Standard II.B Student Support Services



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Standard II.B Student Support Services


The institution recruits and admits students who are able to benefit from the college programs that are consistent with its mission. Student support services address the identified needs of students and enhance a supportive learning environment. The entire student pathway through the institutional experience is characterized by a concern for student access, progress, learning, and success. The institution systematically assesses student support services using student learning outcomes, faculty and staff input, and other appropriate measures in order to improve the effectiveness of these services.
II.B.1. The institution assures the quality of student development and support services and demonstrates that these services, regardless of location or means of delivery, enhance achievement of the mission of the institution and support student learning.

Descriptive Summary:

For the credit division, all student support services are located and available during the day on the Kāne‘ohe campus. Online registration is available to students. Admissions and Records, Financial Aid may only be available during the day on-campus, but tutoring services (Ref. 2B-1), depending on the subject may now be available 24/7. Evening and online students have e-mail and phone access to counseling and advising services. In Fall 2012, an online counseling initiative will be piloted in our Hūlili cohort utilizing Elluminate. Testing is available Mondays and Tuesdays until 6 p.m., and on Wednesdays and Thursdays until 8 p.m. At the Windward Mall, on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, admissions counseling, registration, and financial aid applications are available to the community as part of the “One Stop” endeavor. This Achieving the Dream (AtD) initiative is closely aligned to the UH System (Ref. 2B-2), UHCC System (Ref. 2B-3), and Windward CC Strategic Plans (Ref. 2B-4) that address financial aid access, developmental education, persistence, course completion, and student success. The Financial Aid Outreach initiative aligns with action outcome measures for the Windward CC Strategic Plan 1.2 and 2.2 to increase access to financial aid.


Previously, the College had not been as successful with getting financial aid and course information to non-traditional students, especially in the Kahuku and Waimānalo communities. The College developed an initiative to deliver financial aid services in areas where the community congregates like Windward Mall. Student Affairs established a “One-Stop” Financial Aid Center at the Mall, in partnership with Kamehameha Schools, to provide financial aid assistance and to help with filling out the FAFSA forms on Fridays from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.; on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. One professional staff member and one Peer Mentor staff the site. TRiO SSS further started Saturday outreach activities in Waimānalo to provide access to financial aid, admissions, and counseling for this area. Both these initiatives are present during peak demand periods for admissions, registration, and financial aid application.
An increase in students (Ref. 2B-5) as well as an increase in financial aid applications processed appears to be the direct result of this outreach effort. The effort and resulting increases have affected staffing needs, particularly in the Financial Aid Office, and in the hiring of an Outreach Coordinator.
The Credit Student Affairs Division is directed by the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs through a management team consisting of all unit heads, a student, and a clerical representative. Student Affairs is composed of eight sub-departments: Admissions and Records (Ref. 2B-6), Counseling and Advising (Ref. 2B-7), Financial Aid (Ref. 2B-8), Outreach (Ref. 2B-9, p. 11), Student Life (Ref. 2B-10), Educational Talent Search (Ref. 2B-11), TRiO Student Support Services (Ref. 2B-12), and TRiO Upward Bound (Ref. 2B-13). It supports the mission of the College by supporting and challenging individuals to develop skills, fulfill their potential, enrich their lives, and become contributing, culturally-aware members of the community. In 2006, the College agreed to participate in the AtD initiative, and Student Affairs developed four comprehensive strategies to improve student success: New Student Orientation (Ref. 2B-14), Supplemental Instruction (Ref. 2B-15), Learning Communities (Ref. 2B-16), and Frosh Camp (Ref. 2B-17) all discussed in Standard II.A above.
Supplemental Instruction (SI) serves students in targeted AtD gatekeeper courses, historically difficult courses with high enrollment and pass rates less than 70 percent. Through academic support, SI is intended to increase retention rates and improve student grades in these targeted courses, thereby increasing graduation rates. SI is a proactive, early intervention as distinct from tutoring which follows the recognition of a deficit in learning. It provides academic support through peer facilitated group study sessions.
SI-Windward CC served 22 gatekeeper courses in six different subject areas for the Fall 2010 semester (Ref. 2B-18, p. 18). An evaluation of its effectiveness looked at attendance, frequency, and final grades. The process used in the evaluation started with a list of average pass rates maintained by the Office of Institutional Research (OIR) for five years, ending in 2007. Concurrent courses were then compared as long as the same instructor taught them. These Fall 2010 data suggest that SI has had an impact on student success, in that students were more likely to get a “C” or better if they attend an SI session (Ref. 2B-18, p. 41). Further analysis is needed to determine whether the SI factor is directly responsible in aiding student success (Ref. 2B-19).
The institution also addressed the criteria for this standard through its Student Affairs 2010 Annual Assessment (Ref. 2B-9) submitted in December 2010, its Student Affairs Five-Year Program Review (Ref. 2B-20) covering the academic years 2004 to 2008, and its Achieving the Dream Implementation Plan (Ref. 2B-21) dated May 14, 2008. All units have made significant progress in meeting their respective goals.
Program Review policies and procedures are in place. The Program Review evaluative process includes process outcomes to enhance non-instructional departmental assessment as well as student satisfaction surveys and faculty/staff satisfaction surveys. Current reports are available on the College website (Ref. 2B-22). Student Affairs will continue to participate in these evaluative processes.
Additionally, the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs holds quarterly meetings for the entire Student Affairs staff. These meetings provide the occasion for an informed sharing of information and the implementation of strategies for improvement. Evaluative data from additional surveys and/or information from the College’s OIR as well as statewide data are also used. Results are presented to staff members for use in improving programs and planning for future services.
Admissions and Records (A&R) met its goals of increasing the number of requests and applications processed, receiving an 88 percent Satisfaction Rate based on its survey of Frosh Camp participants (Ref. 2B-9, p. 3). A&R is committed to assess and review its procedure to improve the efficiency of its operation. A&R continues to process admissions applications, transcript requests, graduation certification, and enrollment verification within two weeks (Ref. 2B-9, p. 4). It complies consistently with the Department of Health (DOH) Post-Secondary School Health Requirements (Ref. 2B-23) that are legally required for students who register and attend classes.
Academic Advising/Counseling met its goals (Ref. 2B-9, pp. 5-6) of providing students with pre-admission services and advising, empowering students to navigate successfully through their academic programs, and providing services to enable students to further their educational career endeavors. The unit is involved with New Student Orientation, Learning Communities, Supplemental Instruction, and Tutoring. Based on the satisfaction surveys compiled by the Counseling Department, 93 percent of students who met with a counselor were satisfied with the information and services received (Ref. 2B-9, p. 6). The only goal not met was that of meeting with every student, which may not be attainable. According to the Student Affairs 2010 Annual Assessment, 1861 students, or two-thirds of the total enrollment, met with a counselor (Ref. 2B-9, p. 5).
The Career Center (Ref. 2B-24) offers various services to assist students to explore, define, and pursue their career goals. The center and these services were staffed by one counselor until 2010. A comprehensive career assessment, counseling, and job placement program is needed to augment the career exploration component provided to a reported 300 students (Ref. 2B-9, p. 8). In 2009-2010, the slow economy and rising unemployment rate in the state contributed to an increase of students seeking these services. Fortunately, in 2010, the College received an additional position from the closure of ETC to expand the Career Center and its services, adding a job placement service and a physical space for the CareerCenter on campus.
The Financial Aid Office Survey (Ref. 2B-25, pp. 1-2) in 2009-2010 indicated that 95 percent of students found overall satisfaction with the service they received (Ref. 2B-9, p. 10), an increase from the 83 percent reported in 2007. In 2010-2011, 92.3 percent of students found overall satisfaction, a slight drop from the previous year (Ref. 2B-26, p. [16]). Five of the six goals of the Financial Aid Office were successfully attained; however, processing time for applications took from 3-25 days, not meeting the goal of processing being completed within two weeks of receipt of application (Ref. 2B-9, p. 10). However, in 2010-11, only four of the six goals were successfully attained and processing time for applications took from 5 – 35 days. Clearly, the additional FAFSA applications processed and additional awards given are having an impact (Ref. 2B-26, pp. [15-16]).
According to the annual performance report submitted on November 5, 2010, for the 2009-2010 year (Ref. 2B-9, pp. 14-15), Educational Talent Search (ETS) services met all five performance objectives and both goals by serving 600 students per grant and serving at least 67 percent of low-income, first generation college students. Student Support Services (SSS) met all US Department of Education objectives for 2008-2009, and preliminarily for 2009-2010 (Ref. 2B-9, pp. 15-16).
Upward Bound (UB) services are delivered on an individual basis and/or group setting to students in grades 9-12 to instill the skills and motivation necessary to complete high school and enroll in college. An Annual Performance Report submitted on or before December 17, 2010, for the 2009/2010 program year met four of five goals. The exception was goal 5, which stated that 60 percent of students who enrolled in college by fall immediately following high school graduation continued to be enrolled in fall of their second college year as only 44 percent met this goal (Ref. 2B-9, p. 17).
Until its dissolution in December 2010, the Employment Training Center (ETC) Student Services program served non-credit students, and was coordinated by an ETC Counselor in a rotated position under the supervision of the Director of Vocational and Community. ETC counselors were assigned to specific programs to provide: Admissions counseling; registration, career, academic and personal counseling; self-development and work-readiness workshops and seminars; internships and job placement services. Counselors performing these services have been re-assigned to Student Affairs functions.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

The College will initiate a comprehensive career assessment, counseling, and job placement program for all credit and non-credit programs.

II.B.2. The institution provides a Course Catalog for its constituencies with precise, accurate, and

current information concerning the following:
a. General Information


  • Official Name, Address(es), Telephone Number(s) and Website Address of the

  • Institution

  • Educational Mission

  • Course, Program, and Degree Offerings

  • Academic Calendar and Program Length

  • Academic Freedom Statement

  • Available Student Financial Aid

  • Available Learning Resources

  • Names and Degrees of Administrators and Faculty

  • Names of Governing Board Members


b. Requirements

  • Admissions

  • Student Fees and Other Financial Obligations

  • Degree, Certificates, Graduation and Transfer


c. Major Policies Affecting Students

  • Academic Regulations, including Academic Honesty

  • Nondiscrimination

  • Acceptance of Transfer Credits

  • Grievance and Complaint Procedures

  • Sexual Harassment

  • Refund of Fees


d. Locations or publications where other policies may be found

Descriptive Summary:

Precise, accurate, and current information is provided in the Windward CC Course Catalog and the former Employment Training Center Course Catalog. As in the past, pertinent information is provided in the College’s Course Catalog, available both in print and online (Ref. 2B-27).


The College’s official name, address, phone number and web address appear on the first page of the Course Catalog, preceding the Table of Contents.  The mission statement and information on accreditation are also included on page 2 (Ref. 2B-28, p. 2).  Specific information on the accrediting agency, such as contact information for complaints, etc., is not currently listed in the Course Catalog, but will be provided in future Course Catalogs to comply with new Department of Education (US DOE) regulations.  Lists of the BOR (Ref. 2B-28, p. 1) and UH System Administrators (Ref. 2B-28, p. 1), along with College Administration (Ref. 2B-28, p. 1), Faculty and Staff (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 112-115), including degrees earned, are also provided.
The Course Catalog contains information primarily for the credit program.  Current, accurate information is provided about courses (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 48-111), degree programs and certificate offerings (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 27-29), and learning resources (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 14-17).  An updated academic calendar (Ref. 2B-28, p. [i]), including program length information, is included.  Admission requirements (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 7-9), financial information regarding tuition (Ref. 2B-28, p. 10), fees (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 10-11), refund policies (Ref. 2B-28, p. 11), and financial aid (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 12-13), as well as graduation (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 31-33) and transfer information (Ref. 2B-28, p. 30) are outlined.
Major policies such as academic regulations, including academic dishonesty (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 20-21), non-discrimination (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 3-4), acceptance of transfer credits (Ref. 2B-28, p. 24), sexual harassment (Ref. 2B-28, p. 5), and grievance and complaint procedures (Ref. 2B-28, p. 21) are also provided.  
Files on formal student grievances are kept in the Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Academic Affairs, depending on the type of grievance, and are readily available to authorized persons. Authorized persons include all that are involved in the Student Academic Grievance Procedures (Ref. 2B-29); the person filing the grievance, the person the grievance is being filed against, the respective Dean - if applicable, the respective Vice Chancellor, the Academic Grievance Committee - if applicable, and the Chancellor). Grievances that include student record information are further subject to FERPA guidelines. Memorandum regarding FERPA (Ref. 2B-30) and the Confidentiality of Student Records states “In order to access a student’s education record, you must have a legitimate educational record to fulfill your professional responsibility. Curiosity or personal interest does NOT constitute a legitimate educational need to know.” Administrative Procedure A7.022 (Ref. 2B-31, 4.d.) defines “Education Record.” Files include grievances from all Windward CC students, traditional and distance learning (DL).  Since 2006, two formal student grievances have been filed at Windward CC in early 2012.
Some campus policies are not included in the Course Catalog; however, Administration Governance (Ref. 2B-32), Chartered Groups (Ref. 2B-33), Organization Governance (Ref. 2B-34), Planning Governance (Ref. 2B-35), Strategic Planning (Ref. 2B-36), Budgeting (Ref. 2B-37), Assessment, Program Review (Ref. 2B-38), Mission Policy (Ref. 2B-39), Personnel Policies (Ref. 2B-40), Physical Facilities (Ref. 2B-41), Library (Ref. 2B-42), Copyright Guidelines (Ref. 2B-43), UHCC Policies (Ref. 2B-44), Curriculum Procedures (Ref. 2B-45), Sabbatical Leave Procedures (Ref. 2B-46), and past Chancellor for Community Colleges Memos (CCCMs) (Ref. 2B-47) are easily accessible for students, as they can be found on the College’s website (Ref. 2B-48).
The College Course Catalog is printed on a biannual basis, but is reviewed and electronically updated on an annual basis.  The review process is an informal process that includes discussion and input from the administration, deans, directors, department chairs, and faculty.  These individuals update policies, curriculum, and calendar items within their area.
In addition to the Course Catalog, the College publishes each academic year, in print and online, a Schedule of Classes (SOC; Ref. 2B-49) for its credit programs.  It includes admission information (Ref. 2B-49, p. 2), academic calendar (Ref. 2B-49, p. 2), registration information (Ref. 2B-49, p. 3), tuition payment and refund policy (Ref. 2B-49, pp. 4-5), course schedule information (Fall schedule [Ref. 2B-49, pp. 7-38], Spring schedule [Ref. 2B-49, pp. 41-66]), course descriptions (Ref. 2B-49, pp. 68-84), exam schedule for Fall [Ref. 2B-49, p. 39] and Spring [Ref. 2B-49, p. 67]), graduation and persistence rates (Ref. 2B-49, p. [85]), and a campus map (Ref. 2B-49, p. [86]).
All Windward CC policies, procedures, and fees apply to both traditional students and distance learning students. Windward CC does not differentiate between traditional and DL students.  Basic information on DL has been provided in all Course Catalogs and Schedules of Classes (Ref. 2B-50) dating back to 2001, with more detailed information more recently becoming available on the College's (Ref. 2B-51) and the UH System’s (Ref. 2B-52) websites.  With DL now playing such a big role at Windward CC, more detailed information on DL will be added to future College Course Catalogs.
Online DL information includes a brief description of online education (Ref. 2B-51); registration information (Ref. 2B-6); first steps (including a pre-assessment to see if students are ready for online learning [Ref. 2B-53], student orientation for online learning [Ref. 2B-54], and books and supplies information [Ref. 2B-55]); Laulima learning guides (Ref. 2B-56); technology resources (Ref. 2B-57); and phone numbers and e-mail addresses of Windward CC and UH System computer support and the Library reference desk (located on the right hand side of the main Online Learning page [Ref. 2B-51]). A listing of online classes, class dates, and the instructor’s name (Ref. 2B-58) are also included.
In addition to the information that can be found in the College Course Catalog, Schedule of Classes, and online, an information packet is also mailed to all DL students prior to the start of the semester in which they enroll.  This information packet includes a welcome letter (Ref. 2B-59), a list of things they should know (Ref. 2B-60), a list of important web pages (Ref. 2B-61), steps to log in to Laulima, the UH System course management system, (Ref. 2B-62), and instructions (Ref. 2B-63) on how to forward UH System e-mail to another e-mail account.
The student survey (Ref. 2B-64), conducted in Fall 2011, shows that 91 percent of students rated the clarity of the Course Catalog as excellent or satisfactory, compared to 77 percent of students in the Fall 2005 survey. Ninety-two percent rated the clarity of policies and procedures for registration as excellent or satisfactory, compared to 80 percent of students in the Fall 2005 survey.
In the non-credit area, prior to the dissolution of the ETC program, ETC published an Employment Training Center Course Catalog in print and online (Ref. 2B-65). The ETC Course Catalogs (Ref. 2B-65), which date back to 2006 for this reporting period, included its official name (Ref. 2B-66, p. [iii]), address (Ref. 2B-66, p. [iii]), telephone number (Ref. 2B-66, p. [iii]), the names and phone numbers of the Center’s administrators (Ref. 2B-66, p. 1), faculty and staff (Ref. 2B-66, p. 1), mission statement (Ref. 2B-66, p. [ii]), and a location maps (Ref. 2B-66, p. [36]).  Current, accurate information was provided about courses and programs (Ref. 2B-66, pp. 5-27).  A testing schedule for the Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE; Ref. 2B-66, pp. 31-32), as well as state holidays and non-instructional days (Ref. 2B-66, p. [ii]) were also included. ETC’s Course Catalog was reviewed, updated, and published annually.  The annual review process was an informal process that included discussion and input from ETC instructors, counselors, coordinators, and staff.
Career and Community Education (CCE) produces a non-credit Course Catalog in print and online (Ref. 2B-67). Information provided in the Course Catalog includes course information (course descriptions, dates and times, costs, and instructors), registration information, refund policies, and important changes to the program. Information on Ready Set Grow Hawai‘i is also included in the Course Catalog. In addition to the Course Catalog, information is available online (Ref. 2B-68).

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.  



Planning Agenda:

The Office of Academic Affairs will include accrediting agency contact information for grievances and other purposes in future Course Catalogs.


The Office of Academic Affairs will include more detailed information on Distance Learning in future Course Catalogs.
The Offices of Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, and Administrative Services, and the Marketing and Public Relations Office will create a formal review process for the Credit Course Catalog.
II.B.3. The institution researches and identifies the learning support needs of its student

population and provides appropriate services and programs to address those needs.

Descriptive Summary:

The institution provides a variety of support services to all students through a wide range of lab spaces and specialized tutoring centers, the most comprehensive of which will be the Ka Piko (Ref. 2B-69) Learning Center, which is envisioned as a “one stop” office that provides students with support in counseling, financial aid, and tutoring. Temporarily housed in the Hale ‘Ākoakoa building, the Ka Piko Center will move to the Library Learning Commons when it opens in Fall 2012. It currently houses the Center Coordinator, a Career Adviser, and the Writing Center.



Supplemental Instruction (SI; Ref. 2B-70) began at the institution as an Achieving the Dream initiative in 2006 (Ref. 2B-71). Since then, SI has been offered at the institution in combination with courses that have been identified as gatekeeper (Ref. 2B-72) or historically difficult courses. Under this model, student employees responsible for providing academic support are assigned to specific classes and meet regularly with instructors so that students’ support sessions coordinate with their classroom instruction. In Spring 2010, the most recent semester in which data on this service are available, 323 students at the College were offered SI sessions, 204 made use of those sessions, and of those, 184 or 90.2 percent received a C grade or better in their SI courses (Ref. 2B-9, p. 9).
TRiO Student Support Services (SSS; Ref. 2B-12), a federally funded TRiO project, serves students who have academic support needs to persist in college from semester to semester, to maintain good academic standing, to improve their financial and economic literacy, to graduate with a certificate or associate degree, and to transfer to a four-year institution (Ref. 2B-73). Federal guidelines stipulate that a participant in the project must a.) be a first-generation college student, b.) have family income that does not exceed 150 percent of the US Department of Health and Human Services’ annual poverty guidelines, or c.) have a documented disability (Ref. 2B-74). Between 2006 and 2010, the institution’s SSS project was funded to serve 230 students per year; the project will serve 250 students per year beginning in AY 2011-2012 (Ref. 2B-75).
In the non-credit area, the Employment Training Center (ETC), before its closing, collected student demographic information through its Student Information System and at orientation and registration. Because of the individualized nature of the ETC’s programs, each student met with a counselor regularly. Counselors were an active and positive part of each student’s program, establishing regular and frequent meeting schedules. Following these individualized counseling assessment and advising sessions, students were eligible to receive services designed to assist them in achieving a variety of educational goals. These services included academic and personal counseling, self-development workshops and seminars, internships, and job assistive services (Ref. 2B-76, p. 3).
In 2011, the College implemented Ready Set Grow Hawaiʻi (RSG-HI; Ref. 2B-77), a program designed to address the needs of the population formerly served by ETC. The program is designed to help students with basic skills, career planning, and workforce readiness. RSG-HI’s highly individualized services and assessments involve frequent contact between students and counselors. The face to face classes are employment themed and taught in the context of a career pathway. Individual tutoring is available to students in a computer lab setting for up to 60 hours a week (Ref. 2B-78, pp. 32-33).
To meet the previous Self Study’s planning agenda for Standard II.B.3, the College’s Student Affairs division has completed yearly program reviews and self evaluation (Ref. 2B-22) since 2006.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.  



Planning Agenda:

None.


II.B.3.a. The institution assures equitable access to all of its students by providing appropriate, comprehensive, and reliable services to students regardless of service location or delivery method.

Descriptive Summary:

The institution researches and identifies students’ learning support needs through an entering student survey (Ref. 2B-79) administered with the COMPASS placement exam. It also identifies students’ needs through mandatory counseling sessions, mandatory orientation (Ref. 2B-14) for students new to the campus, faculty referrals, and outreach efforts conducted by faculty and student members of the campus’s mentoring program and of TRiO Student Support Services (Ref. 2B-80, p. 7).


By uniformly assessing and advising new students, the institution ensures that the services it offers all students are appropriate and comprehensive. Equitable assessment of students’ needs for counseling, financial aid, tutoring, and other support services is maintained through delivery of the COMPASS Entering Student Survey and through mandatory orientation and counseling for all new students.
Entering students may sit for the COMPASS exam on campus at the College’s testing center, or at a variety of off-site locations, including Castle High School, Kahuku High School, Kailua High School, Kalaheo High School, Hawai‘i Job Corps, and a variety of approved locations (Ref. 2B-81) throughout Hawai‘i and the mainland United States. In the COMPASS Entering Student Survey, students are assessed for academic and other support needs, including study skills, academic support-related needs, and needs related to financial aid (Ref. 2B-79). The survey also collects demographic information and identifies populations that have traditionally benefited from increased institutional support—first generation and low-income students, students with disabilities, and Native Hawaiian students (Ref. 2B-75).

Since the survey is embedded in the mandatory placement exam, responses are collected from a majority of entering students. Survey data are used not only by counselors and faculty invested in knowing as much as possible about their students, but also by the institution in its efforts to secure grant funding in support of the above-mentioned populations. The TRiO Student Support Services (Ref. 2B-12) project in particular makes thorough use of survey data in its grant applications to the US Education Department (USDOE).


Faculty and counselors, as well as TRiO SSS staff and Peer Mentors, participate in an active referral network, whose aim is to identify students who may benefit from advising, tutoring, and other support services and to refer them to the appropriate campus resources. Students’ support needs are further identified though a sequence of advising and orientation sessions. The institution’s New Student Orientation (Ref. 2B-14) programs have dramatically increased in scale during the current reporting period. Optional orientation sessions were introduced in 2006; these sessions reached approximately two-thirds of all new students (Ref. 2B-82). In 2007, all recent high school graduates were required to attend an orientation. And since 2008, all students who are new to the campus must participate in orientation and advising sessions before they can register for classes. These mandatory orientations and advising sessions for new students were implemented to support the college’s ambitious Achieving the Dream initiative goals to increase student persistence, graduation, and transfer (Ref. 2B-21, p. 6). During their advising/orientation sequence, students are assigned a counselor (Ref. 2B-7) and provided with general guidance and with assistance in registering for classes and applying for financial aid (Ref. 2B-8). Students’ support needs are identified at this time and during follow-up sessions with their assigned counselors (Ref. 2B-80).
New students at the College attend the mandatory orientation/counseling sequence regardless of whether they attend the main campus or attend primarily online or at the institution’s off-site location in Waimānalo (R. Inouye, personal communication, August 2, 2011). As discussed previously in section II.B.3, this sequence has been required of all new students since 2008. With one exception, all distance classes (Ref. 2B-83) at the institution have been offered since 2009. The timing of these efforts has allowed recent Student Affairs initiatives, such as mandatory advising, to be designed with distance learning in mind, which has allowed the institution to ensure distance learning students equitable access to services.

The institution, thus, ensures that all students have equally reliable access to student services. The primary tool that all students use to schedule time with counseling faculty is a phone scheduling system. By making appointments with counselors, all students may receive assistance with the following:





  • Understanding AA, certificate, and transfer requirements

  • Planning registration to fulfill their requirements

  • Making educational and career choices and decisions

  • Preparing for transfer to professional programs and 4-year universities

  • Resources that support academic and personal successes

  • Arranging accommodations for students with disabilities (Ref. 2B-7)

These services are offered to all students, regardless of whether they attend classes on the main campus, online, or at an off-site location. Students and their counselors make use of the same tools and services regardless of service location. The following table identifies these resources by counseling area; please note that these are the primary resources used by all students and faculty.


Table 8: Counseling Areas and Resources



Counseling Area

Resources

Understanding A.A. certificate and transfer requirements

Advising/Counseling (All Counselors; Ref. 2B-84)

Course Catalogs and Schedules of Classes (Ref. 2B-27)



Planning registration to fulfill their requirements

Advising/Counseling (All Counselors; Ref. 2B-84)

Star Advisor (Ref. 2B-85)



Making educational and career choices and decisions

Advising/Counseling (All Counselors; Ref. 2B-84)

Career Connections (Ref. 2B-86)

Career and Workforce Development Counselor (Ref. 2B-87)

Career Specialist (Ref. 2B-88)

DISCOVER (Ref. 2B-89)

Ka Piko Explorations Services (Ref. 2B-90)



Preparing for transfer to professional programs and 4-year universities

Advising/Counseling (All Counselors; Ref. 2B-84)

Transfer Facilitator (Ref. 2B-91)



Resources that support academic and personal success

Advising/Counseling (All Counselors; Ref. 2B-84)

Student Success Resources (Ref. 2B-92)

Success Counselor (Ref. 2B-93)


Arranging accommodations for students with disabilities

Disabilities Counselor (Ref. 2B-94)

Disabilities Handbook (Ref. 2B-95)


Financial aid is offered equitably to all students, regardless of their service location. Financial aid counseling, which in most cases involves assistance with the institution’s Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy (Ref. 2B-96) or with FAFSA completion (Ref. 2B-97), is available to all students by phone, e-mail, or in person.

All students at the institution have equitable access to peer mentoring services. All students may schedule time with a peer mentor by phone to receive help with the following:



  • Tutoring

  • Registration help

  • Website navigation

  • Campus tours

  • Peer counseling

  • New Student Orientation

  • Frosh Camp

  • General information (Ref. 2B-98)

All students at the institution have equitable access to tutoring services. In addition to the tutoring services provided by Peer Mentors, whose areas of expertise may change from semester to semester, the institution offers regular tutoring in Chemistry (Ref. 2B-99), Math (Ref. 2B-100), and Writing (Ref. 2B-101). As of Fall 2011, students may also access strictly online tutoring via the tutoring service Smarthinking (Ref. 2B-1), which besides offering tutoring in the institution’s three regularly tutored subjects, provides assistance in accounting, anatomy and physiology, biology, economics, physics, and statistics. The institution’s Writing Center (Ref. 2B-101) supplements Smarthinking’s online service with its own online tutoring as a percentage of lab instructors’ time is dedicated to reviewing student materials submitted electronically (M. Segura, personal communication, November 3, 2011).



The Career Center is located in ‘Ākoakoa 130.  Instructors in English 22 and English 100 courses work in collaboration with the Career Counselors to integrate career exploration workshops and career research assignments into their curriculum. The Career Center, as well as the Library, serve as primary locations for students to delve deeper into their career exploration and occupational research. A Career Counselor is available for those students who want in-depth career counseling
As indicated in Standard II.C.1. below, all students have access to the Library’s resources and services. In addition to using the Library's physical collections, students can remotely access its online journal and reference databases, e-book collections, and research guides. Each of the four librarians work with students to improve their research skills, and each helps to staff the Reference Desk, where students may receive one-on-one help with their research questions. Reference and research help is also offered via e-mail, telephone, and online chats. Instructional services, including the Library Research Unit curriculum used by all sections of ENG 22 and ENG 100, supports on-campus and DL students in learning information literacy skills. 
All students have access to equitable test proctoring services. As mentioned previously, all new students may arrange at their convenience to take the COMPASS placement exam, which must be administered at an approved testing center at one of several approved locations (Ref. 2B-81) throughout the state. Online students who do not have reasonable access to the institution’s on-campus testing center (Ref. 2B-102) are directed by their instructors to an equivalent “applicable test site” (Ref. 2B-103) as mandated by UH System procedures (Ref. 2B-104).
Because of felicitous timing in its efforts to increase student services programming and distance learning offerings, the institution has not had to struggle as much as it might have in other circumstances with retrofitting existing services to new programs. As it happens, these services and distance learning offerings have all grown during the current reporting period. To online students, other off-site students, and on-campus students, appropriate, comprehensive and reliable services, while still available in person, are also accessible by phone and through e-mail, the College’s webpage, and synchronous and asynchronous chat resources.
One concern with online learning is whether there is a significant difference in support services offered between online and face-to-face classes. To support its online students, the institution began in Fall 2010 to send them a series of communications before the start of each semester, delivered both in hard copy format through USPS and electronically (B. Richardson, personal communication, August 3, 2010). In response to surveys delivered in Fall 2009 and Spring 2010, 77 percent of students either agreed or strongly agreed that there was no significant difference between support services available online and those offered at the main campus. Nine students, or 7 percent of those surveyed, reported that there was a significant difference. None of the nine students offered any optional comments to flesh out their responses (Ref. 2B-105, p. 14). Moreover, 79 percent of students in Fall 2009 and Spring 2010 agreed or strongly agreed that they had adequate access to library resources (Ref. 2B-105, p. 19).
At the institution’s off-site location in Waimānalo, students readily have access to these online and distance resources. In addition, they have access to computer and printing resources and to a Counselor who provides academic advising, financial aid and personal counseling, and assistance with completing FAFSA applications (R. Inouye, personal communication, August 2, 2011).

The institution has plans to expand to an additional off-site location in Kahuku, HI, at which time it will provide the same level of equitable access to services that it provides at its existing Waimānalo location. The institution has begun to collaborate closely with Brigham Young University-Hawai‘i (BYUH) in planning this second off-site location. With BYUH, the institution hosted an “Education Expo” (Ref. 2B-106) publicity event in Summer 2011. Initial offerings in Kahuku have so far consisted of free, non-credit music workshops (Ref. 2B-107) and town hall discussions between interested community members, counseling faculty, and the then interim (and now confirmed) Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs (Ref. 2B-108, p. 1).


Ready Set Grow Hawai‘i students, whose needs often significantly exceed those of traditional community college students, are best served in person using a high-touch, invasive counseling approach (Ref. 2B-78, pp. 27-29).

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

The Office of Academic Affairs plans to expand its off-site course offerings to Kahuku and the necessary entities from the College will provide the same support services to these students as those it already serves.


II.B.3.b. The institution provides an environment that encourages personal and civic responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development for all of its students.

Descriptive Summary:

The College promotes programs that encourage personal and civic responsibility as well as promoting opportunities for intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development for all students through student government (Ref. 2B-109), student organizations (Ref. 2B-110), Service-Learning (Ref. 2B-111), peer mentoring services (Ref. 2B-98), and tutoring services such as Ka Piko (Ref. 2B-69) and TRiO SSS (Ref. 2B-12).


Through paid student worker positions, extra credit for a course, or by volunteering, students are able to participate in the various programs, projects, and events that promote personal and civic responsibility. According to the Student Employment and Cooperative Education Website (Ref. 2B-112), any student attending an institution in the UH System, enrolled in six or more credits may work at Windward CC as a tutor or Peer Mentor. Any student in the UH System may also volunteer to tutor or be a Peer Mentor. For example, potential TRiO SSS tutors and Peer Mentors fill out an application, obtain certification from the instructor, complete a training workshop, are paired with a student, and evaluated (Ref. 2B-113, p. [3]).
For events and projects on campus and in the community, student volunteers are recruited through the various student organizations, programs, clubs, and courses. For example, Phi Theta Kappa members are recruited to assist with the blood drives, food bank donations, and community clean-up projects; and, students in Hawaiian language classes were recruited for the Lakukahekahe Conference (Hawaiian Language Conference for High School Students).
Windward CC Student Life (Ref. 2B-10) coordinates student government, all student organizations, and activities for students. It coordinates or co-sponsors a variety of student activities on campus through the ASUH-WCC Student Government, clubs, and the Interclub Council of Windward Community College. The Associated Student of the University of Hawai‘i-Windward Community College (Ref. 2B-109) is the officially recognized student government for the College. ASUH-WCC provides opportunities for students to participate in institutional governance as well as in determining the needs, wants, and interests of the general student population. With feedback provided by students, faculty, staff, and administration, ASUH-WCC (Ref. 2B-109) plans programs, services, and activities for the campus.
The following is a list of the Windward CC Clubs (Ref. 2B-110), organizations, and activities over the period 2006 - 2012.

Windward CC Clubs & Organizations (Not all have been active every year):

  • Aerospace Club

  • Alapi‘i / The Living Well Leadership Academy

  • Botany Club (Ref. 2B-114)

  • Ceramics Club (All students enrolled in ceramic courses are in the ceramics club and can participate in the sale.)

  • Chess and Backgammon Club

  • Film Club (Ref. 2B-115)

  • Japanese Cultural Society of WCC

  • Ke Kumau ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian Language Club)

  • KuPono Hawaiian Club (Ref. 2B-116)

  • Martial Arts Club

  • Music Club (Ref. 2B-117)

  • Na Ho‘okele (Voyaging Club)

  • PSI Beta (National Honor Society in Psychology for Community and Junior Colleges)

  • Phi Theta Kappa (International Honor Society for Community and Junior Colleges; Ref. 2B-118)

  • Russian Club

  • Safe Spaces (Ref. 2B-119)

  • Students for a Sensible Drug Policy


Windward CC Student Activities (Not all activities are held every academic year) presented by Windward CC students for Windward CC students:

  • Welcome Week Events (Fall and Spring)

  • Mid-Month Munchies (cultural and food events held once a month for Day and Evening students)

  • Halloween Extravaganza

  • Math Contest

  • End of the Semester Bash (Fall)

  • Campus Clues Trivia

  • Common Book Reading and Essay Writing Events

  • Holiday Craft Workshop

  • Valentine’s Craft Workshop

  • Wednesday Movies (Windward CC Library and ASUH-WCC).

  • Ice Cream Social

  • “Take Back the Night” Essay Contest

  • End of the Semester Bash (Spring)

  • Study Sessions

  • Pictures (by year) of some activities are available on the Student Life webpage .


Windward CC Volunteer Events:

  • American Cancer Society Relay for Life Event

  • Blood Drives – four drives annually

  • Hawai‘i Food Bank Food Drive

  • Ho‘olaule‘a (2006 [Ref. 2B-120], 2007 [Ref. 2B-121], 2008 [Ref. 2B-122], 2009 [Ref. 2B-123], 2010 [Ref. 2B-124], 2011 [Ref. 2B-125], 2012 [Ref. 2B-126])

  • Windward CC Christmas Parade

Service-Learning (Ref. 2B-111) is a national movement that, since the mid-1990s, has found its way into the curricula of universities such as Harvard, Berkeley, and Yale, as well as thousands of schools from the elementary to college level. These schools recognize the importance of Service-Learning by helping students practice and apply class knowledge in real life settings, in ways that help the community. Service-Learning is a win-win-win opportunity for students, schools, and communities. Students, faculty, and community members are provided with training and evaluation opportunities to make recommendations to the program. According to the Office of the Chancellor 2010-11 Annual Assessment (Ref. 2B-127, p. 24), a Service-Learning Advisory Panel has been selected and includes the Service-Learning Coordinator, two faculty members, and two community members. Directives have been drafted and there are plans to add one former Service-Learning student as a member.


At Windward CC, students can earn partial course credit for Service-Learning in designated courses. Working with their instructor, students who opt for a Service-Learning component will learn and develop academic skills specific to their course and will apply their learning through active participation at an approved community site. Thus, Service-Learning enhances the academic curriculum of the students and is directed towards fostering civic responsibility.
Courses with a Service-Learning component provide that information in the course outline (Ref. 2B-128, p. 6). The Office of the Chancellor 2010-11 Annual Assessment (Ref. 2B-127, p. 26) provides general data regarding Service-Learning over a period of 2.5 years. The data show that in Fall 2011, there were 24 instructors teaching 33 courses (59 class sections) with a Service-Learning component. The number of students choosing service-learning options has increased more than 100 percent over the last two years, as has the number of classes offering it as a component. The number of classes declined in Spring 2011 because classes that did not offer detailed information on the Service-Learning option were dropped until the instructors re-defined the project in a clear and specific way.

By assisting faculty in re-writing their Service-Learning options, the number of courses offering the component rose back up again in Fall 2011 (P. DaGrossa, personal communication, November 6, 2011).


In addition to the Service-Learning Office, other student clubs encourage civic responsibility by deciding on and planning projects. For example, the KuPono Hawaiian Club (Ref. 2B-116) volunteer projects include the construction and maintenance of lo‘i kalo at Hale ‘Iolani mauka, Hale ‘Imiloa, Po‘ailani DD Treatment Program, and the Women’s Community Correctional Center. Phi Theta Kappa (Ref. 2B-118) develops leadership and service through various projects throughout the year, such as managing recruitment for the biannual campus blood drive, Honolulu AIDS Walk, cleaning Waikalua Loko Fish Pond, Kalihi Auhpua‘a Ulu Pono Ahahui (Kalihi Stream environmental group), and Na Pohaku O Hauwahine (Kāne‘ohe nature preserve). On the average approximately 10-20 members participate in each event (L. Uyeda, personal communication, March 8, 2011).

Other College activities that encourage personal and civic responsibility, as well as intellectual, aesthetic, and personal development for students are tutoring, Supplemental Instruction (SI), and Peer Mentoring. Students have the opportunity to work or volunteer to help others in various labs, i.e., Math Lab (Ref. 2B-100), Speech Lab (Ref. 2B-129), Ka Piko Center (Ref. 2B-69), TRiO Student Support Services (Ref. 2B-12), or the Writing Center (Ref. 2B-101). Formal training is provided for tutors, evaluations of and by tutors is conducted, and students, faculty, staff, and administration provide feedback for the tutoring programs. The Peer Mentoring and SI programs provide opportunities for students to tutor and provide mentoring to their peers.

Adding to the cultural and aesthetic life on the Kāne‘ohe campus, the Palikū Theatre (Ref. 2B-130) affords students and community members the opportunity to enjoy and perform in concerts, drama, musicals, dance programs, film festivals, lectures, and intimate Hawaiian music sessions.
Palikū Theatre also provides an affordable venue (Ref. 2B-131) for community groups to host seminars and showcase their talent. To further enrich the campus experience, Gallery ‘Iolani (Ref. 2B-132), located in the new Hale Pālanakila humanities building adjacent to Palikū Theatre, regularly features artwork by well-known local and national artists, as well as students and faculty members (Ref. 2B-133). Additionally, the College's Hōkūlani Imaginarium (Ref. 2B-134) is a state-of-th- art planetarium and multimedia facility providing astronomy and other shows for students and the community. Lastly, the Lanihuli Observatory (Ref. 2B-28, p. 16) is an astronomical and meteorological observatory that supports the College’s astronomy labs, student projects, K-12 outreach, and the general public.
At the present time, some courses, support services and activities are offered in the eastern limit of Windward CC’s geographic community. Students taking courses in Waimānalo or through distance learning have the opportunity to be a paid or volunteer tutor in Waimānalo, participate in cultural activities, and assist with one of the Service-Learning partners in the area for their intellectual and personal development. Plans are to establish similar course offerings and support services in the north side of Windward CC’s geographic community, Kahuku, in the near future. Exploratory meetings held in the Kahuku community with the College have been conducted as well as events to raise awareness of Windward CC have been held such as the Ko‘olauloa Educational Expo that was held in July 2011 (Ref. 2B-106).
A One-Stop Shop was established at Windward Mall where admissions services, financial aid counseling, academic advising, graduation certification, and tutoring are offered evenings and weekends. In 2010, the original concept for One-Stop was to increase access to financial aid at Windward CC (Ref. 2B-135). However, it was quickly expanded to include more than just financial aid assistance.


Self Evaluation:


The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

The Office of Academic Affairs plans to expand its off-site course offerings to Kahuku and specific entities of the College will provide the same support services to these students as to those it already serves.

II.B.3.c. The institution designs, maintains, and evaluates counseling and/or academic advising programs to support student development and success and prepares faculty and other personnel responsible for the advising function.

Descriptive Summary:

The Counseling Department under Student Affairs serves all students enrolled in academic credit-bearing courses. Counselors (Ref. 2B-7) are responsible for general advising as well as Transfer Advising (Ref. 2B-136), Career Counseling (Ref. 2B-24), and Disabilities Counseling (Ref. 2B-137). Counselors are also responsible for the planning, on-going assessment, and execution of First Year (Ref. 2B-138) and Adult Learner programs, as well as assisting with outreach activities such as the annual Scholarship ‘Aha (Ref. 2B-139) and Career Fair (Ref. 2B-140).


At the time of the 2006 Accreditation Self Evaluation, there were seven full-time and two half-time counselors on staff. This remained unchanged until September 2010. Two full-time positions funded by the Title III Grant (Ref. 2B-19, p. 2) ended on September 30, 2010. On October 1, 2010, the institution received notice of three new Title III Grant awards (Ref. 2B-141). The grants include funds for one counselor position, which was filled by January 3, 2011. The ETC non-credit program was dissolved in December 2010, and four full-time ETC program counselors were reassigned to the Counseling Department as of January 3, 2011 (L. Hokoana, personal communication, n.d.).
As a result of these changes, there are currently twelve counselors on staff. Eleven of the positions are State (“General”) funded; these counselors direct the Career Center, lead in infusing Native Hawaiian educational values into the counseling program, provide counseling for academically at-risk students and students with disabilities, run the First Year programs, and handle general duties (A. Eschenberg, personal communication, n.d.). The remaining full time counseling position is funded by the federal Title III grants (Ref. 2B-142) received in October 2010: a Counselor for Adult Learners focusing on matriculation, successful graduation and transfer of non-traditional students. Three other Title III funded positions include some academic counseling as part of their job duties (SI Coordinator, two Hūlili Coordinators). (Note: Title III grant abstracts are posted online. Proposals, in their entirety, are available for perusal in the Office of the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, Hale ‘Ākoakoa 202.)
Counselors advise all current Windward CC students enrolled in on-campus and distance education courses, as well as prospective students new to, or returning to, college. Advising appointments take place in person, and via phone and e-mail. Appointments for in-person advising from 8:00 a.m. through 4:30 p.m. are scheduled daily, by the clerks in the Counseling Office, in 30- and 45-minute time blocks via the web-based scheduling tool, SARS (Ref. 2B-143). SARS is password protected and accessible by Counseling clerks and Counselors only. Appointments can also be scheduled outside of normal business hours, as individual counselors may agree to meet a student as early as 7:30 a.m. or as late as 6:30 p.m. (C. Akiona, personal communication, n.d.).
Regardless of funding sources (State funds or federal Title III Grant), new counselors go through orientation and training sessions run by senior counselors. The most recent training, for the former ETC Counselors, held to a weekly schedule from January through March 2011 (Ref. 2B-144). A copy of the Advising Manual is available in Hale ‘Ākoakoa 201; individual copies for all counselors include Student Affairs procedures, policies and programs that affect both on-campus and distance learning students. New counselors also sit in on numerous advising appointments to observe different counselors and their methods. Ongoing, informal training for all counselors occurs in weekly faculty meetings and in individual conferences with coordinators of the Career, Disabilities, First Year, and Transfer programs. Addenda to the above mentioned advising manual, covering policies and procedures for topics such as Automatic Admissions are stored in electronic form on the secured Student Affairs K: drive (P. Chong, personal communication, n.d.).
A Peer Mentoring program was established in Spring 2007 to help support first year initiatives toward student success. Peer Mentors assist counseling faculty with running Orientation (Ref. 2B-14) and Frosh Camp (Ref. 2B-17) are available to assist students with online registration, and to serve as tutors and Supplemental Instruction (Ref. 2B-145) leaders throughout the course of a semester. Peer Mentors go through initial training sessions (Ref. 2B-146) over the course of two weeks, led by First Year (Ref. 2B-138) Program counselors and a Title III Supplemental Instruction/Peer Mentor (SI/PM; Ref. 2B-70) Coordinator. The Peer Mentoring Manual is available in the Hale ‘Ākoakoa 232 Lounge. Ongoing training occurs in weekly meetings, led by the SI/PM Coordinator (E. L. Kenolio & L. Akiona, personal communication, n.d.).
General and Title III (Ref. 2B-141) counseling activities are closely tied to the institution’s Achieving the Dream (Ref. 2B-147) initiatives. With the support of Title III funds through 2015, counselors are focusing on First Year Experience (Ref. 2B-138) activities: New Student Orientation, Frosh Camp and Frosh Cohorts (a Learning Community where a College Skills course, taught by counselors, is paired with an academic general education course). Other priorities are:


  • Establishing a pipeline for Adult Learners,




  • Expanding services and outreach of the Career Center, and




  • Establishing support programs specifically for second year students.

There are nine additional counseling positions affiliated with the TRiO federal Educational Opportunity programs. Eight counselors work specifically with regional high school student populations of the Upward Bound (Ref. 2B-13) and Educational Talent Search (Ref. 2B-11) programs. One half-time counselor position for the department is currently vacant with no immediate plans to hire.


TRiO students are referred to the Windward CC Counseling Office for appointments with a Student Affairs Counselor. In addition, a Student Affairs Counselor is available to assist in the TRiO Office during peak registration periods, working directly with the institution’s approximately 280 students who qualify for participation in the SSS program, based on income, disability, or first-generation status (R. Inouye, personal communication, n.d.).
Each branch of counseling, General, TRiO and Title III, has its own assessment procedures. Moreover, the particular needs of online students in Distance Learning (DL) are regularly assessed in accordance with the institution’s current assessment process (Ref. 2B-148). An appropriate instrument for student evaluation of online courses was devised by online faculty in Fall 2009 (Ref. 2B-105, pp. 7-14). Currently, support services needed by DLstudents are being evaluated and early indications include the need for more intensive, proactive academic counseling during the semester. The demographics of online students are being analyzed in order to devise a comprehensive plan for support (Ref. 2B-83, p. 26). At the end of 2010-2011, the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs and the Dean of Division II were to develop an assessment tool to see what was needed to develop further support for online and other DL students.  (See p. 13 “Assessment of Needs and Resources” and pp. 19-20, “Plan for Monitoring Success” in Substantive Change Proposal February 2, 2011 prepared by the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs [Ref. 2B-83, p. 13, 19-20].) This was delayed when the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs left the institution for a position at the UH System office. Currently, the Dean of Division II is working with the Hūlili Title III grant project staff to develop a pilot project for online counseling (C. Lessary, personal communication, April 20, 2012).
In each semester since Fall 2006, general counselors have met with an average of 60 percent of the student population for academic advising including registration. This number represents unique advising appointments, but does not include repeat visits by the same student, and does not include walk-ins, which add approximately 500 students per semester. In AY 2009-2010, counselors met with 1,861 students, roughly two-thirds of the student body (Ref. 2B-9, p. 5). Since the 2005-2006 school year, when 700 students met with a counselor, the number of students who receive academic advising has increased more than 265 percent. This increase can be accounted for because the institution provides orientation and advising support to all new students and advising and counseling throughout the year to all students. Counseling and advising services include course selection and other academic advising, career counseling, student success counseling, transfer advising and workshops, and disabilities counseling and accommodations facilitation from a dedicated disabilities counselor (Ref. 2B-9). The 2010-2011 Student Affairs Executive Summary (Ref. 2B-26, pp. [8-10]) reports that the counselors met with 90 percent of the student population in advising appointments with a 93 percent satisfaction rate during the Fall 2010-Spring 2011 academic year. Thus, the institution has made significant progress toward meeting its goal of advising 100 percent of the students on campus.
An Academic Advising Syllabus (Ref. 2B-149) is used by general counselors to assess counseling services and their effect on student progress. Student satisfaction with counseling services is measured by individual counselor evaluations (Ref. 2B-150) that students complete immediately following their appointment, and by the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE; Ref. 2B-151) that is administered every even-numbered year. Satisfaction with Academic Advising services increased slightly from 2.34 to 2.4 on a 3-point scale in the 2008 and 2010 CCSSE surveys. In addition, in the 2011 Faculty and Student Institutional Surveys, 69 percent of the faculty rated student counseling services excellent or satisfactory (Ref. 2B-152, Item 13.N.), and an average of 82 percent of students rated Counseling services and Counselors as excellent or satisfactory on five criteria: accessibility, concern for student success, knowledge of program and transfer requirements, and helpfulness in goal setting (Ref. 2B-64, Item 15).

TRiO and Title III federal programs provide annual performance reports, including assessment of programs, to their respective federal agencies. In the previous Title III grant cycle (2005-2010), the Transition (Ref. 2B-19, p. 3) and Success (Ref. 2B-19, p. 5) Counselors established procedures leading to increases in transfer, graduation and academic success rates. Initiatives made possible through Title III support include Mandatory New Student Orientation (Ref. 2B-14) for all incoming high school graduates, and mandatory advising for students on academic warning and probation (Ref. 2B-28, p. 26). The academic success rate rose from 72 percent to 80 percent between 2005-2010 (Ref. 2B-19, p. 3). At the end of Spring 2011, the success rate was 78 percent (K. Zane, personal communication, n.d.).


Summary data on transfer and graduation from Fall 2006 through Spring 2010 indicate that students who received transfer counseling earned degrees and certificates at a higher rate than students who did not take advantage of transfer counseling: 78 percent vs. 26 percent (Ref. 2B-153, p. [14]). In addition, students who met with the Transfer Counselor transferred to another UH institution at a greater rate than students who did not meet with the Counselor: 54 percent vs. 30 percent (Ref. 2B-153, p. [12]). The Transition Counselor's efforts are in alignment with the graduation and transfer goals in the 2009 Achieving the Dream Implementation Plan (Ref. 2B-154, p. 6) and 2008 Strategic Plan outcomes (Ref. 2B-155, Outcome 2.6 and 2.7).
Vis-a-vis the AtD and Strategic Plan numbers, Windward CC’s TRiO-SSS program (Ref. 2B-12) has seen extremely successful graduation and transfer rates (Ref. 2B-156). Its main goal is to create an atmosphere where students feel comfortable and have a “home base” on campus. The program does this through encouraging students to ask any faculty, staff, tutors, or volunteers of TRiO-SSS a question and “no feel shame or scared to ask.” In doing so, they receive services provided by the project and find out about other services provided by Windward CC and the UH System. They see TRiO-SSS as the place to stop by often to find out about food events, fun events, workshops, campus visits, etc. They also hang out in the office/computer lab, lobby, or lanai before or after class just to socialize and find out about other aspects of TRiO-SSS, Windward CC, UH System, or other colleges/universities; and, in turn, this mentors new and incoming students. In August 2010, the program was awarded a One Year Continuation Grant plus a new Five-Year Grant for a total of $2.3 million over six years. A copy of the grant is available for perusal in the Business Office, Alaka‘i 114.
Counselors are also affiliated with two non-credit programs on campus. As described in section II.A.1.a, the ETC was dissolved at the end of 2010. At the beginning of 2011, non- credit programs were reorganized and renamed Career and Community Education (Ref. 2B-157, p. 2). Two programs under CCE have counselors assigned to them. The Certified Nurse's Aide program, with one 0.20 FTE Counselor position, and the Ready Set Grow Hawai‘i program with one 1.0 FTE Counselor and one .625 counselor position. Unlike counselors in credit programs, the non-credit counselors’ duties (Ref. 2B-158, p. [3]) more closely resemble those of agency and personal counselors with focus on skill acquisition, vocational and personal counseling, and job search assistance. To gain knowledge about UH System programs, they attend activities programmed by credit counselors, such as Transfer Workshops, New Student Orientation, and Frosh Camp. Non-credit counselors also participate in professional development opportunities and CCE conferences (G. Kabei & J. Uyetake, personal communication, February 29, 2012; Ref. 2B-159).


Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

Student Affairs and the Office of Instruction will establish a pipeline for Adult Learners.


Student Affairs will expand the services and outreach of the Career Center
Student Affairs will establish support programs specifically for second year students.
Student Affairs will perform summative and formative assessment on all current and newly established student support programs.

II.B.3.d. The institution designs and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and services that support and enhance student understanding and appreciation of diversity.



Descriptive Summary:

As noted in the College’s mission statement, “Windward Community College offers innovative programs in the arts and sciences and opportunities to gain knowledge and understanding of Hawai‘i and its unique heritage. With a special commitment to support the access and educational needs of Native Hawaiians, we provide O‘ahu’s Ko‘olau region and beyond with liberal arts, career and lifelong learning in a supportive and challenging environment—inspiring students to excellence.” It was approved on May 17, 2011, by the Board of Regents and is listed in the 2011-2013 Course Catalog (Ref. 2B-28, p. 2).


In the credit area, the College promotes student understanding and appreciation of diversity

through a variety of clubs, organizations, activities, and campus workshops. Data (Ref. 2B-160) indicates that Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders population increased by 11 percent from 2006 to 2011. The average age of a student is about 26. Students who attend WINDWARD CC on a part time basis increased from 62 percent to 66 percent from Fall 2008 to Fall 2011. Students with disabilities have increased from three percent to five percent from 2006 to 2011 (Ref. 2B-161). Various daytime, evening, weekend, and distance education classes are offered to meet students’ needs.


Table 9: Age, Gender, and Ethnicity of Windward CC Students





Fall 2006

Fall 2007

Fall 2008

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Number Enrolled

1781

1824

1,959

2,316

2,625

2,705

Average Age

NA

NA

25.9

25.6

26.0

26.3

Gender

Male

39%

39%

37%

40%

39%

37%

Female

61%

61%

62%

60%

60%

61%

Ethnicity

Hawaiian & Pacific Islanders

34%

35%

36%

39%

44%

45%

Caucasian

22%

22%

22%

20%

20%

20%

Asian

18%

17%

16%

15%

14%

14%

Mixed

14%

14%

15%

14%

14%

14%

Others

5%

5%

5%

6%

4%

4%

Mixed Asian/PI

7%

7%

6%

6%

4%

3%

Attendance Status

Full time

NA

NA

38%

36.5%

36.8%

34%

Part time

NA

NA

62%

63.5%

63.2%

66%

Disability

3%

4%

4.6%

4.4%

4.7%

5%

Student Government Diversity Activities:


ASUH-WCC (Ref. 2B-109), commonly known as Student Government, meets twice a week (Executive and Senate) to gather information about any issues or concerns that may arise for students in their college experience and to help improve the campus for current and future students.
Based on events that occurred within the 2010-11 AY, approximately 3,000 students participated in events coordinated by or sponsored by the ASUH-WCC. Through elections held in Spring 2010, twelve students were elected to represent the Windward CC students as senators and executive members of the ASUH-WCC. They consistently collaborated and interacted with campus representatives (facilities, media, TRiO-SSS, Business Office, etc.) to offer a variety of educational and social programs designed to encourage and engage students. A listing of the date of the event, event name, and number of students who participated in the event are as follows (as indicated in the 2011 Student Affairs Program Review [Ref. 2B-26]):



  • 8/19 Voter Registration (Primary) – encourage registration

  • 8/26 Welcome Back Bash – “The Deadbeats” performed (300+)

  • 9/16 Mid-Month Munchies – Day (274) and Evening (73)

  • 9/28 Enough is Enough – empower yourself to end violence (100+)

  • 10/2 Ho‘olaule‘a 2010 – campus and community event

  • 10/13 Mid-Month Munchies (254)

  • 10/21 Speak-up Series – “Economics” (33)

  • 10/25 Spirit Week – PJ Day (21)

  • 10/26 Spirit Week – Toga Tuesday (7)

  • 10/27 Spirit Week – Wacky Wednesday (16)

  • 10/28 Spirit Week – Warrior Day (24)

  • 10/29 Spirit Week – Costume Day (43)

  • 10/29 Haunted Village – Costume Contest (50+)

  • 10/29 Haunted Village – Haunted Hospital (345)

  • 11/18 Mid-Month Munchies (225+)

  • 11/24 Decorate for the Holidays (45+)

  • 12/8 Holiday Blow Out (85+)

  • 1/13 Welcome Back Re-Mix (260+)

  • 2/14 Valentine’s Day “Condoms, Candies & Ribbons” (101+)

  • 2/17 Mid-Month Munchies – Day (300+) and Evening (64+)

  • 2/23 SAC – Health Fair (50+)

  • 3/8 SAC – Hawaiian Humane Society (35+)

  • 3/16 Mid-Month Munchies (224+)

  • 3/19 Project CLEAN (12+)

  • 4/12 Career & College Fair (136+)

  • 4/14 Mid-Month Munchies (300+)

  • 4/15 National Day of Silence

  • 4/16 Hawai‘i Food Bank (12+)

  • 4/18 Earth Week – Free Store

  • 4/19 Earth Week – Elections

  • 4/20 Earth Week – H2O – Story of Bottled Water (49+)

  • 4/21 Earth Week – Waimānalo Salad (107+)

  • 4/28 Pau Hana Event (275+)

  • 4/28 Student Activity Center – Mural Wall Design (250)

  • 5/4 SAC – Aloha Spring Event (65+)

  • 5/14 Commencement Celebration (350+)

A sign-in list of all participants and flyers of event are kept on file in the Windward CC-ASUH office located in Hale ‘Ākoakoa 203.



Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex Equality (LGBTIE) Organization:

The Windward CC LGBTIE (Ref. 2B-162) organization serves as a campus and community support system for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex individuals, and their allies. It provides support, education, normalization, and collaboration. In addition, it strives to create and maintain a safe and inclusive environment for Windward CC LGBTI students, faculty, staff, and their allies.
Support is provided for students through creating Safe Zones, faculty and staff training, offering LGBTIE events, such as “Safe Dating” workshops, and the opportunity to join and participate in the Safe Spaces Student Club (Ref. 2B-119).

TRiO Programs at Windward CC:

The US Department of Education’s TRiO Programs are educational opportunity outreach programs designed to motivate and support students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Windward CC-TRiO includes three college access and outreach programs and one institutional support program targeted to serve and assist low-income, first-generation college students, and students with disabilities to progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to college.
Windward CC-Student Support Services (SSS; Ref. 2B-12) provides opportunities for academic development, assists students with basic college requirements, and serves to motivate students toward the successful completion of their postsecondary education. SSS also provides grant aid to current participants who are receiving Federal Pell Grants. The goal of SSS is to increase the college retention and graduation rates of its participants, who are either low-income first-generation college students or students with disabilities, and help them make the transition from one level of higher education to the next.
As of December 31, 2010, from Fall 2005 to Spring 2009, 49.88 percent of all SSS participants graduated and/or transferred to a four-year college or university. Of these, 48.99 percent of the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander participants graduated or transferred to a four-year college or university.
Additionally, 24.44 percent of all SSS participants received an AA degree from Windward CC within three years. Of these, 24.24 percent of the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander participants received their AA.
Furthermore 24.69 percent of all SSS participants are currently enrolled in a four-year college or university. Of these 25.25 percent of the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander participants enrolled in a four-year college or university.
Most importantly, 6.09 percent of all SSS participants graduated with a Bachelor’s degree within six years. Of these, 5.1 percent of the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander participants graduated with a Bachelor’s degree within six years.
The performance data from the TRiO SSS population helps to address two areas of the Windward CC Strategic Outcomes (Ref. 2B-155):
1: Native Hawaiian Educational Attainment - To position the University of Hawai‘i as one of the world’s foremost indigenous- serving universities by supporting the access and success of Native Hawaiians.
2 : Hawai‘i’s Educational Capital - To increase the educational capital of the state by increasing the participation and completion of students, particularly Native Hawaiian, low-income students and those from underserved areas.
Windward CC – Upward Bound (UB; Ref. 2B-13) works with 50 high school students in grades 9-12 from the Ko‘olau regions of Oʻahu to build the skills and motivation necessary to finish high school and succeed in college. The goal of Upward Bound is to increase the college admittance and success rates of its participants and help students make the transition from high school to college. To meet the Windward CC-UB goals and objectives, the program is designed to provide the following services and activities to all UB participants:

  • Career and college awareness

  • Academic tutoring and selection of high school college-prep coursework

  • College site visits

  • Study skills and goal setting

  • Cultural & academic enrichment

  • Financial aid planning

  • SAT/ACT & college application fee waivers

  • SAT/ACT Prep courses

  • College applications and financial aid applications assistance

Delivery of services is conducted on an individual basis and/or group setting. Guidance Advisors report to assigned target schools once a week. Windward CC-UB serves Castle, Kahuku, Kailua, and Kalaheo High Schools. One guidance advisor focuses exclusively on the needs of 12th grade students while the other focuses on students in grades 9-11.

In addition to services offered during the school year, Windward CC-UB provides students with a six-week residential college experience complete with credit and non-credit courses on the Windward CC campus and residence hall life on the UH-Mānoa campus. Weekly field trips expose students to college and career opportunities as well as cultural and academic enrichment.
Windward CC – Educational Talent Search (ETS; Ref. 2B-11) serves 1000 young people in grades 6-12. The program provides academic, career, and financial aid counseling to its participants and encourages them to graduate from high school and continue on to the postsecondary school of their choice. Students participate in grade-specific career exploration and college planning activities.
To meet the Windward CC-ETS goals and objectives, the program is designed to provide the following services and activities to all ETS participants:


  • Career and college awareness

  • Exploration and planning

  • College site visits

  • Self-awareness skills

  • Life skills and study skills

  • Cultural & academic enrichment

  • Financial aid planning

  • SAT/ACT & college application fee waivers

  • College applications and financial aid applications assistance

Delivery of services is conducted on an individual basis and/or group setting. College Planning Advisors (CPAs) report to assigned target schools once a week. Each CPA is responsible to manage a caseload of approximately 250 participants between three schools. ETS-Honolulu serves Farrington, McKinley, Anuenue, and Kaimuki High Schools, as well as Dole and Washington Middle Schools. ETS-Windward CC serves Kailua, Kahuku, Hakipu‘u and Castle High Schools, as well as Waimānalo Intermediate and Lā‘ie Elementary.


The Hawai‘i Music Institute (HMI; Ref. 2B-163) helps to nurture and inspire Hawai‘i’s musical talent, offer instruction about both the making of and the business of music, and provide a showcase for sharing talent and information. The mission of HMI is to preserve and perpetuate the music of Hawai‘i—from indigenous Hawaiian music and dance to contemporary music of all genres. It also provides a venue for the teaching and appreciation of music across generations and in all its varied forms, as well assists aspiring musicians in achieving their personal and professional goals.
HMI will offer upcoming events. Past workshops are listed below:
Hawaiian Music Workshops, May 2011 (Ref. 2B-164)

Talk Story Series, April and May, 2011 (Ref. 2B-165)

Hawaiian Music Workshops, April and May 2010 (Ref. 2B-166)

Ukulele and Hula Institute, 2006 (Ref. 2B-167)


Windward CC has one of the highest percentages of Native Hawaiian students within the University of Hawai‘i System. Established in 2003, Ke Kumu Pali (Ref. 2B-168) was made a formal council to the Chancellor in 2005. The purpose of Ke Kumu Pali is to provide a voice and organization through which the Native Hawaiian faculty, staff, students and administrators of Windward CC can participate in the development and interpretation of campus policy and practice as it relates to Native Hawaiian programs, activities, initiatives, and issues. Specifically, the Council will:


  • Provide advice and information to the Chancellor of Windward CC on issues that have particular relevance for Native Hawaiians and for Native Hawaiian culture, language, and history.

  • Work with the campus and system administration to position Windward CC as the Piko of Hawaiian knowledge and practices in post-secondary learning for the Ko‘olau communities of O‘ahu.

  • Promote the access and success of Native Hawaiian students at Windward CC and increase the representation of Native Hawaiians in all facets of the campus including instructional faculty, administration and governance.

  • Encourage and facilitate Native Hawaiian excellence in teaching, research, scholarship, publication, and service in all academic disciplines.

  • Advocate for fairness and equity in all decisions and resource allocations related to Native Hawaiian programs and services.

Ke Kumu Pali council meets at least once per month. Ke Kumu Pali minutes are located on the Windward CC-Ke Kumu Pali web page (Ref. 2B-169).



Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None


II.B.3.e. The institution regularly evaluates admissions and placement instruments and practices to validate their effectiveness while minimizing biases.

Descriptive Summary:

The Admissions policy and placement are consistent to all students whether via distance learning off-site, or traditional face-to-face education. In the credit area, the College has an open admissions policy (Ref. 2B-28, p. 7) for students at least 18 years of age or anyone who has received a US high school diploma or GED.  The admission procedure must be clear, fair and supportive. The Admissions and Records Office follows the admission procedure when determining whether to admit students to Windward CC.  In the 2005 (Ref. 2B-170, Item 16) and 2011 (Ref. 2B-64, Item 16.F.) institutional surveys, 68 percent and 86 percent of the students rated the quality of the services of the Admissions and Records Office as satisfactory or excellent suggesting satisfaction with the way the admission procedure is administered.



Quality of services of the Admissions and Records Office

Fall 2005 (398)

Fall 2011 (242)

Excellent

124 (31%)

101 (42%)

Satisfactory

149 (37%)

106 (44%)

Less than satisfactory

38 (10%)

12 (5%)

Poor

14 (4%)

8 (3%)

Unable to judge

74 (19%)

15 (6%)
Table 10: Student Satisfaction with Admissions Procedures

The Early Admissions/Running Start Program (Ref. 2B-171) offers special admission to high school students. Between 2009-2011, Windward CC had a total of 91 Early Admit Students and 54 Running Start students, which accounted for the equivalent of 36 full-time headcount (FTE). Forty of the students who had been enrolled in Running Start or Early Admit during the 2010-2011 academic year have subsequently enrolled in classes at Windward CC following high school graduation during the 2011 Academic Year (A. Lemke & A. Eschenberg, personal communication, n.d.).


All students, whether Running Start or Early Admit or general students except students who transfer from other community colleges or universities to Windward CC, must take the COMPASS placement test (Ref. 2B-172) to be placed in appropriate English and Math courses. Students with disabilities are given special test accommodations including enlargement of printed material, readers, scribes, adaptive equipment, or materials in alternate formats.
The COMPASS Advisory Group was established in 1997 when the COMPASS placement test was adopted. The most current COMPASS Advisory Work Group (Ref. 2B-173) is formed by faculty, staff, and administrators from all UHCC campuses and meets twice a year to review appropriate placement practices and policies, validating their effectiveness and advising the Office of the Vice President for Community College (OVPCC) and the Community College Council of Chancellors (Ref. 2B-174) on issues that have System-wide impact.  The group reviews appropriate policies and procedures and may recommend changes based on research data and analysis that maximize accurate placement and minimize biases.
ACT conducted a validation in 2004 by using eight semesters (1998-2002) of data from all UH community colleges. Some new cut-offs (Ref. 2B-175) of a few math and English courses were created in 2005. The changes have not been assessed yet, but the OVPCC is planning a validation with the ACT again when funds is available.
In 2006, the COMPASS policy was changed to allow students to self-select the Math level at which they begin the test with the help of guiding questions provided to them. Additionally, students were allowed to use the computer’s drop-down calculator and all campuses were moved from a DOS version to the Windows version of the test (Ref. 2B-176).
In 2007, the COMPASS policy was changed again to allow students to wait 60 days instead of 120 days to retake the COMPASS test without charge.  Immediate retesting might be allowed when mechanical or other testing malfunctions occurred.  Also, in the same memo the UHCCs adopted the UHM cutoffs for placement into ENG 100 via SAT (550 or higher on Critical Reading section and 550 or higher on the Writing section) or ACT (24 or higher on the English/Writing section and 24 or higher on the Reading section).  During the Spring 2007, Maui Community College, Leeward Community College, and Kapi‘olani Community College began a pilot study of retesting on demand, with a $25 proctoring fee for each retest.  The fee would be waived for students who are determined to have eligibility for Pell Grants (Ref. 2B-177). 
In 2009 to 2010, data were collected and analyzed for retesting on demand from UH Maui College, Kapi‘olani CC, and Leeward CC, because they have the highest volume of COMPASS testing among the seven UHCCs.  The data indicated that the growth in retesting, which parallels the overall enrollment growth in taking the COMPASS, did not increase overload work for the Testing Centers.  Due to this assessment, in 2010, all campuses of the UHCC System rescinded the policy (Ref. 2B-178) that required a 60-day wait period for students to retake the placement tests. If students have active test scores in BANNER, the UH Student Information System, they will be charged a $25.00 fee for each retesting session, regardless of how many tests they retake during any one session.  The new UHCC System Retesting Policy (Ref. 2B-179) went into effect on July 1, 2010.  An analysis of placement results from August 22, 2009, to January 15, 2011, indicated that retestees (Ref. 2B-180, p. [3]) improved their placement better than 30 percent in all areas. Furthermore, in Reading and the Math Tests at Kapi‘olani CC, retestees improved 40 percent or more, and, a little over 60 percent in writing placement.
On page 2 (Ref. 2B-181, p. [2]) of the analysis of results, eight months after the policy changes took place, students who improved their placements (and took courses based on those improved placements) performed well in those classes. Based on the data from the report, some students may not have caught on to the idea that they can retest sooner than 60 days after the initial test, which was the former policy. The result might be very different after this policy is in effect for a year or two. Until then, the Retest on Demand Policy will continue, and data will be collected and analyzed.

SAT/ACT:

The current policy, approved April 2007, states that the UH Community Colleges will recognize the SAT/ACT scores used for admissions by UH Mānoa as placement into English 100 (Ref. 2B-182). Recently, UH Mānoa changed their minimum scores to 510 and 22. The Placement Advisory Council recommends that the UH Community Colleges continue to accept Mānoa’s SAT/ACT scores as placement into English 100. On March 8, 2012, Vice Chancellors of Academic Affair (VCAAs) supported continuing to accept the SAT/ACT used by UH Mānoa which will require prerequisite changes for English 100. Windward CC made the appropriate changes prior to pre-registration for Fall 2012.
On the Windward CC Student Survey that was administered in Fall 2011 (Ref. 2B-64, Item 16.H.), for the item “Appropriateness of Math and English placement testing when entering WCC,” 44 percent of students responded excellent, 35 percent satisfactory, seven percent less than satisfactory, five percent poor, and nine percent unable to judge the appropriateness of the COMPASS placement Test. When compared to the Windward CC Student Survey administered in Fall 2005 (Ref. 2B-170, Item 16), this shows that 15 percent more of the students rated the appropriateness of Math and English placement testing as excellent, six percent more as satisfactory, four percent more as less than satisfactory, with no change in poor, five percent more unable to judge the appropriateness of the COMPASS placement Test. Thus, the 2011 survey indicates that 79 percent of the students felt satisfied or very satisfied with their placement testing results, compared to 70 percent in the survey conducted in 2005, a nine percent increase.  This may be an indication that more students like the COMPASS placement test retesting, but more research needs to be done to substantiate this.
Table 11: Appropriateness of Math and English placement testing when entering Windward CC





Fall 2005

Fall 2011

Excellent

117 (29%)

105 (44%)

Satisfactory

164 (41%)

85 (35%)

Less than satisfactory

42 (11%)

18 (7%)

Poor

19 (5%)

11 (5%)

Unable to judge

55 (14%)

22 (9%)

Hawai‘i P-20 Partnerships for Education is a statewide partnership led by the Good Beginnings Alliance, the Hawai‘i State Department of Education, and the University of Hawai‘i System that is working to strengthen the education pipeline from early childhood through higher education so that all students achieve career and college success. As another placement technique into UH Mathematics courses, a proposal was developed by Hawai‘i P-20 (Ref. 2B-183) and adopted by the UH System effective Fall 2010. Placement is determined by using the performance level of the Algebra II End-of-Course Exam, the student course grade for Algebra II, completion of a mathematics course (Algebra II or higher) in the senior year of high school, and meeting other course pre-requisites set by individual campuses. Prior to Fall 2013, validation studies will be used to adjust the range of scaled scores for each performance level and/or course placements as needed.


In the non-credit area, until it was dissolved in December, 2010, ETC accepted students aged 16 and up into its programs.  The Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE; Ref. 2B-66, p. 31-32) was administered to ETC students to test their grade level equivalency and their readiness for job training.  Students with disabilities were provided with accommodations for testing. Student Services staff regularly examined the program completion rates as a measure of the effectiveness of the TABE in the placement of students.
In April-Sept 2011, the College received funding in the amount of $186,000 from the Hawai‘i Community Foundation and $87,711 of Perkins funds to initiate the Ready Set Grow Hawai‘i project (Ref. 2B-78, p. 30). A subsequent grant from the Hawai‘i Community Foundation for $450,000 is helping to disseminate the program state-wide. This program is designed to address the educational needs of the population formerly served by the ETC. Admission requirements (Ref. 2B-78, p. 29) are similar to the former ETC program. Students need to be 16 years and older, and score between the 6th and 9th grade level in one of the areas of math, reading, or writing on the TABE adult test.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.  




Planning Agenda:

The OVPCC will revalidate COMPASS scores with the ACT.


The Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs and Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs will work collaboratively to review admissions and placement instruments to validate their effectiveness and to minimize bias.
Ready Set Grow Hawai‘i will review its admissions and placement instruments to validate their effectiveness and minimize bias.
II.B.3.f. The institution maintains student records permanently, securely, and confidentially, with provision for secure backup of all files, regardless of the form in which those files are maintained. The institution publishes and follows established policies for release of student records.

Descriptive Summary:

FERPA, or the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, protects the privacy rights of students. The UH policy and procedures required under the Act can be found in the Administrative Procedures A7.022 (Ref. 2B-31), Procedures Relating to the Protection of Educational Rights & Privacy of Students, dated June 2001. Student educational rights and privacy are addressed on pages 21-22 of the 2011-2013 Windward Community College Course Catalog (Ref. 2B-28, pp. 21-22). Students are also advised that copies of AP A7.022 may be obtained from the Windward CC Office of the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs. Similar information can be found in the 2005 to 2010 Course Catalogs (Ref. 2B-50). FERPA and the State of Hawai‘i’s Uniform Information Practices Act (Ref. 2B-184), UIPA, provide the policies that govern the release of students’ records. The College Registrar stated that release of students’ records must have a student’s written permission (G. Imai, personal communication, October 10, 2010).


The Registrar reports that permanent record cards (PRCs) or Pre-BANNER records are kept in fireproof vaults located in the Windward CC Admissions and Records Office. Post-BANNER records are kept on a UH System-wide file server that is backed up.  The Chief Information Officer at UH Mānoa is responsible for assuring that all records are backed up.
A UH System Information Security Officer at Mānoa, was asked in an e-mail (Ref. 2B-185) dated, January 18, 2011, about the security of student records within the UH System in light of several recent breaches at UH West Oʻahu (Ref. 2B-186), UHM Parking Office (Ref. 2B-187), Honolulu CC (Ref. 2B-188), and Kapio`lani CC (Ref. 2B-189). The Information Security Officer stated that these student records in the BANNER system are secure and protected in accordance with the UH Policy E2.214 (Ref. 2B-190).  The recent breaches that occurred at UH Mānoa occurred in violation of this UH System policy and generally were caused by human error.  There have been no security breaches at Windward CC to date.
In the non-credit area, until its dissolution, ETC utilized the Classware Student Information System (SIS) for its programs, which was backed up daily.  During its existence, ETC was in compliance with FERPA regulations.  ETC Course Catalogs (Ref. 2B-65) include policies on Student Educational Rights and Privacy of the Students (Ref. 2B-66, p. 30). CCE continues to use the Classware system to manage student data and is in compliance with FERPA regulations.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets the Standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


II.B.4. The institution evaluates student support services to assure their adequacy in meeting

identified student needs. Evaluation of these services provides evidence that they contribute

to the achievement of student learning outcomes. The institution uses the results of these

evaluations as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

Through a formal, systematic process of program review, Student Affairs is evaluated annually to ensure that the needs of the students are being met with maximum success, efficiency, and quality in keeping with the goals and objectives or student learning outcomes of the support units. In an Annual Program Review (Ref. 2B-9), the College uses formal evaluations of student services to assure that it meets student needs. The Policy (Ref. 2B-38) on Program Review states that support units will conduct annual assessments culminating in a Program Review in the fifth year. Covering the 2004 to 2008 school years, the Student Affairs Five Year Program Review (Ref. 2B-20) evaluated the eight units within the Student Affairs department: Counseling, Admissions and Records, Financial Aid, Student Activities, Student Publications, Upward Bound, Educational Talent Search, and Student Support Services. In order to make the Five-Year Review more relevant, significant structural changes (Ref. 2B-148) were made, including the addition of Student Learning Outcomes for each unit, student satisfaction information, and the continued use of the current formative evaluation. The 2010 CCSSE report (Ref. 2B-191) provided further evaluation of student support programs, with 72 percent of students saying the College puts “quite a bit” or “very much” emphasis on providing support to help them succeed.


As part of the Program Review process, mission statements and intended service outcomes for Student Affairs have been defined as:


  • Counseling—to assist students in defining and accomplishing person, academic, and career goals.

  • Admissions and Records—to process applications for admission, maintain student records, and process student transcripts and information requests.

  • Financial Aid—to develop, review, and disseminate financial resources to students to assist them in achieving their educational goals from pre-enrollment through graduation.

  • Student Activities—to promote student learning, success, and satisfaction as students involve themselves in student life and service.

  • Student Publications—to offer an educational experience for students in production of student publications and provide an effective medium for student communication on campus.


TRiO programs (Ref. 2B-192):


  • Upward Bound—to provide educational help to low-income and potential first-generation college student.

  • Student Support Services—to offer an array of services for eligible students that result in success in college.

  • Educational Talent Search—to encourage middle school and high school students to identify, explore and pursue post-secondary education.

Student Affairs has seen tremendous growth within the last five years, with counseling staff going from three counselors to eleven counselors from 2007 to 2011. This growth of the counseling staff was fortunately timed to coincide with a significant growth (Ref. 2B-5) in the overall enrollment at the College. Four additional full-time permanent counselors were added from the ETC program, which was dissolved in December 2010, along with one full-time temporary (grant funded; Ref. 2B-141) counselor, and three APT positions (SI and Hūlili) with counseling responsibilities (A. Eschenberg, personal communication, March 20, 2012). In the 2010 school year, a Freshman Year Experience (Ref. 2B-138)

was implemented. It involves student recruitment, assistance with the admissions and financial aid process, assistance with taking the Compass test, counseling, attendance at New Student Orientation (Ref. 2B-14), and Frosh Camp (Ref. 2B-17), and enrollment in the Frosh Cohort (Ref. 2B-16). These initiatives are based on best practices, a literature review of student success strategies, and measures outlined in Achieving the Dream and the Strategic Plan.
A Counseling Evaluation Form (Ref. 2B-150) was developed for students to evaluate their counseling sessions and assess the services provided. The Student Affairs Monthly Professional Activity Report (Ref. 2B-193) begun in 2005, tracks counselor/student contact by phone, e-mail, or in person, and identifies the College, community service, and professional development activities of the counselors. The counseling team meets weekly to evaluate and plan improvement of services to students (Ref. 2B-194). Counselors piloted the use of SARS Grid (Ref. 2B-195), an appointment and scheduling software in the spring of 2010 to implement across the campus for counseling, financial aid, and Student Support Services. The software assists counselors in understanding times of peak counseling usage and to plan accordingly.
The Counseling Department exceeded its goals to provide an Orientation for all new students, provide Peer Mentoring services for 200 students, provide 15 student transfer workshops, provide Classroom-based student success courses for 50 students, and a 75 percent satisfaction rate. The only exception was a goal that may never be met: providing academic advising for every student (Ref. 2B-9, p. 5).

Initiatives on campus to meet the College’s Strategic Outcomes (Ref. 2B-155) on student success have been led by this department. Student Learning Outcomes created by the Counseling and all of Student Affairs are evaluated in the 2010 Annual Assessment, with an amendment made once the data is validated. Two clerical staff members have been added to support this department as it has taken on new initiatives and the student body has grown (Ref. 2B-5): 1.) The Employment Training Center (ETC), with its closing, was able to provide one additional clerical position, which was assigned to Admissions & Records, thereby freeing up a clerk to be assigned to counseling services. 2.) A second clerical position is paid for through Title III grant funds. The institutionalization of the two Title III counselors assigned to marginalized students and transfer students might better meet these students’ needs.


Peer Mentoring (Ref. 2B-98) services, student transfer (Ref. 2B-136) workshops, and classroom-based student success courses (Ref. 2B-196) have also contributed to the 75 percent (Ref. 2B-9, p. 6) satisfaction rate on satisfaction surveys compiled by the counseling department. The summative data collected in the Spring 2010 semester suggest that Supplemental Instruction (SI) impacts student success, in that the preliminary data show students are more likely to get a “C” or better if they attend an SI session (Ref. 2B-9, p. 9). The direct impact of counseling on increases of retention, persistence, or graduation rates is difficult, if not impossible, to assess.
Outreach (Ref. 4B-26, p. [16]) at Windward CC has the mission of promoting greater student access to higher education through support in financial aid and college admissions assistance and through efforts to recruit Native Hawaiian (NH) students. According to the Windward Community College Strategic Plan and Action Outcomes document (2008), the College will “design and implement an effective enrollment management and recruitment plan to increase Native Hawaiian enrollment by three percent or 162 students (from 555 to 717) by 2015, especially targeting students from Kahuku and Waimānalo” (Ref. 2B-155, p. 9).
Admissions and Records (A&R) services have increased in the past five years. A&R is committed to assess and review its procedure to improve service to students with efficiency. To facilitate students’ access to technology, more Admissions and Records services are being offered online. Alaka‘i Rm. 113, has been dedicated as a One-Stop Student Center that provides students with general information, counseling, and computer assistance. Admissions and Records met all goals in 2008-2009 even with an increase of admissions applications (16 percent increase from the previous year), graduation

certifications (18 percent increase), and enrollment verification (25 percent increase; Ref. 2B-20). The continuing demand for services required additional space and computers for students to have access to the internet, and this has been provided for in Spring 2011 by the expansion of a reception area with additional computers in Alaka‘i 113.


The Financial Aid Office conducts reviews of its programs through yearly audits and examination of the cohort default rate on student loan programs. The cohort default rate does not show current information because students do not have to pay back their loans until after graduating or stopping out of school. The latest information is found in the Official Cohort Default Rates (Ref. 2B-197). The means of assessment for Federal Student Aid Programs include the annual A-133 Federal Student Financial Aid Audit, Annual Loan Default Rate for FFELP (Federal Family Educational Loan Program and Perkins Loan Programs (Ref. 2B-198, p. 42), and the Financial Aid website (Ref. 2B-8). A student satisfaction survey (Ref. 2B-25, pp. 1-2) with twelve items is sent out with award letters and students are asked to return the survey to the Financial Aid Office. This survey is used by the Financial Aid Office to assess their services for the Program Review. Financial Aid service goals include: Goal 1: a two-week time frame for completing the processing of applications and Goal 2: the absence of audit findings. Through a sampling of records and an audit completed in 2009, it was determined that goal 1 above was not met, but goal 2 was met. Additionally, statistical analyses showed that goals concerning low loan default rate, financial aid awards, financial aid outreach, and student satisfaction rate were exceeded (Ref. 2B-9, p. 10).
In terms of applications processed and financial aid stipends awarded, with a total of $6.6 million in federal and state aid awarded in 2009-10, not only has financial aid access at Windward CC increased, but the workload of the staff has also increased (Ref. 2B-4; Ref. 2B-199). As a result of increased demand on level staffing, System grant funds have been utilized to pay for overtime work by the financial aid employees. This is done to help speed processing time and student satisfaction, as well as maintain compliance with federal regulations. The University of Hawai‘i System is currently also beginning a financial aid centralization initiative to centralize initial processing of financial aid documentation, speeding time to award and removing some workload from individual campuses (A. Eschenberg, personal communication, March 23, 2012).
In addition to the 35.6 percent increase in financial aid applications between 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 (Ref. 2B-9, p. 10), financial aid staffing has also been challenged by increasing outreach activities to our community. The development of a One-Stop Scholarship Center at Windward Mall (Ref. 2B-200) has expanded the reach of the Financial Aid Office in an initiative aimed at meeting the needs of non-traditional students. Title III grant funding has been utilized to pay for a half-time financial aid assistant to provide outreach and financial aid services (A. Eschenberg, personal communication, March 23, 2012).
Federally funded programs under the auspices of Student Affairs conduct their own internal evaluations. All TRiO programs (Ref. 2B-13; Ref. 2B-12; Ref. 2B-11) are federal programs that receive special funding through grants and have different reporting and evaluation timetables and requirements. The appraisal processes for these programs are mandated by the granting agency. All TRiO programs (Educational Talent Search, Student Support Services, and Upward Bound) have met their federally prescribed goals.
The Educational Talent Search (ETS) program is designed to provide the following services and activities to all ETS participants:


  • Career and college awareness

  • Exploration and planning

  • College site visits

  • Self-awareness skills

  • Life skills and study skills

  • Cultural and academic enrichment

  • Financial aid planning

  • SAT/ACT and college application fee waivers

  • College applications and financial aid applications assistance

The Annual Performance Report for the 2009-2010 year indicates the goals of serving 600 students per grant and at least 67 percent of low-income, first-generation college students were met (Ref. 2B-9, pp. 14-15).


Student Support Services (SSS; Ref. 2B-12) provides meaningful and life-long learning experiences to prepare students for college and career success. For 2008-2009, all US Department of Education objectives (Ref. 2B-12) were met for this project. The SSS project served 100 percent of its 235 students. 97 percent of the eligible participants were in good academic standing, 78 percent persisted from one academic year to the next, and nearly 41 percent either graduated and/or transferred to a four-year college or university (R. Inouye, personal communication, December 2011).
Preliminary numbers from the 2009-2010 indicate the USDOE objectives were met. Of the 166 participants who were tutored in 211 courses, of those who completed the course, 80 percent earned a passing grade. Due to the success of the tutoring program in TRiO, demand has more than doubled and more tutors were assigned in Fall 2010 than in all of the previous years (Ref. 2B-9, p. 16).
Upward Bound (UB; Ref. 2B-13) students in grades 9-12 participate in grade-specific college planning activities held at their school and at the Windward CC campus. Delivery of services is conducted on an individual basis and/or group setting. Windward CC-UB serves four high schools: Castle, Kahuku, Kailua, and Kalaheo High Schools. One guidance advisor focuses on the needs of 12th grade students, while the other focuses on grades 9-11. Program staffing includes the Program Director and two .75 FTE Guidance Advisors. The annual performance report (Ref. 2B-9) for the 2009-2010 year was submitted in December 2010. Four of five goals and objectives were met, but a fifth goal of 60 percent of students who continue to be enrolled in the Fall term of the second college year was not met as only 44 percent continued (Ref. 2B-9, p. 17).
The Employment Training Center (ETC) of Windward CC Community College’s Vocational & Community Education (VCE) division, now called Career and Community Education, conducted annual assessment of their Student Support Services (Ref. 2B-158). In 2006, the last Accreditation team recommended the elimination of two Student Services divisions within one institution, and this has taken place with the dissolution of ETC and the re-assignment of its counselors to Student Affairs.
Starting in 2009, the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) created Governance Sub-committee Surveys (GSIEC) to create a mechanism to measure perceptions of department and leadership effectiveness in response to the 2006 Team’s recommendation on governance. Results of student evaluations and GSIEC surveys (Ref. 2B-158, p. 10) have been used as indicators on how the individual coordinator or department could improve their delivery of counseling services until the dissolution of ETC as of the end of calendar year 2010.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


Standard II.B Evidence


  1. Smarthinking (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/smarthinking/

  2. UH System Strategic Plan (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ovppp/stratplan/UHstratplan.pdf

  3. UHCC Strategic Plan 2002-2010 Update, Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures, 2008-2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/Update_2008_2015.pdf

  4. WCC Strategic Plan for 2002-2010 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/documents/strategicplanfinal.pdf

  5. Headcount Enrollment of Credit Students, by Campus, UH Fall 2011 to Fall 2011 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/iro/pdf/Fall_Enr_SSH.pdf

  6. Admissions and Records (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Admissions_Records/index.php

  7. Counseling and Advising (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Counseling_Advising/

  8. Financial Aid (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Financial_Aid/index_Secondary.php

  9. Student Affairs 2010 Annual Assessment (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2010/Units/Student%20Services/Student%20Affairs%202010%20Program%20Review.pdf

  10. Student Life (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/index.php

  11. About Educational Talent Search (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ETS/

  12. TRiO Student Support Services (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/TRIO/Student_Support_Services.php

  13. TRiO Upward Bound (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Trio/Upward_Bound.php

  14. New Student Orientation (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Services/Orientation/

  15. Supplemental Instruction at WCC flyer (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/Supplemental_Instruction/SI_Program_Flyer.pdf

  16. Learning Communities (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Learning_Communities/index.php

  17. Frosh Camp (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Services/Frosh_Camp/Index.php

  18. Supplemental Instruction at WCC (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2011/Supplmental%20Instruction_2011_05_04_Evaluation.pdf

  19. Summary of Progress, Title III Grant October 2005 - October 2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Title_III/2010/T3%2005-10%20Success%20Summary.pdf

  20. Student Affairs Five Year Program Review 2004-2008 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/Student%20Services/2009ProgramReview12-15-09.pdf

  21. Achieving the Dream Implementation Plan (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Planning/Plans/AtD/ATD%20implementation%20plan%20Final%20%283%29.pdf

  22. Assessment Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/Documents.php

  23. Health Clearances (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Admissions_Records/Health_Clearance.php

  24. WCC Career Center (Archived Copy) http://web.mac.com/shodell2/Files/Career_Center.html

  25. 2010-2011 Financial Aid Office Survey (Archived Copy)

  26. Student Services 2011 Annual Report of Program Data (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Student%20Services/StudentServicesReport_1-23-12.pdf

  27. Catalogs and Schedules of Classes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/index.php

  28. WCC Course Catalog 2011-2013 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/WCC_Catalog_2011-2013.pdf

  29. Grievance (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Grievance/

  30. FERPA and Confidentiality of Student Records (Archived Copy) http://www.windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Ferpa/WCCFERPAmemo8-31-05.pdf

  31. A7.022 Procedures Relating to Protection of the Educational Rights and Privacy of Students (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/a700/a7022a.pdf

  32. WCC Policy 2.1: Administration Governance (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/2_1.php

  33. WCC Policy 2.2: Policies and Procedures for Chartered Groups on Campus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/Chartered_Groups.pdf

  34. WCC Policy 3.1: Organization Governance (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/3_1.php

  35. WCC Policy 4.1: Planning Governance (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/4_1.php

  36. WCC Policy 4.2: Strategic Planning (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/4_2_Planning_Policy.pdf

  37. WCC Policy 4.3: Budget Development (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/4_3_Budget_development.pdf

  38. WCC Policy 4.4: Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/4_4_program_review.pdf

  39. WCC Policy 4.5: Mission (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/4_5_mission.pdf

  40. WCC Policy 9.1: Personnel Governance (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/9_1.php

  41. WCC Policy 10.1: Land and Physical Facilities Governance (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/10_1.php

  42. Library home page (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu

  43. Library Copyright Information (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Topics/Copyright/

  44. UHCC System Policies (Archived Copy) http://uhcc.hawaii.edu/OVPCC/policies/index.php

  45. WCC Curriculum Review Policy (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/CCAAC/Documents/CCAAC_Philosophy_Procedures.pdf

  46. Sabbatical Leave Procedures for Faculty (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/Sabbaticals_Policy/Sabbatical_Policy.pdf

  47. Chancellor for Community College Memo Numerical Index (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CCCM_PDF/cccm.html

  48. WCC Policies, Procedures, and Guidelines (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/

  49. Schedule of Classes Fall 2011/Spring 2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/SOC_Current.pdf

  50. Archive of Catalogs and Schedules of Classes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/Documents.php

  51. Online Learning (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Online/

  52. Distance Learning at the UH (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/dl/

  53. Online Student Readiness Assessment (Archived Copy) http://www.foothill.edu/fga/pre_assessment.php

  54. Student Orientation for Online Learning (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/online/Orientation.php

  55. Ordering Items for Online Courses (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Bookstore/Online.php

  56. Laulima (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Technology/Laulima.php

  57. Technology on Campus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Technology/index.php

  58. Class Information for Fall 2012: Online (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/index.php?list=Online

  59. Online Courses at WCC letter (Archived Copy)

  60. “Some Things You Should Know” (Archived Copy)

  61. “Important Web Pages” (Archived Copy)

  62. “Logging in to Laulima” (Archived Copy)

  63. “Forwarding Your UH Mail to Another Email Account” (Archived Copy)

  64. WCC Student Institutional Survey 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/IRO/Documents/2011/StudentInsitutionalSurvey_9-12-11combo.pdf

  65. Employment Training Center Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/etc/documents.php

  66. Employment Training Center Course Catalog 2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/ETC/2010_ETC_Catalog.pdf

  67. WCC Non-credit Course Catalog January 2012-May 2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Continuing_Education/Documents/OCCE_2012_Spring.pdf

  68. Continuing Education (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/continuing_education/index.php

  69. Ka Piko (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/KaPiko/

  70. Supplemental Instruction (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/Supplemental_Instruction/

  71. Student Services 2006 Annual Assessment (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2006/Student_Services_Program_Review_2006.pdf

  72. Achieving the Dream: Gatekeeper Courses (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/AchievingDream/GatekeeperCourses.html

  73. Student Support Services Program: Purpose (Archived Copy) http://www2.ed.gov/print/programs/triostudsupp/index.html

  74. Student Support Services Program: Eligibility (Archived Copy) http://www2.ed.gov/print/programs/triostudsupp/eligibility.html

  75. Student Affairs 2009-2010 Annual Assessment Abstract (Archived Copy)

  76. Program Review Report for Employment Training Center Programs Student Services for Fiscal Year 2005-2006 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2006/ETC_Student_Services_2006.pdf

  77. Ready Set Grow Hawaiʻi (Archived Copy) http://www.readysetgrowhawaii.com/

  78. Annual Assessment for Office of Career and Community Education for FY 2010-2011 (Archived Copy) http://www.windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/OCET/2011%20Annual%20CCE%20Jan%202012.pdf

  79. WCC Entering Student Survey Items (Archived Copy)

  80. Student Services 2008 Program Review (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2008/Student_Services_Program_Review_2008.pdf

  81. Locate a COMPASS Internet Remote Testing Site (Archived Copy) http://www.act.org/compass/sites/index.html

  82. Student Services 2007 Annual Assessment (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2007/Student_Services_Annual_Assessment_2007.pdf

  83. Substantive Change Proposal: Associate of Arts (Liberal Arts) Distance Education Program (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Documents/2011/Substantive_change_Online.pdf

  84. Counseling and Advising Directory (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Counseling_Advising/Directory.php

  85. Guide to the STAR Advisor (Archived Copy) https://www.star.hawaii.edu:10012/includes/PDFs/advising/StarOverview.pdf

  86. UHCC Career Connections (Archived Copy) http://careerconnections.hawaii.edu/career_connections/gallery.php

  87. Ryan Perreira, Career Advisor (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/People/Ryan_Perreira/

  88. Sarah Hodell, Career Advisor (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/People/Sarah_Hodell/

  89. ACT Discover (Archived Copy) http://www.act.org/discover/

  90. Ka Piko Career Explorations Student Registration (Archived Copy) https://www.myinterfase.com/windward/studentregistration.aspx

  91. Kuʻulei (Christy) Lessary, Transfer Advisor (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/People/Kuulei_Lessary/

  92. Student Success (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/success/index.php

  93. Kathleen Zane, Student Success Advisor (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/people/Kathleen_Zane/

  94. Ann Lemke, Disabilities Advisor (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/People/Ann_Lemke/

  95. Disabilities Handbook (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Disabilities/Disabilities_Handbook.pdf

  96. Academic Probation Policy (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/success/Academic_Probation.php

  97. Financial Aid Application Process (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/financial_aid/Application_Process.php

  98. Peer Mentors (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Services/Peer_Mentors/

  99. Peer Tutoring in Chemistry (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/chemistry_Tutors/

  100. Math Lab (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/Math_Lab/index.php

  101. Writing Center (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/Writing/

  102. Testing Center (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/testing_center/

  103. UH Distance Learning Proctoring Office Information (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/dl/faculty/prep/proctor_office.html

  104. UH Distance Learning Guidelines and Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/dl/faculty/prep/proctoringprocedures.html

  105. Online Learning at WCC Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/2010_Online_Learning_Report.pdf

  106. “First-ever Ko‘olauloa Educational Expo on July 23” (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Calendar/2011/Education_Expo/

  107. “Free Apple GarageBand Class in Kahuku” (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/spotlight/2011_garageband/

  108. Notes From Kahuku Non-Credit GarageBand Sessions (Archived Copy)

  109. Student Government (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/Student_Government/index.php

  110. Student Life: Clubs (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/Clubs.php

  111. Welcome to WCC Service-Learning (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Service-Learning/

  112. UH Job Program and Eligibility Information (Archived Copy) https://sece.its.hawaii.edu/sece/help/std/std_jobprogram_help.html

  113. WCC TRiO Tutor Application (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/TRIO/Forms/Tutor_Application.pdf

  114. Botany Club (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/Botany/index.php

  115. Film Club (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/Film/

  116. KuPono (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/KuPono/index.php

  117. Music Club (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/Music/

  118. Phi Theta Kappa (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/PTK/index.php

  119. Safe Spaces (Archived Copy) http://web.mac.com/shodell2/Files/Safe_Spaces.html

  120. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a 2006 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/2006/

  121. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a 2007 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/2007/

  122. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a 2008 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/2008/

  123. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a 2009 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/2009/

  124. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a 2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/2010/

  125. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/2011/

  126. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/

  127. Chancellor’s Office Annual Assessment 2010-2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Chancellor%20Office/ChancellorsOfficeAnnualRreport_12.15.11FINAL.pdf

  128. ANTH 200, Spring 2012, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Classes/2012_Spring/64004.pdf

  129. Speech Lab (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/Speech_Lab/

  130. Palikū Theatre (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/paliku/

  131. Rental Information for Palikū Theatre (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/paliku/Renting.php

  132. Gallery ‘Iolani (Archived Copy) http://gallery.wcc.hawaii.edu/

  133. Annual Assessment for Office of Continuing and Community Education for FY 2008-2009 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2009/Program_Review_2009_OCET.pdf

  134. Hōkūlani Imaginarium (Archived Copy) http://aerospace.wcc.hawaii.edu/imaginarium.html

  135. One-Stop at Windward Mall discussion board (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Discussions/2010/One-Stop/

  136. Transferring From WCC (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Affairs/Transfer/

  137. Disabilities Services (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Disabilities/

  138. First Year Experience (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/FYE/Index.php

  139. Native Hawaiian Scholarship ʻAha (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Calendar/2011/Scholarship_Aha/

  140. College and Career Fair, Tuesday, April 12, 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Calendar/2011/Career_Fair/

  141. Title III (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/title_III/

  142. Developmental Kākoʻo Koʻolau grant abstract (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Title_III/2010/T3%2010-15%20Developmental%20KakooKoolau%20Abstract.pdf

  143. SARS Grid login (Archived Copy) http://sarsserver.wcc.hawaii.edu/CounselorsGrid/login.aspx

  144. Counselor, e-mail, 2011/01/28 (Archived Copy)

  145. Supplemental Instruction Leader Training Agenda (Archived Copy)

  146. Mentor/Student Activities Center Staff Training Schedule (Archived Copy)

  147. Achieving the Dream WCC Web page (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/AchievingDream/AchievingDreamdefault.htm

  148. Program Review Timeline (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Program_Review_Timeline.pdf

  149. Academic Advising Syllabus (Archived Copy)

  150. Counseling Services Evaluation (Archived Copy)

  151. Student Engagement (CCSSE) (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/CCSSE/

  152. WCC Faculty Institutional Survey 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/IRO/Documents/2011/FacultyInsitutionalSurvey_9-12-11combo.pdf

  153. From Here to There: Transition Counseling Under Title III (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Title_III/2010/T3%2005-10%20Transition%20Summary.pdf

  154. Achieving the Dream Implementation Plan, Updated 2009/08/11 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/atd/Implementation_plan_Final.pdf

  155. Strategic Plan Action Outcomes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Planning/Plans/Strategic/StrategicPlan12-8-08.pdf

  156. TRiO Student Support Services Scoop (Archived Copy) http://trioscoop.blogspot.com/

  157. Reorganization Proposal Request: UH WCC Vocational and Community Education (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2011/2011_01_07_ETC_Reorganization.pdf



  1. Employment Training Center Student Support Unit Program Review 2005-2009 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/Student%20Services/ETCStudentSupportProgramReview11-29-09.pdf

  2. G. Kabei & J. Uyetake, personal communication, February 29, 2012 (Archived Copy)

  3. WCC Enrollment Reports: Table 5, Selected Student Characteristics Spring 2011, All Ethnicities All Majors (Archived Copy)

  4. Disabilities Counselor, e-mail, 2012/03/19 (Archived Copy)

  5. WCC Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Equality Organization (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/LGBTIE/index.php

  6. Hawaiʻi Music Institute (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hawaii_Music_Institute/

  7. Hawaiian Music Workshops 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hawaii_Music_Institute/Documents/2011/Hawaiian_Music_Workshops_2011.pdf

  8. Talk Story at Palikū Theatre (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hawaii_Music_Institute/Documents/2011/Talk_Story_Series_2011.pdf

  9. Hawaii Music Institute Music Workshops, April 24-May 22, 2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hawaii_Music_Institute/Documents/2010/Mele_Workshop.php

  10. “ʻUkulele & Hula ʼ06-Learn from the Masters” (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hawaii_Music_Institute/HMI_2006.php

  11. Ke Kumu Pali (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Ke_Kumu_Pali/

  12. Ke Kumu Pali Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Ke_Kumu_Pali/Documents.php

  13. WCC Student Institutional Survey 2005 (Archived Copy) http://www.zoomerang.com/Shared/SharedResultsSurveyResultsPage.aspx?ID=L22GSS632SV7

  14. Running Start Early Admission Handbook (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Services/Early_Admissions/Running_Start-Early_Admit_Handbook.pdf

  15. Placement Tests (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Placement_Tests/index.php

  16. 2010-2011 UHCC Placement Advisory Workgroup Members (Archived Copy)

  17. UHCC System-wide Programs/Initiatives (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/resources_placement.html

  18. Implementing the Agreed Upon COMPASS Test Practices (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/placement/2005_SEPTEMBER_Implementing_Agreed_Upon_Compass_Test_Practices.pdf

  19. Recommendations on COMPASS Placement Testing Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/placement/2006_MARCH_Testing_Procedures_Math.pdf

  20. Fall 2006 Recommendations on COMPASS Placement Testing Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/placement/2007_APRIL_Testing_Procedures_Retesting_SAT_Uniform_Math_Instructions.pdf

  21. Expand Proctoring Services at a Standardized fee (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/placement/2010_JUNE_UHCC_Policy_Compass_Test_Proctoring_Servics_at_a_Standardized_Fee.pdf

  22. Change to the COMPASS Retesting Policy (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/placement/2010_MAY_UHCC_Policy_Retesting.pdf

  23. COMPASS Repeaters Study (Archived Copy)

  24. COMPASS Retesting at Kapiʻolani Community College and Leeward Community College (Archived Copy)

  25. Placement Advisory Council, meeting minutes, 2012/03/07 (Archived Copy)

  26. Processing Algebra II End-of-Course Exam Score Reports for Consideration for Placement into UH Mathematics Courses (Archived Copy)

  27. Uniform Information Practices Act (Archived Copy) http://www.state.hi.us/oip/uipa.html

  28. Information Security Officer, e-mail, 2011/19/01 (Archived Copy)

  29. Report on Security Breach at the UH West O‘ahu (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/eaur/govrel/reports/2010/hrs487n-4_2010-11-08_personal_info_breach_report.pdf

  30. Report on Security Breach at the UH at Mānoa (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/eaur/govrel/reports/2010/hrs487n-4_2010-07-06_personal_info_breach_report.pdf

  31. Report on Security Breach at the UH, Honolulu Community College (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/eaur/govrel/reports/2010/hrs487n-4_2010-03-16_personal-info-breach_report.pdf

  32. Report on Security Breach at the UH, Kapiʻolani Community College (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/eaur/govrel/reports/2009/hrs487n-4_05-05-2009_personal-info-breach_report.pdf

  33. E2.214 Security and Protection of Sensitive Information (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e2/e2214.pdf

  34. WCC Community College Student Success and Engagement Survey 2010 Results (Archived Copy) http://www.ccsse.org/survey/public_profile.cfm?ccsse_id=14199000&year=2010

  35. TRiO (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/Trio/

  36. Student Services Monthly Professional Activity Report (Archived Copy)

  37. WCC Counselor Meeting Notes 2009/04/08 (Archived Copy)

  38. WCC SARS Agreement (Archived Copy)

  39. IS 103 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/IS103/

  40. School Default Rates FY 2009, 2008, and 2007 (Archived Copy) *This Web page can be found by opening the following link and typing in “Windward Community College” in the “School” search box: http://www.nslds.ed.gov/nslds_SA/defaultmanagement/search_cohort.cfm

  41. Federal Perkins Loan Program Status of Default as of June 30, 2008 (Archived Copy) https://www.ifap.ed.gov/perkinscdrguide/attachments/0708PerkinsCDR.pdf

  42. Achieving the Dream (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/atd/index.php

  43. One-Stop at Windward Mall (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Affairs/One-Stop/index.php





Standard II.C Library and Learning Support Services


Library and other learning support services for students are sufficient to support the institution’s instructional programs and intellectual, aesthetic, and cultural activities in whatever format and wherever they are offered. Such services include library services and collections, tutoring, learning centers, computer laboratories, and learning technology development and training. The institution provides access and training to students so that library and other learning support services may be used effectively and efficiently. The institution systematically assesses these services using student learning outcomes, faculty input, and other appropriate measures in order to improve the effectiveness of the services.
II.C.1. The institution supports the quality of its instructional programs providing library and other learning support services that are sufficient in quantity, currency, depth, and variety to facilitate educational offerings, regardless of location or means of delivery.

Descriptive Summary:


The Library is located in the 7,800 square-foot Hale La‘akea building, which has seating capacity for 111 people.  The Library provides the following services (Ref. 2C-1, p. 2):





  • Formal instruction: guided tours, orientations, course-related instruction, information literacy tutorials, and research skills tutorials

  • Informal instruction: reference desk interviews, help desk assistance, point-of-use assistance, self-guided tours, instruction by telephone, e-mail, and pathfinders

  • User account: obtain passwords, renew items checked out, and recall items

  • Reference services: assistance with finding, evaluating and using information in all formats; orientation, ready reference, and referral services; citation preparation

  • Research services: on-demand, by appointment, in person, telephone and e-mail

  • Technical assistance: assistance with computer hardware, software, network, e-mail, remote access, printing, making copies

  • Current awareness services

  • Access, borrowing, and course reserve services

  • Interlibrary loan, document delivery and other consortium services

The Library collection includes over 49,000 volumes, 111 active periodicals, and the back issues of 42 inactive periodicals.  The Course Catalogued Collection is composed of over 42,000 books, almost 3,100 pamphlets, and about 3,360 audiovisual items including audiotapes, phonograph records, compact discs, DVDs, CD-ROMs, slides, videotapes, and games (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix A, pp. 2-3).

The Library has a Hawaiian, Hawaiian Reserve, and Hawaiian Pamphlet Collection of 11,478 items. Furthermore, the Library has a Reserve Collection of approximately 836 items that includes assigned class readings and other supplemental materials designated by instructors for student use. The Library circulates an average of 8,200 volumes per year (Ref. 2C-1, pp. 11-12, 14).
A reference librarian is available when the Library is open to assist students and faculty in locating information, learning to use information resources, evaluating sources of information, and citing these sources. Many materials held by other libraries in the University of Hawai‘i System are available to Windward CC students and faculty through intra-system loans. The library also welcomes use by other University of Hawai‘i students and community members.
The Library has 26 desktop computers (seven Macs, 19 PCs, including four express-use stations), nine laptop computers (two Macs and four PCs for use in building), and nine older model laptop computers that can be borrowed for the semester. Wireless network access is available throughout the library.  The Library has three printers, four scanners, five TV monitors, three VCR players, two DVD players, one filmstrip/cassette player, one slide/cassette player, two cassette players, one pay photocopier, two microfilm reader/printers, one microfiche reader printer, one typewriter, and one supply table equipped with a paper cutter, pencil sharpener, hole punch, and stapler (Ref. 2C-1, p. 3).

Through its website, the Library provides secure, 24/7 on- and off-campus access to the Course Catalog and to online materials through subscriptions to databases such as ARTstor, Britannica Online, ebrary, ScienceDirect, Films on Demand, and the EBSCOHost Academic suite (Ref. 2C-2). These provide abstracts and full-text access to a variety of journal, magazine, and newspaper articles, reference works, films, maps, books, quality web resources, and more.  The quantity of full-text items accessed by Windward CC patrons has grown from over 15,000 items in AY 2007 to at least 20,000 items in AY 2008 and AY 2009 and to at least 21,500 full text items in AY 2010 (Ref. 2C-1, p. 14).

The Library provides reciprocal intra-system and interlibrary loan services for Windward CC students, staff, faculty and administrators (Ref. 2C-4).  In AY 2008, AY 2009, and AY 2010, Windward CC Library patrons requested 74, 64, and 72 items from other libraries, respectively. Over the same period, the Windward CC Library fulfilled 582, 578, and 887 requests from other libraries (Ref. 2C-1, p. 12).
The Library provides reference services via e-mail, telephone, and in person during the hours the Library is open.  Since AY 2008, the reference librarians have fielded a growing number of reference questions, one-on-one instruction sessions, faculty consultations, and directional and technical questions. There were over 4,000 Reference and Instructional Service transactions in AY 2008, over 5,000 in AY 2009, and over 6,000 in AY 2010 (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix A, Table 5).

Since AY 2007, the Library has maintained its support of distance learning through various services and resources (Ref. 2C-1, p. 10). One reference librarian is assigned to provide direct support to the distance learning students and faculty. In addition to providing off-campus access to the Library Course Catalog, e-book collections, and journal and reference databases, the Library maintains online tutorials like the Library Research Units (Ref. 2C-5) and the UH Libraries’ interactive tutorial, Learning Information Literacy Online (Ref. 2C-6). Like on-campus patrons, remote students and faculty can receive reference services by phone and e-mail, and can request to have Windward CC Library materials sent other UH campus libraries for pick up.


In accordance with US DOE regulations, the Library requires that all patrons use their unique UH System User ID and password to login to their library accounts, request intra-system loans, and access subscription databases from off-campus devices.

The Library staff provides exceptional service to its patrons. In 2010, 98 percent of respondents to the Library User Survey agreed or strongly agreed that the library staff was approachable and welcoming (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E, p. 14), a 15 percent improvement over the 2008 survey (Ref. 2C-3, Appendix C, p. 3). Similarly in 2010, 99 percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the library staff was courteous and polite (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E, p. 15), up from 85 percent in 2008 (Ref. 2C-3, Appendix C, p. 3). In 2010, 98 percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the library staff was available when needed; 11 percent of respondents agreed and 71 percent strongly agreed that the library staff was willing to leave their desk to help (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E, pp. 16-17).


Also in that year, 99 percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the library staff members guide users to useful information and answered questions accurately, while 98 percent agreed or strongly agreed that the library staff helped users learn to use online resources, and 97 percent agreed or strongly agreed that the library staff encouraged users to return for additional help (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E, pp. 18-21).
Survey respondents have become more satisfied with the Library’s materials, with 97 percent agreeing or strongly agreeing that they were able to find enough books and articles for their coursework, up from 83 percent in 2008 (Ref. 2C-7, p. 3), and 96 percent agreeing or strongly agreeing that they were able to find enough books and 95 percent agreeing that they could find enough journal articles for their Hawai‘i-related courses (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E, pp. 6-7).
The new Library Learning Commons (LLC) opens in 2012 (Ref. 2C-8). Books, materials, and computers in the present Library building will move to the new facility. The College needs to seek funds for the new building’s computers, audiovisual equipment and other electronics that cannot be purchased with Capital Improvement Project (CIP) funds. In its 2009-2010 Annual Review, the Library requested $975,000 to purchase computers, audiovisual equipment, and other electronics that cannot be purchased with CIP funds (Ref. 2C-1, p. 1). This budget request was brought down to $415,000 through the deliberations of the Planning and Budget Council (PBC) during Spring 2011, with the PBC mandating that the LLC equipment budget be funded by taking $150,000 from the accumulated summer school balance and committing $132,500 from the total balance of Summer School receipts for each of the following two summers (Ref. 2C-9).

The Learning Center (TLC) occupied Hale Mānaleo until May 2009, when the building was demolished to make way for the new Library Learning Commons.  The Learning Center included testing areas, study areas with tables and carrels, a computer lab, and a resource teacher desk.  The TLC’s equipment included computers, printers, scanners, CD and DVD writers, viewers for videos, and cassette players to support language learning.  Computer-assisted instruction was available at the Center supported courses in English, Chemistry, Psychology, Mathematics, and Japanese (Ref. 2C-10).


On May 25, 2009 the TLC was renamed The Testing Center (TTC;Ref. 2C-11) and began operations Hale Alaka‘i 106.  Due to smaller quarters, some services that had been provided at the TLC were transferred to other projects or discontinued all together:


  • The TLC offered tutoring services. Student tutors supervised by a Math faculty provided mathematics tutoring. Each semester, at least two faculty members served as writing resource teachers. Later, graduate students were hired as writing resources teachers until the closing of Mānaleo. All tutoring services were transferred to TRiO SSS with the support of Peer Mentors and Supplemental Instructors.




  • The video library was disbanded, returning instructional videos to the appropriate instructors for loaning to students.




  • The Learning Center housed various instructional materials for Independent Study. Supplemental material in reading, writing, mathematics, and study skills were also housed in Mānaleo. Instructional materials formerly used for students’ Independent Study to improve reading comprehension and vocabulary development were returned to the Language Arts Department and have since been supplanted by newer software and print materials that students have access to through the Writing Lab located at Ka Piko.




  • The quiet study area and computer bank were relocated to the Ka Piko Study Center.

TTC (Ref. 2C-12) is open Monday through Friday and provides the following services: COMPASS placement testing (assessment of students’ skills in reading, writing and mathematics), make-up tests, testing for courses offered through distance learning, and test proctoring for any UHCC System or Mainland college.  When the LLC opens in Fall 2012, TTC will be incorporated in the re-located Ka Piko Study Center where tutoring services will be offered as well as an array of other support services yet to be determined.

Even with the May 2009 downsizing, demand for testing services has remained high.  In AY 2008, the TLC administered 1,217 placement tests, 1,439 distance learning tests, and 6,973 campus tests (Ref. 2C-7, pp. 4-5). In AY 2010, the TTC administered 1,370 placement tests, 2,423 distance learning tests, and 4,230 campus tests (Ref. 2C-11, p. [1]).
In accordance with US DOE regulations, the TTC requires identification of all students, including those enrolled in distance learning courses, who make use of testing center services. The Center does not operate virtually; students must come in person, show proper identification and sign in to take an exam or placement test (Ref. 2C-13, p. 17).

Although satisfaction with The Testing Center is high, it has declined. However, it should be noted that the Center has been providing service at a consistent, or perhaps even higher level because the number of students have increased in proportion to the number of exams proctored. In a survey conducted by The Testing Center, 94 percent of respondents said the staff was friendly and helpful versus the 90 percent in the AY 2011 survey. In AY 2010 and AY 2011, 92 percent said the TTC’s hours met their needs. In the AY 2010 survey, 96 percent said the atmosphere of the TTC was conductive to testing versus 93 percent in the AY 2011. In 2010, 96 percent said the services of the TTC are satisfactory versus the 94 percent in AY 2011.  Furthermore, in AY 2010, distance learning instructors were asked to assess their satisfaction with TTC services on a scale of 1-5 (with 5 being the highest).  The average rating was 4.98. This question was not asked in AY 2011 (Ref. 2C-11, pp. 1-2; Ref. 2C-13, p. 16).

The Testing Center suffers from a lack of space.  Since there are only 12 desks and nine computers, students sometimes have to wait until one becomes available.  However, this issue should be resolved when the TTC moves to the new Library Learning Commons building (Ref. 2C-13, p. 17).

The Math Lab, currently housed in a classroom in Hale Mana‘opono, offers tutoring for all mathematics courses at Windward CC (Ref. 2C-14).  The lab has 4 desktop computers and one printer for student use. In Fall 2008, there were 989 student visits to the Math Lab. In Fall 2009, there were 1,142 student visits, while in Fall 2010 there were 1,869 visits. In terms of academic year visitor counts, during AY 2007, there were 1,797 student visits, which increased to 3,172 student visits in AY 2011. Between those years, there were some fluctuations in student visits due to The Math Lab being temporarily relocated into a much smaller room as Hale Mana‘opono was renovated. Nevertheless, demand for Math Lab services has increased over the years (Ref. 2C-15).

The Math Lab also suffers from insufficient resources.  For the past three years, the Mathematics and Business Department has documented the need for release time to allow faculty to develop and define the position of a “Math Lab” instructor.  The department argues, “There is a need to have a full-time permanent position for a Math Lab instructor to manage all the tasks of the Math Lab, to provide independent study or modularized study, to search and evaluate computer software to assist students’ success, primarily in developmental math courses” (Ref. 2C-16, p. 42).
In AY 2007, the Language Arts Department Review identified establishing a Speech Lab as its number two departmental priority (Ref. 2C-17, p. 11). By assessing the needs of the students, the Department funded the Speech Lab, which opened in Fall 2008 in a classroom in Hale Pālanakila (Ref. 2C-18).  Services offered by the Speech Lab include help in minimizing stage fright in oral presentations, assisting students in successfully fulfilling their class oral assignments, adapting mentoring to any teacher’s objectives, one-on-one instruction for meeting oral assignment needs, and allowing students to practice or perform in a non-threatening environment with positive guidance.  Student mentors who staff the lab help students create outlines, visual aids, and PowerPoint presentations.
In Fall 2008, 52 students made use of the Speech Lab. This fell to 25 students in 2012. The decrease in student visits can be attributed to the relatively few hours that the Lab was open since the current Schedule of Classes does not allow additional time outside of the Tuesday/Thursday open lunch period (12:30-1:30) for the Lab to be open. Furthermore, since Fall 2011, even this period has been eliminated due to the Schedule of Classes shifting to a predominantly four-day week schedule. This also limits the number of qualified lab assistants available during the desired open hours.  Because of this, the Language Arts Department has requested funding to expanded Lab hours from 10 to 20 hours per week to allow more time for students to use the lab (Ref. 2C-19; Ref. 2C-20; Ref. 2C-21).

The Writing Center opened in Hale ʻĀkoakoa, in March, 2011. It, too, will be relocated to the Library Learning Commons upon building completion. Funded by the Title III Developmental Grant, this study center offers tutoring and Supplemental Instruction with Peer Mentors to all Windward CC students. It also provides free access to computers, printing and a quiet comfortable place to study.


Writing assistance used to be available in the TLC. With the demolition of Mānaleo (the TLC was housed there), writing assistance was no longer available. The transfer of two ETC faculty to the Language Arts Department in AY 2011 allowed the creation of the Writing Center in response to CCSSE results. The Writing Center, currently located in the ʻĀkoakoa building, is available to students and members of the community for help at any point of the writing process. The Writing Center will be a component of the Ka Piko Study Center in the new Library Learning Commons. Students can seek assistance with their writing, or they may use the computers to write and do research. Distance learning students can receive virtual help from the Writing Center by e-mailing the lab, with the turn-around time for feedback on papers being 48 hours.

The College’s Employment Training Center (ETC), previously headquartered at Honolulu Community College, provided students with a learning center called The Learning Center (to be referred to as ETC’s TLC), to address their students’ academic needs.  ETC’s TLC helped students in the Trades and those enrolled in the Essential Skills program. Students were provided with assistance in developing Math and English skills needed for success in further education, job training, and employment. Computers and computer programs related to certain Trade programs were also provided.  Furthermore, students from other programs with serious deficiencies in language or math were also referred to ETC’s TLC for academic instruction (Ref. 2C-22). As described in section II.A.1.a, ETC was dissolved and its TLC ceased to exist. Ready Set Grow Hawaiʻi, a program designed to address the population formerly served by ETC now provides tutoring in math, reading, writing and work readiness skills.


The College does not have a central tutoring program for all students (Ref. 2C-23). However, the new Library Learning Commons will bring together The Testing Center, The Math Lab, The Speech Lab, and The Ka Piko Study Center. This will provide general tutoring for students who do not qualify for TRiO services.
Computing Services (Ref. 2C-24) is located in Hale No‘eau and provides the College with the following services (Ref. 2C-25, p. 1):


  • The development and maintenance of an information technology infrastructure that supports effective teaching, learning, and decision making.

  • User services that facilitate full and effective use of the College’s technology resources.

  • The contribution of information technology perspectives and expertise to cross-functional planning effects and projects.

  • The development and maintenance of the ability of the Computing Services unit to fulfill its mission of facilitating the College’s needs for highly-effective information technology resources, support, planning, and management.

Students, faculty, and staff can contact the Computing Services Help Desk for assistance in person, by phone, or by e-mail (Ref. 2C-24).


In AY 2008, the Academic Support Unit’s Annual Review identified as a weakness that the “present organization structure and confusion over support responsibilities and planning authority hampers efforts to develop the technology infrastructure and to provide common services to all users across the College.” The organizational structure at the time duplicated efforts and produced significant gaps and variations in support levels between Academic Computing, Administrative Computing, Vocational and Community Education Computing, and the Tech-Vision Committee (Ref. 2C-7, p. 34).
To address these problems, Windward CC reorganized its Computing Services. Effective March 31, 2009, the reorganization consolidated the previously separate Academic Computing and Administrative Computing units created a single Computing Services unit (Ref. 2C-26). This eliminated duplication of effort, streamlined the planning and coordination of technology upgrades, and facilitated the delivery of consistent services to users across the College (Ref. 2C-25).
The College provides students, faculty, and staff with a shared wireless (wi-fi) network. The standard software licensed for use on all computers includes Windows 7 Enterprise and Microsoft Office 2010 (for PCs), Snow Leopard (OS 10.6) and Microsoft Office 2008 or 2011 for Macs, and the Adobe suite, including Acrobat 9 or X, Adobe Reader 9 or X, Adobe CS5 Applications (Contribute, Dreamweaver, Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop), and Adobe Photoshop Elements 9 for the PCs and Macs (Ref. 2C-27). The specifications for computing equipment, media devices, and software applications deployed in computer classrooms and labs were determined through collaborative discussions among the faculty and the Academic Support staff.
In AY 2010, Computing Services assumed support responsibility for 216 new PCs and Macs deployed to classrooms, labs, and faculty/staff while retiring 65 older computers.  New computing facilities include 24 netbooks in the ʻĀkoakoa 113 classroom, 10 MacBooks in the Hale A`o faculty lab, and 10 PCs for off-site class use (Ref. 2C-25, p. 6). The College also provides students with access to PC and Macintosh computers for general-purpose computing and Internet access in the Library, the No’eau Computer Lab, the lobbies of Pālanakila and ʻIolani buildings, and in the Game Room in the Student Center in ʻĀkoakoa (Ref. 2C-25).

Satisfaction with Computing Services has remained high and stable over the years.  In a 2008 survey, 95 percent of respondents, with 57 percent strongly agreeing, agreed that the Computing Services staff effectively solved their computer problems. Moreover, 98 percent of respondents, with 64 percent strongly agreeing, agreed that the Computing Services staff are knowledgeable about computers. Furthermore, 94 percent of respondents, with 62 percent strongly agreeing, agreed that they were satisfied with the customer service provided by the Computing Services staff (Ref. 2C-26, pp. 2).

In a 2010 survey, 96 percent of respondents, with 76 percent strongly agreeing, agreed that the Computing Services staff effectively solved their computer problems. Moreover, 98 percent of respondents, with 84 percent strongly agreeing, agreed that the Computing Services staff were knowledgeable about computers. Furthermore, 98 percent of respondents, with 81 percent strongly agreeing, agreed that they are satisfied with the customer service provided by the Computing Services staff (Ref. 2C-28, Appendix C, p. 2).
The availability of computing resources for student use is currently adequate, but not optimal. During peak usage times, students must occasionally wait for a computer to become available or go to another place that has open computers.  In the 2010 Library User Survey, 89 percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that a computer was available when needed. Despite this high rate, the individual written comments of respondents suggested that the Library should have more computers available (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E, p. 24).
Computing Services, recognizing that most of the tools and services were geared toward on-campus students, took steps to better meet the needs of distance learning students (Ref. 2C-23, p. 13). At the end of FY 2011, Computing Services purchased a Dell PowerEdge 610 server and a small number of Citrix XenApp/XenDesktop licenses “to pilot cloud computing schemes in which Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite, and other Windows applications execute on a shared server rather than a user’s local device.” This virtualization potentially allows the user’s device to be an inexpensive iPad or thin client or an otherwise defunct older computer (Ref. 2C-29, p. 9).
Computing Services will examine the result of the piloting of the cloud computing schemes and if successful, examine the potential of these technologies to meet the needs of students in distance learning courses or studying at home. If the pilot is unsuccessful, then further technologies should explored that could potentially service those needs.

The Media Center and Duplication Center, currently located in Hale No‘eau, provides a wide range of learning support services that include graphic production, purchase and maintenance of classroom equipment, faculty training, duplication, equipment loans, the set-up of equipment for functions, and distance education support.  The Media Center maintains and services an equipment inventory of 1,720 electronic equipment items, maintains the audio and video distribution systems in the 20 fully multimedia-capable classrooms and the six multimedia meeting rooms on campus.


Demand for Media and Duplication Center services is rising.  In AY 2008, the Center completed 5,368 work orders and generated 1,772,966 copies. In AY 2009, the Center completed 6,302 work orders and generated 2,074,370 copies. In AY 2010, the Center completed 9,078 work orders and generated 2,315,294 copies. The number of copies generated per FTE student in 2009-10 was 1,923 copies (Ref. 2C-28, p. 1).

Satisfaction with the Media and Duplication Center is high.  In a unit survey conducted in 2010, 76 percent of respondents (17 percent of respondents said the question did not apply to them) were satisfied with the customer service received in terms of walk-in services, up-to-date equipment, hours of operation, explanations on use, and variety of equipment.  In terms of classroom equipment services (overhead projectors, visual presenters, VCRs, slide projectors, sound systems, video projectors, display systems, language labs, and test scanners) 54 percent of respondents (40 percent of respondents saying the question did not apply to them) were satisfied with the customer service. Moreover, 21 percent of respondents (74 percent saying the question did not apply to them) were satisfied with the customer service they receive in terms of instructional design services (telecourse, teleweb courses, web courses, video production, instructional design assistance, graphic design, instructional software assistance). Thirty-six percent of respondents (52 percent saying the question did not apply to them) feel that their capability to instruct has increased as a result of the services provided by classroom equipment services.  Finally, 26 percent of respondents (67 percent saying the question did not apply to them) think that student learning has increased as a result of the services and technologies provided by the unit’s instructional design services. Thus, after subtracting the percentage of respondents who said the question did not apply to them, the overwhelming majority of respondents are satisfied or very satisfied with the services provided by the Media and Duplication Center (Ref. 2C-28).

The Planning and Budget Council approved approximately $415,000 for equipment/furniture money to be drawn from Summer School special tuition funds. Still, additional funding should be pursued to meet campus and public expectations for a learning-and-gathering space that is well-equipped with technology and staffed to provide quality services and extended hours.  

Self Evaluation:

The College meets the Standard.



Planning Agenda:

More reliable sources of funding for computing maintenance and equipment will be sought.


II.C.1.a. Relying on appropriate expertise of faculty, including librarians and other learning support services professionals, the institution selects and maintains educational equipment and materials to support student learning and enhance the achievement of the institution.

Descriptive Summary:

The librarians select new materials for the collection according to its Collections Development Policy (Ref. 2C-30). This policy provides guidelines for the evaluation, selection, and purchase of materials. Faculty members assist with selection of new materials in their areas of interests, especially those items that directly support their instructional activities. Faculty are invited to review library holdings related to their fields of interest and to identify obsolete materials for withdrawal according to guidelines provided in the culling guidelines of the Collections Development Policy. For example, in 2009 the Library removed its aging collection of 16 mm films and invited faculty members to keep in their offices those films they wished to continue to use. In 2011, in preparation for the move to the new Library Learning Commons, as well as a result of the Library’s on-going anti-mold campaign, the librarians removed obsolete materials following these guidelines. Faculty are also invited to participate in the annual “Shopping Spree” which allows up to four faculty members $1,000 to purchase library materials to support student learning in their discipline (Ref. 2C-31). A total of 15 faculty have participated since the program began.

By FY 2010, the Library’s operating expenditures totaled $87,313. Library funds for the purchase of materials have been supplemented by proceeds from the Friends of the Library (Ref. 2C-1, p. 9). Items withdrawn from the Library’s Collections, as well as donated books, are sold in the library and sometimes at the College’s annual Ho‘olaule‘a. The 2010 Ho‘olaule‘a sale resulted in a $583 donation to the Library for the purchase of new DVDs and other materials. The “Honor With Books” program, initiated in Spring 2006, continues to attract additional donors and to raise extra funds (Ref. 2C-32).

The College’s collaborative selection processes for new materials and new equipment are appropriate. Care is taken to update the Library collection in accordance with its Collection Development Policy as the budget allows. Fortunately, the Library has been able to maintain its budget for acquiring new materials and databases to keep its collections current. The librarians are committed to balancing the acquisition of new books with electronic resources.

While The Learning Center was in operation, it had an annual budget of $300 to $700 per year to purchase educational software and other learning support materials requested by faculty, and for replacement materials and office supplies (Ref. 2C-10).  However, since there is presently no Learning Center, this budget allocation has stopped. The Learning Center was dismantled in May 2009, as the building in which it was housed was demolished to make way for the construction of the new library.  Since Fall 2009, the former Learning Center, now known as The Testing Center, has been housed in the Administration building in a very limited space (Ref. 2C-12). Books and resources, such as learning kits, of the former Learning Center were boxed and stored. The testing computers were relocated to the small Testing Center. The other computers that had been housed in the TLC were placed in Pālanakila and ʻImiloa hallways and in the Game Room in the Student Center where they are available for student use.
The present Testing Center is housed, as mentioned previously, in a very small room, and at times students have had to wait in the hall until a desk is available. However, with the dissolution of ETC, the College has acquired two former ETC Language Arts faculty who will now be Windward CC Resource Teachers. Their initial assignment is to staff the new Writing and Reading Labs, which will also focus on helping students improve their learning skills. This lab, called the Ka Piko Writing Center, opened in Spring 2011. It is housed in `Ākoakoa, the Student Affairs Building, next to the cafeteria.  Stored resources from the former The Learning Center were moved into this new Lab (Ref. 2C-33).

The Testing Center Manager (formerly known as the TLC Manager) retired at the end of the Spring 2011 semester, and has since been replaced.  Meetings are on-going to determine the organization of the future College Learning Center within the new Library Learning Commons building to open in 2012. When the final organization of this Learning Center is decided, the Learning Center Coordinator will be able to plan a budget and request materials and equipment to support the diverse roles envisioned for this new Learning Center.


In AY 2008, the College was given a legislative increase for equipment replacement in the amount of $500,000. This went a long way to reducing the backlog of equipment due for replacement on the Computing Services and Media Center’s equipment replacement schedule. As long as the $500,000 continues to be used for equipment replacement, Computing Services and the Media Center will be able to follow their equipment replacement cycle. However, due to the economic downturn, at least half of the amount initially earmarked for equipment replacement was held back (Ref. 2C-7, p. 30).
In AY 2009, the Media Center had an allocation of $90,000 in equipment replacement funds to cover the replacement of Audio/Visual equipment for the campus. That year, Media Services felt they had done a good job of upgrading and maintaining Windward CC’s general education classrooms. In FY 2011, Media requested an equipment allocation of $158,100 to replace nine-year-old VCR units in 15 classrooms in Pālanakila; upgrade audio and monitor in the HITS classroom in order to expand services to Waimānalo and Kahuku; extend warranties on audio and video equipment for videoconferencing classrooms; replace visual presenter units for six classrooms and the 11-year-old ceiling-mounted conference room projectors in `Ākoakoa; replace AMX units in five `Ākoakoa meeting rooms; and replace four AV carts for general use. PBC records show that the unit received $150,000.
The bulk of Media Center’s request for equipment replacement for FY 2011 is to enhance teaching and learning at the College through life cycle replacement of outdated audio/visual equipment. As the College increases video conference-based distance learning courses, scheduled to start Fall 2011, the completion of equipment upgrades will enable the Media Center to use the remote monitoring capabilities of the upgraded control systems allowing for greater efficiency in preventing and responding to technical problems in the classroom. This will minimize equipment based disruptions to class delivery.

When the Math building was remodeled in Spring 2010, a new computer classroom received $33,652 from an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds.


Although there is no formal policy for a replacement schedule for computers, the Computing Services staff has tried to follow a four-year replacement life cycle. With the monies allocated every year for computer replacement, the College has been able to meet the needs of computer replacement. Currently 49 percent of all computers on campus are no more than two years-old, and only 11 percent are more than four years-old. These older computers tend to be laptops used by special programs such as Upward Bound that were purchased with federal funds, but serviced by the College’s computing staff, or COMPASS testing computers used in the Testing Center. There were in AY 2010, 688 computers total on campus, with 390 in open labs, classroom labs, classroom buildings hallways, the Student Center, as well as one computer in almost every classroom on campus. Of these computers, 47 percent are one to two years-old.
It is worth noting that in the 2008 CCSSE Survey, student satisfaction with the College’s computer labs ranked highest (Ref. 2C-34), and in the 2010 survey, second-highest, after Financial Services, of the eleven services surveyed (Ref. 2C-35). Computing Services staff have expressed frustration that often they do not know how much funding is allocated for replacement of computing equipment until the end of the fiscal year. This forces them to buy older model equipment before funds lapse, rather than having the flexibility to wait to buy newer models at the beginning of the next fiscal year.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:

The College will finalize plans for the new College Learning Center that will provide general tutoring, supplemental instruction, peer mentoring, Math, Speech, and Writing Labs, Academic and Financial Aid advising and testing.


II.C.1.b. The institution provides ongoing instruction for users of library and other learning support services so that students are able to develop skills in information competency.

Descriptive Summary:

The Library's instructional services include group and individual instruction to students, staff, and faculty. In support of the College’s mission, the Library helps students learn to locate and evaluate information, in part through the Library Research Unit (LRU) required of all ENG 22 and ENG 100 students (Ref. 2C-5). Furthermore, the LRU aligns with the UHCC Student Learning Outcome: The student will evaluate information and its sources critically, as well as the College’s Information Literacy General Education and Associate of Arts Program Outcome: Identify information needed in a variety of situations, and access, evaluate, and use relevant information effectively and responsibly. The number of courses that have used the LRU has varied each semester upon how many sections of LSK 100, ENG 22, and ENG 100 are offered. In AY 2008, 32 classes used the LRU; in AY 2009, 31; in AY 2010, 36 classes (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix A, p. 1).


Two librarians provide customized instruction of information literary skills and research in specific subject areas to classes from a number of departments (Ref. 2C-36), including Humanities, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences (Ref. 2C-37; Ref. 2C-38; Ref. 2C-39) through collaboration with faculty. Custom research guides called LibGuides (Ref. 2C-40) are created for most instructional sessions by the Instruction Librarian in conjunction with faculty. In AY 2007, there were 32 special area presentations (7.6 percent of 416 classes); 23 in AY 2008 (4.7 percent of 483 classes); 12 in AY 2009 (2.48 percent of 483 classes). The decrease during these two years is attributed to a vacant reference librarian position. This was filled in AY 2010, with a corresponding jump to 33 presentations (6.09 percent of 542 classes). Also, note that during these past years, the number of classes offered by the College has significantly increased due to enrollment growth (Ref. 2C-1, pp. 20-21).

The Library has shown a general increase in the number of presentation sessions in general information literacy and research skills since the 2006 Self Study. This indicates more students wanting to increase their information literacy and research skills. In AY 2008, 54 presentations, and in AY 2009 42 presentations were given.  Though this was a decrease in number compared to what was reported in the 2006 Self Evaluation, the number of students attending presentation sessions per student FTE increased from .76 in AY 2007 to .84 in AY 2009. Moreover there were 70 presentations, representing 1.14 student FTE in AY 2010 (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix A, p. 1).


The information literacy tutorial called Learning Information Literacy Online (LILO) was first made available in Fall 2005 (Ref. 2C-6).  LILO was developed in collaboration by librarians from each UH library, with input from writing instructors from most UH campuses, including Windward CC. The tutorial allows instructors to closely integrate and monitor information literacy instruction with their class research. In AY 2008, one instructor incorporated LILO into a research assignment, with 47 students using LILO during the Fall semester.  A total of 51 class projects were created in LILO in AY 2009, with 13 class projects created in AY 2010 (Ref. 2C-1, p. 6), and 202 projects in AY 2011.
The Library’s assessments of its ongoing instruction and resources are used to make changes to improve student learning of information competencies. The effect of these changes can be glimpsed in the increasing percentage of students reporting that the LRU helped them do research more effectively; In the Library’s 2006 User Survey, 80 percent in 2006, 90 percent in 2008, and 91 percent in 2010 (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix C, p. 5).

Similarly, a slowly increasing rate of students reporting that the Library’s website was helpful with research for classes can be seen; 92 percent in 2006; 94 percent in 2008, and 96 percent in 2010 (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix C, p. 8).


The Library has a Student Learning Outcome that states, “The student will evaluate information and its sources critically.”  In assessing this SLO, English 22 & 100 students completing the required Library Research Unit will be able to achieve the following three specific outcomes:



  1. When given a list of available information sources, choose the appropriate sources and describe search strategies for locating the needed information.




  1. When given the URL for a Web page, access the page, identify the site’s title and author, its publication or posting date, and evaluate key characteristics about the site in terms of the information need, including timeliness, point-of-view, scope, and authority or credibility.




  1. When given access to a particular information search tool, identify appropriate key words and identify search strings that are focused and appropriately use phrase searching and Boolean operators.

The means of assessment for demonstrating that students meet this SLO are three, 15-question tests designed to measure basic information literacy skills as covered in the study materials and exercises in the LRU. The criteria for success was for at least 75 percent of the students to correctly answer selected questions related to the three outcomes.

In AY 2008, 76 met outcome A, 75 percent met outcome B, and 77 percent met outcome C (Ref. 2C-3, p. 4). No data is available for AY 2009 due to the migration of the LRU from WebCT to Laulima in that year. As part of the migration, the instructional librarian conducted a thorough item analysis of the test questions, leading to significant revisions in the content and assessment. The tests became more rigorous, as easily guessed questions were removed and higher-order thinking questions were added. Interestingly, the scores from AY 2010 were approximately 10-17 percent lower, with 70.4 meeting outcome A, 65.4 meeting outcome B and only 60.4 percent meeting outcome C. While the librarians felt this presented a more accurate picture of student learning, clearly more would need to be done.
Because fewer than 75 percent successfully met the three outcomes, changes were made in the way the tests were administered. The goals of these changes were to increase student motivation to make better use of the study materials, and to introduce one-on-one librarian assistance much earlier for to those who need it. The number of retakes allowed by the system decreased from four to two, so that students unable to pass the second retake were required to seek help from a librarian (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix C, p. 5). In AY 2011, 76 percent met outcome A, 73 percent met outcome B, and only 57 percent met outcome C. This is driving further changes to the LRU instructional materials.
For students enrolled in distance learning courses, the LRU can be done completely online in a secure format through Laulima. Furthermore, remote students can contact the Reference Librarians by phone or e-mail for help.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:

The College will regularly access and maintain the adequacy of instruction in information competency.  In one year, the Library will repeat the aforementioned assessment of the SLO: “the student will evaluate information and its sources critically.”

II.C.1.c. The institution provides students and personnel responsible for student learning programs and services adequate access to the library and other learning support services, regardless of their location or means of delivery.


Descriptive Summary:


The Library, The Testing Center, and Math Lab coordinate their schedules to provide both daytime and nighttime students with adequate access to Library collections, Internet-connected computers, testing, and other learning resources.  The Media and Duplication Center provides adequate personnel to serve student learning programs and services during the day and afternoon.  In compliance with ADA requirements, wheelchair access is available to the Library and other learning support services.


Open hours during spring 2012 are as follows:

The Library is open 57 ¼ hours per week (Ref. 2C-2) from:



  • Monday:  7:45a.m. to 8:00p.m.

  • Tuesday: 7:45a.m. to 8:00p.m.

  • Wednesday: 7:45a.m. to 8:00p.m.

  • Thursday: 7:45a.m. to 8:00p.m.

  • Friday: 7:45a.m. to 4:00p.m.

The Testing Center is open 52 hours per week (Ref. 2C-12) from:



  • Monday:  8:00a.m. to 6:00p.m.

  • Tuesday: 8:00a.m. to 6:00p.m.

  • Wednesday: 8:00a.m. to 8:00p.m.

  • Thursday: 8:00a.m. to 8:00p.m.

  • Friday: 8:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.

The Math Lab is open 39 hours per week (Ref. 2C-14) from:



  • Monday:  8:00a.m. to 3:00p.m.

  • Tuesday:  8:00a.m. to 5:30p.m.

  • Wednesday:  8:00a.m. to 3:00p.m.

  • Thursday:  8:00a.m. to 5:30p.m.

  • Friday:  8:00a.m. to 2:00p.m.

The Speech Lab is open 9 hours per week (Ref. 2C-18) from:



  • Monday: 2:30 to 4:00p.m.

  • Tuesday: 4:00 to 5:00p.m.

  • Wednesday: 2:30 to 4:30p.m.

  • Thursday: 4:00 to 5:00p.m.

  • Friday: 11:00 to 2:30p.m.

The Writing Center is open 17 hours per week (Ref. 2C-33) from:



  • Monday:  1:00 to 4:30p.m.

  • Tuesday:  9:00 to 10:30 a.m.; 2:00 to 4:00p.m.

  • Wednesday:  1:00 to 4:00p.m.

  • Thursday:  9:00 to 10:30a.m.; 2:00 to 4:00p.m.

  • Friday:  9:00 to 10:30a.m.; 2:00 to 4:00p.m.

The Media Production Center is open 44 hours per week (Ref. 2C-41) from:



  • Monday:  8:00a.m. to 6:00p.m.

  • Tuesday:  8:00a.m. to 6:00p.m.

  • Wednesday:  8:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.

  • Thursday:  8:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.

  • Friday:  8:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.

The Duplication Center is open 44 hours per week (Ref. 2C-41) from:



  • Monday:  8:00a.m. to 6:00p.m.

  • Tuesday:  8:00a.m. to 6:00p.m.

  • Wednesday:  8:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.

  • Thursday:  8:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.

  • Friday:  8:00a.m. to 4:00p.m.

The Library’s Website provides access to materials held by the UH Libraries with the Hawaiʻi Voyager Course Catalog (Ref. 2C-42), as well as subscription journal and reference databases, and additional selected web resources that can be accessed on or off campus at all times.  Distance learning students can access library materials electronically 24/7 with a UH username and password.  Remote students can also call the Reference Desk during Library hours for help, or e-mail the Reference Desk for help.


The Library’s subscribes to over 50 databases and electronic resources, including EBSCOHost, ScienceDirect, ebrary, CQ Researcher, ProQuest Honolulu Newspapers, Films on Demand, LibGuides, Credo Reference, Historic Documents, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Britannica Online, CollegeSource Online, A to Z Maps Online, Choice Reviews, ARTstor, and Oxford Art Online (Ref. 2C-2). Online, off-site, and traditional Windward CC students have access to these databases 24/7 so that they can do research to complete their class assignments as needed. The Library Research Unit is offered completely online via Laulima for ENG 21, ENG 22, and ENG 100 students. However, face-to-face classes are required to take a tour of the Library; whereas distance-learning students are not (Ref. 2C-5).
In the Library’s 2010 User Survey (N=357), 88 percent of respondents said they were happy with the Library’s open hours versus the 12 percent that said they were not. In the survey, 14 people commented on the Library’s open hours, saying they would like extended hours on weekdays and/or weekends (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E, p. 26). In response to these comments, the Library extended their weekday hours by opening 15 minutes earlier on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays, and staying open two hours later on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

In the same 2010 Library User Survey (N=321), 89 percent of respondents said computers were available when needed, as compared to the 11 percent of respondents who disagreed.  Three people commented that the Library needed to have more computers; one person said that computers get crowded but are usually available; and one person suggested implementing rules governing use of computers (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E, p. 24).


In February 2011, the College submitted a Substantive Change Proposal to increase the offerings in distance learning (Ref. 2C-43).  Consequently, support for distance education students is growing and being improved upon.  In the Student Evaluation of Online Courses given to students who enrolled in at least one online class in Fall 2009 or Spring 2010, 60 students strongly agreed and 43 students agreed that academic support services, such as tutoring and computing support, were similar to what they would expect from a face-to-face class versus the 15 students who neither agreed nor disagreed, and nine students disagreed. One student even commented:  “I didn’t realize that WCC had such great computing support available to students almost on an as-needed basis, even after being on campus for the past few semester (sic).” Furthermore, 59 students strongly agreed and 49 students agreed that they were able to access adequate library resources for the course versus the 13 students who neither agreed nor disagreed, and five students who disagreed.  One student stated:  “Through this course, I learned how to use the UH Library System on the computer—VERY cool” (Ref. 2C-44).
All students (both traditional and online) have access to an online tutoring service called Smarthinking. Students access the service through the MyUH portal to receive tutoring in Accounting (including Finance), Anatomy and Physiology, Biology, Chemistry (Organic and Inorganic), Economics, Physics, Mathematics (from the beginning through Calculus), Statistics, and Writing (Ref. 2C-45).

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:

None.


II.C.1.d. The institution provides effective maintenance and security for its library and other learning support services.

Descriptive Summary:

The Operations and Maintenance Department (Ref. 2C-46) provides cleaning in all campus buildings and handles general facilities maintenance. The Library and other learning support services are adequately maintained.  In the Library’s 2010 User Survey (N=373), 97 percent of respondents said that the Library’s facilities are clean and comfortable (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E, p. 28).


The UH Library Systems Office at UH-Mānoa provides administrative support and maintenance of the Library’s Ex Libris Voyager Library Management System.  The Library contracts outside vendors for carpet cleaning and the maintenance and repair of its copier and anti-theft system. The anti-theft system uses “tattle-tags” in library materials and a sensor gate that sounds an alarm if materials pass by that have not been checked out.  The Library keeps items designated as high risk for theft behind the circulation desk, where library patrons can request them. Library losses due to missing items were low, with no more than $500 per year (N. Heu, personal communication, March 2, 2012).
Reasonable security measures are in place campus-wide. The Library, No‘eau Computer Lab, and the Media Center have audible alarms on their doors.  The Computer Lab and Media Center also have bars on their windows that work to deter unauthorized entry and thefts. The Testing Center and the Math Lab are housed in buildings that have audible alarms. Nevertheless, in Fall 2011, there was a rash of break-ins at various buildings around campus, and new security measures were implemented.

Since the College has centralized the planning, purchasing, and management of most of the College’s instructional and faculty/staff computers, Computing Services has deployed standardize technology implementations and service levels across departments, which provides students with a fairly seamless infrastructure as they transition between various classrooms and computer labs.

Computing Services has implemented a web mechanism through which students activate and set the password for their personal Windward CC computing and printing account allowing for more secure passwords (Ref. 2C-47).
Additionally, they deployed Apple Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard and Microsoft Windows 7 as the standard operating systems in classrooms and labs, and they began the deployment to faculty and staff, which enables instructors to teach using the latest technologies.
When it comes to cyber security, in order to deal with network disruptions, malicious attacks, and data breaches, Computing Services needs appropriate network security tools, expertise, policies, and procedures. Currently, the College is vulnerable to network disruptions that interfere with instructional activities and administrative functions, and when such disruptions or security events occur, the problems can persist for extended periods because the Computing Services lacks the means to isolate and resolve the fault in a timely fashion. This problem is especially critical as the College has recently moved to a Voice-Over-IP (VoIP) phone system (Ref. 2C-25, p. 7).
Security personnel patrol the campus 24/7.  At night, they verify that facilities are closed and respond to any audible alarms.  Furthermore, in January 2011, in accordance with a UH System Initiative, the College hired a Safety and Security Manager who is responsible for the coordination of security services (Ref. 2C-48).
Many of Windward CC’s support services require students to present any official ID, such as a Windward CC Student ID card, driver’s license, or military ID. The Testing Center requires photo identification of students using their services. The Library requires its patrons show an ID card to borrow library items, and requires users to securely log in to the LRU and to the databases using their UH Username and password. It should be noted that in lieu of eye scanners or other sophisticated security measures, it is impossible to ensure that the persons logging into these resources are who they say they are.  Nevertheless, the security measure of the use of a UH Username and password are in place to make a scenario such as this less likely.


Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:

None.


II.C.1.e. When the institution relies on or collaborates with other institutions or other sources for library or other learning support services for its instructional programs, it documents that formal agreements exist and that such resources and services are adequate for the institution’s intended purposes, are easily accessible, and utilized.  The performance of these services is evaluated on a regular basis.  The institution takes responsibility for and assures the reliability of all services provided either directly or through contractual arrangement.

Descriptive Summary:

The Windward CC Library does not contract with academic or business institutions on matters regarding its instructional programs as a singular entity. Therefore, no formal agreements exist, nor is there a need for evaluation of contracted services. However, collaboration among the UH System Libraries have ensured that policies are cooperatively created, consistent, and widely promulgated. The UH Library Council monitors policies and updates them when called for. The Windward CC Library has also created its own policies to meet the needs of its patrons.


Within the University of Hawai‘i System, the Windward CC Library, as a member of the UH System Library Council, works closely with other four-year and community college libraries to formulate uniform policies. The Library Council regularly reviews and updates system-wide procedures and policy statements. The libraries, as a consortium, negotiate System-wide licensing of database subscriptions and library management systems.

If the Windward CC Library needs to borrow items from a non-UH library, it relies on interlibrary loan services provided by the graduate library at University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, which has loan agreements with research libraries outside the UH System.


Users have easy Internet access to policies regarding borrowing, loan periods, fines, and expected behavior, as all system and campus library policies are posted on the Windward CC Library’s Website (Ref. 2C-2). The Libraries of the University of Hawai‘i System Circulation Policy, revised in 2005 (Ref. 2C-49) and again in April 2012 (Ref. 2C-50), allows UH System students to borrow resources from any UH System Library, and governs the use of library materials and services for community users. Other policies generated by the Library Council include the 2009 E-mail Delivery of Notices” (Ref. 2C-51) and the 2010 Intrasystem Loan (ISL) Policy (Ref. 2C-4).
The Windward CC Library has developed the following policies to meet the needs of its students and faculty: Laptop Circulation Policy, 2009 (Ref. 2C-52), Fines and Fees Appeal Process, 2008 (Ref. 2C-53), Loan Periods, Renewals, and Limits, 2010 (Ref. 2C-54), Collection Development Policy (Ref. 2C-30) and the Library Use and Conduct Policy (Ref. 2C-55).

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:

None.


II.C.2. The institution evaluates library and other learning support services to assure their adequacy in meeting identified student needs.  Evaluation of these services provides evidence that they contribute to the achievement of student learning outcomes.  The institution uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

Discussion in the previous sections specifically evidence how, in terms of Program Review, Planning, and Student Learning Outcomes, the Library and other learning support services strive do the following things:





  • Utilize a program review process that is ongoing, systematic and used to assess and improve student learning and achievement.

  • Review and refine its program review processes to improve institutional effectiveness.

  • Discuss ways in their Annual Program Reviews to improve and refine their practices in order to improve institutional effectiveness.

  • Use the results of program review to continually refine and improve program practices resulting in appropriate improvements in student achievement and learning.

  • Use the results from program review assessments to improve student achievement and learning.

  • Use ongoing and systematic evaluation and planning to refine its key processes and improve student learning.

  • Have dialogue that is ongoing, robust, and pervasive where data and analyses are widely distributed and used throughout the institution.

  • Publish their Annual/5-Year Program Reviews and Departmental Reports online for public viewing.  The Math Lab and The Speech Lab are discussed in their respective Departmental Annual Reviews.

  • Perform ongoing review and adaptation of evaluation and planning processes.

  • Have consistent and continuous commitment to improve student learning and educational effectiveness that is a demonstrable priority in all planning structures and processes.

  • Have student learning and/or process outcomes and authentic assessment in place.

  • Use results of assessment for improvement and further alignment of institution-wide practices.

  • Require additional funding in order to improve and further align their services with institution-wide practices.  Dialogue regarding funding requests takes place at the Planning and Budget Council (PBC).

The College evaluates its library and learning support services through a variety of mechanisms and uses the results of these evaluations for improvements and future program plans.  Distance learning is relatively new at the College; however, evaluation mechanisms are being developed to assess the use, access, and relationship of the services to intended student learning for distance learning classes. For example, the 2011 Student Institutional Survey (discussed below) included questions regarding support services for distance learning students (Ref. 2C-56).

According to the Assessment and Program Review Timeline, Academic Support Services conducts an Annual Assessment and is scheduled for a comprehensive Program Review every five years (Ref. 2C-57). The first Academic Support Services Program Review was completed in December 2005 and the most recent was done during AY 2011 (Ref. 2C-13).

Each of the Academic Support units – the Library (Ref. 2C-58), The Testing Center (Ref. 2C-59), Computing Services (Ref. 2C-29), and the Media Center (Ref. 2C-60) develops an Annual Program Plan aligned with division goals and the College mission (Ref. 2C-61, p. 2) These plans are used as the basis for unit assessment activities that include tracking of service usage, user surveys, and focus groups. Furthermore, these plans are used to then justify PBC Requests (Ref. 2C-62).

The Library conducts a Library Use Survey every two years (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix E). In response to the 2010 Library Use Survey where students commented that they would like longer library hours, the Library expanded its hours by 5.25 hours during the semester, and 1.25 hours in the summer months. This expansion in hours was made possible with the addition of permanent staff (Ref. 2C-13, p. 7).
The Library’s instructional activities are assessed by way of an assessment plan for the Library Research Unit, and through the use of feedback forms distributed to classes receiving specialized instruction (Ref. 2C-1, Appendix C, pp. 5-6). Suggestions for improvement are incorporated whenever possible. For example, the Library used the results from the Library Research Unit Assessment done in AY 2011 to determine the following curricular changes: Since students did not meet the benchmark (75 percent of students correctly answer a 15-question multiple choice text; 73 percent of student met) for SLO 3.1.b (When given the URL for a Web page, access the page, identify the site’s title and author, its publication or posting date, and evaluate key characteristics about the site in terms of the information need, including timeliness, point-of-view, scope, and authority or credibility), the Library decided to add more examples and exercises to the content in those areas (Ref. 2C-13, p. 6). Furthermore, since students did not meet the benchmark (75 percent of students correctly answer a 15-question multiple choice text; only 57 percent of student met) for SLO 3.1.c, the Library suspected the reason for this was that students may rush through or skip through the study materials. Thus, the Library plans to research and implement best practices for motivating students using online self-paced modules. The Library will repeat this assessment in AY 2012.

Due to construction of the new Library Learning Commons, the building that housed The Learning Center (TLC) was demolished in early 2010.  To maintain service continuity for testing services, The Learning Center was dissolved and the testing services were moved to a new location on May 25, 2009, and renamed The Testing Center (TTC).  Until its closure, The Learning Center (TLC) evaluated its services through student and faculty surveys regarding TLC, Math Lab, and resource teacher services (Ref. 2C-11).  TTC evaluates its services through bi-annual student and faculty surveys (Ref. 2C-13, p. 16). The Testing Center also takes part in the annual review process through the Academic Support Annual Assessments and Program Reviews. The AY 2011 Academic Support Services Program Review of The Testing Center noted a decline in the indicators for effectiveness measures gleaned from common survey questions given to students (Ref. 2C-13, p. 17). For example, in AY 2011, there was a three percent decline in the number of students who agreed that The Testing Center atmosphere is conducive to testing, and a four percent decline from AY 2010 in students perceiving TTC staff as friendly and helpful. The Testing Center report addresses this decline in testing effectiveness in several ways: first, the TTC is staffed with student workers and only one FTE APT, and the “reception area” is a just a small desk; second, The Testing Center is in a much smaller space since its move from Hale Mānaleo (when it was The Learning Center); and third, during peak hours, students often have to wait for a seat/computer to open. These problems will be alleviated once the TTC moves to the new Library Learning Commons building. An area was designed specifically for the Testing Center, with a separate reception room with a counter for distribution of tests, a separate testing room, a separate room for students who require accommodations, and more seating areas outside of The Testing Center (Ref. 2C-13, p. 17).

Media and Duplication Services evaluate program services through faculty and staff surveys (Ref. 2C-28, Appendix C). In the 2010 survey, 78 percent of faculty and staff said that they were satisfied or strongly satisfied with the quality of services offered by Media and Duplication. There was no one who disagreed with the quality of services offered.

Academic Computing Services use faculty and staff surveys to evaluate services (Ref. 2C-25, pp. 2-3). In the 2010 survey, 98 percent of faculty and staff said that they were satisfied or strongly satisfied with their overall experience with Computing Services. Additionally, 96 percent agreed or strong agreed that the Computing Services Staff effectively solved their computer problems.


In Fall 2009, an evaluation to assess the effectiveness of online learning was developed and implemented by administrators and faculty during AY 2010 (Ref. 2C-44).  The evaluation was sent to students and asked Likert-scale and open-ended questions, several pertaining to the academic support services. The evaluation was sent to students in the Spring 2010 semester. On a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree), students, in AY 2010, gave an overall 4.20 rating when asked the question “The academic support services, such as tutoring and computing support, were similar to what I would expect from a face-to-face class.” This question addressed the concern with online learning in whether there is a significant difference in support services offered between online and face-to-face classes. When broken down in actual student numbers, most students in AY 2010 (103 out of 134 or 77 percent) agree or strongly agree that there is no significant difference. Only nine students (or 7 percent) reported that there was a significant difference. However, none of those nine students offered to write comments on why they felt this was so (Ref. 2C-44, p. 14). Furthermore, when asked the question “I was able to access adequate library resources for this course,” students gave an overall 4.29 rating. It should be noted, though, that in response to how this question was worded, “it is impossible to measure the actual use of library resources by online students” (Ref. 2C-44, p. 14). Also, when asked the question “technical support was available in a timely manner,” students gave an overall 4.22 rating.

The College initiated institutional surveys of faculty, staff, and students (Ref. 2C-63) in Fall 2005, which provided feedback on the effectiveness of academic support services (and other areas).  In Fall 2011, this institutional survey was again sent to faculty (Ref. 2C-64), staff (Ref. 2C-65) and students (Ref. 2C-56).

In the 2011 Windward CC Student Institutional Survey, The Testing Center, The Math Lab, The Speech Lab, and The Ka Piko Writing Center were evaluated. Results of this survey (Ref. 2C-56, Item 16.I.) indicated that 47 percent of students rated the usefulness of The Testing Center as excellent, 37 percent rated it satisfactory, and 9 percent were unable to judge.  In the 2005 survey (Ref. 2C-63, Item 16), the same question was asked regarding The Learning Center with 37 percent of the students rating the usefulness as excellent, 36 percent rated it satisfactory, with 18 percent unable to judge. In other words, in the past six years, there has been a ten percent increase in the number of students that found the usefulness of The Testing Center as excellent. It should be noted that the perceived usefulness of The Testing Center has increased despite The Testing Center being a downsized version of The Learning Center.
In the 2011 Windward CC Student Institutional Survey (Ref. 2C-56, Item 16.J.), 35 percent of students rated the usefulness of The Math Lab as excellent, and 30 percent rated it satisfactory, with 31 percent were unable to judge. In other words, 65 percent of students were satisfied by the support offered by The Math Lab in 2011. In the 2005 Windward CC Student Institutional Survey, this question regarding the specific student support service of The Math Lab was not asked. At the time, The Math Lab did not exist independent of The Learning Center. Hence, the question asked on the 2005 survey (Ref. 2C-63, Item 16) related to The Learning Center (with the assumption of the Math tutoring services provided by The Learning Center being a part of this question).
Furthermore, in the 2011 Windward CC Student Institutional Survey (Ref. 2C-56, Item 16.K.), 25 percent of students rated the usefulness of The Speech Lab as excellent, and 27 percent rated it satisfactory, and 44 percent were unable to judge.  In other words, 52 percent of students were satisfied by the support offered by The Speech Lab. This question was not asked on the 2005 survey as the Speech Lab did not exist until 2008.
In the 2011 Windward CC Student Institutional Survey (Ref. 2C-56, Item 16.L.), 25 percent of students rated the usefulness of The Ka Piko Writing Center as excellent, and 28 percent rated it satisfactory, with 42 percent unable to judge. In other words, 53 percent of students were satisfied by the support offered by The Ka Piko Writing Center. This question was not asked on the 2005 survey, as The Ka Piko Writing Center did not open until 2011. Prior to the demolition of The Learning Center in 2009, students were able to receive writing assistance there. Hence, it is assumed that in the 2005 survey (Ref. 2C-63, Item 16), when students rated The Learning Center, they were also judging the writing assistance they received there.

Additionally, in the 2011 Windward CC Student Institutional Survey (Ref. 2C-56, Item 16.N.), aspects of the Library and Computing Services were evaluated, and 32 percent of students rated the adequacy of the Library Collection to support course assignments as excellent, 39 percent rated it satisfactory, with 22 percent were unable to judge. In the 2005 survey (Ref. 2C-63, Item 16), the same question was asked regarding Library Collection with these results:  32 percent of students rated the usefulness as excellent, 36 percent rated it satisfactory, and 21percent were unable to judge.  Over the past six years, there has been an increase in the number of students who rated the Library Collection as satisfactory. To note: in the 2005 survey, 11 percent of students rated the adequacy of the Library Collection as less-than-satisfactory or poor. In the 2011 survey, this number of students rating the Library Collection as less-than-satisfactory or poor fell to seven percent. In other words, the Library has improved its rating among students in terms of how students view the adequacy of the Library Collection. In the past six years, as noted in a previous Section II.C.1.a., the Library has worked diligently to select new materials and equipment, and has also implemented the “Shopping Spree” program in which faculty members are given $1,000 to purchase materials in their field (Ref. 2C-31). This program started in 2006, and since then a total of 15 faculty members have participated. Furthermore, according to the 2010-11 Academic Support Units Annual Reviews, the Library has increased its subscription to electronic databases over the years: in AY 2008, the Library had 19 databases; 28 in AY 29, 37 in AY 2010, and 34 in AY 2011. The Library has increased its access to electronic books over the years, as well: in AY 2007, the Library had access to 34,000 electronic books; 37,700 in AY 2008, 44,511 in AY 2009; 49,971 in AY 2010; and 70,233 in AY 2011. In other words, the Library has more than doubled its electronic book collection since 2006 (Ref. 2C-13, p. 4).

In the 2011 Windward CC Student Institutional Survey (Ref. 2C-56, Item 16.O.), 55 percent of students rated the adequacy of campus computer equipment, software, and internet access as excellent, 34 percent rated it satisfactory, and 6 percent were unable to judge.  In the 2005 survey (Ref. 2C-63, Item 16), the same question was asked regarding adequacy of campus computer equipment, software, and Internet access with these results:  42 percent of students rated the usefulness as excellent, 37 percent rated it satisfactory, and 10 percent were unable to judge.  Over the past six years, there is a dramatic increase in the number of students rating this service as excellent. During the past six years, as noted in sections II.C.1 & II.C.1.a, Computing Services implemented a campus-wide wireless policy, replaced a number of older computers, increased the number of new computers, and upgraded computer software.
Additionally, in the 2011 Windward CC Student Institutional Survey (Ref. 2C-56, Item 16.P.), 47 percent of students rated the adequacy of computer support provided to students as excellent, 39 percent rated it satisfactory, and 11percent were unable to judge. This question was not asked on the 2005 survey.

In the same survey, 45 percent of students rated the overall quality of support services for on-campus classes and programs as excellent, 44 percent rated it satisfactory, and 9 percent were unable to judge (Ref. 2C-56, Item 16.R.). This question was not asked on the 2005 survey.

Lastly, in the 2011 Windward CC Student Institutional Survey (Ref. 2C-56, Item 16.S.), 30 percent of students rated the overall quality of support services for distance learning classes and programs as excellent, 29 percent rated it satisfactory, with 37 percent were unable to judge. This question was not asked on the 2005 survey, but based on the answers provided on the Evaluation of Online Learning Survey (Ref. 2C-44, p. 14) described above, students have a favorable view of the quality of support services provided for distance learning classes and programs. For example, 77 percent of students agree or strongly agree that there is no significant difference in the support services offered between online and face-to-face classes.
On the 2010 CCSSE Survey, the College received a 3.23 mean score (on a scale of 1-4 with 1 meaning very little, and 4 meaning very much) in terms of providing the support that students need to succeed in college (Ref. 2C-66, p. [1]).  This score of 3.23 is significantly above that of the College’s peer institutions (3.01 mean score for Small Colleges, and 2.98 for the 2010 cohort). Furthermore, the College’s mean score of 3.23 in this area is an improvement from the mean score of 3.12 that the College received on the 2008 CCSSE (Ref. 2C-35, p. [1]).


Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:

None.


Standard II.C Evidence


  1. Library Annual Program Review 2009-10 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Library.pdf

  2. Library home page (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu

  3. Library Annual Program Review 2008-09 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/Documents/2009/Program_Review_2009_Library.pdf

  4. Library IntraSystem Loan Policy (Archived Copy) http://libweb.hawaii.edu/libdept/access/isl/ISLPolicy082405.html

  5. Library Research Units (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Topics/LRU_Intro.html

  6. Learning Information Literacy Online (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/lilo/index/SU10_index_day.php

  7. Windward CC Academic Support Annual Review 2007-2008 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2008/Academic_Support_Review_2008.pdf

  8. Library Learning Commons blog (Archived Copy) http://wccllc.blogspot.com/

  9. Planning and Budget Council, meeting minutes, 2011/04/29 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/PBC%20MtngNotes%204-29-11.pdf

  10. The Learning Center (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/tlc/

  11. The Testing Center AY 2009-2010 Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2010/Units/Instruction/Academic%20Support/TTC%20Prog%20Review%2009-10.pdf

  12. The Testing Center (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/testing_center/

  13. Academic Support Units Annual Reviews 2010-2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Instruction/Academic Support/AcadSupportExecSummary_2011.pdf

  14. Math Lab (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/Math_Lab/index.php

  15. Math Lab Visitor Count Graphs (Archived Copy)

  16. Mathematics and Business Annual Department Report 2009-2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Math_Business.pdf

  17. Language Arts Annual Department Report 2006-2007 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2007/Program_Review_2007_Language_Arts.pdf

  18. Speech Lab (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/Speech_Lab/

  19. Speech Lab Turning Problems into Solutions Fall-Spring 2009 (Archived Copy)

  20. Speech Lab Turning Problems into Solutions Fall-Spring 2011 (Archived Copy)

  21. Language Arts Annual Department Report 2009-2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Language_Arts.pdf

  22. Annual Assessment Report Windward CC Employment Training Center Programs Essential Skills FY 2008-2009 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2009/Program_Review_2009_Essential_Skills.pdf

  23. Academic Support Services 2009-2010 annual report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Academic_Support.pdf

  24. Computing on Campus (Archived Copy) http://www.windward.hawaii.edu/Computing/

  25. Windward CC Computing Services AY 2009-2010 Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Computing_Services.pdf

  26. Windward CC Computing Services AY 2008-2009 Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2009/Program_Review_2009_Computing_Services.pdf

  27. Information Technology Specialist, e-mail, 2011/02/28 (Archived Copy)

  28. Media and Duplication Services 2009-2010 Annual Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Media.pdf

  29. Windward CC Computing Services AY 2010-2011 Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Instruction/Academic Support/CompSvcs Annual Report 2011 v2 copy.pdf

  30. Library Collection Development Policy (Archived Copy) http://library.windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/collectiondevelopment.html

  31. Library Shopping Spree (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Faculty_Staff/Library_Shopping_Spree.php

  32. Honor with Books (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Honor/default.html

  33. Writing Center (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/Writing/

  34. Windward CC Community College Student Success and Engagement Survey 2008 Results (Archived Copy) http://www.ccsse.org/survey/public-profile.cfm?ipeds=141990&source=2008&CFID=2848694&CFTOKEN=36e38c4792bd82d4-53E957F9-188B-402E-2A6CE07B82C4C9A8

  35. Community College Success and Student Engagement Windward CC 2008 miscellaneous data (Archived Copy)

  36. Library Faculty Services (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Faculty_Services/index.html

  37. LibGuides: Humanities (Archived Copy) http://guides.wcc.hawaii.edu/cat.php?cid=35262

  38. LibGuides: Science (Archived Copy) http://guides.wcc.hawaii.edu/cat.php?cid=43599

  39. LibGuides: Social Sciences (Archived Copy) http://guides.wcc.hawaii.edu/cat.php?cid=35261

  40. LibGuides at WCC (Archived Copy) http://guides.wcc.hawaii.edu/index.php

  41. Media Production Center and Duplicating Services (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/media/

  42. Hawai`i Voyager Catalog (Archived Copy) http://windwardcc.lib.hawaii.edu:7008/vwebv/searchBasic?sk=windward

  43. Substantive Change Proposal: Associate of Arts (Liberal Arts) Distance Education Program (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Documents/2011/Substantive_change_Online.pdf

  44. Online Learning at WCC Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/2010_Online_Learning_Report.pdf

  45. Smarthinking (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/smarthinking/

  46. Operations and Maintenance (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Operations_Maintenance/

  47. Windward CC Computing Account Activation (Archived Copy) https://accounts.wcc.hawaii.edu/secure/index.php

  48. Security (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/security/

  49. Library Circulation Policy 2005 (Archived Copy) http://libweb.hawaii.edu/uhmlib/libinfo/circpolicy05.pdf

  50. Library Circulation Policy 2012 (Archived Copy) http://library.manoa.hawaii.edu/about/policies/circpolicy_rev0412.pdf

  51. Library Notices (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Policies/emailnotices.html

  52. Library Laptop Circulation Policy (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Policies/laptop.html

  53. Library Fines and Fees Appeal Process (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Policies/Appeals.html

  54. Library Loan Periods, Renewals and Limits (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Policies/UH_User_Policies.html

  55. Library Use and Conduct Policy (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Policies/conduct.html

  56. Windward CC Student Institutional Survey 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/IRO/Documents/2011/StudentInsitutionalSurvey_9-12-11combo.pdf

  57. Program Review Timeline (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Program_Review_Timeline.pdf

  58. Library Annual Program Review 2010-11 (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/_SelfStudy/Library Annual Report 2010-11 Portfolio.pdf

  59. AY 2011 Testing Services System Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Instruction/Academic%20Support/Testing%20ServicesAR2010-2011.pdf

  60. 2010-2011 Annual Report Media and Duplication Services (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Instruction/Academic%20Support/Media_Dup_AR_2011%20copy.pdf

  61. Windward CC Course Catalog 2011-2013 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/WCC_Catalog_2011-2013.pdf

  62. Planning and Budget Council 2011-12 documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Instruction/InstructionPBCMenu2011.html

  63. Windward CC Student Institutional Survey 2005 (Archived Copy) http://www.zoomerang.com/Shared/SharedResultsSurveyResultsPage.aspx?ID=L22GSS632SV7

  64. Windward CC Faculty Institutional Survey 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/IRO/Documents/2011/FacultyInsitutionalSurvey_9-12-11combo.pdf

  65. Windward CC Staff Institutional Survey 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/IRO/Documents/2011/StaffInsitutionalSurvey_9-12-11combo.pdf

  66. Community College Success and Student Engagement Windward CC 2010 miscellaneous data (Archived Copy)



Standard III Resources



The institution effectively uses its human, physical, technology, and financial resources to achieve its broad educational purposes, including stated student learning outcomes, and to improve institutional effectiveness.

Standard III.A Human Resources


The institution employs qualified personnel to support student learning programs and services wherever offered and by whatever means delivered, and to improve institutional effectiveness. Personnel are treated equitably, are evaluated regularly and systematically, and are provided opportunities for professional development. Consistent with its mission, the institution demonstrates its commitment to the significant educational role played by persons of diverse backgrounds by making positive efforts to encourage such diversity. Human resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.
III.A.1. The institution assures the integrity and quality of its programs and services by employing personnel who are qualified by appropriate education, training and experience to provide and support these programs and services.
III.A.1.a. Criteria, qualifications, and procedures for selection of personnel are clearly and publicly stated. Job descriptions are directly related to institutional mission and goals and accurately reflect position duties, responsibilities and authority. Criteria for selection of faculty include knowledge of the subject matter or service to be performed (as determined by individuals with discipline expertise), effective teaching, scholarly activities, and potential to contribute to the mission of the institution. Institutional faculty play a significant role in selection of new faculty. Degrees held by faculty and administrators are from institutions accredited by recognized U.S. accrediting agencies. Degrees from non-U.S. institutions are recognized only if equivalence has been established.

Descriptive Summary:

Personnel at the College generally fall into one of the following four position categories:




  1. Executive and Managerial (E/M)
    College personnel in this category include the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs, Deans of Academic Affairs, Vice-Chancellor of Student Affairs, Vice-Chancellor of Administrative Services, and Director of Career and Community Education. The Classification and Compensation Plan for University of Hawai‘i Executive Classes is published at http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/bor/emcompp.htm (Ref. 3A-1). E/M positions are excluded from collective bargaining.



  2. Faculty
    College personnel in this category include instructors, counselors, librarians, and computing and media coordinators. UH Executive Policy E5.221 “Classification of Faculty” includes the classification plan and compensation policy for community college faculty (Ref. 3A-2, pp. 37-53). Faculty constitute Collective Bargaining Unit 7 and are represented by the University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly (UHPA). The 2009-2015 Faculty Contract is published at http://www.uhpa.org/uhpa-bor-contract/100129-2009-2015-agreement-for-website.pdf (Ref. 3A-3).





  1. Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT)
    College personnel in this category include registrars, financial aid officers, personnel officers, IT specialists, electronics technicians, educational specialists, and marketing staff. The Classification and Compensation Plan for APT Personnel is documented in UH Administrative Procedure A9.210 at http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9210.pdf (Ref. 3A-4). APT personnel constitute Collective Bargaining Unit 8 and are represented by the Hawai`i Government Employees Association (HGEA).



  2. Civil Service
    College personnel in this category include secretaries, account clerks, office assistants, janitors, and maintenance workers. Civil service position classification and compensation are determined by the State of Hawai‘i, Department of Human Resources Development (DHRD) and documented at http://hawaii.gov/hrd/main/eccd/ (Ref. 3A-5). Clerical staff constitute Collective Bargaining Unit 3 and are represented by the Hawai‘i Government Employees Association (HGEA). Maintenance staff constitute Collective Bargaining Unit 1 and are represented by the United Public Workers (UPW).

The UH Office of Human Resources prepares and publishes clear procedures for recruiting and selecting college personnel. These include:




  • A9.620 Recruitment and Reassignment of Executive and Managerial Personnel (Ref. 3A-6).



  • A9.540 Recruitment and Selection of Faculty and Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT) Personnel (Ref. 3A-7).



  • Policy No. 300.003 Competitive Recruitment for Civil Service Positions (Ref. 3A-8).

Before recruiting for any vacancy, a position description is created that accurately reflects the duties and responsibilities, the minimum qualifications, and the desirable qualifications. Positions descriptions are reviewed and approved at the division, Vice-Chancellor or Director, and Personnel Officer levels before they are advertised. Samples position descriptions on file include those of the College’s executive staff (Ref. 3A-9).


As re-affirmed in the “Minimum Qualifications for Faculty Positions” dated August 2011, a Master’s degree is typically required for faculty positions, and degrees from non-US institutions are recognized only if equivalence has been established (Ref. 3A-10). Successful experience teaching at the community college level and experience assessing student learning outcomes are usually among the desirable qualifications for faculty.
Executive/managerial, faculty, and APT vacancies are advertised with application instructions through the Work at UH website (Ref. 3A-11), the Sunday edition of the Honolulu Star Advertiser newspaper, and in some cases national publications such as The Chronicle of Higher Education. Civil Service vacancies are advertised through the State’s Department of Human Resources Development Website (Ref. 3A-12). Sample advertisements on file include those of recent faculty vacancies (Ref. 3A-13; Ref. 3A-14).
Faculty and staff play a significant role in selecting new employees by serving on ad hoc screening committees. Screening committees consist of three or more members with a mix of gender, ethnicity, and job classifications. They develop the interview questions and optional exercises that are used to determine the qualifications and abilities of applicants. Applicants for faculty positions are typically required to teach a short lesson on an assigned topic as part of their interview. The screening committee submits its findings and recommendations to the appropriate Vice-Chancellor or Director, who then advises the Chancellor on the final hiring decision.
Most faculty and staff are satisfied with their involvement in campus hiring based on responses to Fall 2011 institutional surveys. Of faculty respondents expressing an opinion, 81 percent rated the overall involvement of faculty in the campus hiring process as either Excellent or Satisfactory, with an average rating of 3.1. Of staff respondents expressing an opinion, 65 percent rated the overall involvement of staff in the campus hiring process as either Excellent or Satisfactory, with an average rating of 2.7. (4 = Excellent, 3= Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, 1 = Poor; Ref. 3A-15)

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:

None.


III.A.1.b. The institution assures the effectiveness of its human resources by evaluating all personnel systematically and at stated intervals. The institution establishes written criteria for evaluating all personnel, including performance of assigned duties and participation in institutional responsibilities and other activities appropriate to their expertise. Evaluation processes seek to assess effectiveness of personnel and encourage improvement. Actions taken following evaluations are formal, timely, and documented.

Descriptive Summary:




Executive and Managerial (E/M)

Board of Regents Policy Chapter 9 requires that all E/M employees be evaluated annually between March and June for performance and accomplishments (Ref. 3A-16, Part IV.A). The procedure for accomplishing this is outlined in UHCC Policy #9.202, “Executive Employees Performance Evaluation” (Ref. 3A-17). The process calls for establishing written objectives at the beginning of evaluation period; obtaining anonymous feedback from subordinates, peers, and constituents; completing an end-of-period Self Evaluation; and having a performance review discussion with the supervisor. Anonymous feedback is collected through an online 360° Performance Assessment tool administered by the UH Office of Human Resources, as directed by the University President (Ref. 3A-18). The 360° instrument collects ratings on nine attributes (leadership, relations with others, planning, decisiveness, problem solving, organizational abilities, EEO/AA, safety, and overall rating) plus any comments the reviewer would like to make (Ref. 3A-19).
In January 2007, the ACCJC accreditation team recommended that Windward CC, in part, should “…implement an annual evaluation process to assess the effectiveness of leadership and decision making which leads to institutional improvement” (Ref. 3A-20, p. 42). In response to that recommendation, the College developed and conducted surveys to evaluate leaders and governance structures beginning in Fall 2008, as documented on the Governance Survey Information website (GSIEC; Ref. 3A-21). This initiative is discussed in detail under Standard IV.A.

Faculty and Lecturers

Lecturers (adjunct faculty) participate in an annual self-assessment and performance evaluation in accordance with Windward CC’s Lecturer Self-Assessment Procedures (Ref. 3A-22). Lecturers are ranked at step levels A, B, or C depending on the total number of credits they have taught in the UH System, and lecturers at lower steps are subject to more extensive assessments. By April 1, lecturers compile and submit self-assessment materials including student evaluations for every course taught during the previous calendar year, peer evaluations, and a discussion of accomplishments and contributions since the last evaluation. By May 15, the Department Chair and the Division Personnel Committee (DPC) separately complete an assessment of strengths and weaknesses and typically provide recommendations for improvement. By June 30, the Dean and Vice Chancellor complete their reviews. The assessments at each level are documented and kept on file in the Office of Academic Affairs.
Non-probationary faculty, such as those hired on grant funds, are hired on one-year contracts, and probationary faculty in tenure-track positions are hired on two-year contracts. Their effectiveness and performance are evaluated when they apply to renew their contracts, and the procedures and criteria for this are documented in the UH Community Colleges Contract Renewal Suggested Guidelines and Forms. Contract renewal applications are due in mid-October and are expected to include a self-assessment of teaching ability, discussion of student evaluations, discussion of peer evaluations, outline of accomplishments (curriculum development, professional development, and college/community service), responses to reviewers of the previous contract renewal application, and goals and objectives for the coming contract period. Reviews by the DPC, the Department Chair, the Director or Vice-Chancellor, and the Chancellor are completed by mid-January. The assessments at each level are documented and kept on file with the employee’s personnel records (Ref. 3A-23; Ref. 3A-24).
Probationary faculty may apply for tenure after completing four years of service, and all faculty may apply for promotion after four years as an Instructor (Rank 2), three years as an Assistant Professor (Rank 3), or three years as an Associate Professor (Rank 4). The UH Community Colleges Guidelines for Tenure and Promotion documents the process and criteria for evaluating the effectiveness and performance of applicants. Tenure and promotion applications are due in early October and are expected to include a discussion of: philosophy and goals regarding teaching, counseling, or appropriate area of instructional support; perceptions about the students served, including their needs and aspirations; a self-analysis of the response to these educational needs; the impact and contributions made toward achieving professional objectives and meeting students’ needs; and evidence that the performance criteria of the rank being applied for has been met. Reviews by the DPC, the Department Chair, the Vice-Chancellor, the Tenure and Promotion Review Committee (TPRC), and the Chancellor are completed by March. The assessments at each level are documented and kept on file with the employee’s personnel records (Ref. 3A-25; Ref. 3A-26).
Tenured faculty are evaluated at least every five years in accordance with the Post-Tenure Review Procedure documented in CCCM #7200 Faculty Evaluation Procedures (Ref. 3A-27). Faculty submit information regarding the nature and extent of contributions in each area of duties and responsibilities, including evidence relating to the quality of those contributions. The Chancellor or a designee evaluates performance and, if there is a need for improvement, jointly develops a professional improvement plan with the faculty member.
Department chairs are evaluated annually by colleagues in their departments, their divisional Dean of Academic Affairs, and the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs (Ref. 3A-28).

Administrative, Professional, and Technical (APT)

APT personnel are evaluated annually in accordance with UH Administrative Procedure A9.170 “Performance Evaluation of Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT) Personnel” (Ref. 3A-29). The standard evaluation period for all APTs is November 1 through October 31. At the beginning of the period, the supervisor and employee jointly develop and document performance expectations. Throughout the year, the supervisor is expected to monitor performance, reinforce positive behavior, and immediately correct performance problems. Near the end of the period, the supervisor evaluates actual performance against the defined expectations, discusses the assessment with the employee, and documents the ratings of competence, quality, and productivity. The University maintains an online Performance Evaluation System that facilitates this process and the documentation of expectations and performance appraisals. The probationary period for APT employees is three years (Ref. 3A-30).

Civil Service

Civil service employees are evaluated at the end of their probationary period (generally six months) and annually thereafter. The process is specified in the Performance Appraisal System (PAS) Supervisory Manual (Ref. 3A-31). It calls for communicating performance expectations/requirements and goals/projects at the beginning of the evaluation period, monitoring performance and coaching throughout the period, and completing and filing a performance appraisal at the end of the period.

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.

III.A.1.c. Faculty and others directly responsible for student progress toward achieving stated student learning outcomes have, as a component of their evaluation, effectiveness in producing those learning outcomes.

Descriptive Summary:



Non-tenured faculty and lecturers are evaluated on their teaching ability as part of the contract renewal process. UH Community Colleges Guidelines specify that their contract renewal dossier should include “a statement on your teaching ability that includes… a self-assessment of your teaching ability with respect to courses you have taught, including a discussion of your effectiveness, learning outcomes, student’s responses to your approach, etc.” (emphasis added; Ref. 3A-23, p. [1]).
Tenure-track faculty are evaluated on their contributions towards defining, assessing, and improving student learning outcomes. As stated in the UH Executive Policy E5.221 Classification of Faculty, “During the tenure and promotion review process, the faculty’s primary responsibilities are carefully evaluated… Where appropriate, they design measurable or observable learning outcomes and assess and provide evidence of student learning. Above all they work to improve student achievement and success” (Ref. 3A-2, pp. 39-40).
Notwithstanding the above, the University and the faculty union (UHPA) have agreed that SLO assessment data will not be used to evaluate faculty for contract renewal, tenure, or promotion. As discussed in an August 2006 UHPA report:
From the perspective of the union, the evaluation of a faculty member’s performance through the use of the SLO [would represent] a substantial shift in responsibility for learning away from the student and onto the faculty member. The faculty member has a duty to present instruction in a manner consistent with professional standards in the classroom, and the student must also participate in meeting the expectations of the course of study. … Even the Executive Director of the ACCJC, Barbara Beno has written “The accreditors’ concern with assessment of student learning is not meant to target individual faculty members, but to stimulate institution-wide engagement with student learning and institutional-wide improvement in learning.” (The Role of Student Learning Outcomes in Accreditation Quality Review, New Directions for Community Colleges, no. 126, Summer 2004, Wiley Periodicals, Inc., p. 69; Ref. 3A-32).
College faculty and others directly responsible for student progress continuously engage in assessment activities and collaborative analyses to improve personal and institutional effectiveness in achieving learning outcomes. Because they regularly assess SLOs in their classes, and make changes in their instructional techniques based on those assessments, faculty are acutely aware of the success of their students in achieving stated SLOs in their classes. Examples of changes made to improve assessments and student success include the following:


  • Windward CC implemented eCAFE, the UH Electronic Course and Faculty Evaluation System, in Fall 2008 (Ref. 3A-33). Unlike the previously used scantron-form evaluation system, the online eCAFE system fully protects the anonymity of student respondents and it quickly provides faculty with the raw data, summaries, and student comments after the end of the semester.  The Faculty members are able to customize the questions and to make the evaluation results public. These evaluations facilitate instructional improvement by providing feedback on student development, instructor methods, and course elements.




  • Windward CC instituted a Supplemental Instruction (SI) program in Spring 2009 in an effort to improve pass rates in gatekeeper courses -those with high enrollment and a success rate of less than 70 percent- and to improve student persistence rates. Ongoing assessment and analysis of results has led to both expansion and refinement of the program (Ref. 3A-34).




  • The Math/Business Department redesigned its Developmental Mathematics curriculum to include both a traditional lecture-based track and an open-entry/open-exit computer-aided instruction track. The objective is to improve low student pass rates that have been in the range of 57 percent to 62 percent, and to shorten the time students take to complete remedial/developmental mathematics without sacrificing preparedness for college-level. The new curriculum is being piloted in Spring 2012 with full implementation planned for Fall 2012 (Ref. 3A-35, Ref. 3A-36).



Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.

III.A.1.d. The institution upholds a written code of professional ethics for all of its personnel.



Descriptive Summary:



As State employees, all College personnel are held to the Code of Ethics detailed in Hawai‘i Revised Statutes, Chapter 84, Part II (Ref. 3A-37, pp. 2-8).
Faculty also abide by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) Statement on Professional Ethics, which was adopted by the UHCC System in 1989 as documented in UHCC Policy #5.211 (Ref. 3A-38).
In addition, there are many university policies and procedures that define expected and prohibited employee behavior in specific contexts, including the following:


  • E1.203 Policy on Sexual Harassment and Related Conduct (Ref. 3A-39).



  • E1.202 University Statement of Nondiscrimination and Affirmative Action (Ref. 3A-40).



  • E2.210 Use and Management of Information Technology Resources (Ref. 3A-41).



  • E5.214 Conflicts of Interests (Ref. 3A-42).



  • E9.210 Workplace Non-Violence (Ref. 3A-43).



  • E11.201 Illegal Drugs and Substance Abuse (Ref. 3A-44).



  • E11.203 Illegal Drugs and Alcohol Abuse (Ref. 3A-45).



  • A9.325 Political Activity (Ref. 3A-46).



  • A9.335 Employment of Relatives (Ref. 3A-47).



Most employees feel the College effectively promotes ethical standards, as reflected in the Fall 2011 Windward CC Human Resources Survey. Of those employees expressing an opinion, 84 percent rated the overall effectiveness of the College in promoting ethical standards for all employees as either Excellent or Satisfactory (Ref. 3A-15).

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.



III.A.2. The institution maintains a sufficient number of qualified faculty with full-time responsibility to the institution. The institution has a sufficient number of staff and administrators with appropriate preparation and experience to provide the administrative services necessary to support the institution’s mission and purposes.

Descriptive Summary:





The College’s allocated position count has increased only slightly during the past five years, from 148 FTE in 2006 to 154 FTE in 2011. The classification and organization of these positions are reflected in the table below and in the College’s organization charts (Ref. 3A-48).
Table 12: Allocation Position Counts


Allocated Position Counts

2006

2011

Faculty:







• Instructors

54.0

61.5

• Other faculty (librarians, coordinators, etc.)

23.0

19.0

Subtotal Faculty

77.0

80.5

Administrative, Professional and Technical

20.0

25.5

Executive/ Managerial

7.0

7.0

Civil Service

44.0

41.0

Total

148.0

154.0


While the College’s allocated position count increased by only 4.0 percent from 2006 to 2011, student enrollment soared by 52 percent during same period. Windward CCs headcount enrollment of credit students increased from 1781 in Fall 2006 to 2705 in Fall 2011. Total student semester hours (SSH) taken increased by 41 percent from 15,433 SSH in Fall 2006 to 21,834 SSH in Fall 2011.
Windward CC has been able to accommodate the tremendous growth in student enrollment by supplementing its allocated positions with adjunct faculty (lecturers), grant-funded temporary employees, and part-time student assistants. The following table lists the College’s total employee headcounts as of the spring of each year (Ref. 3A-49).
Table 13: Total Employee Headcount





2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Faculty & Lecturers
• Full-time
• Part-time
• Total Headcount



80
34
114



80
31
111



91
34
125



98
25
123



96
27
123



98
42
140



100
39
139


Admins & Staff
• Full-time
• Part-time
• Total Headcount



63
10
73



66
6
72



79
7
86



77
8
85



81
6
87



78
7
85



70
2
72


All Employees
• Full-time
• Part-time
• Total Headcount



143
44
187



146
37
183



170
41
211



175
33
208



177
33
210



176
49
225



170
41
211


























Student Assistants

118

115

155

190

187

200

174


All administrators, faculty, and staff hired meet or exceed the minimum qualifications established for their position. As reflected in the table above, roughly 70 percent of faculty have full-time responsibility to the College.
When appropriate, the College has re-described and internally transferred positions to maintain adequate staffing of the services critical to the College’s mission and purposes. For example, the College began dissolving its Employment Training Center (ETC) unit in 2010 due to declining program enrollments and revenue, and affected faculty and staff positions were transferred to other College units to support burgeoning enrollment of credit students. As Chancellor Dykstra wrote in announcing plans for the ETC closure:
“Vice President Morton has noted in the past that WinCC needs to build its enrollment to between 4,000-4,500 credit students per semester. Any strategy for such a recruitment target will require substantial support from the Student Affairs division which has provided outstanding service heretofore.  The absorption and re-assignment of ETC faculty would add several counselors to our team to help with this intensified recruitment and counseling effort. Moreover, the best way to build enrollment is to improve the retention and persistence of those students already enrolled and the addition of experienced teaching talent re-assigned from ETC would help WinCC to improve its academic support efforts to assure that learning lab and/or supplemental instructional support can be provided particularly to students at the remedial and developmental levels. Finally, WinCC has been famous within the community college system for having one of the highest ratios of faculty to clerical staff, and this situation has been exacerbated by untimely retirements and a hiring freeze on clerical positions that has been imposed by the Governor since the fiscal crisis began in 2008. The several ETC clerical staff coming to join the Kaneohe campus will provide welcome relief to Student Affairs, Instructional Services and Vocational Community Education divisions for their respective clerical needs” (Ref. 3A-50).
The transfers of ETC positions are fully detailed in the College’s January 2011 Reorganization Proposal Request that was approved by Vice President Morton on January 7, 2011 (Ref. 3A-51).
The Windward CC Human Resources Survey indicates slight improvement in the “adequacy of the number of support staff to provide effective support services for employees.” Of the faculty and staff respondents expressing an opinion, 51 percent rated the number of support staff as either Excellent or Satisfactory in the Fall 2005 survey, and that percentage improved to 56 percent in the Fall 2011 survey. The average rating increased slightly from 2.4 to 2.5. (4 = Excellent, 3 = Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, and 1 = Poor.)
The same Windward CC Human Resources Survey indicates some concern about the “adequacy of the number of support staff to provide effective support services for students.” Of the faculty and staff respondents expressing an opinion, 65 percent rated the number of support staff as either Excellent or Satisfactory in the Fall 2005 survey, and that percentage fell to 49 percent in the Fall 2011 survey. The average rating declined just slightly from 2.6 to 2.5. The lowered ratings are not surprising considering the huge 52 percent increase in headcount enrollment that is being accommodated with a less-than-proportional increase in support staffs. Potential staffing adjustments are being proposed and considered through the College’s ongoing program review, planning, and budget processes.
While staff have had to absorb substantial workload increases as enrollment has grown, high levels of service to students are being maintained. In fact, surveys indicate that student satisfaction with support services has increased from what were already high levels in 2005. For example, ratings of each of the following services rose from the Fall 2005 Student Survey to the Fall 2011 Student Survey. (The results summarize ratings of 4 = Excellent, 3 = Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, and 1 = Poor. Responses of “unable to judge” were excluded.)


  • Availability of access to my counselor / academic advisor
    2005 survey: 83% rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.2 average rating
    2011 survey: 94% rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.5 average rating



  • Help of my counselor / academic advisor in setting my goals
    2005 survey: 79 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.2 average rating
    2011 survey: 86 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating



  • Quality of Financial Aid Services for my needs
    2005 survey: 84 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory, 3.2 average rating
    2011 survey: 90 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory, 3.5 average rating



  • Quality of services of the Admissions and Records Office
    2005 survey: 84 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory, 3.2 average rating
    2011 survey: 91 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory, 3.3 average rating



  • Availability of advice and assistance for registration
    2005 survey: 84 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory, 3.2 average rating
    2011 survey: 94 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory, 3.5 average rating



The College has succeeded in serving greatly increased numbers of students while simultaneously improving student satisfaction, and this could only be achieved by maintaining adequate numbers of well-qualified and highly-dedicated faculty and staff.

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.



III.A.3. The institution systematically develops personnel policies and procedures that are available for information and review. Such policies and procedures are equitably and consistently administered.
III.A.3.a. The institution establishes and adheres to written policies ensuring fairness in all employment procedures.

Descriptive Summary:



The College adheres to State and University of Hawai‘i personnel policies and procedures published at the following locations:


  • State of Hawai‘i Human Resources Civil Service Policies and Procedures (Ref. 3A-52).



  • Board of Regent Policies, Chapter 9 Personnel (Ref. 3A-16).



  • UH System-wide Administrative Procedures, Volume III – Personnel (A9.000) (Ref. 3A-53).



  • UH System-wide Executive Policies, Section E9.000 Personnel (Ref. 3A-54).



  • UHCC System Policies (Ref. 3A-55).



Personnel policies and procedures specific to Windward CC are published on the College website, including those at:


  • College Policies, Procedures, and Guidelines (Ref. 3A-56).



  • Office of Academic Affairs Guidelines, Policies and Procedures (Ref. 3A-57).



Personnel practices also conform to collective bargaining agreements and to federal and state employment laws.

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.

III.A.3.b. The institution makes provision for the security and confidentiality of personnel

records. Each employee has access to his/her personnel records in accordance with law.

Descriptive Summary:



The College conforms to the following policies and procedures to maintain the security and confidentiality of personnel records:


  • UH Administrative Procedure A9.075 “Personnel Records – BOR Appointees”, updated September 2009, establishes procedures for the maintenance of official personnel files and identifies the documents to be included (Ref. 3A-58). The procedure calls for personnel files to be maintained in locked filing cabinets in areas/rooms that are accessible only to authorized individuals. Employees may review their personnel file by scheduling an appointment with a Personnel Officer.




  • UH Executive Policy E2.214: “Security and Protection of Sensitive Information”, updated April 2009, provides a framework for the handling sensitive, personal and confidential information whether in paper documents, digital media, or electronic systems (Ref. 3A-59). Sensitive information includes social security numbers, dates of birth, private home addresses and phone numbers, confidential salary information and other such data. The policy also describes procedures for reporting security breaches in accordance with state law.




  • College employees are given UH Form 92 “University of Hawai‘i General Confidentiality Notice” as part of their new-hire packet (Ref. 3A-60). This form notifies employees of their responsibility to respect and protect the confidentiality of personally identifiable information (PII) in the course of performing their duties. Examples of PII include social security numbers, admission and academic records, employment and payroll records, UH usernames and passwords, credit card or credit-related information, and bank account information.


Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.

III.A.4. The institution demonstrates through policies and practices an appropriate understanding of and concern for issues of equity and diversity.
III.A.4.a. The institution creates and maintains appropriate programs, practices, and services that support its diverse personnel.

Descriptive Summary:

It is the policy of Windward CC and the University of Hawai‘i System to provide equity of opportunity in higher education, both in the educational mission and as an employer. The University is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of race, sex, age, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, handicap, marital status, arrest and court record, sexual orientation, and veteran status. This policy covers admission and access to and participation, treatment, and employment in the University's programs and activities. It covers employment practices such as recruitment, hiring, training, promotion, retention, compensation, benefits, transfers, and layoffs. The College complies with all applicable federal and state statutes, rules, regulations, city and county ordinances and provisions in the collective bargaining agreements that prohibit discrimination in University programs, activities, and employment practices. It promotes a full realization of equal opportunity through a positive, continuing program of equal opportunity and affirmative action (Ref. 3A-40).


Windward CC’s commitment to equity and diversity are reflected in its mission, which affirms a “…special commitment to support the access and educational needs of Native Hawaiians,” and its core values which include Na‘auao (Learning), Ho‘okomo (Access), Laulima (Collaboration), and Ho‘ihi (Respect; Ref. 3A-61, pp. 2-3).
The College and University organizations, programs, and services that promote equity and diversity are:


  • The University’s Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action (EEO/AA) Office and the College’s EEO/AA Coordinator promote the commitment to diversity and oversees the development and implementation of related policies and procedures. The services provided include advising departments and search committees on recruiting and retaining a diverse workforce, auditing personnel practices, preparing annual affirmative action plan reports, investigating, and resolving complaints, and sponsoring educational programs to ensure an environment free from discrimination and harassment (Ref. 3A-62).



  • The UH Commission on the Status of Women supports the well-being, development, and advancement of all University women. The Commission actively promotes a working and learning environment free of sexism and discrimination through policy, advocacy, and education. It serves as a conduit for information between the administration and the total University community by making recommendations to the UH President on issues that have particular relevance for women, including, but not limited to safety and security, equity, access, retention, and advancement; fosters an awareness, understanding, and recognition of the potential contributions, special challenges and many roles women play in a University community; and develops alliances with like organizations throughout the community, state, and nation (Ref. 3A-63).



  • The UH Commission on the Status of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) Equality promotes a safe and inclusive environment by creating a culture of equality, acceptance, and respect throughout the UH system (Ref. 3A-64).





  • The Windward CC Safe Space Club is affiliated with the UH Commission on the Status of LGBTI Equality and serves as a campus and community support system for LBGTI individuals and their allies (Ref. 3A-65).



  • The Puko‘a Council is a chartered advisory group to the UH President that provides a formal, independent voice and organization through which the Native Hawaiian Faculty, administrators, and students of the University of Hawai‘i System can participate in the development and interpretation of System-wide policy and practice as it relates to Native Hawaiian programs, activities, initiatives, and issues (Ref. 3A-66).



  • Windward CC’s Ke Kumu Pali group was established in 2003 and is affiliated with the Puko‘a Council. It was recognized as an official advisory group to the Chancellor in 2005. Its mission is to infuse Hawaiian culture, values, and knowledge into academic and social communities at Windward CC. It also identifies the needs of Hawaiian students at the College and provides supportive services, programs, opportunities, and culturally enriching professional development for faculty and staff. Additionally, it supports faculty and staff in working more effectively with Hawaiian students, collaborates with System-wide Hawaiian initiatives, and advocates for Hawaiian students, faculty, and staff (Ref. 3A-67).



  • The University’s Diversity and Equity Initiative provides grants of up to $5,000 for campus projects promoting diversity and a climate of inclusiveness. Projects may address issues on ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, disabilities and culture. Among past awards to Windward CC have been funds for staff training in prejudice reduction and coalition building, for attendance at the Native Hawaiian Education Association conference, for partnership in programs providing services in underserved areas (Ref. 3A-68).



  • The College regularly hosts activities and programs that acknowledge and celebrate the different perspectives and values of the many cultures of our community, our nation, and the world. For example, the College stages an annual Ho‘olaule‘a community festival featuring a wide variety of local music, arts, crafts, and foods (Ref. 3A-69). Every March since 2005 the College has observed Women’s History Month with a series of free events that celebrate the important contributions of women from Hawai‘i and around the world (Ref. 3A-70). Free Talk Story Sessions bring Hawaiian music masters to the College and promotes Hawaiian music events and courses (Ref. 3A-71).



Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.

III.A.4.b. The institution regularly assesses its record in employment equity and diversity consistent with its mission.

Descriptive Summary:

Windward CCs Strategic Plan includes Action Outcome 5.1 to “increase the number of faculty and staff from underrepresented demographic groups within EEO parameters” (Ref. 3A-72, p. 14).


In accordance with UH Administrative Procedure A9.890 Equal Employment Opportunity / Affirmative Action, the College develops an EEO/AA Plan based on an annual analysis of the gender and race/ethnicity of the College’s current employees, the applicants for vacancies, and the employees that are newly hired, terminated or resign (Ref. 3A-73).
The College’s EEO/AA Officer oversees recruitment practices and monitors the screening, interviewing, and selection process. For positions where females or minorities are under-represented, the recruitment period is extended from the usual 11 working days to 16 working days in the hopes of attracting a larger and more diverse applicant pool. Screening committees consist of at least three members with a mix of gender and ethnicity. The EEO/AA Officer reviews and approves the screening committee’s interview questions before applications are seen to ensure appropriateness and lack of bias, and the screening committee is required to document how its selection (or recommendation) reflects the most qualified applicant. The Chancellor approves, determines the new hire selection and salary placement in consultation with the EEO/AA Officer.

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.

III.A.4.c. The institution subscribes to, advocates, and demonstrates integrity in the treatment of its administration, faculty, staff, and students.

Descriptive Summary:



The College Course Catalog reviews the Windward CC’s stance on nondiscrimination and affirmative action and specifies that students, employees, or applicants for admission or employment who believe they have been discriminated against on the basis of race, sex, age, religion, color, ancestry, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, marital status, veteran’s status, or arrest and court record may file a complaint with the College EEO/AA Coordinator, or with the Office for Civil Rights (Ref. 3A-61, pp. 3-4).
The discrimination complaint procedure is further detailed in UH Administrative Procedure A9.920 Discrimination Complaint Procedures for Students, Employees and Applicants for Admission or Employment (Ref. 3A-74). As specified in A9.920, the objective is:
to provide an equitable, timely, and effective means of resolving discrimination complaints. By assuring internal due process in the investigation and resolution of complaints, it is hoped that a spirit of openness, fairness, and civility will govern relations among members of the University community.
The College and University have established other procedures for fair handling of student academic grievances and alleged student conduct code violations, and these are outlined in the Windward CC Course Catalog (Ref. 3A-61, pp. 20-21) and documented in Windward CC Policy No. 4-6 Student Academic Grievance Procedures (Ref. 3A-75) and UH Executive Policy E7.208 University of Hawai‘i System-wide Student Conduct Code (Ref. 3A-76).
Student satisfaction with the “availability of channels for expressing student complaints” is high, with 87 percent of those expressing an opinion in the Fall 2011 Student Survey rating it as Excellent or Satisfactory. This is up from 73 percent in the Fall 2005 Student Survey.
Surveys of faculty and staff indicate that an overwhelming majority continue to be satisfied with the fairness and respect shown by administrators, the policies concerning equity and diversity, and the overall working and learning environment. The following summarizes Fall 2005 and Fall 2011 survey ratings of 4 = Excellent, 3 = Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, and 1 = Poor.


  • Overall manner in which college personnel are shown fairness and respect by the college administration
    2005 survey: 85 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.0 average rating
    2011 survey: 77 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.0 average rating



  • Adequacy and appropriateness of college policies concerning issues of equity and diversity
    2005 survey: 88 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.1 average rating
    2011 survey: 81 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.0 average rating



  • Overall level of satisfaction with WINDWARD CC working / learning environment
    2005 survey: 75 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.9 average rating
    2011 survey: 85 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.2 average rating


Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.
III.A.5. The institution provides all personnel with appropriate opportunities for continued

professional development, consistent with the institutional mission and based on identified teaching and learning needs.
III.A.5.a. The institution plans professional development activities to meet the needs of its personnel.

Descriptive Summary:



Windward CC participates in numerous professional development programs coordinated at the System level to meet needs that are common among faculty and staff throughout the UHCC System. These include:


  • The Wo Learning Champions initiative, which was established in 2000 with a $1,000,000 endowment from two Wo Family Foundations. The Wo Learning Champions (WoLCs) are representatives selected from each of the UHCCs who serve an 18-month term and receive a personal $2000 professional development stipend. The WoLCs are collectively responsible for designing a program of professional development for faculty/staff renewal and enrichment that will keep learning at the center of its focus, have System-wide impact, and allow for expansion and enrichment of activities as new resources become available. In addition to coordinating workshops at each campus, they present annual Wo Innovation Awards and Wo Community Building Awards to recognize outstanding initiatives that might be replicated on other campuses (Ref. 3A-77; Ref. 3A-78).



  • Scenarios Online: Teaching in the Learning College, an eight-week course primarily for new instructors that is designed to orient faculty to learning-centered teaching and assessment practices, increase student engagement and rapport between students and faculty, foster supportive connections among new faculty cohorts, introduce new faculty to the Laulima learning management system from a participant experience, and provide a safe and confidential space to ask questions and reflect on classroom experiences (Ref. 3A-79).



  • The Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) and Summer Institute, a two-week program conducted every other summer focuses on WAC and assessment. It assists college teachers in all programs and subject areas to use writing as a tool for thinking and learning, to prepare to teach a writing-intensive course, to gain confidence and practice in their own personal writing, and to explore effective approaches to teaching and learning (Ref. 3A-80; Ref. 3A-81).



  • The Hawai‘i National Great Teachers Seminar, a summer retreat that brings teachers together to learn from each other and exchange teaching innovations and solutions to teaching problems (Ref. 3A-82; Ref. 3A-83).



  • UHCC Achieving the Dream Hawai‘i Strategy Institute, an annual two-day conference at which participants from the UHCC System and invited guest speakers share lessons learned and best practices in meeting Strategic Plan goals and Achieving the Dream goals; identify practices that will increase student success and ensure quality; and increase capacity for data analysis, program evaluation, and data-driven decision-making (Ref. 3A-84; Ref. 3A-85).





  • Teaching And Learning with Electronic Networked Technologies (TALENT), a faculty development program that provides instruction on various online tools and pedagogical strategies surrounding the design, creation, delivery of Internet-supported course materials (Ref. 3A-86).



  • The Community Colleges Leadership Champions program that was established in 2004 to identify, encourage, develop, and support the next generation of community college leadership (Ref. 3A-87).



  • The President’s Emerging Leaders Program (PELP) identifies and develops future campus and System leaders through a program that provides each cohort with a base of knowledge about higher education and an opportunity to reflect upon their leadership potential and how they might make a difference on the UH campuses and within the System (Ref. 3A-88).



Several College groups and departments also develop and conduct professional development activities that are designed to meet the particular needs of Windward CC faculty and staff. These include:


  • The Staff Development Committee (SDC) plans and implements development workshops, raises funds to support staff development activities, and reviews and approves proposal for professional improvement mini-grants up to $1000 (Ref. 3A-89). The committee consists of faculty and staff volunteers, and they administer an annual budget of roughly $8,000. The SDC Annual Reports review the workshops and other activities conducted and the mini-grants awarded (Ref. 3A-90).



  • The Sub-committee for Professional Development in Assessment (SPDA) of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) was formed in 2010 to identify essential assessment workshops to be conducted during the academic year, to create a schedule of workshops, to plan for a consistent cycle of professional development in assessment, and to assist in institutionalizing these professional development efforts (Ref. 3A-91).



  • Windward CC’s Learning to Learn Initiative conducts a summer institute and monthly small-group sessions during which participants look at strategies to enhance students’ skills in learning, discuss how success strategies can be integrated into courses, and design curricular modifications to increase student success through the application of learning / study skills (Ref. 3A-92; Ref. 3A-93).




  • Excellence in Education Day / Wo Innovations in Learning Day (WILD) is an annual non-instructional day that the College devotes to personal and professional development activities every first Friday in March. The Staff Development Committee and the Wo Learning Champions alternate with each other to plan and organize each year’s program (Ref. 3A-94; Ref. 3A-95; Ref. 3A-96).


Faculty and staff are also provided with employee benefits that encourage them to engage in ongoing personal and professional development. These include:


  • Tuition waivers for faculty and staff employed on a half-time basis or more. This applies to courses at any UH campus, up to six credits per semester (Ref. 3A-97, Section 6-7a).



  • Sabbatical leaves for faculty. After six years or 12 semesters of full-time creditable service, faculty may apply for a one-year sabbatical leave at half pay, or a one-semester sabbatical at full pay (Ref. 3A-98, Ref. 3A-99). Since 2006, all sabbatical applications received have been approved and funded, as listed in the following table.



Table 14: Sabbatical Application





Full Year

Half Year

2006-2007

0

2

2007-2008

0

2

2008-2009

0

4

2009-2010

0

4

2010-2011

0

1




  • Professional Improvement Leaves for Administrative, Professional, and Technical (APT) employees. After six continuous years with the University, APT employees qualify for a professional improvement leave of up to six months at full pay or up to one year at half pay.


The College’s Strategic Plan recognizes the importance of providing and funding professional development opportunities. Action Outcome 5.2 calls for the College to “develop and support professional development opportunities for all faculty and staff, and include professional development funding as a base budget line item equaling 1-5 percent of each division’s personnel costs” (Ref. 3A-72, p. 14). Actual expenditures for professional development peaked at $191,830 in FY2008 and have been below that level since, as shown in the following table. (Table data from 2012 Strategic Plan Goals and Outcomes – Windward CC, Item 5.1 Professional Development Investment; Ref. 3A-100, p. 19)
Table 15: Professional Development Investment


Fiscal Year

Professional Development Expenditures

Expenditures as Percentage of Personnel Costs

2006-2007

$178,043

2.33%

2007-2008

$191,830

2.20%

2008-2009

$126,889

1.34%

2009-2010

$75,478

0.86%

2010-2011

$131,811

1.44%


Satisfaction with support for professional development has increased despite the lower College expenditures in recent years. In surveys of faculty and staff, 67 percent of those expressing an opinion in Fall 2011 rated the adequacy of support for professional development as either Excellent or Satisfactory, and that’s an increase from 59 percent in Fall 2005. The average rating rose from 2.6 in Fall 2005 to 2.8 in Fall 2011 (4 = Excellent, 3 = Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, 1 = Poor). This increase in satisfaction reflects growth in professional development opportunities offered by system offices and others outside the College, as well as astute planning by the College to focus its staff development investments and offerings where they would do the most good.

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.
III.A.5.b. With the assistance of the participants, the institution systematically evaluates professional development programs and uses the results of these evaluations as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:



It is standard practice for the Wo Learning Champions, the Staff Development Committee, and other units that present professional development activities to have all participants complete anonymous evaluation forms. The evaluations and suggestions provided by participants are used to assess the effectiveness of activities, to identify opportunities for program improvements, and to guide the development of future offerings. The Staff Development Committee’s Year-End Report for 2010-2011 includes the results of the evaluations (Ref. 3A-90, pp. 7-11).
The College’s systematic faculty and staff performance evaluation processes provide regular opportunities for employees to collaborate with their manager or department chair on personalized plans for professional development. Employees are encouraged to reflect on the effectiveness of development activities undertaken, to discuss areas of potential growth and skills enhancement, and to identify objectives and development pursuits for the next evaluation period. Managers and department chairs typically provide mentoring, offer advice regarding benefits such as tuition waivers and sabbatical leaves and staff development grants, and share information about pertinent training and development programs being conducted. As a result of creating professional development plans with the employee, current departmental funds might be drawn on to cover costs involved, or the need for additional funding may be included in the Department’s Annual Report and Budget Request for the coming year.

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.

III.A.6. Human resource planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution systematically assesses the effective use of human resources and uses the results of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:



The College regularly and systematically assesses the use of its human resources through Individual Performance Evaluations (as described under Standard III.A.1.b), Annual Departmental Reviews, and Five-Year Program Reviews. These reviews may identify opportunities for improvement through further training, through reorganization or reallocation of positions, or through the hiring of additional personnel.
When new positions are needed to meet growing workload demands or to implement new programs, they are requested through funding proposals submitted to the College’s Planning and Budget Council (PBC). The PBC includes representatives from across the College, and it reviews, evaluates, prioritizes, and makes recommendations to the Chancellor regarding the use of resources in the College budget and regarding resource requests for future funding.
The PBC prioritizes proposals for new positions and future funding using a rubric that considers the linkage to system priorities, the linkage to College goals and priorities, the assessment data demonstrating a need, the immediacy of the need, the contribution to health and safety, and the scope of impact at the College (Ref. 3A-101).
The Chancellor considers the PBC’s ranking of position requests in deciding whether to pursue the necessary funding for them through requests to the UH System, to the legislature, or through grant applications.
While the College’s planning process for new positions is appropriate, the difficulty in obtaining new positions has led to some dissatisfaction. Surveys asked faculty and staff to rate the “adequacy of evaluating staff needs in the planning and development of new facilities, programs and services.” In Fall 2011, only 48 percent of respondents expressing an opinion rated the adequacy as either Excellent or Satisfactory, and the average rating was 2.4. (4 = Excellent, 3 = Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, 1 = Poor) Those ratings are about the same as the Fall 2005 survey in which 46 percent rated the adequacy as either Excellent or Satisfactory and the average rating was 2.4.

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None


Standard III.A Evidence


  1. Classification and Compensation Plan for UH Executive Classes (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/bor/emcompp.htm

  2. E5.221 Classification of Faculty (Archived Copy) http://manoa.hawaii.edu/ovcaa/faculty/tenure_promotion_contract_renewal/pdf/Appendix_A.pdf

  3. Agreement between the UH Professional Assembly and the UH Board of Regents, July 2009-June 2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.uhpa.org/uhpa-bor-contract/100129-2009-2015-agreement-for-website.pdf/view

  4. A9.210 Classification and Compensation plan for Administrative, Professional and Technical Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9210.pdf

  5. Position Classification and Compensation: Department of Human Resources Development (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/hrd/main/eccd/

  6. A9.620 Recruitment and Reassignment of Executive and Managerial Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9620.pdf

  7. A9.540 Recruitment and Selection of Faculty and Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT) Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9540.pdf

  8. Competitive Recruitment for Civil Service Positions (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/dhrd/0300003.pdf

  9. Executive/Managerial Position Descriptions (Archived Copy)

  10. Minimum Qualifications for Faculty Positions (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/mqs._faculty,_August_2011.pdf

  11. Work at UH (Archived Copy) http://www.pers.hawaii.edu/wuh/

  12. State Job Information (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/hrd/main/esd/

  13. Work at UH Advertisement: Title: Instructor, CC (Animal Sciences) (Archived Copy)

  14. Work at UH Advertisement: Title: Instructor, CC (Mathematics) (Archived Copy)

  15. Calculation of Survey Statistics Cited in Standard III.A Human Resources (Archived Copy)

  16. Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 9 Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch9.pdf

  17. UHCC Policy #9.202 Executive Employees Performance Evaluation (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/9.202.pdf

  18. 360° Performance Assessment of Executive Managerial Personnel (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/360/02-10-12_360_Performance_Assessment.pdf

  19. 360° Executive Assessment e-mail and sample survey (Archived Copy)

  20. ACCJC Letter and Evaluation Report 2007/01/31 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2007/2007_01_31_ACCJC_eval.pdf

  21. Governance Survey Information (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/GovernanceMenu.htm

  22. Lecturers Self-Assessment (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Lecturers/Self-Assessment.php

  23. UHCC Contract Renewal Suggested Guidelines (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Faculty_Staff/Contract_Renewal/Documents/2011/2011-2012_Contract_Renewal_General_Guidelines.pdf

  24. Windward CC Schedule for Renewal of Contract During Probationary Period (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Faculty_Staff/Contract_Renewal/Documents/2011/2011-2012_Contract_Renewal_Schedule.pdf

  25. Guidelines for Tenure and Promotion: UHCC 2011-2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Faculty_Staff/Tenure_Promotion/Documents/2011/2011_2012_Tenure_Promotion_Guide.pdf

  26. Community Colleges 2011-2012 Tenure/Promotion Timelines (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Faculty_Staff/Tenure_Promotion/Documents/2011/2011-2012_Tenure_Promotion_Timeline.pdf

  27. Faculty Evaluation Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CCCM_PDF/7200-031982.pdf

  28. Duties and Responsibilities of Department Chairs in Credit Instruction (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Department_Chairs/

  29. A9.170 Performance Evaluation of Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT) Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9170.pdf

  30. Evaluating APT Employees presentation (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/download/aptdocs/APTEvalProcess2009.pdf

  31. Performance Appraisal System: Supervisory Manual (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/download/pasman.pdf

  32. Proposed Reclassification of Community College Faculty (Archived Copy) http://www.uhpa.org/official-position-on-events/community-college-faculty-classification/proposed-reclassification-of-the-faculty-at-community-colleges

  33. eCAFE (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ecafe/

  34. Supplemental Instruction at WCC (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2011/Supplmental%20Instruction_2011_05_04_Evaluation.pdf

  35. Windward CC Developmental Mathematics Two-Track Curriculum (Archived Copy)

  36. Windward CC ARRA Mathematics Multi-level Class Proposal (Archived Copy)

  37. Hawai`i Revised Statutes: Chapter 84 Standards of Conduct (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/ethics/constitution/chap84

  38. UHCC Policy #5.211 Statement on Professional Ethics (Faculty) (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/5.211.pdf

  39. E1.203 Policy on Sexual Harassment and Related Conduct (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e1/e1203.pdf

  40. E1.202 University Statement of Nondiscrimination and Affirmative Action (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e1/e1202.pdf

  41. E2.210 Use and Management of Information Technology Resources (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e2/e2210.pdf

  42. E5.214 Conflicts of Interests (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e5/e5214.pdf

  43. E9.210 Workplace Non-Violence (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e9/e9210.pdf

  44. E11.201 Illegal Drugs and Substance Abuse (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e11/e11201.pdf

  45. E11.203 Illegal Drugs and Alcohol Abuse (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e11/e11203.pdf

  46. A9.325 Political Activity (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9325.pdf

  47. A9.335 Employment of Relatives (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9335.pdf

  48. Organization Chart (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2011/WCC_Organization_Charts_2011.pdf

  49. Employee headcounts e-mails (Archived Copy)

  50. Chancellor, e-mail, 2010/08/13 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/Calendar/2010/ETC_Integration/

  51. Reorganization Proposal Request: UH WCC Vocational and Community Education (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2011/2011_01_07_ETC_Reorganization.pdf

  52. State of Hawai`i Human Resources Civil Service Policies and Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/dhrd/index.htm

  53. UH System-wide Administrative Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/sysap.php

  54. E9.000 Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e9/personnel.php

  55. UHCC Policies (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/policies.html

  56. WCC Policies, Procedures, and Guidelines (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/

  57. Office of Academic Affairs (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/academic_affairs/

  58. A9.075 Personnel Records: Board of Regents Appointees (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9075.pdf

  59. E2.214 Security and Protection of Sensitive Information (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e2/e2214.pdf

  60. UH General Confidentiality Notice (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/docs/forms/uh92.pdf

  61. Windward CC Course Catalog 2011-2013 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/WCC_Catalog_2011-2013.pdf

  62. Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/eeo/index.html

  63. UH Commission on the Status of Women (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/op/csw/index.html

  64. UH Commission on the Status of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Equality (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/op/lgbti/index.html

  65. Safe Spaces (Archived Copy) http://web.mac.com/shodell2/Files/Safe_Spaces.html

  66. Pukoa Council (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/pukoa/Pukoa_Charter.html

  67. Ke Kumu Pali Charter (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Ke_Kumu_Pali/Charter.php

  68. Diversity and Equity Initiative (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/diversity/dei/index.html

  69. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/2011/

  70. Women’s History Month 2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/WHM/

  71. Hawai`i Music Institute (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hawaii_Music_Institute/

  72. Strategic Plan Action Outcomes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Planning/Plans/Strategic/StrategicPlan12-8-08.pdf

  73. A9.890 Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9890.pdf

  74. A9.920 Discrimination Complaint Procedures for Students, Employees, and Applicants for Admission or Employment (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9920.pdf

  75. Windward CC Policy 4.6: Student Academic Grievance Procedures (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/policies/4_6_grievance.pdf

  76. E7.208 UH System-wide Student Conduct Code (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e7/e7208.pdf

  77. Wo Learning Champions (Archived Copy) http://wolc.hawaii.edu/WoGen7/About_Wo.html

  78. Wo Learning Champions WCC Web page (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/wo/

  79. ScenariosOnline (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/instructional_development/Scenarios/index.php

  80. Writing Across the Curriculum (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Instructional_Development/WAC/

  81. Writing Across the Curriculum Summer Institute flyer (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Writing_Intensive/WAC2010.pdf

  82. Hawai`i Great Teachers Seminar WCC Web page (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/great_teachers/index.php

  83. Hawai`i Great Teachers Seminar (Archived Copy) http://www.greatteacher.hawaii.edu/Seminar.html

  84. Hawai`i Strategy Institute e-mails (Archived Copy)

  85. Hawai`i Strategy Institute 2011 Schedule of Presenters (Archived Copy)

  86. TALENT (Teaching and Learning with Electronic Network Technology) (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/talent/

  87. Windward Community College Leadership Champions (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/leadership/

  88. President’s Emerging Leaders Program 2009-2010 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ovppp/Leaders/

  89. Staff Development Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Staff_Development/

  90. Year End Report for Staff Development 2010-2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Staff_Development/2011/Staff_Development_2011_10_01_Annual_Report.pdf

  91. Professional Development Activities Spring 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Institutional_Effectiveness/2011/IEC_2011_Spring_Workshop_Schedule.pdf

  92. Learning to Learn Coordinator, e-mail, 2011/05/05 (Archived Copy)

  93. Learn To Learn (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/learn_to_learn/

  94. Windward CC Wo Innovations in Learning Day 2010 program (Archived Copy)

  95. Windward CC Excellence in Education Conference 2011 program (Archived Copy)

  96. Windward CC Wo Innovations in Learning Day 2012 program (Archived Copy)

  97. Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 6 Tuition, Financial Assistance, and Fees (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch6.pdf

  98. A9.400 Guidelines for Sabbatical Leave for Faculty (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9400.pdf

  99. Sabbatical Leave Procedures for Faculty (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/Sabbaticals_Policy/Sabbatical_Policy.pdf

  100. Strategic Plan Goals and Outcomes 2012 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/WIN_CC_2012_Actuals.pdf

  101. Planning and Budget Council request form (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/PBCForm_10-3-11.pdf



Standard III.B Physical Resources


Physical resources, which include facilities, equipment, land, and other assets, support student learning programs and services, and improve institutional effectiveness. Physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning.
III.B.1. The institution provides safe and sufficient physical resources that support and assure the integrity and quality of its programs and services, regardless of location or means of delivery.
III.B.1.a. The institution plans, builds, maintains, and upgrades or replaces its physical resources in a manner that assures effective utilization and the continuing quality necessary to support its programs and services.

Descriptive Summary:

The College’s buildings and other physical facilities are designed, built, maintained and operated in a manner that facilitates achieving the College’s mission and strategic goals. The following is a campus map (Ref. 3B-1) and a listing of the main buildings and the primary functions that they house:






Hale A‘o: Hawaiian Studies, Native Hawaiian Program

Hale Alaka‘i: Faculty and Administrative Offices, Admissions & Records, Business Office/Cashier, Financial Aid, The Testing Center (TTC)

Hale Kuhina: Career and Community Education, Marketing and Communications, Health Career Programs

Hale ‘Ākoakoa: Student Affairs, Academic Counseling, Student Publications, Student Government, Ka Piko Student Centers, Bookstore, Cafeteria

Hale No‘eau: Media Production Center, Computing Services, PC classrooms

Hale La‘akea: Library

Hale `Iolani: Art Studios, Temporary Vet Tech Lab

Hale Pālanakila: Faculty Offices, Music Classrooms, Art Classrooms, Ceramics Studio, Photography Lab, English CAI Classroom, Speech Lab, Gallery ‘Iolani, Palikū Theatre

Hale Lanihuli: Observatory

Hale Hōkūlani: Planetarium

Maintenance Building

Hale ‘Imiloa: Faculty Offices, Science Classrooms/Labs, Aerospace Exploration Lab, Hoa‘aina RS/GIS Center for Environmental Monitoring, Kuhi La‘au Plant Identification Center, Marine Option Program, Water Quality Lab

Hale Uluwehi: Agriculture Program, Par 3 Golf Course

Hale Mana‘opono: Faculty Offices, Classrooms, Math Lab

Hale Na‘auao: Faculty Offices, TRiO, Talent Search, Upward Bound
The following is a list of the new construction, major renovations, and significant repair and maintenance projects undertaken or planned since 2006 to ensure the effectiveness and safety of campus facilities:

Table 16: New Construction and Renovations


No.

Description

Location

Status

1

Replace conference room partitions/drapery

‘Ākoakoa

Future

2

Repair glass windows and skylight

Ākoakoa/Pālanakila

Future

3

Renovate Hale Alaka‘i building

Alaka‘i

Future

4

Re-landscape Alaka‘i Front

Alaka‘i

Future

5

Upgrade and Expand Emergency Notification System (EMS)

Campus Wide

Future

6

Re-paint building exterior

Campus Wide

Future

7

Replace Deteriorated Transformers and Exterior metal door

Campus Wide

Future

8

Replace flooring with non-slip flooring (safety)

Campus Wide

Future

9

Replace fume hood/eyewash

‘Imiloa

Future

10

Renovate - La‘akea building after LLC opens

La‘akea

Future

11

Renovate - No‘eau building after moved to New Library building

No‘eau

Future

12

Redesign/Landscape slope between Imaginarium/Pālanakila, Pālanakila courtyard

 

Future

13

Repair Gutters/Downspouts

‘Ākoakoa

Final Design

14

ADA Compliance - Install Automatic Door Openers

Campus wide

Final Design

15

Replace/Repair Awning, Ramps, Rails  (campus wide)

Campus wide

Final Design

16

Refurbish/Expand Hale A‘o patio for Hawaiian Studies program

A‘o/Patio

Design

17

Expand Electronic Access Keying System

Campus Wide

Design

18

Upgrade/Replace Campus telephone system to VoIP

Campus Wide

Design

19

Replace exhaust fans - ‘Imiloa - EPC - JCI

‘Imiloa

Design

20

Repair/Redesign Skylight Roof

‘Imiloa

Design

21

Upgrade/Replace fire alarm system

‘Imiloa

Design

22

Renovate Na‘auao Building

Na`auao

Design

23

Improvement of Storm Drain - Uluwehi

Uluwehi

Design

24

Install chain fence between Kāne`ohe District Part and Windward CC boundary

Windward CC

Design

25

Install Chiller Loop - part of Energy Conservation Project - JCI

Campus wide

Construction

26

EPC - JCI campus-wide

Campus Wide

Construction

27

New Library Learning Commons building construction

Old Manaleo

2012

28

Convert old lot next to Hale Awa to parking lot

Parking lot

2012

29

Road widen between Kuhina and ‘Ākoakoa parking lot

Roadway

2012

30

Road widen - Back of La‘akea & Pālanakila

Roadway

2012

31

Road widen - Road along maintenance shop

Roadway

2012

32

Repave/widen Alaka‘i Roadway

Alaka‘i Roadway

BID

33

Renovate Alaka‘i classrooms

Alaka‘i

2010

34

Upgrade/Replace light fixtures - Alaka‘i/ No‘eau

Alaka‘i/ No‘eau

2010

35

Install Campus Directory - Campuswide

Campus Wide

2010

36

Security System: Code Blue phone/PA/Cameras

Campus Wide

2010

37

Demolish 1 of 4 cottages front of Hale Awa

Cottage

2010

38

Upgrade Imaginarium equipment from analog to digital

Imaginarium

2010

39

Demolish Manaleo for new library

Manaleo

2010

40

Renovate Mana‘opono

Mana‘opono

2010

41

Rewiring - removed overhead, install new transformers, underground power and telecom - campus wide

Campus Wide

2009

42

Install Sink for Nursing Program

Kuhina

2009

43

Replace A/C system - La‘akea

La‘akea

2009

44

Re-seal/Re-roof Pālanakila, repair gutters/downspouts, repair leaks

Pālanakila

2009

45

Termite Repair - Termite treatment and replace damaged door

Pālanakila/Theatre

2009

46

Replace campus switchgear

Campus Wide

2008

47

Sub-meter Water

Campus Wide

2008

48

Replace Hokulani Metal Roof

Imaginarium

2008

49

Re-roof/repair leaks - ‘Imiloa

‘Imiloa

2008

50

Install/Upgrade A/C controls to JCI Metasys

‘Imiloa

2008

51

Replace Chiller - Kuhina

Kuhina

2008

52

Re-floor and entry way - No‘eau

No‘eau

2008

53

Renovation of restrooms, ETC/HCC campus

ETC/HCC Campus

2007

54

Lanihuli Observatory - new building

Lanihuli

2006

The new Library Learning Commons, currently under construction and scheduled to open in Fall 2012, will house the Library, Media Production Center, Computing Services, Ka Piko Career & Learning Center and The Testing Center. The integrated facility will provide more centralized, efficient and up-to-date services to students, faculty and staff in an environment where responsiveness to changes in information and technology is crucial (Ref. 3B-2).


The UHCC System Office provides support for major scheduled/deferred maintenance projects in the areas of roof, utilities upgrades, and electro-mechanical repair and replacement. The College has recently engaged in a performance-based contract to reduce energy consumption. This entails the implementation of various energy conservation measures such as installing energy efficient lights and fixtures, converting to a chilled water loop system, replacing toilet fixtures with those that use less water, etc. (Ref. 3B-3).
The College’s facilities are meeting program needs. Fall 2005 and Fall 2011 surveys of faculty, staff, and students indicate high levels of satisfaction with the College’s facilities. The overwhelming majority of respondents continue to rate the classrooms, labs, and overall quality of facilities as either Excellent or Satisfactory, and most average ratings have improved. Student ratings are particularly high and exceed those of faculty and staff. While there’s been a dip in faculty and staff satisfaction with the adequacy of parking, it’s notable that student satisfaction with parking improved slightly even with the College serving a 52 percent increase in students from a headcount enrollment of 1,781 in Fall 2006 to 2,705 in Fall 2011. (The following summarizes survey ratings of 4 = Excellent, 3 = Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, and 1 = Poor. Responses of “Unable to Judge” were excluded; Ref. 3B-4)


  • Adequacy of classrooms

    2005 Student Survey: 88 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating


    2011 Student Survey: 97 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.6 average rating

    2005 Faculty Survey: 73 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.9 average rating


    2011 Faculty Survey: 84 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.1 average rating



  • Adequacy of laboratories, shops and studios

    2005 Student Survey: 87 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.


    2011 Student Survey: 93 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.4 average rating.

    2005 Faculty Survey: 80 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.0 average rating.


    2011 Faculty Survey: 75 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.0 average rating.



  • Adequacy of parking

    2005 Student Survey: 55 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.6 average rating.


    2011 Student Survey: 65 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.7 average rating.

    2005 Faculty and Staff Survey: 71 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.9 average rating.


    2011 Faculty and Staff Survey: 56 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.6 average rating.



  • Overall quality of campus facilities and equipment

    2005 Student Survey: 90 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.


    2011 Student Survey: 95 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.5 average rating.

    2005 Faculty and Staff Survey: 79 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.9 average rating.


    2011 Faculty & Staff Survey: 83 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.1 average rating.




Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.B.1.b. The institution assures that physical resources at all locations where it offers courses, programs, and services are constructed and maintained to assure access, safety, security, and a healthful learning and working environment.

Descriptive Summary:

Windward Community College focuses on constructing and maintaining physical resources to ensure access, safety, security, and a healthful learning and working environment.


Facilities are designed and constructed according to building codes and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which require compliance with regulations regarding safety and handicapped accessibility.  Although new or remodeled buildings meet the accessibility standards described in the ADA Act, accessibility for the disabled is still a concern in older buildings. Campus access for persons with disabilities has also been a concern during construction and renovation projects that have closed sidewalks and some handicap parking for extended periods and required long detours for those choosing to remain on paved walkways rather than use unpaved shortcuts over uneven ground.
The facilities are maintained and operated in accordance with Hawai‘i Occupational Health and Safety (HIOSH) standards. Bio and hazmat materials are handled and stored appropriately; asbestos, installed in earlier construction, is removed in all remodels; and, a chemical locator binder, which identifies chemicals currently in inventory, is kept in the science laboratories.  A Chemical Hygiene Plan is being adhered to, an Annual Inventory of Hazardous Materials is prepared, and readily-accessible Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are kept in proximity to storage and use areas (Ref. 3B-5).
Corrective measures are taken to maintain safe and unobstructed accessible routes, and walkways and stairways are in good repair for all buildings. Non-slip grips have been installed on ramps and in problem areas, and non-slip carpeting has been installed at the entrances to buildings. Parking lots, walkways, and building perimeters are generally well lit around campus, and battery-operated emergency lights have been installed in most buildings. Smoking is prohibited within buildings, on outdoor patios and lanais, within 20 feet of any building entrance or exit, and within 50 feet of designated pick-up and drop-off points.
Windward CC’s Operations and Maintenance (O&M) staff reports to the Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services. They are responsible for building and grounds maintenance as well as safety, access, and security concerns. The College has the following 18.0 FTE O&M positions, plus one contracted security guard on duty 24/7, 365 days a year (Ref. 3B-6).
Table 17: Operations and Maintenance Employee Headcount


FTE Count

Position Title

1.0

Facilities Manager

1.0

General Bldg. Maintenance Supervisor

1.0

Building Maintenance Worker I

1.0

General Laborer II

1.5

General Laborer I

1.0

Groundskeeper

1.0

Janitor III

8.5

Janitor II

1.0

Safety & Security Manager

1.0

Security Officer

Campus Security performs a full range of public safety services: incident reports; campus investigations, medical and fire emergencies; traffic accidents; enforcement of laws regulating the use of alcohol, drugs and weapons; inspection of lighting and shrubbery; and all other situations requiring Campus Security assistance (Ref. 3B-7). Campus Security Officers are trained in areas such as emergency first-aid, CPR, report writing, investigative skills, and crowd control by experts from federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. The following are among the safety measures managed by Campus Security.




  • Security and Emergency procedures are published on the College website at http://windward.hawaii.edu/Security/emergency.php (Ref. 3B-8).




  • A campus Security Guard is on duty 24-hours-a-day, 7 days-a-week, including all holidays, and conducts vehicle and foot patrols on campus.




  • Six Closed Circuit TV cameras that pan, zoom, and monitor most of the outdoor areas of the campus and some of the indoor areas.




  • Seven “Blue” Emergency Phones that have direct connections to campus security are positioned throughout the campus.  




  • “Emergency Notification System” via e-mail, text, and emergency Public Address (loudspeaker) System that students, faculty and staff are encouraged to sign up to receive or review and update through the UH Alert System information at https://www.hawaii.edu/alert (Ref. 3B-9).

The Campus Safety Committee was established in 2011 to evaluate, monitor, and analyze safety issues in an attempt to reduce the risks of illness, injury, property damage, etc. The group is chaired by Windward CC’s Safety and Security Manager and advises the Chancellor on appropriate policies and procedures to enhance the safety and security of Windward CC personnel and students (Ref. 3B-10).


Crimes and injuries on campus have been infrequent, as reflected in the following table reporting the number of crimes on campus and the number of workers comp claims since 2005 (Ref. 3B-11; Ref. 3B-12).
Table 18: Crimes and Workers Compensation Claims, 2005-2010





2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Crimes Committed

6

4

5

1

2

1

Workers Comp Claims

4

4

8

7

11

5

Faculty, staff, and student ratings of building maintenance, grounds maintenance, and overall safety of buildings continue to be high, and most average ratings improved slightly from the Fall 2005 surveys to the Fall 2011 surveys. Satisfaction with campus accessibility and accommodation for persons with disabilities has dipped slightly, and this perhaps reflects the closures of sidewalks and some handicap parking during construction work.




  • Adequacy of maintenance of buildings

    2005 Student Survey: 87 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.


    2011 Student Survey: 92 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.4 average rating.
    2005 Faculty and Staff Survey: 67 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.8 average rating.
    2011 Faculty and Staff Survey: 78 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.0 average rating.



  • Adequacy of maintenance of grounds

    2005 Student Survey: 91 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.5 average rating.


    2011 Student Survey: 95 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.5 average rating.
    2005 Faculty and Staff survey: 71 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.9 average rating.
    2011 Faculty & Staff Survey: 85 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.



  • Overall safety of buildings and equipment

    2005 Student Survey: 91 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.


    2011 Student Survey: 95 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.4 average rating.
    2005 Faculty & Staff Survey: 70 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.8 average rating.
    2011 Faculty & Staff Survey: 85 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.1 average rating.



  • Adequacy of campus accessibility and accommodation for persons with disabilities

    2005 Student Survey: 88 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.


    2011 Student Survey: 84 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.

    2005 Faculty and Staff Survey: 73 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.7 average rating.


    2011 Faculty and Staff Survey: 63 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.7 average rating.


Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.B.2. To assure the feasibility and effectiveness of physical resources in supporting institutional programs and services, the institution plans and evaluates its facilities and equipment on a regular basis, taking utilization and other relevant data into account.
III.B.2.a. Long-range capital plans support institutional improvement goals and reflect projections of the total cost of ownership of new facilities and equipment.

Descriptive Summary:



Windward CC’s Master Plan for campus development was approved by the Board of Regents in 1989, and its Plan Review Use Application (PRU) dates to 1992 (Ref. 3B-13). Since then, most of the site and facilities projects called for in the Master Plan have been completed, and many programmatic visions for the College have changed. Consequently, the College is working with the UH System to secure the substantial funds necessary to develop a new Master Plan and to update its PRU (Ref. 3B-14).
The College is part of the University of Hawai‘i Community College System that centrally manages the expenditure of CIP, renovation, and major Renovation and Modification (R&M) funding. Requests for CIP and renovation funding from the campus must be in line with the College’s Master Plan or an approved modification of it. Campus CIP requests are then forwarded to the UHCC System Office for consideration. If approved by the UHCC System Office, the request is forwarded to the UH System Office for inclusion in the UH Board of Regents budget request. If approved by the UH System Office, it will be included as part of the UH Board of Regents Budget Request and submitted to the Governor’s Office to be considered as part of the Executive Budget Request to the Legislature. If approved, the State Legislature appropriates funding for CIP, minor CIP for renovations and major R&M projects.
CIP allocations for new and renovated buildings do not include operating funds. Once construction bids are approved, the College makes separate funding requests to support the new building when it is completed.
The System normally receives an annual lump sum for R&M projects and funding is determined based on individual campus needs considering health and safety as a priority. These funds are also used to accomplish System-wide initiatives that would result in cost savings such as telephone system upgrades, security systems, and re-keying projects. The College maintains a list of R&M projects that is used to obtain funding from the System R&M allocation. Projects are funded on the basis of need and merit. Once funding is allocated, emergency changes are only made to address unforeseen health, safety, or code issues or critical facility problems that are adversely affecting instructional programs or support services.
Ongoing maintenance and minor repairs are performed as part of the College’s normal operational budget. The College has maintenance contracts for various systems and equipment such as air conditioning, elevators, alarm systems, etc. Installation or maintenance of sewer, water, electricity, communications, roadway, and parking lot infrastructure are undertaken as needed.

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.
III.B.2.b. Physical resource planning is integrated with institutional planning. The Institution systematically assesses the effective use of physical resources and uses the results of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:



The College regularly assesses the use of its physical resources through Annual Departmental Reports and Five-Year Program Reviews. These reviews may identify opportunities for improvement through improved maintenance, reassignment, renovation, or new construction.
Proposals for significant changes to facilities or to their assigned use are reviewed by the College’s Master Plan and Space Allocation Committee (MaPSAC; Ref.3B-15). The MaPSAC is chaired by the Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services, and it includes representatives from across the College (Ref. 3B-16). The Committee provides recommendations to the Chancellor on campus facilities needs and uses based on a consideration of the College’s Strategic Plan, Educational Master Plan, Master Facilities Plan, and Five-Year Construction Plan. MapSAC requests are typically posted to the College’s online discussion board for open comment before a recommendation to the Chancellor is decided on (Ref. 3B-17).
When costly renovations or new facilities are needed to meet growing program demands or to implement new programs, they are requested through funding proposals submitted to the College’s Planning and Budget Council (PBC). The PBC includes representatives from across the College, and it reviews, evaluates, prioritizes, and makes recommendations to the Chancellor regarding the use of resources in the College budget and regarding resource requests for future funding. The PBC prioritizes proposals for enhanced facilities and future funding using a rubric that considers the linkage to System priorities, the linkage to College goals and priorities, the assessment data demonstrating a need, the immediacy of the need, the contribution to health and safety, and the scope of impact at the College (Ref. 3B-18).
The College’s Aesthetics Committee is consulted on facilities projects that impact the physical appearance of the campus. The Committee advises the Chancellor on the maintenance of aesthetic standards in accordance with the existing Master Plan, PRU, and Urban Design Plan and Design Guidelines (Ref. 3B-19; Ref. 3B-20).
The College strives to maximize the effective usage of its classrooms and meeting rooms. The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs plans and develops the Schedule of Classes and makes room assignments for the credit programs, and the Career and Community Education (CCE) Office oversees all other facilities use (Ref. 3B-21). The College’s credit classes have first priority in room allocations. When not in use for college programs, rooms are available for rental to the community. The College adheres to UH Executive Policy E10.201 “Facilities Use” to provide for community use of campus facilities (Ref. 3B-22).

Self Evaluation:



The College meets this standard.

Planning Agenda:



None.


Standard III.B Evidence


  1. Windward CC Spring 2012 map (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/Campus_Map_Large.pdf

  2. Library Learning Commons blog (Archived Copy) http://wccllc.blogspot.com/

  3. “UHCC Implements $58 million Energy Savings Program” (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/news/article.php?aId=4376

  4. Calculation of Survey Statistics Cited in Standard III.B Human Resources (Archived Copy)

  5. Hazardous Materials and Hazardous Waste Management Program (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Security/Hazardous_Materials.php

  6. Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services, e-mail, 2011/04/11 (Archived Copy)

  7. Security (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/security/

  8. Windward CC Emergency Procedures (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Security/emergency.php

  9. UH Alert Emergency Notification (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/alert/

  10. Charge for Campus Safety Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Campus_Safety/Documents/Safety_Committee_2011_Charge.pdf

  11. Windward CC Crime Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/security/Crime_Report.php

  12. Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services, e-mail, 2011/03/08 (Archived Copy)

  13. Plan Review Use Application (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Planning/Documents/1992/PlanReviewUseApplication.PDF

  14. Rough Notes and Thoughts on a New PRU (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/RoughNotes_PRUupdate_12-2-11.pdf

  15. Master Planning and Space Allocation Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Master_Planning/index.php

  16. Master Plan and Space Utilization Committee Charge from the Chancellor (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/master_Planning/Documents/2009/Chancellor%27s_Charge.pdf

  17. Discussions Archive (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/discussions/archive.php

  18. Planning and Budget Council request form (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/PBCForm_10-3-11.pdf

  19. Aesthetics Committee Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Aesthetics/Directives.php

  20. Windward CC Urban Design Plan and Design Guidelines (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Planning/Documents/1995/UrbanDesignPlan.PDF

  21. Facilities (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Facilities/index.php

  22. E10.201 Facilities Use (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e10/e10201.pdf



Standard III.C Technology Resources


Technology resources are used to support student learning programs and services and to improve institutional effectiveness. Technology planning is integrated with institutional planning.
III.C.1. The institution assures that any technology support it provides is designed to meet the needs of learning, teaching, college-wide communications, research, and operational systems.
III.C.1.a. Technology services, professional support, facilities, hardware, and software are designed to enhance the operation and effectiveness of the institution.

Descriptive Summary:

Technology and related services play a key role in supporting the institutional effectiveness at Windward Community College. Students, staff, faculty and administrators use computers, networks, software, information management programs, communication services, classroom equipment, and other technologies daily. Accordingly, Windward CC has the infrastructure, equipment, and applications to support campus operations, instruction, student learning, planning and assessment, and resource management.


Planning and provisioning of these occur at various organizational levels:


  • The University System’s Information Technology Services unit (UH ITS) provides technology resources to meet needs that are common across UH campuses (Ref. 3C-1).




  • Windward CC’s Computing Services, Media Center, and Administrative Services units provide technology resources to meets needs that are common across College departments.




  • Individual departments plan and acquire technology resources that are only used within their specific discipline or programs.


UH Information Technology Services (ITS)

UH ITS provides much of the technology infrastructure employed at all campuses, such as wide area network connections between campuses, as well as connections to the Internet. UH ITS recently oversaw a project to deploy Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephone services to all UHCC System colleges by the end of 2011 (Ref. 3C-2).
The Management Information System section of the UH ITS department implements and administers various information systems such as the PeopleSoft Human Resource Management System and the Student Employment & Cooperative Education (SECE) system (Ref. 3C-3).
UH ITS provides the System with a learning management system (LMS), as well. Faced with rising licensing fees and an uncertain future following a merger of WebCT with Blackboard, UH ITS began exploring alternatives to the WebCT LMS in 2006. In Fall 2007, the open source Sakai LMS, locally referred to as “Laulima,” became available so that faculty could migrate their course content by Fall 2008, when the WebCT licensed expired (Ref. 3C-4; Ref. 3C-5).
To save costs and expand services, UH ITS began a process in February 2011 to switch UH students from UH-administered e-mail accounts to Google Apps for Education accounts, while offering departments and faculty the option to migrate. Additional advantages of Google Mail include 25GB of storage space for every user (compared to .5 GB with UH Mail), spam filtering, integrated voice/video conferencing, chat, and text messaging (Ref. 3C-6).
In addition to e-mail administration, Google@UH provides a sophisticated calendaring/ scheduling system (Google Calendar), collaborative editing and sharing of documents, drawings, spreadsheets and presentations (with Google Docs), plus other tools such as a Website builder (Google Sites), communication forums (Google Groups), and video sharing (Google Video).
UH ITS also provides selected computer applications and utilities for download under a System-wide license, including anti-virus software for faculty, staff, students and affiliates, and an anti-spyware program for UH staff and faculty (Ref. 3C-7; Ref. 3C-8).

Windward CC Support Units

In April 2002, the College consolidated what had been separate Academic Computing and Administrative Computing staffs into a single Computing Services unit. This consolidation has allowed Computing Services to standardize technology implementations and service levels across the campus so that students have a fairly seamless infrastructure as they transition between various classrooms and computer labs. Furthermore, because Computing Services now coordinates technology purchases for the whole institution, including individual departments, the College achieves significant savings through economies of scale and resource sharing (Ref. 3C-9, pp. 6-7).
In addition to supplying and supporting computers and printers for classrooms and personnel, Computing Services oversees most of the College’s technology infrastructure, including the campus wired and wireless networks, web and file servers, and VoIP telephones. For example, the department initially implemented 802.11b/g wireless hotspots using Apple Airport base stations in a number of heavily-used areas in 2006, and in AY2010 it upgraded to an advanced Ruckus Wireless System that provides nearly ubiquitous 802.11b/g/n wireless coverage in all campus buildings and adjacent outdoor seating areas (Ref. 3C-10).
Computing Services acquires, installs, and supports the majority of software and applications used on campus. It administers the College’s Microsoft Campus Agreement that provides the latest version of the Microsoft Windows operating system and the Microsoft Office Suite for use on all college-owned PCs and Macs. Computing Services also manages a pool of Adobe concurrent-use licenses and the KeyServer software metering system so that applications such as Acrobat Pro, Contribute, Dreamweaver, Flash Pro, Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop Elements, and Photoshop Extended can be installed on any College computer.
The Media Services department provides the campus with other types of instructional technologies and support. For example, Media Services deploys and maintains electronic classroom equipment. As of AY2010, 31 of the 45 classrooms were equipped with permanent multi-media equipment such as LCD projectors, audiovisual players, and presentation devices, with mobile equipment provided to older buildings and laboratories. The department also performs special equipment setups, such as those needed for meetings, and provides support for Hawai‘i Interactive Television Service (HITS) broadcasts, graphic and video services, and the College’s Polycom videoconferencing system (Ref. 3C-11, pp. 2-4).

Departments and Programs

Individual departments or programs may purchase technology resources to meet discipline-specific needs. For example, the Natural Science Department has acquired the following tools for use in the Pacific Center for Environmental Studies (PaCES) program and in GIS courses (Ref. 3C-12, p. 104):


  • Six high-end workstations for the Hoa‘aina RS/GIS Center

  • Trimble GPS data-logger for the Trimble ProXR GPS

  • Steel utility cart to allow lab-to-lab transportation of the Cole-Parmer UV/Visible

  • Dual beam spectrophotometer

  • 18 Garmin Geko201/301 GPS units

  • ESRI ArcGIS 9 software (and renewals) for the Hoa‘aina RS/GIS Center

  • Trimble Pathfinder Office upgrades for the Hoa‘aina RS/GIS Center

  • Digitizer for Hoa‘aina RS/GIS Center

Occasionally, a tool that was originally purchased for use by a small group of users becomes more widely adopted, and in such cases it may continue to be managed by the original purchaser. For example, in 2008 an ICS faculty familiar with the Elluminate Web Conferencing System (now called Blackboard Collaborate) requested an Elluminate account for Windward CC to allow real-time online instruction. The Dean of Division II secured the resources to purchase an account that all faculty and staff could use. The service became available in Spring 2011, and a UH graduate student led an online tutorial session on using Elluminate for 15 Windward CC faculty and administrators. Several instructors have scheduled use of the program for their distance learning courses and virtual office hours (Ref. 3C-13; Ref. 3C-14).



Technical Support

The UH Information Technology Services (ITS) department “provides technical support for UH network connections, supported desktop computers, and supported software” to UH students, staff, and faculty by e-mail, phone or walk-in (Ref. 3C-15; Ref. 3C-16). The ITS Help Desk operates 52.5 hours during the Fall and Spring semesters, and for 42.5 hours per week during the summer (Ref. 3C-17). ITS provides a wide variety of useful documents on its Website with information ranging from recommendations on computer equipment to e-mail client configuration, and virus scanning to wireless networking (Ref. 3C-18).
The Windward CC Computing Services Department provides user support services to students, staff, and faculty through its HelpLine. The department works staggered hours so the HelpLine can remain staffed throughout the school day and after regular business hours, especially during the first couple of weeks every semester. In cases where the staff members are assisting a user on the phone, or attending to a trouble call outside the office, helping someone in person, or are otherwise unavailable, the HelpLine goes to voice-mail. Afterhours and weekend support is provided on an as-available basis. The staff may also respond to e-mails any time of the day, any day of the year.
The Windward CC Media Services Department provides user support services upon request, including assistance with graphic, video, and production software. Trained staff respond to reports of equipment problems in the classroom and other areas of campus, usually within ten minutes of the call. Evening and weekend support is provided only by special request due to lack of staffing.
The overwhelming majority of faculty, staff, and students are satisfied with the technology resources provided to them. As shown in the following surveys, satisfaction with and average ratings of the adequacy of computers, Internet access, and classroom AV equipment were highly favorable in Fall 2005 surveys, and all of these measures rose higher in Fall 2011 surveys. (The results summarize ratings of 4 = Excellent, 3 = Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, and 1 = Poor. Responses of “unable to judge” were excluded; Ref. 3C-19)


  • Adequacy of campus computer equipment, software, and Internet access
    2005 Student Survey: 88 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating
    2011 Student Survey: 94 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.5 average rating



  • Adequacy of computer equipment provided to faculty/staff
    2005 Faculty and Staff Surveys: 85 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.2 average rating.
    2011 Faculty and Staff Surveys: 93 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.4 average rating.



  • Speed and reliability of campus computer networks and access to the Internet
    2005 Faculty and Staff Surveys: 84 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.1 average rating.
    2011 Faculty and Staff Surveys: 91 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.4 average rating.




  • Adequacy of classroom AV equipment
    2005 Faculty and Staff surveys: 77 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.9 average rating.
    2011 Faculty and Staff Surveys: 89 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.



Survey results also indicate that an overwhelming majority of students, faculty, and staff are satisfied with the computer support and media support provided to them. (Most of the following items were not measured in Fall 2005 surveys.)


  • Adequacy of computer support provided to students
    2011 Student Survey: 96 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.5 average rating.



  • Adequacy and quality of services provided by the Computing Services staff
    2011 Faculty and Staff Surveys: 96 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.7 average rating.



  • Adequacy and quality of services provided by the Media Center
    2005 Faculty and Staff Surveys: 77 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.9 average rating.
    2011 Faculty and Staff Surveys: 89 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.



  • Adequacy and quality of instructional design and graphic design services
    2011 Faculty and Staff Surveys: 88 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.2 average rating.

The 2010 Online Learning Survey asked students whether the “academic support services, such as tutoring and computing support, were similar to what I would expect from a face-to-face class.” On a five point scale, student response averaged 4.11, indicating a strong perception among online students that these services were comparable with that they’d receive in a face-to-face class (Ref. 3C-20, p. 12).



Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


II.C.1.b. The institution provides quality training in the effective application of its information technology to students and personnel.

Descriptive Summary:

Faculty and Staff Training



Each semester UH Information Technology Services presents ITS Brown Bag Workshops with topical reviews of technology developments affecting the University community; hands-on training workshops for Mac and Windows operating systems, Microsoft Office applications, and other software; and Teaching and Learning with Electronic Networked Technologies (TALENT) workshops that provide faculty with instruction on various online tools and pedagogical strategies surrounding the design, creation, and delivery of Internet-supported course materials (Ref. 3C-21).
The UHCC Wo Learning Champions take responsibility for organizing and managing the Wo Innovations in Learning Day (WILD), a one-day staff development conference, held at each campus in the Spring semester every other year (Ref. 3C-22). In 2010, the Windward CC Wo Champions conducted an interest survey to guide the selection of presentations. The most requested option was “Fun Technology in Instruction,” so the Wo champions scheduled a Technology in Instruction track with workshops on making instructional videos, facilitating online classroom discussions, and using Google Apps for Education. When asked the likeliness of using what they learned, 64 percent answered “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to use what they learned in the classroom, and 88 percent were “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to use what they learned in their work (Ref. 3C-23; Ref. 3C-24, p. 7).
Windward CC’s Staff Development Committee (SDC) periodically conducts needs assessments, and plans and funds training opportunities for faculty and staff, including technology training. For example, the committee arranged a Social Media workshop during the bi-annual Excellence in Education Conference held in March 2011 (Ref. 3C-25, p. 3). Previous workshops have included “Assistive Technology,” “5 Easy Ways of Incorporating CIL Skills in Your Teaching,” “Computing with Comfort,” and “Improving PowerPoint Presentations (Ref. 3C-26; Ref. 3C-27; Ref. 3C-28).
Additionally, the Staff Development Committee routinely awards grants for technology training and materials. For example, staff development grants have funded attendance at workshops regarding Microsoft Excel, Fathom Dynamic software, and web surveys; and purchased the Apple Developer Connection Video Collection for Information Technologists (Ref. 3C-29).
The Windward CC Instructional Developer employed from 2007 to 2010 offered the faculty a variety of technology workshops, included training in using the SIS portal, web searching, and Adobe software. Since subsequently being hired as Dean of Division II, he has offered workshops covering MS Office, synchronous communication platforms, the course management system, and classroom student response systems. The same administrator serves in the role of Distance Learning Coordinator, whose duties include training first time distance learning instructors on using the course management system, and in accessing and using online sites and technologies for supporting instruction (Ref. 3C-30, p. 10).
Starting in Spring 2011, College Librarians offered six workshops covering electronic books, article and reference databases, finding and citing media, using Google for academic research, and citation tools (Ref. 3C-31). The Spring Workshops were attended by 25 library staff, 20 other faculty and staff, and 18 students (Ref. 3C-32). Due to the success of the workshops, the library has offered these each semester and intends to continue in the future.
Computing Services primarily hosts training sessions when new technologies are rolled out to the entire campus. For example, in 2010 they held training sessions on using Windows 7 and Office 2010, and in 2011 they offered sessions on using the new VoIP telephone system (Ref. 3C-33).
Upon installation of new equipment and at the onset of each semester, Media Services offers training on using the duplicating machines, and the educational technology equipment in the classroom.  Additionally, the department encourages faculty and staff to contact them directly about their training needs (Ref. 3C-34; Ref. 3C-35).
In Spring 2010, two faculty members, Leticia Colmenares and Emi Troeger, piloted a Staff Development Mentoring Project for Online Teaching (Ref. 3C-36). The program paired five mentors with five faculty members who wanted to learn to use course collaboration software (Laulima), or to learn to teach online courses. Forming mentoring relationships allowed participants more personalized training at less restricted times. One unintended outcome of the project was a list of tools and skills that, when used in online course design, could contribute to a richer, online learning experience. This list was incorporated into the Mentoring Application Form (Ref. 3C-37). Based on the favorable outcomes of this pilot, in Fall 2011 the Staff Development Committee approved a motion to institutionalize the program.

Student Training

From 2003 through 2009, the College offered free workshops to prepare students to pass the College’s Computer and Information Literacy (CIL) AA degree requirement exit exams. The CIL Coordinator offered bi-monthly workshops and tutored students individually by appointment throughout each semester (Ref. 3C-38, pp. [2-4]; Ref. 3C-39, pp. [3-4]; Ref. 3C-40; Ref. 3C-41; Ref. 3C-42; Ref. 3C-43; Ref. 3C-44). The Coordinator also produced and linked to online tutorials and resources for learning word processing, e-mail, information literacy, spreadsheet, web authoring, and database skills (Ref. 3C-45). The College chose to eliminate the CIL requirement as of Fall 2010, and the free CIL workshops were discontinued. Credit courses teaching the same skills continue to be offered.
Starting in Spring 2011, librarians have offered six workshops per semester (Mysteries Revealed) to teach students and staff to use the Library’s electronic book, article, and reference databases, as well as to provide guidance on finding and citing digital media, using Google for academic research, and using online citation tools (Ref. 3C-31; Ref. 3C-32).
Beginning in Spring 2008, the Distance Learning Coordinator createda setof resources for onlinelearning, including links to UH System tutorials for students and faculty on using the Sakai/Laulima CMS, links to tutorials on computer and other educational technologies, information on how to buy computers and supplies via the Windward CC bookstore, guides to using UH-licensed anti-virus software, and more (Ref. 3C-46; Ref. 3C-47; Ref. 3C-10).
In support of online students, in Spring 2010 a “…personalized introductory letter and four pages of basic resources were mailed to 237 students. These files were also e-mailed to students as PDFs” (Ref. 3C-20, pp. 50-54).
Fall 2011 surveys indicate that the majority of faculty and staff are satisfied with the support provided to them in developing computing skills and information literacy. An overwhelming majority of students are also satisfied, and the measures of their satisfaction improved from the Fall 2005 survey to the Fall 2011 survey. (The results summarize ratings of 4 = Excellent, 3 = Satisfactory, 2 = Less than Satisfactory, and 1 = Poor. Responses of “unable to judge” were excluded.)


  • Adequacy of professional development support in developing computing skills and information literacy
    2011 Faculty Survey: 77 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.1 average rating.
    2011 Staff Survey: 64 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 2.6 average rating.



  • Quality of assistance to students in developing computing and information literacy skills
    2005 Student Survey: 89 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.3 average rating.
    2011 Student Survey: 96 percent rated as Excellent or Satisfactory; 3.4 average rating.



Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:



None.

III.C.1.c. The institution systematically plans, acquires, maintains, and upgrades or replaces technology infrastructure and equipment to meet institutional needs.



Descriptive Summary:

The College has centralized the planning, acquisition, and maintenance of most of its technology infrastructure and equipment. This centralization has facilitated the development of a comprehensive and robust technology infrastructure that is consistent across the College, that maximizes economies of scale and minimizes the duplication of technology planning and support that would otherwise be required in numerous user departments.


Windward CC’s centralized technology support units include:


  • Computing Services which is responsible for network equipment, telephones, computers, printers and other peripherals.




  • The Media Center which is responsible for audio/visual and duplicating equipment.




  • Administrative Services which is responsible for energy management systems, physical security and alarm systems, and vehicles.

These support units design the technology infrastructure to be both highly functional and highly reliable. Equipment selections are carefully considered. Maintenance contracts are typically obtained to keep hardware in good working order and to keep software up-to-date. Spare parts and devices are kept on hand to quickly swap out defective units, and where appropriate, backup systems protect against failure of primary systems.


For example: Computing Services has selected Enterasys gigabit Ethernet switches, Ruckus Wireless access points, Dell Windows PCs, Apple Macintosh computers, and HP and Brother printers as standard components of the College’s IT infrastructure. Network equipment and computers are purchased with three- to five-year extended warranties, and software maintenance agreements provide users across the College with the latest versions of the Windows Operating System, the Microsoft Office Suite, and most Adobe applications. UPS Systems enable the campus network, telephone system, and data servers to continue running through short power outages and to shut down gracefully in the event of longer power outages. Data on faculty/staff computers is automatically backed up to central servers whenever they are connected to the network. Servers use RAIDs for fault tolerance and key data is backed up nightly and rotated off-site once a week.
The technology support units plan for the upgrade and periodic replacement of equipment as they age and eventually reach the end of their useful life, and the Computing Services and the Media Center typically seek to retire and replace roughly 15-20 percent of their equipment each year. However, the College’s ability to plan for and fund ongoing lifecycle replacement of technology resources is questionable. Rather than plan for equipment replacement as a necessary cost, College practice has been to wait until nearly the end of the fiscal year to see whether any funds remained that could be allocated for equipment. While enrollment spikes have increased tuition revenue significantly and generally provided adequate funds for equipment in recent years, future funding to maintain the College’s IT infrastructure is uncertain. As of April 2012, the College has had to reallocate resources and does not anticipate providing any funds for replacement of outdated equipment in FY2012. The Planning and Budget Council has been discussing the challenges of funding ongoing equipment needs and strategies for meeting those needs.

Self Evaluation:

The College partially meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

The College must develop funding sources and a budget methodology that provides for all ongoing costs, including lifecycle replacement of technology resources, vehicles, and other college equipment.

III.C.1.d. The distribution and utilization of technology resources support the development, maintenance, and enhancement of its programs and services.

Descriptive Summary:

The College’s technology resources have facilitated program enhancements, growth in the number of students being served, and improvements in student learning. The following are examples of this.




  • The College served 1,781 students in Fall 2006, and in five years enrollment increased to 2,705 students in Fall 2011. The College accommodated this 52 percent enrollment growth while increasing student satisfaction with College computer equipment, software, and Internet access. In a Fall 2005 Student Survey, 88 percent of respondents expressing an opinion rated these technology resources as Excellent or Satisfactory, and that increased to 94 percent of respondents in a Fall 2011 survey.



  • College programs have increased student engagement with technology resources as reflected in Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) results. The mean student response to the CCSSE question, “How much does this college emphasize using computers in academic work?” increased from 3.11 in 2008 to 3.23 in 2010. The mean student response to the CCSSE question, “How much has your experience at this college contributed to your knowledge, skills, and personal development in using computers and information technology?” increased from 2.76 in 2008 to 2.82 in 2010. (1 = Very little, 2 = Some, 3 = Quite a bit, 4 = Very much).



  • The College has increased its online course offerings from only two sections in Fall 2006 to 38 sections in Fall 2011. In March 2011, the ACCJC approved the College’s Substantive Change Proposal to offer an Associate Degree in Liberal Arts at 50 percent or more via distance learning (Ref. 3C-48; Ref. 3C-49).



  • The College has introduced new technology courses, including BUSN 191 Veterinary Office and Computer Skills, ICS 123 Introduction to Audio and Video Editing, ICS 214 Fundamentals of Design for Print and Web, MUS 240 Introduction to Digital Music Production, and MUS 241 Digital Music Production II.



  • The College has introduced new certificate programs, including Certificate of Achievement in Veterinary Assisting, Certificate of Competence (CC) in Business Technology, CC in Geographic Information System and Global Positioning System, CC in Information Computer Science (ICS): Applied Business and Information Technology, and CC in ICS: Web Support.



Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.C.2. Technology planning is integrated with institutional planning. The institution systematically assesses the effective use of technology resources and uses the results of evaluation as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

Since its accreditation was last reaffirmed, the College has made three significant improvements in technology planning:




  1. The current Computing Services Unit was established by consolidating the positions and responsibilities of previously separate Academic Computing Services and Institutional Computing groups. This eliminated duplication of effort and divergent initiatives by the two groups, and facilitated more consistent and cost-effective IT planning across the college.



  2. The Planning and Budget Council (PBC) was established in place of the previously separate Strategic Plan Committee and Budget Committee, and the Computing Services Coordinator became a permanent member of the PBC. This facilitated consideration of the technology implications of any new initiative.



  3. The College’s Technology Vision Committee was disbanded in recognition that technology usage across the College was too pervasive to be effectively planned by a single group, and that technology planning needed to be integrated with other institutional planning processes rather than pursued separately (Ref. 3C-50).

The College has designated which units have primary responsibility for developing and maintaining key technology resources. For example: Computing Services is responsible for the campus network and servers, PCs/Macs, printers, and the phone system. The Media Center is responsible for audio/visual presentation equipment, videoconferencing systems, and duplicating equipment. Administrative Services is responsible for energy management systems, physical security and alarm systems, and vehicles. Other units may have responsibility for technology resources that are only used within their program, such as the Natural Sciences Department being responsible for specialized technology equipment used for science instruction and research.


The planning of all units is guided by the College Mission Statement and the College Strategic Plan, and each unit plans and assesses the effective use of the technology resources it is responsible for as part of its Annual Departmental Review or Five-Year Program Review process.
Computing Services and the Media Center assess service outcomes and the adequacy of the technology resources they provide through periodic user satisfaction surveys, by tracking usage patterns, by paying careful attention to problem reports and frequently asked questions, and by consulting with other units regarding their projected needs and new initiatives.
When program needs cannot be met with existing technology resources, funding for additional or replacement resources are pursued through grants or in proposals to the Planning and Budget Council (PBC). PBC members prioritize funding requests using a rubric that considers the link to System priorities, the link to College goals and priorities, the assessment data demonstrating the need, the immediacy of the need, the impact on health and safety, and the level of impact (Ref. 3C-51).

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


Standard III.C Evidence


  1. ITS UH System (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/its/

  2. UHCC Voice Over IP Deployment (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/askus/1284

  3. UH System Student Employment Site (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/sece/

  4. Sakai and its Possibilities for UH (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/its/sakai/

  5. Laulima (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Technology/Laulima.php

  6. Google@UH Frequently Asked Questions (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/google/faq.html#faq1

  7. UH Computer Virus and Threat Information (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/askus/1254

  8. Installing McAfee AntiSpyware Enterprise 8.7 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/askus/1236

  9. Windward CC Computing Services AY 2009-2010 Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Computing_Services.pdf

  10. Computing on Campus (Archived Copy) http://www.windward.hawaii.edu/Computing/

  11. Media and Duplication Services 2009-2010 Annual Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Media.pdf

  12. Natural Sciences Annual Department Report 2009-2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Natural_Sciences.pdf

  13. Windward CC Elluminate (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/elluminate/

  14. Windward CC Elluminate Archive of Use (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Elluminate/Elluminate_Use.php

  15. Information Technology Services Supported Software (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/askus/575

  16. Information Technology Services Computer Support Policy (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/askus/588

  17. About the ITS Help Desk (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/its/about/helpdesk.html

  18. Information Technology Services Documents (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/askus/716

  19. Calculation of Survey Statistics Cited in Standard III.C Technology Resources (Archived Copy)

  20. Online Learning at WCC Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/2010_Online_Learning_Report.pdf

  21. ITS Brown Bags and Other Trainings (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/its/brownbags-trainings/

  22. Wo Learning Champions (Archived Copy) http://wolc.hawaii.edu/WoGen7/About_Wo.html

  23. Wo Wild Survey 1 (Archived Copy) https://docs.google.com/a/hawaii.edu/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0ApTqZeE7PmdUdDNhT3Y0ajliUm9oTFVJeFJ6NHRJZUE&hl=en_US#gid=0

  24. Report on Windward CC’s Wo Innovations in Learning Day 2010 (Archived Copy) https://docs.google.com/a/hawaii.edu/file/d/0B5TqZeE7PmdUMGZkZWY2YzMtZjE5NC00ZThlLThhZWQtOGIwNzI5NjJmY2Vj/edit

  25. Year End Report for Staff Development 2010-2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Staff_Development/2011/Staff_Development_2011_10_01_Annual_Report.pdf

  26. Staff Development Committee, meeting minutes, 2006/12/04 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Staff_Development/Documents/2006/StaffDev_Minutes_2006_12_04.pdf

  27. Computing with Comfort presentation (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Staff_Development/2009/Computing_with_Comfort_Miles.pdf

  28. Staff Development Committee, meeting minutes, 2010/03/08 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Staff_Development/2010/Staff_Development_2010_03_08_Minutes.pdf

  29. WindwardCC Year End Report for Staff Development for AY 2007-2008 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Staff_Development/2008/Staff_Development_2007-2008_Report.pdf

  30. Substantive Change Proposal: Associate of Arts (Liberal Arts) Distance Education Program (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Documents/2011/Substantive_change_Online.pdf

  31. Mysteries Revealed workshop flyer (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/_SelfStudy/Mysteries%20Revealed_wrkshop%20flyer%20Spr%202011.docx

  32. Library Workshop Spring 2011 Attendance data set (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/data/Workshop%20Attendance%20Spring%2011.pdf

  33. Your New Phone; Phone and Voice Mail Training Sessions e-mail (Archived Copy)

  34. Media Specialist, e-mail, 2010/08/10 (Archived Copy)

  35. Media Specialist, e-mail, 2011/08/25 (Archived Copy)

  36. Windward CC Faculty Mentoring (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/calendar/2010/Mentoring/

  37. Mentoring application form (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/calendar/2010/Mentoring/Mentoring_Application.doc

  38. Resources for Learning CIL Skills Fall 2006 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20061215144637/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/resources/index.shtml#workshops

  39. Resources for Learning CIL Skills Summer 2007 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20070624021202/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/resources/index.shtml#workshops

  40. Computer and Information Literacy Preparation Workshops Spring 2008 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20080115043828/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/workshops.shtml

  41. Computer and Information Literacy Preparation Workshops Summer 2008 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20080604095831/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/workshops.shtml

  42. Computer and Information Literacy Schedule Fall 2008 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20080926151432/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/schedule.shtml

  43. Computer and Information Literacy Preparation Workshops Spring 2009 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20090328190237/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/workshops.shtml

  44. Computer and Information Literacy Tutoring Sessions by Semester and Topic AY 2009 (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/_SelfStudy/CIL%20Tutoring%20&%20Workshop%20Statistics%20AY09.pdf

  45. Resources for Learning Computer and Information Literacy Skills (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/resources/index.shtml

  46. Online Learning (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Online/

  47. Technology on Campus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Technology/index.php

  48. Data for Online Classes Offerings (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/online/Data/Class_Offerings.php

  49. ACCJC Letter to Chancellor Dykstra Re: Substantive Change (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/academic_Affairs/Documents/2011/Substantive_Change_online_Letter.pdf

  50. Tech Vision Committee, meeting minutes, 2009/09/11 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/TechVision/Documents/2009/TechVision_2009_09_11_Minutes.pdf

  51. Planning and Budget Council request form (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/PBCForm_10-3-11.pdf

Standard III.D Financial Resources


Financial Resources are sufficient to support student learning programs and services and to improve institutional effectiveness. The distribution of resources supports the development, maintenance, and enhancement of programs and services. The institution plans and manages its financial affairs with integrity and in a manner that ensures financial stability. The level of financial resources provides a reasonable expectation of both short-term and long-term financial solvency. Financial resources planning is integrated with institutional planning.  

Descriptive Summary:

The College remains committed to an open and collaborative budget development process that uses the College Mission, Strategic Plan and Program Reviews for prioritization of all discretionary expenditures. It has a balanced budget and adheres to the State’s “no deficit spending policy” law. The institutional liabilities and obligations are included in its Biennium Budget request to the State Legislature. Also, tuition revenues are higher due to the yearly tuition increases as well as much higher enrollment. In addition, the College has been proactive in its efforts to build up a cash reserve fund of five percent, to cover its liabilities and obligations in down years.  


Since the last Self Evaluation and subsequent accreditation team recommendations, the College has established a process that integrates assessment with planning and budgeting in a systematic way. The Planning and Budget Council bases its prioritization on the program reviews and annual assessment reports of the different campus units and its decision-making is recorded in minutes and posted for transparency on the College website.
Moreover, as will be shown in the discussion below, the College has been successful in securing external funds to improve student learning and academic programs and continues to work with the UHCC System to share costs. The Planning and Budget Council has established funding priorities based on the College’s Strategic Plan Action Outcomes and continues to do systematic assessment of its programs. The College has been able to keep pace with its enrollment growth and is continuing to look for ways to expand its reach using distance learning and other technological tools that require less facility costs to accommodate students. Other than personnel cost, electricity is the largest operating cost for the campus. A shared-performance contract and a renewable energy agreement involving the UH Community Colleges and an energy conservation company will help reduce the College’s electricity costs.

III.D.1. The institution relies upon its mission and goals as the foundation for financial planning.


III.D.1.a. Financial planning is integrated with and supports all institutional planning.

Descriptive Summary:

Since the 2006 Accreditation visit, the College has met the ACCJC recommendation that the strategic planning process needs to be tied to budget planning, based on institutional measures of effectiveness as well as to the research function and accountability measures. A January 29, 2010, letter from the ACCJC affirmed that the College “…provided evidence that it has adequately responded to the recommendations for improvement relating to strategic planning, program reviews and annual assessment tied to planning and resource allocation . . .” (Ref. 3D-1).


Through Fiscal Year 2009, resource allocation recommendations were made by the College’s Budget Committee while the Strategic Planning Committee conducted the Strategic Plan review (Ref. 3D-2; Ref. 3D-3). Following his appointment as the College’s new Chancellor in Summer 2009, Douglas Dykstra replaced these committees with the Planning and Budget Council (PBC; Ref. 3D-4; Ref. 3D-5) to further integrate program evaluation, planning and budgeting with the College’s Strategic Plan (Ref. 3D-6). The Council also refers to the BOR System-wide Strategic Plan (Ref. 3D-7) and UHCC System priorities and Strategic Plan (Ref. 3D-8; Ref. 3D-9) in its decision-making. The 24-member PBC includes College-wide representation and makes recommendations to the Chancellor regarding the use of resources in the College budget as well as resource requests for future funding.
The PBC is involved in developing three types of budgets for the College: the Annual Operating Budget, the Biennium Budget, and the Supplemental Budget (Ref. 3D-10; Ref. 3D-11; Ref. 3D-12). According to the PBC process, the Windward CC unit, department, or program fills out a PBC Summary Sheet and combines it with its Departmental Report or Annual Assessment/Program Review in November. These are posted on the PBC website, and reviewed by Council members by the end of January. PBC members submit their ratings for budget items, which are then tabulated and discussed in meetings from February to April. The PBC then submits its recommendations to the Chancellor, who determines the budget allocations (Ref. 3D-13; Ref. 3D-14; Ref. 3D-15).
The Strategic Plan is updated annually by the PBC based on Annual Assessment Reports and Program Reviews. Each year in the Fall, the PBC reviews department and unit requests in conjunction with the Strategic Plan, and drafts a recommended Operating Budget.
The resource needs prioritized by the PBC become the basis for the College’s Biennium Budget requests. The UH System Administration and the Office of the Vice President for Community Colleges (OVPCC) also provide guidelines and System-wide priority categories for budget preparation (Ref. 3D-16). Sometimes the UHCC System will consolidate a request on behalf of all seven community colleges, such as allocations for repair and maintenance, health and safety, enhanced security or additional electricity or equipment. Capital improvement requests are consolidated for the UHCC System, and ranked in priority by the BOR. For the 2011-2013 Fiscal Biennium, Windward CC requested funds to renovate four existing buildings for faculty offices, administration, and additional classroom space (Ref. 3D-17, pp. 60-61). UHCC System Repair and Maintenance (R&M) funds were divided up by the OVPCC, and the result was that the College received design funds for No‘eau and La‘akea buildings.
Beginning with FY 2007-2009, Enrollment Growth General Funds were appropriated by the Legislature to the UH System (UOH 800) to cover the differential cost (additional costs net of tuition revenue) for adding credit classes to meet student demand. As the economy in Hawai‘i has slowed, Windward CC has experienced some of the largest enrollment growth in the UH System. This Enrollment Growth Funding has enabled the College to offer classes that might not have been possible before this fund was in place (Ref. 3D-18).
For the 2011-2013 Biennium, the UH System took a slightly different approach to its legislative funding request. As noted in the 2011-2013 Budget Policy Paper (Ref. 3D-19), it divided its operating fund request into two parts: first, requesting outcome-based funding for the Hawai`i Graduation Initiative, Workforce Development and Technology Advancement and Project Renovate to Innovate, and second, requesting Performance-based Program Change Requests (PCRs). The PCRs included any requests from the campuses that advanced workforce development, technological advancement and diversifying the economy. Thus, the UH System is proposing that additional funding to the campuses be tied to reaching particular performance goals (Ref. 3D-17).
This approach has been proposed because in the past items ranked as having high priority at the campus-level may not have “fit” in certain categories at the UH System-level. Therefore, the hope is that performance-based funding will offer campuses more discretion in applying funds to their specific priorities. However, this is contingent on the Legislature supporting such an approach. The College’s Chancellor has also asked that the UH System consider identifying specific priorities and strategies early enough so that budget decisions at the campus-level can take those System goals into account for more meaningful shared governance.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.1.b. Institutional planning reflects realistic assessment of financial resource availability, development of financial resources, partnerships, and expenditure requirements.

Descriptive Summary:

The College’s Strategic Plan was updated with “Strategic Action Outcomes” to cover a period from 2008-2015, in coordination with UH System and UHCC System planning (Ref. 3D-6).  The areas of focus include Native Hawaiian Educational Attainment, Increasing Hawai‘i’s Educational Capital, Contributing to the State’s Economic Growth, Addressing Critical Workplace Shortages, and Exercising Exemplary Stewardship of Resources. The PBC uses the document and its measurable outcomes (Ref. 3D-20) to make Biennium Budget recommendations and revise the Annual Operating Budget.


In recent years, the UH System has relied on tuition increases to help make up the difference for more restricted General Fund appropriations from the State Legislature. With its dramatic increase in enrollment during this same period and the UHCC System’s Enrollment Growth Funding initiative (a state General Funded system of partial subsidies for entry-level class sections added to meet rising enrollment demands), the College has managed to keep pace with the course demands of its students. The College has also been highly successful in receiving substantial Title III federal funds to address the needs of its growing Native Hawaiian student population—totaling about 40 percent of its enrollment. The funds are being used for both this targeted student group to expand and to benefit the College as a whole. This has resulted in more outreach services and credit courses in communities such as Waimānalo and Kahuku, increased student services at a One-Stop Center at Windward Mall, more focused outreach to adult students, and additional resources for tutoring and mentoring (Ref. 3D-21; Ref. 3D-22)  
The College has also joined with the other UH Community Colleges in launching the Achieving the Dream (AtD) initiative, which receives funding from Kamehameha Schools and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.  The goal of this multiyear national initiative in Hawai‘i is to help more community college students succeed, especially Native Hawaiian, low-income and other under-served students (Ref. 3D-23; Ref. 3D-24).
Other federal grants are helping the College continue initiatives through the USDA, NASA, Perkins and TRiO. The College’s Astronomy program has gained funding for its Lanihuli Observatory, Hōkūlani Imaginarium, and NASA Lab. The Plant Biotechnology program has used funding from the USDA to buy equipment, supplies, expand course offerings and even establish international partnerships. And the Veterinary Technology program has received support from Perkins.  Finally, the College is funded for all of the TRiO programs: Upward Bound, Talent Search and Student Support Services (Ref. 3D-25).
The College has also been successful in increasing its record for private giving from $179,016 in 2006 to $624,941 in 2012—part of the College’s Strategic Plan – Outcome 3.1. UH Foundation records also show an increase in gifts ($397,062 in 2008), the result of an annuity that was realized as well as pledges for other gifts. In the past several years, a Windward CC general scholarship endowment as well as other endowed scholarships have been started through the UH Foundation.
In addition, the College has a UH Foundation Major Gifts Officer assigned to work closely with the College and three other UH Community Colleges. She meets with the Chancellor to identify priorities for private giving, naming opportunities, and projects that would appeal to donors. Nine stellar programs have been identified as focal points for fund development at the College (Ref. 3D-26). Also, for the first time in the history of any UH campus, the College will be offering five-year as well as permanent naming opportunities for interior spaces in its theatre and the Library Learning Commons.
The College’s Natural Science department launched its PaCES summer program (Ref. 3D-27) to provide research experience for promising high school science students with two grants from the Harold K. L. Castle Foundation: a three-year grant for $225,000 followed by a five-year grant for $75,000, and the Palikū Theatre (Ref. 3D-28) reached its goal of raising $100,000 to name its lobby after Camille Almy, a leader in the arts.   Finally, the College has recently revived its College Ambassadors Standing Committee with prominent friends and alumni of the college to help support the College’s mission and build relationships with the community (Ref. 3D-29; Ref. 3D-30). For the future, the Chancellor’s Office will continue to update the section of the Windward CC website on “Giving to WCC,” listing the Ambassadors and their role as well as communicating the College’s fund development plans and efforts to the campus at large.
The local business community has also stepped up its support of the College through the annual Windward Ho‘olaule‘a, a joint project with the Kāne‘ohe Business Group, which helps raise funds for Windward CC student scholarships as well as promote the College’s facilities and programs (Ref. 3D-31). This festival, now in its eleventh year and held on the Windward CC campus, draws an estimated 15,000 people from all parts of the island and beyond (Ref. 3D-32; Ref. 3D-33; Ref. 3D-34).  From the 2010 Ho‘olaule‘a, some $16,000 was raised for scholarships for Windward CC students and another $7,000 was donated to Windward CC’s Advancement Fund.
A realistic assessment of financial resources availability has led the UHCC System to take steps to better manage increasing electrical costs. This is particularly critical for Windward CC since several new, larger buildings have been constructed on the campus in recent years, including the new Library Learning Commons set to open in Fall 2012. To achieve energy savings and share utility costs, the UHCC System colleges are embarking on a new agreement with Johnson Controls, Inc. The agreement identifies energy conservation measures and allows campuses to pool their resources and energy savings (Ref. 3D-35; Ref. 3D-36; Ref. 3D-37). To date, the College has been able to manage the increased electrical costs by reallocating resources internally and reminding the campus about conserving energy by turning off unneeded lights, shutting off computers when not in use, and other cost-saving measures (Ref. 3D-38; Ref. 3D-39).

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.1.c. When making short-range financial plans, the institution considers its long-range financial priorities to assure financial stability. The institution clearly identifies and plans for payment of liabilities and future obligations.

Descriptive Summary:

The Planning and Budget Council (PBC) was established to regularly review and update the Strategic Plan and to prioritize the College budget. The Windward CC Strategic Plan has been widely distributed and is referred to by faculty, staff, and budget managers as the basis for budget items requests.  The PBC reviews all Program Reviews, Annual Assessments, Departmental Reports, and other assessments to prioritize items for budget consideration and/or to modify the Strategic Plan.


The College considers long-range financial priorities in making short-term planning. According to the UHCC's Unrestricted Fund Reserve Policy, UHCCP #8.201, the College’s reserve fund must be at three to four percent of the expenditures and encumbrances (E&E) for the fiscal year (Ref. 3D-40). However, this has been modified to reflect a minimum reserve of five percent and targeted reserve of ten percent of the operating funds (Ref. 3D-41). All campuses, including Windward CC, currently meet the five percent reserve levels. The reserve fund was established to maintain financial stability by ensuring that adequate reserves are set aside for unexpected situations (e.g., unforeseen decline in enrollment, significant delays in payments, unanticipated expenses, etc.).
The College sets aside sufficient cash (working capital) at the beginning of each fiscal year to cover operating costs before the revenues are collected. The Chancellor is responsible for managing the cash reserve and the working capital requirements. The status of the Special and Revolving Fund Cash Reserves is provided with Budget Level Summary (BLS) information on a quarterly basis. At the end of each year, the College must have a balanced budget. The College does not have any long-term financial liabilities or obligations.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this Standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.1.d. The institution clearly defines and follows its guidelines and processes for financial planning and budget development, with all constituencies having appropriate opportunities to participate in the development of institutional plans and budgets.

Descriptive Summary:

With the creation and inauguration of the PBC, the College has revamped, and taken a large step towards confirming, that all campus constituencies are appropriately and adequately represented in financial and budgetary matters.   In response to the GSIEC Self Evaluations of the Strategic Planning and Budget Committees, the PBC was created in 2009, by the new Chancellor of the College, as an attempt to see open discussion of budgetary and Strategic Plan items as well as to ensure active and full participation by faculty and staff.  


This Council incorporates members from the administration, each academic department (usually the department chair), from the non-credit Vocational and Community Education group, from Academic Support, in addition to a representative from the Faculty Senate, the Associated Students of the University of Hawai‘i-Windward CC (ASUH-WCC), the Ke Kumu Pali group, and the Institutional Effectiveness Committee.
Meetings are convened by the Chancellor following a schedule established by the entire Council at its first meeting of the academic year.
This Council replaces the Strategic Planning and Budget Committees under the prior administration, merging functions into one group that is large, but not unwieldy, and serves to see good discussion and concordance on budgetary items.  The establishment of the PBC by the new administration was in response to faculty and staff concerns that prior arrangements for budget and strategic planning and implementation were inadequate.
Definition and description of the PBC, its membership, obligations, and purpose, are posted on the College website (Ref. 3D-5). Proceedings of the PBC are posted on this website, in addition to being transmitted to various academic departments and administrative/support units by representatives on the Council.
Membership of the PBC committee consists of the following:


  1. Coordinator of Computing Services, or designee.

  2. Coordinator, OCET, or designee.

  3. Accreditation Liaison Officer.

  4. Faculty Senate Member.

  5. Department Chair – Language Arts, or designee.

  6. Department Chair – Social Sciences, or designee.

  7. Department Chair – Business and Math, or designee.

  8. Department Chair – Humanities, or designee.

  9. Department Chair – Natural Sciences, or designee.

  10. Operational Support Member.

  11. Institutional Support Member.

  12. Academic Support Member.

  13. Student Services Member.

  14. ASUH_WCC Member.

  15. Ke Kumu Pali Member.

  16. Employment Training Center Member.

  17. Director of Planning and Program Evaluation.

  18. Director of Institutional Research.

  19. Chancellor (ex officio, non-voting).

  20. Vice Chancellor of Instruction.

  21. Vice Chancellor of Administrative Affairs.

  22. Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs.

  23. Director of Vocational and Community Education.

  24. Chancellor’s Secretary (non-voting, recorder).

It is important to understand that this Council and its outcomes are advisory to the College Chancellor.  If, however, the Chancellor rejects any outcomes, a written explanation will be provided at the following PBC meeting.


Continuing and future discussions by faculty and staff, including self-appraisal by PBC members, monitors the success and effectiveness of the PBC.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.2. To assure the financial integrity of the institution and responsible use of financial resources, the financial management system has appropriate control mechanisms and widely disseminates dependable and timely information for sound financial decision making.
III.D.2.a. Financial documents, including the budget and independent audit, reflect appropriate allocation and use of financial resources to support student learning programs and service. Institutional responses to external audit findings are comprehensive, timely and communicated appropriately.

Descriptive Summary:

The seven community colleges in the UH System have never had independent annual external audits. Previous financial and compliance audits (prior to 2006) done by Price Waterhouse Coopers covered the entire University of Hawai‘i System, but did not include any findings/recommendations specific to Windward Community College or any other community college in the System.


In a memorandum dated August 9, 2005, the Associate Vice President for Community College Administration indicated that an agreement with ACCJC had been reached with regard to the type of audit (“…the presentation of a combined balance sheet and income statement of the Community College System as supplemental information to the University’s consolidated financial statements with an opinion on such supplemental information…”) that will be accepted as documentation of financial integrity. Since 2006, the UH Consolidated Financial Statements have included a combined balance sheet and income statement of the community colleges as supplemental information that is being produced by Acuity CC LLP (Ref. 3D-42; Ref. 3D-43; Ref. 3D-44; Ref. 3D-45; Ref. 3D-46; Ref. 3D-47).
In 2007, the State of Hawai‘i performed a legislative audit on the entire UH System. This audit criticized the UH System for failing to adequately account for how monies are spent from the Legislature. Specifically, the audit found that the University devoted considerable resources to planning, but ultimately produced strategic plans that lacked cohesion and measurability (Ref. 3D-48).
Windward CC has gone through great lengths in recent years to tie program and budget decisions to strategic plans and ultimately to student learning outcomes. The Planning and Budget Council (PBC) prioritizes budget requests based on their projected impact on strategic outcomes and student learning outcomes for the College.
Every fiscal year, the UH System undergoes a Financial and Compliance Audit conducted by independent auditors (Ref. 3D-49). If there is a budget item that is questionable, then the auditing agency notes it under its Summary of Findings and Questioned Cost Section (typically Section 3 of the A-133 Audit). In that section, the questionable cost is noted as well as the source campus. The UH System then submits a Corrective Action Plan that addresses the questionable costs as listed in the audits. In FY 2005 and FY 2008, Windward CC had questionable cost findings that were remedied in the Corrective Action Plan for 2005 and 2008 (Ref. 3D-50; Ref. 3D-51; Ref. 3D-52; Ref. 3D-53).
In sum, since 2006, the UH Consolidated Financial Statements have included supplemental information on the UHCC System colleges. ACCJC has accepted this supplemental information as evidence of financial integrity. Windward CC has also responded quickly to any external audit, especially when they pertain to extramural funds and financial aid programs.
The College will continue to perform yearly internal audits on extramural funds and will continue to follow ACCJC advice on external audit procedures.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.2.b. Appropriate financial information is provided throughout the institution.

Descriptive Summary:

Providing and distributing financial data is the responsibility of the Windward CC administration. The Annual Operational Expenditure Plan is published on the Windward CC website under “Budget Documents” (Ref. 3D-10).


Since 1996, the College, as part of the consolidated UH System, has used the Financial Management Information System (FMIS), to provide financial information to department and project principal investigators. However, FMIS has not been supported by its vendor, Software AG, and UH has been responsible for all support for FMIS since 1997. FMIS is also no longer repairable to meet UH’s on-going fund accounting requirements (e.g. UH is running out of account codes, school codes, etc). As a result, the UH System will replace FMIS with the Kuali Financial System (KFS). The KFS system was jointly developed and cost shared with multiple universities across the country. It is the first of a series of community source information systems for higher education. Its software was first developed at the University of Indiana and now includes partners such as Cornell University, UC Davis and the University of Hawai‘i. The UH Board of Regents and the UH Business Process Council (BPC) strongly believe that a community source financial information system will optimize control, cost, and risk factors within the UH System. Unlike FMIS, Kuali is a system that provides integrated budget and financial data. The BPC believes that the KFS is a better fit for the UH System long-term future than FMIS (Ref. 3D-54).
The College will schedule training (which might include online tutorials) to staff and faculty as the transition on July 1, 2012 approaches. The new Kuali system should provide the necessary financial information for principal investigators and budget managers at the College.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.2.c. The institution has sufficient cash flow and reserves to maintain stability, strategies for appropriate risk management, and realistic plans to meet financial emergencies and unforeseen occurrences.

Descriptive Summary:

The current funding levels of general funds and tuition and fee special funds are sufficient to support the various academic and operating programs of the College. The College has never exceeded its General Fund Allocation and has been able to meet its cash reserve requirement. The UHCC Reserve Policy calls for a minimum five percent of unrestricted funds.


By statute, the State of Hawai‘i General Fund is not allowed to go into deficit spending. Windward CC’s General Funds have always been fully spent at fiscal year end. Tuition and Fees special funds and other special funds that are retained by the campus have been kept at adequate levels for working capital and program needs.
Appropriations are allocated in a manner that allows for managing unexpected financial emergencies and unforeseen situations. Equipment funds of approximately $500,000 are partially withheld to provide for a “safety net” to cover unanticipated costs. A small percentage of equipment funds are allocated in the beginning of the fiscal year to replace emergency equipment needs throughout the year. Other non-critical equipment funds are withheld and released when it is fairly certain that the College has adequate resources through the end of the fiscal year.
Additionally, the College minimizes its risk by securing maintenance contracts on various systems and equipment to avoid costly repairs and replacement. Financial risk aversion is also provided by utilizing the services of the Office of Risk Management to review programs or situations where a financial risk should be avoided.
The College adheres to ACCJC’s guidelines to maintain an adequate Unrestricted Fund Reserve (General, Special, Revolving Funds).  The reserve fund ensures adequate financial reserves to see financial stability, and is applied through UHCCP Memorandum #8.201 (last update – January, 2009; Ref. 3D-40).  
The Chancellor is responsible for this fund.  It provides both as cash reserve (at three to four percent of unrestricted expenditures and encumbrances funds), and working capital (in excess of three to four percent of a target reserve level). These are identified for addressing emergency/unanticipated fiscal situations, as well as for costs at the beginning of each fiscal year prior to those revenues being received.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.2.d. The institution practices effective oversight of finances, including management of financial aid, grants, externally funded programs, contractual relationships, auxiliary organizations or foundations, and institutional investments and assets.

Descriptive Summary:  

Windward Community College currently utilizes the University of Hawai‘i’s Financial Management Information System (FMIS) to assure financial integrity and to insure appropriate control mechanisms are in place for all sources of funding.  The University of Hawai‘i must conform to the State’s allocation and allotment accounting system. As such, quarterly allotment requests are done that require the College to budget and monitor its expenditures on a quarterly basis. Inherent to this system is a funds check feature that will not allow units to exceed their allotments or enter into a negative cash position. The Fiscal Officer is responsible to ensure that allotments are sufficient to cover projected expenditures for the campus.


All credit program tuition and fees received by the College are recorded and managed within BANNER, the System’s student information software. BANNER maintains accountability of each student’s account and interfaces with the FMIS. Each type of tuition and fee fund has its own account code and every transaction gets recorded in BANNER and summarized into FMIS. Federal, state, and local student financial aid grants and awards are also managed through BANNER and FMIS.
Internally, the College manages its resources through an Annual Operational Expenditure Plan that identifies what its resources are and how it plans to expend those resources. Programs are provided with their allocations and they are responsible to manage their budget allocations. Program Managers and Principal Investigators are provided access to the FMIS and are able to view the status of their budgets in real time. These monies are recorded in separate funds and are annually audited. (Section 487[c] of the Higher Education Act [HEA] of 1965 [Ref. 3D-55, pp. 126-131] and Section 668.23 of the Title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations [CFR; Ref. 3D-56].)  The Financial Aid Office determines student aid eligibility and the Business Office generates and disburses financial aid funds.
The Office of Research Services (ORS) assists the College in administering various externally funded contracts and grants. ORS acts as the contracting office for all University of Hawai‘i proposals. Once the award is granted, ORS will advise the campus to establish an account code with budget allocations. ORS coordinates the establishment of accounts for contracts and grants which are serviced by the Research Corporation of the University of Hawai`i (RCUH). The College’s Fiscal Officer and the Principal Investigator are responsible to manage these funds.
The UH Foundation (UHF) is the fund raising arm of the University of Hawai‘i. UHF has their own financial management system and policies and procedures on managing their resources. The Chancellor is the overall person responsible for all UH Foundation accounts for the College.
The College currently has annual audits in place.  The Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA) and Section 668.23 of Title 34 of the CFR require all institutions participating in the Federal Student Assistance Programs to have annual audits conducted by an independent auditor.  The audits are implemented System-wide in that the auditors meet and review records for all 10 campuses, and report their results as a whole for the “UH System.”  The A-133 Report is a cumulative report for all federal funds, i.e., grants, financial aid, etc.   However, not all sources of funding at the College are specifically audited.  Funds such as tuition and revenue do not get audited unless an audit is called for by the Office of the Internal Auditor.
External audits provide the College with tools to sustain and improve areas of weakness in relation to financial resources and the management of such funds. The College has had a few minor audit findings during the last six years, specifically for financial aid and other Federal Grant programs such as TRiO’s Student Support Services and Upward Bound, according to the A-133 Report.  The College has addressed all audit findings and does not have any outstanding findings. As stated in the Annual A-133 Report (required under HEA), corrective action has been taken (refer to the A-133 Report) to ensure compliance, and the College has continued to receive federal contracts and grants as well as financial aid programs.
Policies and procedures for review and authorization of purchases are in place to meet the funding agreements/contracts (UH APM Administrative Procedural Manual, A8.200-A8.295; Ref. 3D-57).  A principal investigator is assigned to every funding source and that particular individual is responsible to review all purchases and authorize personnel hires within the scope of the contract/grant.  For oversight, the Fiscal Officer conducts a second review.  
In summary, the University’s student information system, BANNER, is not solely a student information system. It is also used to store student information, financial aid information, and financial transactions information.
In the management of financial resources, the College is preparing for a smooth transition from FMIS to the new system, Kuali, to ensure continued and better oversight. Together, the BANNER and FMIS/Kuali systems are effectively used in managing financial aid, grants, externally funded programs and contractual relationships.
UH has maintained the systems adequately to enable fund managers to monitor and control the receipt and disbursement of the College’s financial resources.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.2.e. All financial resources, including those from auxiliary activities, fund-raising efforts, and grants are used with integrity in a manner consistent with the mission and goals of the institution.

Descriptive Summary:

All funds that are held at the University of Hawai‘i must be managed and administered in compliance with UH Administrative Procedures. Fiscal Officers are trained to ensure that all revenues and disbursements are in accordance with established policies and procedures. All disbursements of funds require dual approvals: first by a Principal Investigator or Program Manager, and second by a Fiscal Officer to ensure compliance and availability of funds.


The College’s Special and Revolving Funds such as auxiliary services programs or tuition and fees special funds may be audited by the UH Office of Internal Audit (OIA) or if necessary an external audit company. The purpose of these audits is for program improvement.

Money raised through fund raising efforts is deposited and expended with the University of Hawai‘i Foundation.  Since the UH Foundation is not part of the UH System, their audit practices and findings, if any, would not be included in the A-133 Report.  However, the Foundation does receive a full external audit of all their programs on an annual basis. Similar to the A-133 Report, the Foundation audit covers all their programs and Windward CC funds would just be a part of that report.  The full audit reports are available on their website dating back to FY2005 (Ref. 3D-58).  UH Foundation’s annual audit reports indicated that there have not been any negative audit findings from FY2005-2010.    


As a System, grant monies are audited on an annual basis and the findings are reported in the A-133 Audit Report. According to the corrective actions stated in the A-133 Report, the audits provide a means for the College to determine which areas need to be addressed to become more compliant and fiscally responsible.
To assure financial integrity, control mechanisms for all funding sources are imbedded in the Financial Management System (FMIS) soon to be replaced with Kuali Financial System on July 1, 2012. Policies and procedures for review and authorization of purchases are in place to meet the funding agreements/contracts. A principal investigator is assigned to every funding source and that individual is responsible to review all purchases and authorize personnel hires within the scope of the particular grant and/or contract. The Fiscal Officer conducts a second review.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None


III.D.2.f. Contractual agreements with external entities are consistent with the mission and goals of the institution, governed by institutional policies, and contain appropriate provisions to maintain the integrity of the institution.

Descriptive Summary:

Contractual agreements, Memoranda of Agreements (MOAs), Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs), Cooperative Agreements, lease agreements, contracts, and grants exist at the College and are consistent with the institutional mission and goals. All contracts, grants, MOAs, and MOUs are reviewed and endorsed by the principal investigator, usually a dean or director. This review considers whether a project is appropriate and will support the College’s mission and goals. The document is then forwarded to the Fiscal Officer for additional campus analysis for fiscal acuity, soundness, and accuracy. The Chancellor will examine and may authorize the project for the campus.


Contracts that bind Windward CC financially specify the amount of financial commitment and/or resources expected from a division or the College as a whole.  Contractual agreements are centralized throughout the UH System, for legal support and contract advisement. The UH Office of Research Services (ORS; Ref. 3D-59) conducts the final examination of documents. The ORS Director is the authorized signatory for all external grant funds for the UH System.
The UH Office of Procurement and Real Property Management (OPRPM; Ref. 3D-60) is responsible for the System-wide administration of policies and procedures for the acquisition of goods, services, construction and the processing of transactions involving real property. The Campus Fiscal Officer is delegated purchasing authority not exceeding $25,000 and may issue purchase orders and enter into contracts within their authority. The OPRPM has the signature authority for designated levels of contracts with the University.
Policies and procedures are in place and available on both ORS and OPRPM Websites (Ref. 3D-61; Ref. 3D-62). Both ORS and OPRPM insure that contracts and grants contain provisions to terminate contracts that do not meet the required quality standards. All contractual agreements are consistent throughout the UH System because legal support and contract advisement are centralized.
The College has been successful in receiving federal grants to strengthen the goals and Strategic Action Outcomes set by the College while adhering to the standards and policies set forth by the ORS and the OPRPM. Examples of these are the Title III Grant from the US Department of Education and the 3CT Grant from the US Department of Labor.
The College has recently been awarded three separate Title III grants, which total $12.3 million for institutional funds:


  1. Hūlili - A collaborative grant between UH-Mānoa and Windward Community College to improve the transfer and success rates of Native Hawaiian students (Ref. 3D-63).



  1. Strengthening Student Engagement through the renovation of Hale A‘o and Hawaiian Studies Curriculum Expansion (Ref. 3D-64).




  1. Strengthening Student and Institutional Engagement (Ref. 3D-65).



Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.  



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.2.g. The institution regularly evaluates its financial management processes and the results of the evaluation are used to improve financial management systems.

Descriptive Summary:

The College and UH System are currently in the process of switching from the Fiscal Management Information System (FMIS) to the Kuali Financial System effective July 1, 2012. FMIS maintains the financial information for the entire UH System, which is composed of 10 campuses.  FMIS is over 20 years old, it cannot be modified, and it is primarily a manual accounting system.  Kuali is expected to increase efficiency and improve easy access to financial data and information, streamline electronic processing of financial documents, allow electronic approvals, provide web accessible and digital archiving, and create dashboards of financial reports to help make better decisions.


The Kuali Financial System (KFS) is based on the Financial Information System used at Indiana University for more than ten years. KFS is a modular financial accounting system designed to meet the needs of higher education. According to the Kuali page on the UH website, UH will be implementing these KFS modules: Chart of Accounts, General Ledger, Financial Processing, Labor Ledger, Accounts Receivable, Contracts and Grants, Purchasing, Accounts Payable and Capital Asset Management (Ref. 3D-66).
The UH System receives an annual Office of Management Budget (OMB) A-133 Audit at the System-level conducted by an independent external audit firm. The review tests the validity of the Institution’s financial statement information ensuring that the University is in compliance with general and specific government audit requirements, which cover both financial and non-financial factors such as program effectiveness, client eligibility, and efficiency with which resources are used. The auditors look closely at policies and procedures to ensure that the College is in compliance.
The Planning and Budget Council (PBC) uses past financial history as reference for current and future financial and budget planning. As an example prior fiscal year allocation is used as basis for current fiscal year’s allocation. Extra funding is then presented to the PBC, who in turn, recommends to the Chancellor on how to allocate the remaining balance less five percent reserve.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.


III.D.3. The institution systematically assesses the effective use of financial resources and uses the results of the evaluation as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

The College assesses the use of financial resources through various annual internal and external audit reports and recommended procedural changes. The College continues with the UH System Consolidated Audit Reports as agreed to with the ACCJC in July of 2005. The PBC reviews the extent to which strategic outcomes are being achieved, Grant Performance Reports, Annual Departmental Reviews, and Five-Year Program Reviews are ongoing. These reviews evaluate the effectiveness of past uses of financial resources and investments. These assessments provide the data necessary to determine whether allocation adjustments are necessary to improve results, and identify opportunities for greater efficiencies and cost savings.



Self Evaluation:

The College meets this standard.



Planning Agenda:

None.



Standard III.D Evidence


  1. ACCJC Letter and Acceptance of WCC’s Midterm Report 2010/01/29 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2010/ACCJC.MidtermRecommendation.1-29-2010.pdf

  2. Windward CC Budget Committee Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Budget/Directives.php

  3. Windward CC Strategic Planning Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Strategic_Planning/Directives.php

  4. Planning and Budget Council (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/PlanningBudgetMenu.html

  5. Planning and Budget Council Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Planning_Budget/Directives.php

  6. Strategic Plan Action Outcomes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Planning/Plans/Strategic/StrategicPlan12-8-08.pdf

  7. UH System Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures 2008-2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ovppp/uhplan/SOPM.pdf

  8. UHCC Strategic Plan 2002-2010 Update, Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures, 2008-2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/Update_2008_2015.pdf

  9. Appendix B: UHCC Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures 2008-2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/Appendix_B_UHCC_Strategic_Outcomes_and_Performance_Measures_2008_2015%20.pdf

  10. Windward CC Operational Expenditure Plans FY 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Budget/Documents.php

  11. UHCC Office of Budget, Planning, and Finance (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/ccadminbp_budgetDevelopment.html

  12. FB 2011-2013 Biennium Budget Request Summary (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Planning_Budget/Documents/2011/PBC_PCR_Priority_Summary_2010_07_06.pdf

  13. Planning and Budget Council Flow Chart and Timeline (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2010/PBCouncilFlowchartRevised_3-10-11.pdf

  14. Planning and Budget Council request form (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/PBCForm_10-3-11.pdf

  15. Planning and Budget Council Summary Sheet 2010/04/15 (Archived Copy)

  16. Preparation of the UH 2011-2013 Biennium Budget Proposal (Archived Copy) http://manoa.hawaii.edu/ovcafo/newbudget/SystemMemo.pdf

  17. 2011-2013 Biennium Budget Update presentation (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/budget/pdfs/BOR%202011-13%20Biennium%20Budget%20Presentation%20Final_09-01-10.pdf

  18. Preliminary Request for Enrollment Growth Cost Differential Funding FY 2011: Community Colleges Summary (Archived Copy)

  19. 2011-2013 Biennium Budget Policy Paper (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/budget/pdfs/2011-2013BIBudgetpolicypaper.pdf

  20. Strategic Plan Goals and Outcomes 2012 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/WIN_CC_2012_Actuals.pdf

  21. “Windward CC Gets Federal Boost From Title III and More” (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/news/article.php?aId=4039

  22. Title III (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/title_III/

  23. Achieving the Dream (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/atd/index.php

  24. Achieving the Dream Implementation Plan, Updated 2009/08/11 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/atd/Implementation_plan_Final.pdf

  25. Report for Awards Distributed by Windward CC 2006/07/01-2012/05/03 (Archived Copy)

  26. Giving to WCC (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/giving/index.php

  27. Pacific Center for Environmental Studies (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/paces/

  28. Palikū Theatre (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/paliku/

  29. Windward CC Committee and Council Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Directives.php

  30. Windward CC Ambassadors documents (Archived Copy)

  31. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/

  32. Ka ‘Ohana “Moving Forward with One Heart” (Archived Copy) http://kaohana.windward.hawaii.edu/story.php?aID=703

  33. Ka ‘Ohana “Festival of Music at Ho‘olaule‘a” (Archived Copy) http://kaohana.windward.hawaii.edu/story.php?aID=446

  34. Ka ‘Ohana “Ho‘olaule‘a: A Community Celebration” (Archived Copy) http://kaohana.windward.hawaii.edu/story.php?aID=229

  35. “UHCC Implements $58 million Energy Savings Program” (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/news/article.php?aId=4376

  36. Energy Savings Performance Contract RFP #10-0141 Section E WCC (Archived Copy)

  37. Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services, e-mail, 2011/01/19 (Archived Copy)

  38. Spring 2009 Convocation: Administrative Services Update presentation (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Ecology/Documents/2009/Clifford_Togo_Presentation_2009_01_05.pdf

  39. Chancellor, e-mail, 2012/02/24 (Archived Copy)

  40. UHCC Policy #8.201 Unrestricted Fund Reserve Policy – General, Special, Revolving Funds (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/UHCCP_8.201.pdf

  41. FY 2012 Budget Allocation Methodology (Archived Copy) http://uhcc.hawaii.edu/OVPCC/financing_cc/allocation.php

  42. Consolidated Financial Statements, June 30, 2005 and 2006 (Archived Copy) http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/cfo/reports/Financial%20Reports%202006/Year%20Ended%20%202006.pdf

  43. Consolidated Financial Statement and Supplementary Information June 30, 2006 and 2007 (Archived Copy) http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/sites/programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu.intranet/files/UH%206-30-2007%20CFS_0.pdf

  44. Consolidated Financial Statements, Required Supplementary Information and Other Supplementary Information: June 30, 2007 and 2008 (Archived Copy) http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/sites/programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu.intranet/files/UH%206-30-2008%20CFS.pdf

  45. Consolidated Financial Statements and other Supplementary Information: June 30, 2008 and 2009 (Archived Copy) http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/cfo/reports/Financial%20Reports%202009/UH%206-30-2009%20FS.pdf

  46. Consolidated Financial Statements, Required Supplementary Information and Other Supplementary Information June 30, 2009 and 2010 (Archived Copy) http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/cfo/reports/Financial%20Reports%202010/UH%206-30-2010%20CFS.pdf

  47. Consolidated Financial Statements, Required Supplementary Information and Other Supplementary Information, June 30, 2010 and 2011 (Archived Copy)

  48. Systemwide Financial Audit of the UH System: Phase II (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/auditor/Reports/2007/07-08.pdf

  49. Directory Listing for files/compliance/a133/ (Archived Copy) http://www.ors.hawaii.edu/files/compliance/a133/

  50. UH, State of Hawaii, OMB Circular A-133 Audit Report, June 30, 2005 (Archived Copy) http://www.ors.hawaii.edu/files/compliance/a133/FY2005%20A-133%20CAP.pdf

  51. UH Institutional Corrective Action Responses for the A-133 Findings and Questioned Costs for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2005 (Archived Copy)

  52. UH, State of Hawaii, OMB Circular A-133 Audit Report, June 30, 2008 (Archived Copy) http://www.ors.hawaii.edu/files/compliance/a133/FY2008%20A-133%20CAP.pdf

  53. UH Institutional Corrective Action Responses for the A-133 Findings and Questioned Costs for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2008 (Archived Copy)

  54. Taste of Kuali (Archived Copy) http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/fmotraining/doc/FMIS/Kuali%20Overview.PDF

  55. Higher Education Act of 1965: Title IV: Student Assistance (Archived Copy) http://www.tgslc.org/pdf/HEA_Title_IV_Oct02.pdf

  56. Title 34: Education (Archived Copy) http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=9558bb40c227ef4e4ebec0399b67d7d5&rgn=div8&view=text&node=34:3.1.3.1.34.2.39.13&idno=34

  57. UH Administrative Procedures A8.200-A8.295 Procurement (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/a8200.html

  58. UH Foundation – Reports and General Information (Archived Copy) http://www.uhfoundation.org/about/reports.aspx

  59. UH System, Office of Research Services (Archived Copy) http://www.ors.hawaii.edu/

  60. UH Office of Procurement and Real Property Management (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/oprpm/

  61. Office of Research Services: Policies & Agreements (Archived Copy) http://www.ors.hawaii.edu/index.php/policies-a-agreements

  62. UH General Provisions for Goods and Services (Archived Copy) http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/procure/doc/gp0710.pdf

  63. Hūlili grant abstract (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Title_III/2010/T3%2010-15%20Cooperative%20Hulili%20Abstract.pdf

  64. Strengthening Student Engagement Through the Renovation of Hale A’o and Hawaiian Studies Curriculum Expansion grant abstract (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Title_III/2010/T3%2010-15%20Ao-HWST%20Abstract.pdf

  65. Developmental Kākoʻo Koʻolau grant abstract (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Title_III/2010/T3%2010-15%20Developmental%20KakooKoolau%20Abstract.pdf

  66. Kuali Financial System (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/kualifinancial/?page=home

Standard IV Leadership and Governance

Standard IV.A Decision-Making Roles and Processes


Windward CC Community College is a collegial institution serving the Windward side of O‘ahu and connected to the University of Hawai‘i system. The decision-making structure is a combination of college administrators, committees, the college community, unions, the System-level governance structures, and the Board of Regents.
IV.A.1. Institutional leaders create an environment for empowerment, innovation, and institutional excellence. They encourage staff, faculty, administrators, and students, no matter what their official titles, to take initiative in improving the practices, programs, and services in which they are involved. When ideas for improvement have policy or significant institution-wide implications, systematic participative processes are used to assure effective discussion, planning, and implementation.

Descriptive Summary:


The institutional environment empowers members of the College to improve the College through the College’s website, campus-wide discussions, and the committee structure. The result is a communication system where all individuals connected to the College can participate in decision-making processes and understand what is happening on campus. Venues within this communication system are discussed in detail below. The committee structure, which is a crucial element of the overall leadership environment, is discussed in more detail in Standard IV.A.3. The assessment of the leadership environment is discussed in Standard IV.A.5.




Forums

The College has initiated face-to-face campus forums on a variety of topics affecting the future direction of Windward CC (e.g., dissolution of the ETC, possible changes to AA degree requirements, Faculty Senate constitutional changes, mission, vision, and core values), resulting in frank and open discussions among administration, faculty, staff, and students. Announcements for such important meetings are posted on the Windward CC website and sent to members of the College through an electronic mailing list that is maintained by the Office of Academic Computing.


The College Website

The College’s website (Ref. 4A-1) is a primary vehicle for communicating within the College. Following a substantial redesign in 2008, the website balances the different information needs connected to learning, governance, and marketing. Documents are posted, surveys are distributed, and information about the College is made widely available. Current policies are posted on the website. Various features on the website are being implemented to enhance the communication functions. For instance, some offices, such as theOffice of Academic Affairs (Ref. 4A-2), have suggestion boxes that allow for anonymous feedback.
Individual offices have been given increasing control over presentation of information related directly to them (e.g., being able to maintain lists of their own events), resulting in a greater sense of shared ownership and responsibility for the website.

The Discussion Board

The Faculty Senate’s New Initiatives (Ref. 4A-3) Sub-committee took the lead in 2009 to create a “new initiatives” website, a virtual space that serves as a forum for sharing information about current projects and projects in the making. The goal was to provide another way for faculty and staff to ask questions, voice their ideas, and express concerns. In Spring 2010, a DiscussionBoard (Ref. 4A-4) System was integrated into the College’s website that superseded the original new initiatives page. The discussion board has been used for such initiatives as changes to programs, policies, and buildings. An archive of the discussions (Ref. 4A-5) is available.

Anyone on campus can initiate a college discussion, though discussions tend to be initiated by the Faculty Senate, the Master Planning and Space Allocation Committee, and by the administration. Individuals or committees with new ideas can request input. The system also functions as an archive of past dialogues. Posting requires a UH User ID; however, the forums can either be read by anyone or only by people with UH IDs.

With the new curriculum policy adopted in 2012, all Course Change Proposals will be posted on the discussion board to elicit College-wide feedback. This process will ensure that the College is informed of curriculum changes and that an environment of cooperative improvement is created for the College’s curriculum.


Social Media

The College has also recently created an official Facebook presence (Ref. 4A-6). Other Windward CC Facebook accounts available to students include:


  • Service Learning (Ref. 4A-7)

  • ASUH-WCC (Ref. 4A-8)

  • TRiO WCC (Ref. 4A-9)

  • WCC Recruitment – Outreach (Ref. 4A-10)

  • W CC Hawaiian Studies (Ref. 4A-11)

  • WCC Library (Ref. 4A-12)

  • WCC Film Club (Ref. 4A-13)


Other Communication Systems

E-mail is used as a primary means of communicating information between members of the College. The Chancellor and other administrators frequently share key information via e-mail by using the faculty and staff and the student electronic mailing lists. Further, emergency information (e.g., the decision to close the campus for a day) can be communicated via an Emergency Alert System (Ref. 4A-14) which utilizes e-mail and text alerts.
Ka ‘Ohana (Ref. 4A-15), the College’s award-winning student newspaper, contributes to communication and dialogue on campus. It is published monthly in print and online and regularly offers articles on campus issues, plans, and concerns, as well as providing students a place to express their thoughts on a variety of campus and community issues.


Student Participation

The College Course Catalog (Ref. 4A-16) describes the roles of student participation in college governance and encourages students to contact ASUH-WCC Konohiki Council to get involved. This Council comprises up to 15 elected members from the enrolled student body and meets weekly and as needed to accomplish its identified projects and programs. The goal (Ref. 4A-17) of the ASUH-WCC is “to assist individuals within the community served by the College to come to greater awareness of themselves, the environment in which they live and their relationships with this environment” and “to

assist in developing skills and abilities necessary for them to cope with their environment and assume a role as contributors to this environment.” In addition to supporting student activities on campus, the ASUH-WCC Konohiki Council regularly appoints students to participate in regular College standing and ad hoc committees. They also appoint at least two students to serve on theUH System-wide Student Caucus (Ref. 4A-18), which meets monthly to address System-wide student concerns.

Students are invited to participate on decision-making committees such as the Institutional Effectiveness Committee, the Planning and Budget Council, Master Planning and Space Allocation Committee, and ad hoc personnel hiring committees for institutional-level positions. However, as discussed in Standard IV.A.1, even though opportunities for student representation on campus committees have improved over the years, student participation in governance has posed an ongoing challenge at Windward CC. The most obvious reasons are a lack of continuity of students year-to-year and the fact that most students have jobs, families, and other responsibilities more pressing than extracurricular responsibilities. During the 2010-2011 Academic Year, students had seats on the Commencement Committee, Master Planning & Space Allocation Committee, Planning and Budget Council, the Excellence in Teaching Committee, Aesthetics Committee, Institutional Effectiveness Committee, Student Publications and Faculty Senate.

Student Affairs will continue to impress upon students that representation on campus committees is a worthwhile opportunity, and ASUH-WCC Konohiki Council plans in 2011-2012 to improve their participation in recognition of the importance of the student voice. For example, they plan to send a regular representative for information purposes to Faculty Senate, which has only been done off and on over the years.



Results of Campus Surveys

The Institutional Surveys of Students, Faculty, and Staff, first done in Fall 2005 and then in Fall 2011 (Ref. 4A-19), provide a broader perspective on areas to be addressed. Quantitative results are published on the web in an effort to create as much transparency as possible. Specifically, since the last re-accreditation visit in 2006, particular attention has been paid to ensuring greater staff and student representation. Comparing the College’s institutional surveys from 2005 and 2011, this has been shown to be successful. In 2006, 51 percent of students felt their “overall level of student involvement in campus decision-making” was excellent or satisfactory (Ref. 4A-20, Item 14a), and in 2011, this figure increased to 69 percent (Ref. 4A-21, Item 14a). Regarding “opportunities to participate in campus activities and student government,” 62 percent of students provided a response of excellent or satisfactory in 2006 (Ref. 4A-20, Item 14e), which increased to 82 percent in 2011 (Ref. 4A-21, Item 14e). It can be speculated that the growth in student satisfaction is partly due to an increase from 2005 to 2011 in activities available to students.
Staff perceptions also showed an increase. In 2005, staff rated “overall involvement of staff in campus decision-making” at 28 percent satisfactory (0 percent excellent; Ref. 4A-22, Item 8a), but that increased to 60 percent in 2011 (excellent or satisfactory; Ref. 4A-23, Item 8a). Staff also rated “overall availability of opportunities to evaluate college governance and decision-making process” at only 24 percent satisfactory (0 percent excellent) in 2005 (Ref. 4A-22, Item 9p) but that increased to at 57 percent in 2011 (excellent or satisfactory; Ref. 4A-23, Item 9u). These increases may partially be due to the creation of the New Initiatives Forum (Ref. 4A-3), or online discussion boards (Ref. 4A-4), that allow faculty and staff to learn about or remark on topics that impact the campus, as well as the opportunity to participate in open forums regarding the hiring of executive and managerial positions.

Furthermore, faculty, staff, and student perception of representation has remained consistent between 2005 and 2011 for ratings on the involvement of another division, but there were increases in excellent and satisfactory responses for ratings within one’s own group. The College’s Fall 2005 Institutional Surveys (Ref. 4A-24) for the 2006 Self Study showed that while faculty satisfaction with their involvement was 61 percent (excellent or satisfactory; Ref. 4A-24, Item 11o), only 32 percent of the staff were satisfied with their level of involvement (Ref. 4A-22, Item 9m). However, in 2011, staff rated their involvement at 44 percent excellent or satisfactory (Ref. 4A-23, Item 9p), while faculty remained relatively constant at 60 percent (Ref. 4A-25, Item 11q). Further, while in 2005, 74 percent of faculty rated their “overall involvement of faculty in campus decision-making” as excellent or satisfactory (Ref. 4A-24, Item 10a) that number increased to 78 percent in 2011, with “excellent” ratings increasing from 12 percent to 29 percent (Ref. 4A-25, Item 10a). The ratings boost from staff and faculty could perhaps, again, be related to having the opportunity to provide feedback through New Initiatives and open forums.


In 2005, faculty members were unimpressed with student involvement, with only 40 percent perceiving it as excellent or satisfactory and 28 percent unable to judge (Ref. 4A-24, Item 10b). The perception remained the same in 2011 for faculty at 41 percent (Ref. 4A-25, Item 10b), but students’ perception of their own involvement increased from 51 percent (Ref. 4A-20, Item 14a) to 69 percent (Ref. 4A-21, Item 14a). It can be speculated this difference has to do with what each group perceives involvement to be, and what each group participates in. Faculty may distinguish participation as being through meetings and committees, which students do not always participate or have a seat in, while students may define involvement on a broader scope, as they have a wide range of opportunities, such as events, student clubs, service-learning, etc., to take part in. Also, the ASUH-WCC has markedly increased its presence and role on campus, in part fueled by the increased number of students during this period.

The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE$) Survey for 2010 indicates that students have very close, supportive relationships with instructors (6.11 on a scale of 1 to 7 where 1 is “Unfriendly” and 7 is “Friendly, supportive, sense of belonging”) and administrative personnel and offices (5.44 on a scale of 1 to 7; Ref. 4A-26, Items 11b and 11c) This is reinforced by results from the Student Institutional Survey conducted in Fall 2011 which found that 92 percent of students felt that they had the “opportunity to interact with faculty” (Ref. 4A-21, Item 14d). So while few participate in governance structures, students may have other informal means by which to communicate their concerns and ideas.


According to the 2010 CCSSE Survey, Windward CC is performing above the national average (average is 50) in terms of the benchmarks “Student-Faculty Interaction” (53.3) and Support for Learners” (57.5), two key indicators of student connectedness to the campus. Both factors increased from the 2008 survey (with 51.9 and 54.4 respectively; Ref. 4A-27). The Student Institutional Survey also found that 86 percent of Windward CC students experienced a “sense of being a part of the campus community,” (Ref. 4A-21, Item 18e) which in combination with the CCSSE indicates that the campus is actively designing opportunities for interaction and support of the student constituency. Information on the College’s CCSSE results can be found on the CCSSE webpage on the College’swebsite (Ref. 4A-27).

The Faculty and Staff Institutional Surveys conducted during the Fall 2011 semester were strong indicators that the campus governance and communication structures were providing opportunities for constituency involvement. One example of involvement can be found in the clear acceptance and incorporation of the recently adopted Windward Community College Mission Statement. Ninety-five percent of the faculty (Ref. 4A-25, Item 7) and 91 percent of the staff (Ref. 4A-23, Item 6) are familiar with the Windward CC Mission Statement, and 88 percent of the faculty (Ref. 4A-25, Item 8) and 85 percent of the staff (Ref. 4A-23, Item 7) feel that the mission statement adequately describes the mission of the College. Whereas, 80 percent of students are familiar with the mission statement (Ref. 4A-21, Item 10), and 90 percent feel that the mission statement describes their experience with the College (Ref. 4A-21, Item 11).


The Governance Sub-committee of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (GSIEC; Ref. 4A-28) created Governance Perception Surveys (Ref. 4A-29) and first administered them in 2008 to assess leadership and governance structures. Faculty and staff are surveyed about their perceptions of all administrative offices, committees and their leadership.

The purpose of the GSIEC Surveys is to promote continual improvement in College leadership and decision-making structures. Both members and non-members of the entities take the surveys with questions aligned to this ACCJC standard. Feedback is sought on perceptions of how the office/person/committee handles new ideas, inspires confidence, communicates information, solicits faculty/staff/student input, and conducts and utilizes assessment. Results are restricted to campus personnel and are available on Laulima through the College website. They are also available in print form, when requested.

To ensure that survey results are used for institutional improvement, each organizational entity (individual, office, or committee) for whom a survey is done must submit a self-assessment describing strengths and weaknesses revealed by the survey as well as improvements to be made, how those improvements will be measured, and changes made as a result. The self-assessments are available on Laulima via the College Website, but are accessible only by those on campus with a UH User ID.

In sum, staff, faculty, administration, and students have many different means by which to take initiative to improve the College: participation on committees and councils, providing input through institutional surveys, attending campus-wide forums and meetings, and exchange of information via the Discussions page. The expectation and welcoming of involvement by all campus constituents is a well-established part of campus culture. Increased transparency and inclusiveness of decision-making processes has empowered students and staff to take greater roles in campus leadership, and ensure that decision-makers hear their voices and concerns. However, improvement is still possible and desired.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:


The Web Administrator will organize the expansion of communication features of the website, such as suggestion boxes.

IV.A.2. The institution establishes and implements a written policy providing for faculty, staff, administrator, and student participation in decision-making processes. The policy specifies the manner in which individuals bring forward ideas from their constituencies and work together on appropriate policy, planning, and special-purpose bodies.
All College stakeholders have roles in institutional governance and, to varying degrees, participate in the areas of institutional policies, planning, and budgeting. Various stakeholders are involved in recommending student learning programs and services. Moreover, the College has made significant progress in the utilization of Program Review data to support its decisions regarding policy, planning, and program improvement, and the MaPSAC and Aesthetics Committees are now instrumental in ensuring that outside projects that have campus-wide implications are properly vetted.
IV.A.2.a. Faculty and administrators have a substantive and clearly defined role in institutional governance and exercise a substantial voice in institutional policies, planning, and budget that relate to their areas of responsibility and expertise. Students and staff also have established mechanisms or organizations for providing input into institutional decisions.

Descriptive Summary:


The primary roles played by administrators, faculty, and staff are outlined in the respective policies, procedures, and committee directives. Revision of the Policy Governing Committees and other chartered groups (Ref. 4A-30) occurred in Spring 2012, and the College will be undertaking a review of the committee structure for the remainder of the 2012 calendar year.

In the 2006 Accreditation Self Study Report (Ref. 4A-31), the College indicated that a Master Plan Committee would be formed to work with the Strategic Planning Committee to jointly consider programmatic Master Plan issues. In response to this, the Master Planning and Space Utilization Committee (Ref. 4A-32) was formed in early 2008 to address Master Plan issues. In December 2009, the Master Planning and Space Utilization Committee was renamed the Master Planning and Space Allocation Committee (MaPSAC; Ref. 4A-33) and charged with the tasks of working with the Master Plan, the Plan Review Use (PRU; Ref. 4A-34) and the Urban Design Guidelines (UDG; Ref. 4A-35) which detail how the campus addresses campus space allocation for short-range and long-range planning.

Campus-wide issues and concerns that involve policy, planning, and the curriculum can be identified in various ways: either through the committees or meetings discussed above or through other means of assessment. For example, an external survey conducted by SMS (Ref. 4A-36) identified a need for outreach classes in Waimānalo, a community served by the College. As a result of this March 2009 Survey, courses in Hawaiian language, Developmental Writing, and Speech have been offered in Waimānalo. Additionally, the Office of Institutional Research (OIR) and the UHCC System Office provide data to the Faculty Senate, Planning and Budget Council (PBC), Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC), and MaPSAC for planning and initiative assessments, academic planning, policy analysis, and program improvement.

Moreover, the Chancellor has charged the Windward CC Aesthetics Committee to re-establish itself as a permanent standing committee reporting to him and to oversee the aesthetic standards of the campus in accordance with the existing Master Plan, PRU (Ref. 4A-37) and Urban Design Plan (Ref. 4A-35). The Committee will be consulted and make recommendations for the physical appearance of the campus in regard to all campus aesthetic concerns that are brought to its attention.

The GSIEC also conducts Annual Assessment Surveys on all decision-making bodies on campus. For example, the Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs and his office are assessed by both members of the unit and non-members (those not directly working in or affected directly by the unit). The quantitative data and the unit’s response (analysis and plan of action) are posted on the Windward CC website (Ref. 4A-28). The GSIEC results can be retrieved by the public at http://www.Windward CC.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/2010-11/GovernanceMenu_2011.html.


Based on the Fall 2011 Faculty Survey, 78 percent of the faculty gave “excellent” or “satisfactory” ratings in the area of “overall involvement of the faculty in campus decision making” (Ref. 4A-25, Item 10a). In the same survey, 66 percent of the faculty gave “excellent” or “satisfactory” ratings in the area of “overall involvement of the faculty in the budgeting process (Ref. 4A-25, Item 10c). In related areas of the survey, faculty gave even higher ratings. Excellent or satisfactory ratings were given out as follows: “overall involvement in scheduling of course offerings” 65 percent (Ref. 4A-25, Item 10f), “program review” 71 percent (Ref. 4A-25, Item 10h), and “curriculum approval” 75 percent (Ref. 4A-25, Item 10g). This is a significant improvement over the 2005 Faculty Survey where 74 percent of the faculty gave “excellent’ or “satisfactory” ratings in the area of “overall involvement of the faculty in campus decision making” (Ref. 4A-24, Item 10a). In the same survey, 45 percent of the faculty gave “excellent’ or “satisfactory” ratings in the area of “overall involvement of the faculty in the budgeting process” (Ref. 4A-24, Item 10c).

The 2011 Staff Surveys showed significant improvement in similar categories. In overall involvement of staff in the decision making process, 27 percent answered “less than satisfactory or poor” compared with 60 percent “satisfactory or excellent” (Ref. 4A-23, Item 8a). In overall involvement of staff in the budgeting process, 32 percent answered “less than satisfactory or poor” compared with 49 percent “satisfactory or excellent” (Ref. 4A-23, Item 8b). In “setting campus priorities,” 36 percent of the staff answered that their involvement was “less than satisfactory or poor” compared with 49 percent “satisfactory or excellent” (Ref. 4A-23, Item 8c). In the 2005 Staff Survey, 68 percent of staff answered “less than satisfactory or poor” compared to 28 percent involvement in the decision-making process (Ref. 4A-23, Item 8a), 70 percent of the staff answered “less than satisfactory” involvement in the budgeting process, compared with 16 percent “satisfactory” (Ref. 4A-22, Item 8b) and 60 percent replied “less than satisfactory or poor” compared to 24 percent “satisfactory or excellent” regarding staff involvement in setting campus priorities (Ref. 4A-22, Item 8c).


In terms of decision-making connected to budget, the College prepares annual budget priorities based on the Strategic Plan (Ref. 4A-38), which is in turn connected to the Strategic Plans of the UHCC (Ref. 4A-39) and the UH (Ref. 4A-40) Systems. The College Strategic Plan is reviewed, evaluated, and updated by the Planning and Budget Council (Ref. 4A-41) at least once a year. The campus has completed one full cycle under this new policy, and the procedures (Ref. 4A-42) and forms (Ref. 4A-43) have undergone revisions in order to make the process more efficient and effective. As a way to standardize the decision-making process, a rubric (Ref. 4A-44) was created by an IEC member appointed as Auditor by the Chancellor. This rubric provides the criteria used to assess all PBC requests.


Self Evaluation:


The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:


Administrative units will refine learning, process, and functional outcomes analysis as part of the Program and Unit Review Reports to the Planning and Budget Council.

IV.A.2.b. The institution relies on faculty, its academic senate or other appropriate faculty structures, the curriculum committee, and academic administrators for recommendations about student learning programs and services.

Descriptive Summary:


The Faculty Senate (Ref. 4A-45)plays a primary role in curriculum and program development. With its members elected by faculty, the Senate operates as an authority independent from administration (Ref. 4A-46). The Chancellor and the University President have authority only to approve or disapprove the Senate’s constitution.

The Credit Curriculum and Academic Affairs Committee (CCAAC; Ref. 4A-47), a standing committee of the Faculty Senate, reviews and approves curricular actions, such as new course and/or program proposals. It plays a vital role in providing current and relevant curriculum to enhance student learning. Sub-committees of the CCAAC: the Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific Issues Board (Ref. 4A-48); the Foundations Board (Ref. 4A-49); and the Writing Advisory Board (Ref. 4A-50) also have an impact on curricula.

Academic departments also have a major role in creating, developing, and implementing new course and program offerings, given CCAAC approval. Via monthly meetings with the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs, Department Chairs discuss campus issues, including student learning and services (Ref. 4A-51). Department Chairs are the departments’ voices and are nominated by their respective departments and appointed by the Chancellor (Ref. 4A-52).

The Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC; Ref. 4A-53), a standing committee of the Chancellor, consisting of members from each academic department or unit, administration, staff, and students, oversees institution, program, and course-level assessment. Course and program changes may be the result of assessment results. An IEC Sub-committee on SLOs reviews SLOs for new/modified course and program proposals before these proposals are sent to the CCAAC (Ref. 4A-47) for action. Moreover, advisory committees (Ref. 4A-54, p. 6) provide insight in specific fields of study and can make recommendations for program currency and relevancy.

The academic decision-making bodies have clear roles and responsibilities. The concern about the coordination between Department Chairs and the now defunct Enrollment Management Committee from the last accreditation report has been addressed. In 2009, the Chancellor dissolved (Ref. 4A-55) the Enrollment Management Committee because it had completed its mission. The roles of the Department Chairs and the Office of the Academic Affairs have been delineatedand the process of scheduling and cancelling classes has been clarified in the Policy and Procedures about theSchedule of Classes and Class Cancellation (Ref. 4A-56). A newly-developed online management tool (Ref. 4A-57) to schedule courses for each semester is on the College website.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.A.3. Through established governance structures, processes, and practices, the governing board, administrators, faculty, staff, and students work together for the good of the institution. These processes facilitate discussion of ideas and effective communication among the institution’s constituencies.


Descriptive Summary:


College committees and councils are the primary organizational structures at the College that facilitate input into decision-making. College committees are established to investigate, consider, report, and take action on a particular subject matter. Committees generally conduct their own investigations of issues under consideration, while council discussions are based on input from additional sources.

In February, 2012, the College revised its Policies and Procedures for Chartered Groups (Ref. 4A-30)on Campus, replacing the earlier Policy on College Committees and Councils. The policy change arose as the result of an ad hoc Committee on Committees that formed in the summer of 2011 to formulate policies that would govern chartered groups on campus such as committees, councils, and advisory boards. The Committee on Committees reported suggestions to the Chancellor in September 2011, and the document (Ref. 4A-30)was approved in March 2012. Steps will be taken to implement this by reviewing it against the current committee structure to determine how committee organization can be improved. Suggestions for changes to the committee structure were elicited from the College’s Discussion Board in March, 2012 (Ref. 4A-5).


Committee and Council Structures

Faculty, students, staff, and administration have numerous opportunities for involvement in decision-making. A complete list of Committees and Councils along with their directives is available on the College website (Ref. 4A-58). Chartered Groups (Ref. 4A-30) assist the Chancellor and/or administrators in the operations and governance of the College. They are also used as a communication tool to keep the campus informed of issues, events, processes, and opportunities to provide College service. Representation by faculty, staff, students, administration, and community may be sought on councils and committees, depending on the scope of their task or responsibility.

Committees are identified as either Standing “deal with long-term and/or ongoing college-wide issues” or Ad Hoc “temporary…created as needs arise, such as meeting new initiatives or responding to special, one-time only issues.” Ad hoc committees may become standing committees after being active for a period of two years, for instance, the Aesthetics Committee was given standing committee status by the Chancellor in April 2011.

Advisory Committees, consisting of business, industry, and professional community leaders, provide input in curriculum development based on their knowledge of requirements in their fields of expertise. The Windward CC Course Catalog 2011-2013 states, “Consultations with these leaders relate to course content, selection of training equipment, the nature and extent of employment needs, and evaluation of the effectiveness of the curriculum.” Advisory committees include the Agriculture Advisory Committee, Hawaiian Studies Advisory Committee, Pacific Center for Environmental Studies Advisory / Fundraising Committee, Veterinary Studies Advisory Committee, and the Windward Community College Ambassadors.

New committees are created as the need arises. Ad hoc committees are typically created by the sanctioning group or person.

The organizational roles of each committee and council, along with the individuals to whom the committees or councils report, are described in their directives, all of which are available on the College’s website along with lists of meetings convened and minutes, if available (Ref. 4A-58). The Committee on Committees is currently updating committee information to specify what kind of information ought to be posted, such as membership lists and meeting minutes.

An Information and Decision Making Flow Chart (Ref. 4A-59), produced in 2008, shows each committee’s and council’s place in the College organizational structure, and how information is distributed throughout the College. This will be updated once the reforms to the committee structure are completed.

The official College Organizational Charts (Ref. 4A-60), most recently revised in 2010, contains only legislatively budgeted positions (Ref. 4A-61). They do not include unbudgeted temporary positions, federally funded positions, positions that come through faculty reassigned time, or committees and councils. The Committee on Committees presented a proposal (Ref. 4A-30) to the Chancellor regarding committee governance, which was approved and is in the process of being implemented.
Committee membership lists are posted on the College website and disseminated through e-mail announcements to the faculty and staff list. Individual committee chairs or secretaries submit membership changes to the web administrator as they occur. To encourage greater participation, term lengths are normally one to two years, though, depending on committee, individuals may volunteer for consecutive terms. Currently, the Dean for Academic Affairs, Division II sends an e-mail at the start of every semester requesting people to check their committee assignments.

Committee vacancies are announced as they occur. Announcements are made by e-mail to the faculty and staff electronic mailing list, announcement at Convocation, or printed memorandum. Department Chairs or Division Heads recruit members from their units at the beginning of each school year for committees needing full representation. Student committee members are recruited through the student government, thus ensuring that a channel exists for information flow. Representation on College committees is generally broad and includes students, faculty, and staff, as appropriate.

When a new need or challenge is identified, the concern is referred to an appropriate existing committee or council, or a new one is created. For example, the Non-Credit Curriculum and Academic Affairs Committee, or NCCAAC, was created to address non-credit faculty input into decision-making. Sometimes these may include informal advisory groups, such as the Online Education Advisory Group, which is composed of faculty planning or teaching online courses, librarians, and administrators and is intended provide feedback and offer other advice as issues arise.

The template for committee and council directives includes a section on “Documentation.” Each chartered group specifies its methods of recording discussion and decisions and publicizing information. The Policy on Chartered Groups (Ref. 4A-30, p. 4) specifies that, “The charter will specify what documents must be created, such as agendas and minutes, and who has access to them. Other documents can be posted as decided by the group,” and that “The group’s charter must specify who is responsible for sending new or updated information to the person responsible for maintaining the college’s website.”



Core Elements of the Committee Governance Structure

There are three key committees and councils at the College: The Planning and Budget Council, The Faculty Senate, and the Master Planning and Space Allocation Committee.


The Planning and Budget Council

To enhance the effectiveness of decision-making on campus, the Budget (Ref. 4A-62) and Strategic Planning (Ref. 4A-63) Committees were consolidated into the Planning and Budget Council (PBC; Ref. 4A-64) in November 2009 after the Chancellor reviewed the results of the GSIEC Surveys (Ref. 4A-65) for both committees and determined there was an overlap in the information, purpose, and responsibilities of each committee. A recommendation to combine the committees was discussed in an open forum and agreed upon.

The PBC was first convened in November 2009. According to the committee’s directives (Ref. 4A-66), its primary function is to provide “…advice and counsel to the Chancellor regarding economic, political, industry, and programmatic forces that are currently or will have impact on the College’s plan of action that is designed to accomplish specific goals.”

Specific budget requests are based on annual unit and departmental reports submitted every year (Ref. 4A-41). The campus Biennium Budget and Supplemental Budget Requests are then developed. The Biennium Budget Policy Paper (Ref. 4A-67), approved by the Board of Regents, impacts how the requests are prioritized. Initiatives to achieve campus goals are justified by assessment, analysis, and evidence of community needs (Ref. 4A-44). A major outcome of the PBC’s work is regular review and updating of the Strategic Plan and the prioritization of the College Budget (Ref. 4A-42). The PBC is widelyrepresentative (Ref. 4A-68) of Windwarad CC constituencies.

The PBC, composed of representatives of all campus constituencies, has the most direct hand in steering the institution. The PBC has gone through two complete planning cycles, producing a Biennium Budget proposal (Ref. 4A-69) and the following year addressing campus-based issues primarily because the Supplemental Budget request by the System solicited no campus-based requests (Ref. 4A-70). In Spring 2012 the PBC is preparing for another Biennium Budget proposal (Ref. 4A-71). Its processes, particularly in relation to budget recommendations, appear to be quite clear. However, the weight those recommendations carry with the Chancellor remains to be seen. The PBC’s Directives state, “If the Chancellor does not implement or accept the Council’s recommendation, the Chancellor will provide a written explanation to the Council” (Ref. 4A-66). Meeting notes of the PBC are posted on the Council’s website (Ref.4A-41), and non-members may attend meetings and even speak to items before the committee. Because the PBC comprises such diverse subgroups of the College, there is tremendous incentive for its discussions and decisions to focus on the good of the institution as a whole.




The Faculty Senate

One key mechanism for faculty involvement is the Faculty Senate. Under its constitution (Ref. 4A-72), academic units, credit instruction as well as student support services and Career and Community Education, are represented. The Faculty Senate meets twice a month to oversee and coordinate activities that affect instruction and students. For example, the Faculty Senate was involved in the creation of the Mission, Vision and ValuesCommittee (Ref. 4A-73) tasked with reviewing the current mission statement. It also created the committee to investigate and facilitate discussions on the CIL and Math requirements for Windward CC’s Associate in Artsdegree (Ref. 4A-74). Under the auspices of the Faculty Senate, the Credit Committee of Academic Affairs and Curriculum (CCAAC; Ref. 4A-47) and its Sub-committees - the Writing Advisory Board (Ref. 4A-50), theFoundations Board (Ref. 4A-49), and the Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific Issues Board (HAP; Ref. 4A-48) - play a major role in the development of curriculum and issues related to instruction.

The Windward CC Faculty Senate (Ref. 4A-45) is the primary representative body for the College faculty. The relationship between the Faculty Senate and administration is mutually respectful and has been productive, especially in terms of collaboration to revise and create policies. From 2009-2011 the Faculty Senate, via its ad hoc Sub-committee on Procedures and Policies, worked collaboratively with administration and the Director of Planning and Program Evaluation to create the current policies on Excellence in Teaching Award, Emeritus faculty, New Faculty Prioritization, Sabbaticals, Schedule of Classes and Class Cancellation Procedures, Assigned Time, and the Policy and Procedures Formation Process (Ref. 4A-75).



The Faculty Senate also facilitates campus forums to disseminate information and to provide a venue for discussion of issues related to academic affairs. For example, the Faculty Senate initiated discussion on proposed changes to two AA degree requirements: Computer Information Literacy (CIL) and Math 25 (Ref. 4A-76). The forum was followed by a faculty vote, the results of which led to the removal of the CIL requirement, but the retention of the Math 25 requirement.


The Master Planning and Space Allocation Committee

Space and facilities use on campus is largely delegated to specific divisions, where Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, and Administrative Services govern the use of their respective spaces. Overall management of space, including new buildings, renovations, and significant changes in space use is handled by the Master Planning and Space AllocationCommittee (Ref. 4A-32). The committee membership, which totals 23, creates a broad representation of campus stakeholders.


Chancellor's Administrative Staff

The Chancellor also holds a weekly meeting with theadministrative staff (Ref. 4A-77). This is the primary opportunity for administrative team to share concerns. Notes to these meetings are posted on the College website for everyone to read (Ref. 4A-78).


Recent Changes to the College’s Committee Structure

With the adoption of the Policies and Procedures on Chartered Groups (Ref. 4A-30), which replaced the Policies and Procedures on Committees, changes to the committee structure have been made. Asurvey (Ref. 4A-79) of college faculty, staff and employees was done in March 2012 to elicit suggestions regarding the committees. The Committee on Committees ad hoc committee was then reconstituted to help guide the committee reform process. Changes to the committee structure are expected to be implemented beginning in Fall 2012.


University of Hawai‘i System-Level Committees

Windward CC faculty, administrators, and students sit on several System-level committees. The “Off-Campus Faculty Senate Chair” meets monthly with the UH All-Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs (ACCFSC; Ref. 4A-80), and the UH Community College Faculty Senate Chairs (CCFSC; Ref. 4A-81). The purpose of the ACCFSC is “to provide a formal, independent voice and organization through which the faculty of the University of Hawai‘i System can participate in the development and interpretation of system-wide policy, and to promote and improve coordination, communication, and understanding among the faculty, students, community, administration, and Board of Regents” (Ref. 4A-82). The CCFSC ensures faculty input into decision-making as the Vice President for Community Colleges participates in those meetings. The Faculty Senate Off-Campus Chair reports on those meetings at Windward CC Faculty Senate meetings, and solicits feedback from faculty through the Senators both at the Senate meetings and by e-mail. The Chair e-mails minutes and summaries of meeting highlights to all faculty and staff (Ref. 4A-83).

The Chancellor, the Off-Campus Faculty Senate Chair, and the ASUH-WCC Konohiki Council (student government) President sit on a System-wide Strategic Planning Council (Ref. 4A-84), which has been meeting almost every quarter. The UH Director of Academic Planning, Assessment, and Policy Analysis (APAPA) and the UH Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs head the meetings. The primary purpose is sharing of data and strategic initiatives with the campuses. The Vice President for Community Colleges also conveys thisinformation through semester visits to each campus (Ref. 4A-85).

In Spring 2011, the University of Hawai‘ireconstituted the Distance Learning Advisory Committee (DLAC; Ref. 4A-86) to assist the UH System in advancing its mission through distributed and distance learning. It is a coordinated effort to improve distance learning by acting in an advisory capacity to identify and move action on concerns relating to distributed and distance learning. The Windward CC Dean of Academic Affairs, Division II currently serves on this committee.


Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:

An ad hoc committee will review to the structure of groups on campus based on the Policy on Chartered Groups.

IV.A.4. The institution advocates and demonstrates honesty and integrity in its relationships with external agencies. It agrees to comply with Accrediting Commission standards, policies, and guidelines, and Commission requirements for public disclosure, Self Study and other reports, team visits, and prior approval of substantive changes. The institution moves expeditiously to respond to recommendations made by the Commission.

Descriptive Summary:


Windward Community College has complied with the ACCJC requirements and deadlines. Windward CC has submitted reports requested by the ACCJC by the required deadline. Reports available on the Windward CC Website include:




  • Annual Report to the ACCJC 2006-2007 (Ref. 4A-87)

  • Progress Report to the ACCJC 2007/10/15 (Ref. 4A-88)

  • Follow-Up Report to the ACCJC 2009/03/15 (Ref. 4A-89)

  • Annual Report to the ACCJC 2008-2009 (Ref.4A-90)

  • Windward CC Midterm Report to the ACCJC 2009/10/15 (Ref. 4A-91)

  • Annual Report to the ACCJC 2010 (Ref. 4A-92)

This Self Evaluation Report was developed through broad, systematic participation across the College. At the Fall 2009 convocation, all faculty and staff were given the opportunity to sign up for a standard and/or sub-standard committee. They were asked to indicate their first, second, and third choice. The Accreditation Liaison Officer (ALO) and Chancellor formed the committees based on these choices and tried to ensure equal representation among faculty and staff. Most participants were given their first or second choice. Those who did not submit a sign-up sheet were assigned to a committee. New faculty and staff hired before January 2011 were assigned to a committee. Once the committees were formed, the ALO and Chancellor assigned the Accreditation Standard Chairs and sent out invitations to those chosen. In cases where individuals declined, the ALO and Chancellor made another selection and the process continued until all Accreditation Standard Chairs were in place. Accreditation Standard Chairs were given 3 credits per semester assigned time.


The same process was used to assign the Accreditation Sub-Standard Chairs within each Standard. These individuals report to Accreditation Standard Chairs about the research and findings that their committee members have done. For Standard I, there are two Sub-Standard Chairs; for Standard II there are three; for Standard III there are four; and for Standard IV there are two. Sub-Standard Chairs and their committee members received no compensation for their work (see Organization of this Report Section of the Introduction, p. 26-29).

The Accreditation Standard Chairs reported their progress to the Accreditation Steering Committee, which met once a month during the 2010 academic year and twice a month during the 2011 academic year to discuss the progress of the Report (Ref. 4A-93). This committee consists of the Chancellor, the ALO, the four Standard Chairs, the Director of Institutional Research, the IT Specialist, the Documentarian, and the Editor. A list of the committee members can be foundonline (Ref. 4A-94). The entire committee developed the timeline for the Self Evaluation. The first draft of the standards was submitted in Spring 2011.

The Standard Chairs worked over the summer to provide feedback to the Sub-Standard Committees on their first draft. More information was added to the report in the Fall 2011. A second draft of the report was submitted to the ALO in December 2011. The Steering Committee and the Chancellor’s Administrative Team provided feedback both to the ALO and Editor in January 2012. After this review, the document went back to the Sub-Committees for further modification and was also put on the Discussion Board for faculty/staff comment before going to Windward CC’s Faculty Senate, the Vice President for Community Colleges, the President of the University of Hawai‘i, and, finally the Board of Regents. In August 2012, it will be sent to the ACCJC, along with documentation, for review before the October 15-18, 2012 visit. The College, thus, has complied with internal agency requirements and deadlines and followed the University of Hawai‘i’s Policies and Procedures.

The College interacts through short-term and long-term relationships with other external agencies. Among these are various federal and private granting institutions involving student and instructional funding. One of the external agencies with which the College interacts is theUS Department of Education (including Pell grants; Ref. 4A-95) and auditors, such as Accuity LLP (Ref. 4A-96). TheKāne‘oheBusinessAssociation (Ref. 4A-97) has also attested to the valuable partnership it enjoys with the College. The ongoing success for renewal and awarding of new grants and loans constitutes evidence that the College is deemed by outside agencies to be acting with honesty and integrity to its obligations to and dealing with those agencies.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.A.5. The role of leadership and the institution’s governance and decision-making structures and processes are regularly evaluated to assure their integrity and effectiveness. The institution widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:

The evaluation of administrators is guided largely by System-level policies. The Board of Regents’ Policy, Executive Employees, Part IV, Conditions of Service, includes details on Performance Evaluation (Ref. 4A-98, Section 9-14) and the Evaluation of the Board of Regents’ Appointees (Ref. 4A-98, Section 9-15). In addition, Executive Policy E9.203 (Ref. 4A-99), Evaluation of Board of Regents’ Appointees, sets forth the evaluative purpose of evaluating the Board of Regents’ Appointees of the University of Hawai‘i.


The College evaluates leadership and governance and decision-making structures and processes through annual and longitudinal assessments. The primary tools of leadership evaluations are annual 360° Executive Assessments of Administrators (Ref. 4A-100), regular but infrequent Faculty/Staff/Student Institutional Surveys (Ref. 4A-19), and annual Governance Sub-committee of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (GSIEC) Governance Perception Surveys (Ref. 4A-29) done for individuals, committees, and councils in primary leadership and decision-making roles.

The Administrative Evaluation Guidelines (Ref. 4A-101) are available online. Administrators (Deans, Directors, Vice Chancellors, and the Chancellor) are evaluated annually via the 360° Executive Assessment, a web-based assessment that is coordinated by the University of Hawai‘i System, Office of Human Resources (Ref. 4A-100). Evaluators are selected from three categories: peers, constituents, and

subordinates or personnel within the responsibility of the Executive employee being evaluated. Each Executive employee is asked to provide a list for each category. The Chancellor then reviews this list and might request additional names to be added. The Chancellor’s Office indicates that the Chancellor is asking the Administrative team to include a broader base of evaluators. Evaluation results are confidential and shared only with the individual being evaluated.

In response to the accreditation 2006 recommendation, the College formulated a response to the criticism that it had not effectively evaluated its governance structure. In 2008, Kathleen French submitted herreport on Recommendation 5 (Ref. 4A-102) to the campus. The recommendations in the report were the basis of a Governance Survey (referred to as GSIEC). The survey, as formulated by the Institutional Research Office and the Institutional Effectiveness Committee, was first implemented in 2009 and has been used annually.

Results are posted on the College website. Survey results for 2009 are available athttps://laulima.hawaii.edu/access/content/group/bae10c45-90f2-4cc2-a2be-8e00bb8ac0f3/2009/

and survey results for 2010 available at



https://laulima.hawaii.edu/access/content/group/bae10c45-90f2-4cc2-a2be-8e00bb8ac0f3/2010/. These pages are password protected and access is limited to members of the College. A public site is available from the GSIEC home page. Copies of these self-assessments are also available as hard copies upon request.
GSIEC surveys have been done annually since 2008-2009 (Ref. 4A-103). The 2011 GSIEC results are not yet available. These surveys evaluate perceptions of effectiveness of the leadership and decision-making entities at the College: Committees, Councils, Coordinators, Department Chairs, Administrators, major servicing offices, and Faculty Senate Chairs. Those individuals and groups assessed must submit a response to the survey results, highlighting strengths and weaknesses and identifying actionable, measurable changes to be made based on the survey results. The following year, changes actually made must be described.

Department Chairs (DCs) are evaluated for their effectiveness at carrying out their duties via the annual Governance Perception Survey. These results are available to the College. An additional evaluation process, described in the Description of Duties and Responsibilities of the Department Chairs in Credit Instruction (Ref. 4A-104), includes evaluations by department members, the Dean of Academic Affairs, and the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs. The Natural Sciences Department has an Administrative/Professional/Technical (APT) employee working directly with their DC. Currently, that APT does not participate in the evaluation of the DC. The results of these evaluations are shared privately with Department Chairs and are not made available to the College.

As outlined in the Duties and Responsibilities of Department Chairs in Credit Instruction (Ref. 4A-104), elections for Department Chairs are conducted by the Chancellor. Technically, the departments do not elect their chairs since their decision is a recommendation to the Chancellor. Current policy states, “Faculty members in a department shall meet to consider the recommendation of a bargaining unit member to serve as Chair...If there is no consensus among the faculty members as to whom should serve as Chair, the Chancellor shall consider both the majority and minority views before making an appointment.” There is no clear definition of what constitutes a consensus. According to the 2009-2015 Agreement between the University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly and the Board of Regents of the University of Hawai‘i, the Department‘s recommendation for DC “shall be based on a majority vote of all bargaining unit Faculty Members in the Department” (Ref. 4A-105, p. 18). Department Chairs serve a two-year term. For information on the duties and responsibilities of Department Chairs, see http://Windward CC.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Department_Chairs/ (Ref. 4A-104).

Faculty, Staff, and Student Institutional Surveys were conducted in Fall 2005 and Fall 2011 (Ref. 4A-19). The College intends to continue conducting these surveys on a regular basis in order to assess longitudinal changes. The 2005 Survey asked faculty and staff to evaluate the overall effectiveness of the UH Board of Regents, the UH System administrative structure, College administration effectiveness, and opportunities for participation in governance and decision-making.

The College is currently assessing the effectiveness of its governance assessment procedures. An external evaluator, David Mongold, UH System Senior Institutional Analyst, reviewed GSIEC and hisreport was submitted to the Chancellor in January 2012 (Ref. 4A-106). Mongold recommended the process be continued for another planning cycle. However, the report also states deficiencies have become evident that need to be addressed, such as “redesign of the survey instrument; provision of adequate resources for institutional research support; increased commitment by senior administrators; better communication of process results and associated action plans.” It was also recommended that the College conduct a study that evaluates the decision-making process to outline what is under senior administration jurisdiction and what warrants input and participation from faculty. Despite the deficiencies, Mongold determined the GSIEC has value, and, if continued with the appropriate adjustments and full commitment by all involved, it can prove effective. An IEC Sub-committee reviewed the report during Spring 2012 and made recommendations that were approved by the IEC and blessed by the Faculty Senate in April 2012 (Ref. 4A-107).


Self Evaluation:


The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:


Under the leadership of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee, the College will consider the recommendations made by the IEC Sub-committee reviewing the Mongold Report on Governance Surveys, including a recommendation for separate assessments of offices currently subsumed by a broader authority (e.g. Marketing, Institutional Research, and Planning and Program Evaluation under the Chancellor’s Office).




Standard IV.A Evidence


  1. Windward Community College (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/

  2. Office of Academic Affairs (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/academic_affairs/

  3. Faculty Senate New Initiatives Subcommittee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/faculty_senate/New_Initiatives/

  4. Discussions (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/discussions/

  5. Discussions Archive (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/discussions/archive.php

  6. Windward CC Facebook profile (Archived Copy) https://www.facebook.com/windwardcommunitycollege

  7. Windward CC Service Learning Facebook profile (Archived Copy) https://www.facebook.com/pages/Windward-Community-College-Service-Learning/138220606251207

  8. ASUH-WCC Facebook profile (Archived Copy) https://www.facebook.com/wccasuh

  9. TRiO Student Support Services Facebook profile (Archived Copy) https://www.facebook.com/pages/TRiO-SSS-WCC/278239185570

  10. Windward CC Recruitment-Outreach Facebook profile (Archived Copy) http://www.facebook.com/people/Wcc-Recruitment-Outreach/100000646467481

  11. Hawaiian Studies WCC Facebook profile (Archived Copy) http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hawaiian-Studies-at-WCC-Windward-Community-College/282538480689

  12. WCC Library Facebook profile (Archived Copy) http://www.facebook.com/WindwardCCLibrary

  13. WCC Film Club Facebook profile (Archived Copy) http://www.facebook.com/people/Wcc-FilmClub/100001723537117

  14. UH Alert Emergency Notification (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/alert/

  15. Ka `Ohana: About Us (Archived Copy) http://kaohana.windward.hawaii.edu/aboutus.php?iID=72

  16. Catalogs and Schedules of Classes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/index.php

  17. Konohiki Council (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Konohiki/Directives.php

  18. UH Student Caucus (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/uhsc/index.htm

  19. Accreditation survey data (Archived Copy) http://www.windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Accreditation%202011/Accreditation2012.html

  20. Windward CC Student Institutional Survey 2005 (Archived Copy) http://www.zoomerang.com/Shared/SharedResultsSurveyResultsPage.aspx?ID=L22GSS632SV7

  21. Windward CC Student Institutional Survey 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/IRO/Documents/2011/StudentInsitutionalSurvey_9-12-11combo.pdf

  22. Windward CC Staff Institutional Survey 2005 (Archived Copy) http://www.zoomerang.com/Shared/SharedResultsSurveyResultsPage.aspx?ID=L22FFYSFXHDZ

  23. Windward CC Staff Institutional Survey 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/IRO/Documents/2011/StaffInsitutionalSurvey_9-12-11combo.pdf

  24. Windward CC Faculty Institutional Survey 2005 (Archived Copy) http://www.zoomerang.com/Shared/SharedResultsSurveyResultsPage.aspx?ID=L22F362EZX86

  25. Windward CC Faculty Institutional Survey 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/IRO/Documents/2011/FacultyInsitutionalSurvey_9-12-11combo.pdf

  26. Windward Community College Student Success and Engagement Survey 2010 Results (Archived Copy) http://www.ccsse.org/survey/public_profile.cfm?ccsse_id=14199000&year=2010

  27. Student Engagement (CCSSE) (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/CCSSE/

  28. Governance Survey Information Page 2010-11 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/2010-11/GovernanceMenu_2011.html

  29. Governance Subcommittee of the Intuitional Effectiveness Committee sample perception survey (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/Laulima/Examples/SurveyExample2-13-09.pdf

  30. Windward CC Policy 2.2: Policies and Procedures for Chartered Groups on Campus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/Chartered_Groups.pdf

  31. Accreditation Self Study Report of WCC 2006 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2006/2006_Self_Study.pdf

  32. Master Plan and Space Utilization Committee Charge from the Chancellor (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/master_Planning/Documents/2009/Chancellor%27s_Charge.pdf

  33. Master Planning and Space Allocation Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Master_Planning/index.php

  34. Plan Review Use Application (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Planning/Documents/1992/PlanReviewUseMasterPlan.PDF

  35. Windward CC Urban Design Plan and Design Guidelines (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Planning/Documents/1995/UrbanDesignPlan.PDF

  36. Windward Community Education Needs Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/governance/Documents/2009/SMS_Educational_Needs.pdf

  37. Plan Review Use Application (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Planning/Documents/1992/PlanReviewUseApplication.PDF

  38. Strategic Plan Action Outcomes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Planning/Plans/Strategic/StrategicPlan12-8-08.pdf

  39. UHCC Strategic Plan 2002-2010 Update, Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures, 2008-2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/Update_2008_2015.pdf

  40. UH System Strategic Plan (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ovppp/stratplan/UHstratplan.pdf

  41. Planning and Budget Council Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Planning_Budget/Documents.php

  42. Planning and Budget Council Flow Chart and Timeline (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2010/PBCouncilFlowchartRevised_3-10-11.pdf

  43. Planning and Budget Council request form (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/PBCForm_10-3-11.pdf

  44. Planning and Budget Council Rubric (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Planning_Budget/2011/PBC_Rubric_2011.pdf

  45. Faculty Senate (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/index.php

  46. Faculty Senate Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Directives.php

  47. Credit Curriculum and Academic Affairs Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/CCAAC/index.php

  48. Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific Issues Board (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/hap/

  49. Foundations Board (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Foundations/index.php

  50. Writing Advisory Board (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Writing_Board/index.php

  51. Vice Chancellor's Advisory Council Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Vice-Chancellor_Council/Documents.php

  52. Description of Duties and Responsibilities of Department Chairs in Credit Instruction (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Documents/2008/Duties_of_Department_Chairs.pdf

  53. Institutional Effectiveness Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Institutional_Effectiveness/index.php

  54. Windward CC Course Catalog 2011-2013 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/WCC_Catalog_2011-2013.pdf

  55. Dissolution of the Enrollment Management Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Enrollment_Management/Enrollment_Dissolution.pdf

  56. Schedule of Classes and Class Cancellation Procedures (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/SOC_Cancellation.pdf

  57. Creation of Schedule of Classes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Scheduling/

  58. Committees and Councils (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/

  59. Planning and Budgeting Process for WCC (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Governance/DecisionCharts_2008.pdf

  60. Organization Chart (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2011/WCC_Organization_Charts_2011.pdf

  61. A3.101 UH Organizational and Functional Changes (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/a3101/a3101.pdf

  62. Windward CC Budget Committee Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Budget/Directives.php

  63. Windward CC Strategic Planning Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Strategic_Planning/Directives.php

  64. Planning and Budget Council (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/PlanningBudgetMenu.html

  65. Governance Survey Information Page 2008-09 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/2008-9/GovernanceMenu.htm

  66. Planning and Budget Council Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Planning_Budget/Directives.php

  67. 2011-2013 Biennium Budget Policy Paper (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/budget/pdfs/2011-2013BIBudgetpolicypaper.pdf

  68. Planning and Budget Council Membership (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Planning_Budget/Membership.php

  69. Preparation of the UH 2011-2013 Biennium Budget Proposal (Archived Copy) http://manoa.hawaii.edu/ovcafo/newbudget/SystemMemo.pdf

  70. Planning and Budget Council Rating Survey Results 2010-11 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2010/SurveyResults/PBCResultsFinal_4-27-11.pdf

  71. Planning and Budget Council Rating Survey Results 2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/PBC%20Results_5-15-12.pdf

  72. Constitution of the Faculty Senate (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Faculty_Senate/Faculty_Senate_Constitution.pdf

  73. Mission, Vision, and Core Values Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Mission_Values/

  74. Associate in Arts Degree (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academics/Associate_Arts.php

  75. Windward CC Policies, Procedures, and Guidelines (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/

  76. Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2010/10/05 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Faculty_Senate/2010/Faculty_Senate_2010_10_05_Minutes.pdf

  77. Chancellor’s Administrative Staff (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Chancellor_Staff/index.php

  78. Chancellor’s Administrative Staff Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Chancellor_Staff/Documents.php

  79. Survey on Current Committee Structure (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Feedback/View.php?ID=64%29

  80. All Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/accfsc/

  81. Community Colleges Council of Faculty Senate Chairs (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/ccfsc.html

  82. All Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs Charter (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/accfsc/charter.html

  83. All Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs, meeting minutes, 2011/02/25 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/accfsc/minutes/accfsc_min_20110225.doc

  84. UHCC Strategic Planning/Budget Development (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan.html

  85. Access and Success: Planning, Tracking, and Innovating presentation (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2011/VP_Morton_Campus_Visit_Spring_2011_WinCC.pdf

  86. Reconstituting the Distributed Learning Advisory Committee (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/app/aa/cms/dlac.pdf

  87. 2006-2007 Accreditation Annual Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2006/2006-2007_Annual_Report.pdf

  88. Accreditation Progress Report of Windward CC 2007/10/15 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2007/2007_15_10_ProgressReport.PDF

  89. Accreditation Follow-up Report of Windward CC 2009/03/15 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2009/2009_Follow-Up_Report.PDF

  90. 2008-2009 Accreditation Annual Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2009/Accreditation_Report_2008-2009.pdf

  91. Accreditation Midterm Report of Windward CC (Archived Copy) http://wcc.hawaii.edu/accreditation/Documents/2009/Midterm_Report_2009_Final.pdf

  92. 2010 Accreditation Annual Report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2010/ACCJC_2010_Annual_Report_Submission.pdf

  93. Self-Study Workspace for 2010-2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Self-Study_2011/

  94. Accreditation Steering Committee Membership (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Accreditation/Membership.php

  95. US Department of Education (Archived Copy) http://www.ed.gov/

  96. Accuity LLP (Archived Copy) http://www.accuityllp.com/

  97. Kāne`ohe Business Group (Archived Copy) http://kaneohebusinessgroup.com/

  98. Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 9 Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch9.pdf

  99. E9.203 Evaluation of Board of Regents Appointees (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e9/e9203.pdf

  100. 360° Evaluations (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/360/

  101. UHCC Policy #9.202 Executive Employees Performance Evaluation (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/9.202.pdf

  102. Report on ACCJC’s Recommendation 5 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/2008-9/2008_REC_5_REPORT_KFRENCH.pdf

  103. Governance Survey Information (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/GovernanceMenu.htm

  104. Duties and Responsibilities of Department Chairs in Credit Instruction (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Department_Chairs/

  105. Agreement between the UH Professional Assembly and the UH Board of Regents, July 2009-June 2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.uhpa.org/uhpa-bor-contract/100129-2009-2015-agreement-for-website.pdf/view

  106. Governance Subcommittee of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee Evaluation Process at WCC: Report of the Consultant (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2012/GSIEC_Report_2012.pdf

  107. Policies and Procedures for the Assessment of the College Governance Structures (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/Governance_Assessment.pdf



Standard IV.B Board and Administrative Organization


In addition to the leadership of individuals and constituencies, institutions recognize the designated responsibilities of the governing board for setting policies and of the chief administrator for the effective operation of the institution. Multi-college districts/ systems clearly define the organizational roles of the district/system and the colleges.
IV.B.1. The institution has a governing board that is responsible for establishing policies to assure the quality, integrity, and effectiveness of the student learning programs and services and the financial stability of the institution. The governing board adheres to a clearly defined policy for selecting and evaluating the chief administrator for the college or the district/system.

Descriptive Summary:

In 1907, the University of Hawai‘i was established based on the model for land-grant universities created by the 1862 Morrill Act. In the 1960s and 1970s, the University was developed into a system of accessible and affordable campuses.

These institutions currently include:


  • A research university at Mānoa offering a comprehensive array of undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees through the doctoral level, including law and medicine.




  • A comprehensive, primarily baccalaureate institution at Hilo, offering professional programs based on a liberal arts foundation and selected graduate degrees.




  • An upper division institution at West O‘ahu, offering liberal arts and selected professional studies.




  • A system of seven open-door community colleges spread across the islands of Kaua‘i, O‘ahu, Maui, and Hawai‘i, offering quality liberal arts and workforce programs. In addition to the seven colleges, outreach centers are located on the islands of Moloka‘i and Lāna‘i (administered by UH Maui College), on the island of Hawai‘i in Kealakekua (administered by Hawai‘i CC), and in the Wai‘anae/Nānākuli area of O‘ahu (administered by Leeward CC). Effective August 2009, Maui Community College’s accreditation was transferred from the WASC Junior to the WASC Senior Commission and renamed, University of Hawai‘i Maui College. The college remains part of the University of Hawai‘i Community College (UHCC) System for administrative and organizational reporting and funding.

IV.B.1.a. The governing board is an independent policy-making body that reflects the public interest in board activities and decisions. Once the board reaches a decision, it acts as a whole. It advocates for and defends the institution and protects it from undue influence or pressure.



Descriptive Summary:

The UH System is governed by a 15-member Board of Regents (BOR). Board of Regents By-Laws and Policies define the duties and responsibilities of the Board and its officers and committees. The BOR is responsible for the internal organization and management of the University, including, but not limited to, establishing the general mission and goals of the system and approving any changes to them; adopting academic and facilities planning documents for the system and the campuses; adopting Broad policy that guides all aspects of University governance; appointing and evaluating the President; establishing the administrative structure and approving major administrative appointments; approving all major contractual obligations of the University; approving new academic and other programs and major organizational changes; reviewing all fiscal audits of University operations; and approving the University budget, long-range financial plans, and budget requests for state funding.


In 2007, The Regents Candidate Advisory Council of the University of Hawai‘i was created by Act 56. Act 56 was amended by Act 9 (Ref. 4B-1)in 2008 which, in part, established residency within the county as a requirement and, in 2010, Act 9 was amended by Act 58 (Ref. 4B-2)which, in part, ensured student involvement by creating a student advisory group.
There are seven members on the Council (Ref. 4B-3). They establish the criteria for qualifying, screening, and forwarding candidates for membership on the UH Board of Regents to the governor of the State of Hawai`i. The Council also advertises pending vacancies and solicits and accepts applications from potential candidates. Furthermore, in 2010, Section 304A-104 of the Hawai‘i Revised Statutes was changed to read that Officers of the Board of Regents will consist of a Chairperson and up to two Vice Chairpersons. The Chairperson and up to two Vice Chairpersons are now elected by the Board at a meeting prior to July 1 of each year. The statute further states that, “Affairs of the university shall be under the general management and control of the Board of Regents” (Ref. 4B-4).

BOR Policy Chapter 9, Part III (Ref. 4B-5, p. 24), addresses recruitment and appointment of Executive and Managerial personnel. The BOR appoints the President of the University and approves other executive appointments, including Vice Presidents, Chancellors, and Deans. BOR Policy Chapter 2 (Ref. 4B-6) details how the BOR evaluates the President. Furthermore, The BOR elects its own officers and hires its own staff. Currently, it has two professional staff members, the BOR Executive Administrator and Secretary and the Executive Assistant, and three secretaries. System administrative staff also provides support to the BOR as needed.


Community college actions requiring Board approval are discussed and acted upon by the full Board at its regular monthly meetings. Meetings are held on all UH System campuses to assure that the Board has a change to visit all campuses within the System. In accordance with the State’s Sunshine Law (Ref. 4B-7),all meetings are public, except those involving discussion of personnel and legal matters. Board of Regents By-Laws and Policies—as well as agenda and minutes of meetings—are publicly available at the BOR website (Ref. 4B-8).
The VPCC remains the principal liaison with the full BOR and the standing Community Colleges Committee on all community college matters. The standing committee met as a separate committee in March, April, and November of 2010 (Community College Committee 2010; Ref. 4B-9), and January 18, 2012. The main agenda items for standing committee meetings were listed as “Campus Issues and Concerns – Information Only and Campus Tour. Within “Issues and Concerns,” the standing committee’s schedule is structured to include an open comment period for the community, meetings with student leaders, faculty leaders, and administration. A report from the standing committee chair to the full BOR was given at the November 19, 2010 BOR meeting.

Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.
IV.B.1.b. The governing board establishes policies consistent with the mission statement to ensure the quality, integrity, and improvement of student learning programs and services and the resources necessary to support them.



Descriptive Summary:


BOR policies are implemented through administrative policies and procedures and delegations of authority published and promulgated by means of the UH System Executive Policies and Administrative Procedures Manual. These documents are available on the Web at http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/apm/sysap.html (Ref. 4B-10). Implementation of BOR policies is the responsibility of the President and the Executive Managerial Team.


The issues of the community colleges are being addressed appropriately by the Board of Regents. The BOR Meeting Agenda and Minutes (Ref. 4B-9) show many agenda items focused on the needs and issues of the community colleges. The BOR practice of meeting at the colleges was designed to give Regents a better understanding of each college’s climate and culture. The Regents have had a long-standing practice of holding its meetings on each of the University’s campuses annually, which is evidenced by the BOR Meeting Agenda and Minutes (Ref. 4B-9).

The UHCC Strategic Plan 2002-2010 was adopted by the BOR on November 22, 2002(Ref. 4B-11). This Plan (Ref. 4B-12) states that within the overall mission of the University of Hawai‘i, the Community Colleges have as their special mission:




  • Access: To broaden access to postsecondary education in Hawai‘i, regionally, and internationally by providing open-door opportunities for students to enter quality educational programs within their own communities.




  • Learning and Teaching: To specialize in the effective teaching of remedial/developmental education, general education, and other introductory liberal arts, pre-professional, and selected baccalaureate courses and programs.




  • Work Force Development: To provide the trained workforce needed in the State, the region, and internationally by offering occupational, technical, and professional courses and programs that prepare students for immediate employment and career advancement.




  • Personal Development: To provide opportunities for personal enrichment, occupational upgrading, and career mobility through credit and non-credit courses and activities.




  • Community Development: To contribute to and stimulate the cultural and intellectual life of the community by providing a forum for the discussion of ideas; by providing leadership, knowledge, problem-solving skills, and general informational services; and by providing opportunities for community members to develop their creativity and appreciate the creative endeavors of others.




  • Diversity: By building upon Hawai‘i’s unique multi-cultural environment and geographic location, through efforts in curriculum development, and productive relationships with international counterparts in Asia and the Pacific, UHCC System students’ learning experiences will prepare them for the global workplace.

In Fall 2006, the interim VPCC filed a letter of intent for the UHCCs to join the national Achieving the Dream (AtD) initiative. Implementation began in July 2006 and will continue through June 2012. A Core Team and a Data Team were set up under the VPCC. Members include an Initiative Director, representatives from each of the community colleges, and staff from the OVPCC.


The five AtD Goals (Ref. 4B-13) for student success focus primarily on success gaps for Native Hawaiian students. Although the UHCC System is focusing on increasing Native Hawaiian student success and achievement, all students benefit from the initiative because of the evidence-based strategies that are being employed. The commitment to these initiatives is evidenced by the inclusion of many AtD goals within the UHCC System and individual college Strategic Plans.

As mentioned above the AtD goals were included when the UHCC System updated the UHCC Strategic Planning Context Appendix A (Ref. 4B-14) and developed Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures 2008-2015 Appendix B (Ref. 4B-15)in 2008. These provide a more uniform method with which to evaluate System progress. Furthermore, in 2008, the UHCC System established the Strategic Planning Council. The roles and responsibilities of this Council are codified in UHCCP 4.101 (Ref. 4B-16). The Council is made up of Chancellors, Faculty Senate Chairs, and Student Body Presidents from each college, and the Vice President and Associate Vice Presidents for the UHCC System.


In Spring 2008, the Strategic Planning Council began to evaluate and report on performance data represented in the UHCC Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures 2008-2015 Appendix B (Ref. 4B-15). The VPCC visited each college to review benchmarks, baseline data, and suggested targets set by the Council. The colleges were asked to review the proposed outcomes and agree to or suggest new targets. Each college had a different starting reference point as well as a different capacity – all of which were taken into account in establishing theUHCC System Outcomes and Performance Measures. Thus, college-level goals and outcomes underlay the System goals and outcomes.
In Fall 2008, the Strategic Planning Council finalized the strategic outcomes, performance measures, definitions, data sources, and expected performance levels before making the results of their work public. This transparency has continued as the OVPCC currently distributes updated Annual Performance Data for the UHCC System as well as the individual colleges in the spring of each year (Ref. 4B-17), and the VPCC holds forums at each college to compare the UHCC System and college-level performance data expressed in these updates. The plans and performance measures align with the UH System Strategic Plan.

Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.1.c. The governing board has ultimate responsibility for educational quality, legal matters, and financial integrity.

Descriptive Summary:

The descriptive summary for Standard IV.B.1.b addressed the BOR’s responsibility for educational quality. Assessment of the strategic planning process is conducted regularly using the Community College Inventory Survey. Survey data are used for determining progress for the following Strategic Plan Performance Measure: “Develop and sustain an institutional environment that promotes transparency, and a culture of evidence that links institutional assessment, planning, resource acquisition, and resource allocation.” The need to assess this measure and to link assessment, planning, and resource allocation was further accentuated when Act 188 was adopted by the 2008 State Legislature. Act 188 established a task force that made recommendations to the governor on a budgetary system that “includes an equitable, consistent, and responsive funding formula for the distribution of fiscal resources to the various University of Hawai‘i campuses.”

One result of ACT 188 was that with the-2007-09 UH System Budget, general funds were appropriated by the Legislature to the University of Hawai‘i Community Colleges (UOH 800) to cover the differential cost (additional net tuition revenue costs) for expanding credit classes required to meet student demand. These general funds are can only be used to defray the cost of additional credit classes. Any funds not used for this specific purpose lapse back into the State general fund at the end of each fiscal year (Ref. 4B-18). Due to declining levels of State funding, it has become necessary to assess each campus a pro rata share of certain unfunded costs that are administered on a System-wide basis. These costs include Risk Management Program costs, including legal settlements; private fundraising costs; and Workers’ Compensation/Unemployment Insurance premiums.
Evidence of the BOR as an independent policy-making body can be traced to a constitutional amendment in 2006 that gave greater autonomy to the University of Hawai‘i. Although the Constitution had previously granted the BOR authority to manage the University, a clause “in accordance with law” had been interpreted to mean that the BOR could not take action unless specific legislation permitted it. The constitutional amendment mentioned above removed that clause (Ref. 4B-19). This increased autonomy guarantees that the University has the right to determine where budgets will be cut or reallocated when state appropriations are reduced.
The budget procedure is as follows. The UH System President prepares a budget that includes all constituencies of the University. After this budget is approved by the BOR, it is submitted to the state legislature. After the legislature appropriates the general funds, there is a System-wide allocation of resources.
The UHCC System allocations are determined through a budget process overseen by the Strategic Planning Council and submitted to the president to include in the larger university budget. The president’s final budget recommendation is then communicated to the Community College Chancellors.

The University System’s Operating and Capital Improvement Projects (CIP) Budget Requests are submitted simultaneously to the Governor for review and incorporated into the Executive Budget Request for the State and to the Legislature for informational purposes after BOR approval. The State’s Executive Budget Request is submitted to the Legislature in December for consideration in the regular session of the Legislature in January. Appropriations by the Legislature are usually passed in May and transmitted to the Governor for approval. In June, after being approved by the governor, allocation notices are transmitted to all state agencies, including any restrictions imposed on Legislative appropriations. The Governor can impose further restrictions at any time of the year based on economic conditions.

Legislative appropriations for operating funds are specifically designated by fund type for major organizational units (UH-Mānoa, UH-Hilo, West O‘ahu, Community Colleges, System-wide Programs, etc.). General fund allocations are made to each major organizational unit less any restrictions imposed by the Governor. The President is authorized to determine distributions of general fund restrictions as well as reallocating between major organizational units. The Vice President for Community Colleges and the Community College Chancellors determine the general fund allocations awarded to individual colleges, normally maintaining established current service funding levels.

Furthermore, external auditors audit the UH System annually. The System’s financial statements are prepared in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards using Government Accounting Standards (GASB) principles. In July 2005, the ACCJC accepted “…the presentation of a combined balance sheet and income statement of the community college system as supplemental information to the University’s consolidated financial statements with an opinion on such supplemental information in relation to the University’s consolidated financial statements taken as a whole …” as documentation that the UHCC System met its audit requirements .




Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.1.d. The institution or the governing board publishes the board bylaws and policies specifying the board’s size, duties, responsibilities, structure, and operating procedures.

Descriptive Summary:

The BOR maintains a website (Ref. 4B-8)on which the by-laws, policies, and meeting minutes are regularly posted. All of the policies mentioned in this Standard are published on this site.



Self Evaluation:

The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:

None.


IV.B.1.e. The governing board acts in a manner consistent with its policies and bylaws. The board regularly evaluates its policies and practices and revises them as necessary.

Descriptive Summary:

As mentioned in Standard IV.B.1.a., community college actions requiring Board approval are discussed and acted upon by the full Board at its regular monthly meetings. Meetings are held on all UH System campuses to assure that the Board has a change to visit all campuses within the System. In accordance with the State’s Sunshine Law (Ref. 4B-7), all meetings are public, except those involving discussion of personnel and legal matters. Board of Regents By-Laws and Policies—as well as agenda and minutes of meetings—are publicly available at the BOR website (Ref. 4B-8).


During 2010/2011, the BOR initiated and completed a review of all BOR policies to ensure they followed best practices. These revisions were intended to remedy the following three areas: “readily apparent changes that are long overdue; convert prescriptive statements to broader policy statements; and propose delegations of authority to enhance operational efficiency and effectiveness.” Vice Presidents were assigned specific chapters for review and revision (Ref. 4B-20). The UH System All-Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs (ACCFSC; Ref. 4B-21) was advised about the proposed revisions via a Memo from the BOR Chair on February 3, 2011.
At the February 25, 2011 (Ref. 4B- 22), ACCFSC meeting, concern was raised about the short turn-around time for faculty consultation. In response to the request by the ACCFSC co-chair to the BOR, the deadline for feedback was extended. Individual college senates reviewed the proposed changes, and sent faculty feedback to the ACCFSC co-chairs. The proposed changes to BOR Policies, Chapters 1-8 and 10-12, were approved by the BOR on March 17, 2011. Language clarification and additional changes occurred at the BOR meeting (Ref. 4B-23) on April, 21, 2011 for Chapters 1-8 and 10-12. An in-depth discussion of Chapter 9 also occurred, and all revisions were approved.

Additionally, BOR Policy on Board Self Evaluation (Ref. 4B-6, Section 2-4b)requires that the BOR conduct a Self Study of its stewardship every two years. From minutes available from the Briefing and Workshop conducted by WASC executives (Ref. 4B-24) and the BOR Briefings and Workshop on Best Practices by the Association of Governing Board’s Dr. MacTaggart (Ref. 4B-20), the BOR has complied with this policy. Another Briefing and Workshop on Best Practices was conducted by Dr. MacTaggart on September 29, 2011, but those minutes are not yet available.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:

None.


IV.B.1.f. The governing board has a program for board development and new member orientation. It has a mechanism for providing for continuity of board membership and staggered terms of office.

Descriptive Summary:


Governance of the UH System is vested in a fifteen-member Board of Regents (BOR) who are confirmed by the State Senate after being nominated by the Governor from a list prepared by the Regents Selection Advisory Committee. Hawai‘i Revised Statutes§304A-104 (Ref. 4B-4) sets the term of office for Regents as five years except for the student member whose term is two years. The statute provides for staggered terms. Every member may serve beyond the expiration date of the appointment until a successor has been appointed by the governor and confirmed by the senate. Members may serve no more than two consecutive five-year terms.

The President facilitates an annual briefing and workshop on Best Practices for all Regents (conducted by Association Governing Boards; Ref. 4B-20). New Regent Orientation has been conducted by the UH Executive Vice President/Provost of Academic Planning and Policy. Orientations were conducted on August 24, 2010, May 20, 2011, and September 21, 2011. At the BOR meeting on February 23, 2012 (Ref. 4B-25), changes to BOR By-laws were adopted that reflect the Board’s obligation to conduct timely orientations for new members. The action is reflected in the March 2012 BOR minutes (Ref. 4B-26). The University has developed the Board of Regents’ Reference Guide (Ref. 4B-27)as the foundation. An updated copy was released May 2011.


Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.1.g. The governing board’s Self Evaluation processes for assessing board performance are clearly defined, implemented, and published in its policies or bylaws.

Descriptive Summary:


The BOR Policy on Board Self Evaluation (Ref. 4B-6, Section 2-4) details the purpose, policy, responsibility, process, and outcomes for the BOR Self Evaluation. As discussed in more detail in Standard IV.B.1.e above, the BOR has complied with this policy through a series of Workshops and Briefings on Best Practices.



Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.1.h. The governing board has a code of ethics that includes a clearly defined policy for dealing with behavior that violates its code.


Descriptive Summary:


BOR Policy, Article X (Ref. 4B-28, p. 11), and HRS Chapter 84 (Ref. 4B-29)address the BOR’s stated process for dealing with unethical behavior.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.1.i. The governing board is informed about and involved in the accreditation process.

Descriptive Summary:


Accreditation is part of the training for new BOR members (Ref. 4B-27). The Vice President for Community Colleges (VPCC) keeps the BOR informed about the accreditation process. The BOR meeting minutes from April 1, 2010, evidence a three-hour workshop presented by the WASC president/executive director and the ACCJC president.


The OVPCC coordinates the schedule of college Self Evaluations submitted to the BOR. In the past, the BOR has approved the Self Evaluations at their August or September meeting August 24-25, 2006 (Ref. 4B-30). However, since the Team Visit is scheduled for October 15-20, 2012, and copies of the self evaluation are due to the Team and ACCJC on August 15, 2012, the BOR will approve the Self Evaluations for all six ACCJC affiliated college’s when they meet in July 2012.

Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.1.j. The governing board has the responsibility for selecting and evaluating the district/system chief administrator (most often known as the chancellor) in a multi-college district/system or the college chief administrator (most often known as the president) in the case of a single college. The governing board delegates full responsibility and authority to him/her to implement and administer board policies without board interference and holds him/her accountable for the operation of the district/system or college, respectively.

In multi-college districts/systems, the governing board establishes a clearly defined policy for selecting and evaluating the presidents of the colleges.

Descriptive Summary:

Within the time frame of this Self Evaluation, the University completed successful searches for two Community College Chancellors and the president of the UH System. BOR policies and procedures were followed in conducting the searches. According to Chapter 2 (Ref. 4B-6) of the BOR By-laws on Administration (Ref. 4B-6), the UH System President has full responsibility and authority for execution of the policies authorized and established by the BOR, and will be evaluated by the Board.


On August 1, 2009, Dr. M.R.C. Greenwood became the 14th president of the University of Hawai‘i. Dr. Greenwood previously served as Chancellor of the University of California, Santa Cruz and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs within the University of California System. During her tenure with the UC System, Dr. Greenwood had close working relationships with area community colleges and is very familiar with WASC and its accrediting requirements.
Dr. Greenwood highlighted the work of the UH Community Colleges in her inaugural speeches focusing on both the extraordinary enrollment increases and the emphasis that the community colleges have placed on student success through the Achieving the Dream (AtD) and the National Association of System Heads (NASH) Access to Success initiatives. She is firmly committed to establishing measurable outcomes and effective planning and budgeting to reach those decisions.
One of the System-wide initiatives initiated by Dr. Greenwood was the Hawai‘i Graduation Initiative, which increases the number of college degrees awarded by System colleges by 25 percent by 2015. Hawai‘i along with another 16 other states form the Complete College Alliance, a group committed to significantly increasing the number of students successfully completing college and closing attainment gaps for traditionally underserved populations. As part of the initiative, the UH System president coordinates local initiatives within the Complete College America agenda with a team of leaders, that includes the VPCC; the President of Chaminade University; the Director of Hawai‘i Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT); the Chairs of the Hawai‘i State Senate and House of Representatives Committees on Higher Education; the Superintendent of Schools, Hawai‘i Department of Education (HI DOE); the Executive Director of the Hawai‘i Workforce Development Council; and the Executive Director of Hawai‘i P-20. Minutes (Ref. 4B-20) from the BOR January 20, 2011, show approval of the President’s goals and the extension of the President’s contract with the UH System.

The current UHCC organizational structure is the result of a June 2005 BOR approved reorganization (Ref. 4B-31)of the community colleges that included the re-establishing of the VPCC position. The VPCC is responsible for executive leadership, policy decision-making, resource allocation, and development of appropriate support services for the seven community colleges. The reorganization also consolidated the academic and administrative support units for community colleges under the VPCC.


The reorganization also created a dual reporting relationship whereby the Community College Chancellors report to the VPCC as the Council of Community College Chancellors for leadership and coordination of community college matters, and concurrently to the UH System President as the Council of Chancellors for System-wide policymaking and decisions impacting the campuses. This dual reporting relationship preserves a previous BOR action that promoted and facilitated campus autonomy in balance with System-wide academic and administrative functions and operations. College Chancellors retain responsibility and control over campus operations, administration, and management.
As mentioned above, the UHCC System is led by the VPCC. The VPCC is approved by the BOR, but the position is evaluated by the President of the UH System. The Board also approves the appointment of each college Chancellor who is evaluated by the VPCC and the UH System president. At present, there are no immediate plans to change the current organizational UHCC System structure.


Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.2. The president has primary responsibility for the quality of the institution he/she leads. He/she provides effective leadership in planning, organizing, budgeting, selecting and developing personnel, and assessing institutional effectiveness.

Descriptive Summary:


An effective governance structure includes clear lines of authority that are ultimately consolidated in the Chief Executive. The organization at Windward Community College combines three primary levels: the College, the OVPCC office, and the UH System as a whole. As indicated by the organization chart (Ref. 4B-32), within Windward Community College, authority ultimately resides with the Chancellor. Beyond the College, authority resides in the Vice-President of Community Colleges (VPCC), the President of the UH System, and ultimately to the UH Board of Regents.

The Chancellor, as the leader of the College, provides effective leadership for the College as evidenced by the effectiveness of the College budget, the learning outcomes and academic achievements of the students, and the overall coherence of the College. Oversight over the education and resource planning process is discussed under Standard IV.B.2.b. The Chancellor’s relationship to the budgeting process is also discussed in Standard IV.B.2.b.

The Chancellor’s role as the leader of the College is tied to the overall quality of the communication and governance systems in the College. He is ultimately responsible for the information systems in the College, such as the website, and ensures that committees and other elements of the governance structure operate effectively.

IV.B.2.a. The president plans, oversees, and evaluates an administrative structure organized and staffed to reflect the institution's purposes, size, and complexity. He/she delegates authority to administrators and others consistent with their responsibilities, as appropriate.

Descriptive Summary:


In a discussion draft of organizational principles, the VPCC states, “by accreditation standards and to remain effective, the Chancellors of each community college must have the authority to operate as the CEO with full responsibility and authority for the operation of their College, within the framework of University and Community College system policies.” The Office of the Chancellor is responsible for the orderly and proper functioning of Windward Community College. The Office is also responsible for directing all aspects of the administration and development of the College in order that the College fulfills its mission. Furthermore, the Chancellor delegates authority to campus administrators and others consistent with their responsibilities.


Windward CC’s Chancellor has demonstrated the ability to appropriately delegate duties and responsibilities. His Executive Staff is ready, willing, and able to provide the management and leadership to operate their respective areas. Windward CC’s Chancellor’s experience and understanding of college operations allows him to exercise his authority to get the job done. He respects the roles of the members of the Administrative Team and has delegated authority appropriately. Furthermore, the Chancellor appropriately has delegated more authority to the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs to operate the programs consistent with the ordinary requirements for reporting and requesting authority when an action may be beyond the ordinary scope of the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs’ authority.

The Chancellor’s Evaluation of the Administrative Structure
The administrative structure is evaluated in relation to the functional roles that each element plays in the structure. Functional diagrams for each administrative unit of the College may be found in the Organization Charts updated on July 1, 2011, which are also located online at http://Windward CC.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2011/WINDWARD CC_Organization_Charts_2011.pdf (Ref. 4B-32) and in the Introduction of this report.

360° Evaluations

360° Evaluations (Ref. 4B-33) are administered by the UH System and are personal and private performance evaluations. The results are shared only between the staff member and the immediate supervisor. The evaluations are used by the Chancellor to evaluate his administrative staff. These are done online and each person is contacted by e-mail to participate. After the evaluations are completed, the Chancellor reviews the results and meets with each person and discusses what they are doing well and what needs to be improved. Among other uses, these evaluations are taken into account for recommendations for salary adjustments.
All members of the Administration Staff participate in 360° evaluations. Each administrator identifies ten or more peers from the administration ranks anywhere in the System, ten or more subordinates from the College, and at least 50 constituents from the College. Those surveyed include all faculty and staff who report to the administrator, as well as some who may be outside the administrator's jurisdiction. The Chancellor then discusses the results with administrators, identifies areas for improvement and compares this year results with the previous years to gauge progress or lack thereof.
The Chancellor uses the 360° Evaluations to write an evaluation of the administrators who directly report to him, this evaluation is then submitted to the VPCC and the UH System President with a rating of the administrator’s work. The Chancellor's own 360° goes to the VPCC for analysis, discussion, and review to produce a rating of the Chancellor during a face-to-face evaluation session with the VPCC and the UH President.

The Chancellor also meets with the VPCC and UH System President on an annual basis to review the results of his own 360° review. They work together to interpret this information and discuss other issues not addressed through the 360°, including those that pertain to the Chancellor's functions in the college's administrative structure.




College Governance Surveys (GSIEC)

College Governance Surveys (GSIEC; Ref. 4B-34) are campus-wide surveys of governance and decision-making structures. The surveys are open to all faculty and staff on campus and are carried out by a sub-committee of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC). Chairs of committees and responsible parties for the administration offices interpret those results and determine what steps they need to take to address the more serious concerns expressed through the GSIEC survey process. The GSIEC web page provides information on survey results and any responses that have been made. The Chancellor's primary role is to ensure that people respond to the results of the surveys by setting targets.

In 2011, an external report (Ref. 4B-35) was requested from an evaluator, David Mongold, to consider the effectiveness of the Governance Survey and to suggest changes. In March, 2012, an ad hoc sub-committee of the IEC reviewed the recommendations and suggested how the College could improve the survey mechanism. The suggestions were approved by the IEC via an e-mail vote, and blessed by the Faculty Senate at its April 17, 2012, meeting.



The Chancellor’s Identification and Communication of Challenges to the College

The identification and response to challenges is based on fostering an open, transparent, and proactive communication system where some groups have a formal responsibility and other groups and people have an informal, but often encouraged, ability to identify challenges. The College likewise has a formal and informal system to produce solutions to those challenges, whether through the committee structure, the College's discussion board, or informal conversations with stakeholders. Evidence of this communicative system can be found in the committee structure, program reviews, and the use of communication technologies such as e-mail and an electronic discussion board.

Interactions with College Committees

Challenges that the College faces are identified and addressed primarily through the committee structure, which allows College concerns to be transmitted to the appropriate governance channels. In addition to formal interactions, the Chancellor's door is open to all students, staff, and faculty.

Faculty Senate

The Faculty Senate (Ref. 4B-36) provides formal faculty involvement in educational decision-making, academic policy, and program development to ensure that quality education is provided, preserved, and improved at Windward CC and in the UH System. Challenges, specifically those connected to education and academic policy, are often brought up by the Senate and transmitted directly to the Chancellor through a weekly meeting with the Senate Executive Officers. After every Faculty Senate meeting, the Senate Executive Officers meet with the Chancellor to update him on faculty concerns and initiatives. Given the scope of the Faculty Senate, much of this feedback is informal and expressed in terms of recommendations and requests.


Chancellor's Administrative Staff

The Chancellor’s Administrative Staff (Ref. 4B-37), including the Vice Chancellors of Academic Affairs, Administrative Affairs, and Student Affairs, the Deans of Academic Affairs, and the Interim Director of Career and Community Education, meets weekly to report on and discuss issues related to the College and the UH System. In this way, challenges in one area of the College are brought to the attention of other units and discussed in a broader group.


Planning and Budget Council (PBC)

The PBC is the chief body through which Program and Unit Reviews are collegially reviewed and prioritized giving the Chancellor guidance on what direction the College should take. The PBC is the chief collegial governance body on campus that advises the Chancellor on long-range objectives that satisfy the goals of Windward CC’s Strategic Plan. Likewise, it evaluates budgetary concerns drawn from Program and Unit Reviews to propose Program Change Requests (PCRs) that first go to the OVPCC before going to the UH System President, and finally to the Legislature requesting general funds from the State as described in Standard IV.B.1.c above. PCRs can include everything from new faculty and staff positions, all the way to additional budgetary support for new positions, new equipment, and new or renovated facilities. The PBC also prioritizes all equipment and Capital Improvement Requests so the Chancellor has a pulse of the needs of the campus.


Master Planning and Space Allocation Committee (MaPSAC)

MaPSAC (Ref. 4B-38) is an advisory committee whose membership broadly represents the campus. The committee’s directives are explained in the Standard III.B of this document. MaPSAC reviews the use of space on the campus and makes its recommendations to the Chancellor concerning any significant changes to building or space use. Requests for buildings and space must comply with the College's Mission and Strategic Plan.

Aesthetics Committee

The Aesthetics Committee (Ref. 2B-39) is an advisory body that works in conjunction with MaPSAC, but is focused on aesthetic concerns rather than space. Recommendations are provided to the Chancellor and the College regarding the aesthetic elements of the campus, including the appearance of buildings, the College’s landscape, and the signage. As discussed in Standard III.B, the Aesthetics Committee has been allocated additional responsibilities by the Chancellor.


Student Senate

The student government (Ref. 4B-40)is encouraged to bring forth concerns about the College to the Chancellor through the Student Life Coordinator, who is the faculty liaison between the students and the institution. Many Student Senate representatives serve on various College committees. Therefore, they have a significant voice in College decision-making.


Department and Staff Meetings

Typically, the Chancellor does not attend departmental meetings except when invited or when a major announcement must be made. Developments of departmental and staff meetings are reported to the Chancellor via the Vice Chancellors and through minutes that are posted on the web. Any issues that come up are also reported at the Administrative Staff Meetings.


Program and Unit Reviews

Programs and units produce Annual Reports that include a discussion of challenges and possible solutions. Every five years, programs and units are responsible for doing a more in depth longitudinal analysis to foster sustainable, continuous improvement. More information can be found at http://Windward CC.hawaii.edu/Assessment/ (Ref. 4B-41).


Discussion Board

Inspired by the quality and functionality of the Faculty Senate’s New Initiatives Forum, the College's Discussion Board allows proposals to be transmitted to the College for discussion and feedback. More information can be found athttp://Windward CC.hawaii.edu/Discussions (Ref. 4B-42).


College Ambassadors

The Windward CC Ambassadors, a group of community members, meet bi-monthly. Programs and initiatives in need of support are presented to the group and the Ambassadors in turn provide feedback on where funding might be secured as well as making introductions of prominent community members to the Chancellor as part of the “friend raising leads to fund raising” nexus.


Meetings with other units in the UH System

The Chancellor, his administrative staff, and faculty attend meetings at the UHCC and UH System-level. The Chancellor attends monthly meetings of the Council of Community College Chancellors as well as monthly meetings of the Council of Chancellors and Vice Presidents. There are also monthly meetings for all Vice Chancellors of Academic Affairs and Vice Chancellors of Student Affairs. Additionally there are monthly meetings with System-level Faculty Senate personnel. All of these groups offer places where external and System-wide challenges can be identified and discussed.


Interactions with Faculty, Staff, Students, Parents, Community Groups

As with people who are part of the College, the Chancellor is accessible to members of the community. Appointments to meet with the Chancellor can be made simply by calling his office.

Meetings with State Legislators

The Chancellor frequently meets with Hawai‘i State legislators, which allows him to identify significant external challenges to the College such as those connected to the State's budget, education policy, and other legislation. When the legislature is in session, the Chancellor and others will meet with the local representatives or attend legislative hearings to deliver testimony as appropriate.


Community Groups

The Chancellor regularly attends meetings of community groups such as the Kāne`ohe Business Group (Ref. 4B-43), the Kailua Chamber of Commerce (Ref. 4B-44), Hawai`i Council for the Humanities (Ref. 4B-45), Aloha United Way (Ref. 4B-46), Rotary (Ref. 4B-47), and the Kāne`ohe Neighborhood Board (Ref. 4B-48).He is a Board member on the Kailua Chamber of Commerce and the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities and also a Steering Committee member for the Aloha United Way.


Delegation of Authority

In addition to evaluating the College, the Chancellor also delegates authority in appropriate and effective ways. The organization chart (Ref. 4B-32)reflects the formal authority structure of the College which divides the primary College functions into Academic, Administrative, Student Affairs, and Career and Community Education. Authority is further delegated within each aspect of the College to the administrator for each unit.


Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.2.b. The Chancellor guides institutional improvement of the teaching and learning environment by the following: 1) establishing a collegial process that sets values, goals, and priorities; 2) ensuring that evaluation and planning rely on high quality research and analysis on external and internal conditions; 3) ensuring that educational planning is integrated with resources planning and distribution to achieve student learning outcomes; and 4) establishing procedures to evaluate overall institutional planning and implementation efforts.

Descriptive Summary:


Windward CC has a systematic process of assessment, program review, strategic planning, and budget allocation. The Chancellor connects institutional, program, and course assessment to the Strategic Plan, Mission, and goals of the College and the UH and UHCC Systems. He takes a “hands-on” approach to assessment to ensure institutional improvement. He provides feedback to Department Chairs on SLO assessment and requests a more in-depth analysis as needed. The Chancellor also requires that all requests for resources and personnel be supported with data linked to improving the teaching and learning environment. When making planning and budgeting decisions, the Chancellor aligns decision-making with the UH System and UHCC Strategic Plans and the Windward CC’s Mission and goals.

In an interview with the Standard IV.B Self Evaluation Sub-Committee, the Chancellor indicated that the College is performing adequately in assessing SLOs at the course-level. According to the timeline set in 2004, 20 percent of the courses in each department are assessed each year. Therefore, all courses taught at the College are assessed in a five-year cycle. All courses have been mapped to both program (AA degree) SLOs and institutional (General Education) SLOs; therefore, when assessing course SLOs, faculty were also implicitly assessing program and institutional SLOs. As of Spring 2012, a more explicit assessment of program and institutional SLOs has occurred as described in Standard II.A.c above. Additionally, as convener of the Planning and Budget Committee (PBC), the Chancellor ensures

that the departments link Course-level SLO Assessment to Departmental Budgetary Requests. For example, departments requesting an increase in Supplemental Instruction must now support their requests with SLO assessment data.


Moreover, the Chancellor has encouraged the College to embrace the value of external validation. With external evaluation, student work is also evaluated by other faculty outside of the College or the department of the course the student is being assessed in using an established rubric to validate the internal assessments. The planning for institutionalizing external validation is part of the current College push to expand the assessment of SLOs.
An example of the Chancellor’s commitment to a collegial process is in his vision statement (Ref. 4B-49) to the Planning and Budget Council in October 2011. The paper created the basis for a campus-wide discussion regarding the future direction of the College. Another example of his commitment to a collegial process is his creation of task forces to consider the College’s educational goals.
In Summer 2011, the Chancellor convened a General Education Task Force to identify General Education Outcomes (GE SLOs). This committee established four General Education themes with associated outcome measures as compared with the ten outcomes established in 2004. Additionally, the Chancellor established an “AA SLO Task Force” in Fall 2011 to identify SLOs and Assessment tools for the Associate of Arts degree (Ref. 4B-50). The AA SLOs have gone through the curriculum adoption process and were accepted by the CCAAC and the Faculty Senate in April 2012.

The Chancellor also has encouraged a closer connection between teaching, resource planning, and student learning through campus-wide trainings and modifications to the committee structure. An example of his commitment to the assessment process is that a portion of each Convocation (Ref. 4B-51) has been devoted to assessment workshops designed to help faculty analyze data and connect assessment to Program Review, SLOs, Strategic Planning, and Budgeting.

According to the Chancellor, strategic planning for the College typically occurs at the UH System-level. Institutional planning, however, takes place locally via the Planning and Budget Council (PBC), and appropriate decisions are communicated to external entities. When the current Strategic Plan matures in 2015, the Chancellor encourages the PBC to sponsor a broader effort to determine the future direction of the College.

The Office of Planning and Program Evaluation was established in December 2007 to provide comprehensive support services to the faculty, staff, and administration for planning, research, accreditation, and assessment. The Director of this office convenes the Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) and is the Accreditation Liaison Officer (ALO) for the College. An additional function of the office is to improve the communication between elements of the College. The Office has been very active on campus; and its effectiveness has been assessed in the 2011 Institutional Surveys and three iterations of the GSIEC Surveys.


Additionally, each unit is required to submit a comprehensive Program Review every five years. The PBC reviews every Annual Assessment and Program Review and prioritizes budget requests for equipment, supplies, and positions based on the needs of the College. Budget requests are linked to the Strategic Plan, Annual Assessment and Five-Year Program Review, and the Mission and goals of the College (Ref. 4B-52).
The Chancellor submits an Annual Report to the Vice President for Community Colleges (VPCC) indicating the performance (Ref. 4B-53)of the College in meeting the Windward CC and UHCC System Strategic Plan Objectives. In preparing his report, the Chancellor draws on data from sources throughout the College, and is thus able to create a comprehensive sense of how the College is doing. For instance, according to the Chancellor in using Achieving the Dream (AtD) data, it is evident that the College meets AtD requirements, particularly in regards to increasing the enrollment, persistence, and graduation rate of Native Hawaiian students.
Further evidence of the Chancellor’s role in the improvement of the teaching and learning environment at the College is that he has given assign time to Department Chairs for the added responsibility of overseeing learning outcome assessment in their respective departments. The Department Chairs have become an integral part of the assessment process in part through their participation on the Institutional Effectiveness Committee.

Self Evaluation:

The College meets the standard.



Planning Agenda:

The Chancellor will develop more explicit training to help department chairs to lead departmental analysis and application of learning outcomes assessment as part of the planning and budget process.

IV.B.2.c. The president assures the implementation of statutes, regulations, and governing board policies and assures that institutional practices are consistent with institutional mission and policies.

Descriptive Summary:

The College's Mission Statement was revised in 2010 through the work of the Mission, Vision and Core Values Committee (Ref. 4B-54). The current mission is posted in classrooms, on class syllabi, and on the College's Website at http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC (Ref. 4B-55). The mission serves as a shared reference point for all College activities.

Furthermore, the Chancellor meets directly with his executive staff every week in the Chancellor’s Administrative Staff meeting (Ref. 4B-37). These meetings focus on events and issues relevant to the campus such as: the Accreditation Self Evaluation, the Title III Grant, agenda items for Convocation, facility renovation plans, etc. At these meetings, the Chancellor also informs the group of System-wide matters such as the impact of State budget cuts on the System and how Windward CC is affected. Subsequently, these meetings afford the Chancellor an opportunity to hear about issues related to College policies and to discuss possible responses.

The Chancellor also holds bi-weekly, one-on-one meetings with the staff under his immediate supervision: the Directors of Marketing and Public Relations, Institutional Research, Planning and Program Evaluation, the Vice-Chancellors of Academic Affairs, Administrative Services and Student Affairs, and the Director of the Office of Career and Community Education. These meetings are used as an opportunity for these officials to raise issues that need to be addressed, and for the Chancellor to ensure that all units under his control are functioning properly.

Implementation of the College’s Mission is assured through Planning and Budget Council deliberations. Budget requests to the Council include a narrative section where the request is tied to the College's Mission, Strategic Plan, and relevant SLO assessment. In situations where non-compliance is indicated, the Chancellor implements a prescribed practice and works with the individual(s) to resolve any issues.

Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.2.d. The president effectively controls budget and expenditures.

Descriptive Summary:


The effective control of budget and expenditures at Windward CC is largely the result of authority delegated to the Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services and to the Fiscal Officer. The Chancellor’s oversight in this process is based on his supervision of people in these positions and on the procedures and committees tied to the budget and expenditure process.

The Chancellor delegates minor budget decisions to other administrators. Minor departmental expenditures that occur within the established budget, for instance, are authorized by the appropriate Dean of Academic Affairs, while larger instructional purchases are authorized by the Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs. Effective oversight in these instances occurs within the context of broader budget allocations tied to the specific goals of the office. The Chancellor is, thus, not overly burdened with minor decisions and can focus on exerting a broader oversight of the budget.


The Use of the College Website

The College presents the budget information in an open and coherent way both in the Program Reviews and on the College’s website. There is an assessment page (Ref. 4B-41) that consolidates assessment documents. The College also has a Budget webpage (Ref. 4B-56) that provides an overview of the College’s budget and budget-related policies.


Program Review Process

The Program Review process (Ref. 4B-57)at Windward CC involves the departments and other units of the College consolidating data and reports on programs and disciplines. The primary data for budget discussions is located in the Annual Unit and five-year Program Reviews, which are based on data provided by the Institutional Research Office (OIR; Ref. 4B-58)and other sources as appropriate. A Program Review and Annual Assessment Template has been constructed by the UHCC Office of Academic Programs, Academic Policy and Assessment (APAPA) with input from the campus.

These reviews include requests for funds that become the basis for the budget and planning process. All Departmental Reports, Annual Reviews, and Five-Year Comprehensive Program Reviews are posted on the College's Assessment page (Ref. 4B-59) and copies are sent to appropriate administrators. The Chancellor reads the final versions, which then form the basis for subsequent discussions for funding at Planning and Budget Council meetings.




Planning and Budget Council (PBC)

One way that the Chancellor effectively controls the College’s budget and expenditures is by convening thePBC. The PBC is a large, broadly representative group of campus faculty, staff, and students that was created in November, 2009 when the Strategic Planning Committee and the Budget Committee were merged due to the Chancellor’s evaluation of the GSIEC surveys showing a duplication of responsibilities and representation. The impetus behind this merger was to increase the connection between budgetary decisions and the College’s strategic planning process. According to the directives the Council reviews, “…all program reviews and annual assessments to prioritize items for budget consideration and for modifying the Strategic Plan” (Ref. 4B-60).

Budget requests must be included in Annual Reports and must be justified in terms of evidence and program need. Moreover, offices, departments, and programs must prioritize their requests as part of their initial submission to the Council. SLO assessment and data provided by the Institutional Research Office (OIR) is used to justify budget requests. Requestors not on the Council are also able to present their case when their request is heard.

In 2011, a rubric (Ref. 4B-61)was adopted by the PBC that included measures on how budget requests were connected to the College’s priorities, whether the request was supported by evidence of need, and how much impact the request would have on the College. Therefore, during the Council’s deliberation process, budget requests are ranked and advice offered to the Chancellor is finalized. The Policy Review and Budget Process, thus, creates a framework where the results of Program Reviews are aligned to resource allocation.

Given the nature of budget allocation for the College described above, the Chancellor’s control over the budget must exist within a funding context where the budget can be reduced or increased at any time and for reasons that were not part of the Council’s deliberation. Effective control, then, has meant combining well-discussed recommendations from the Council with the ability to respond flexibly to changing funding situations. The College's annual operational expenditure plan (budget) is also reviewed by the PBC and posted on the Budget Website (Ref. 4B-56).




Monitoring Expenditures

The College tracks expenditures through the use of an Operational Expenditure Plan (OEP). The OEP is essentially the College’s operating budget for a given fiscal year, July 1-June 30. The OEP identifies sources of income and planned expenditures for the fiscal year. For Windward CC, sources of income are derived from General Funds (GF), Tuition and Fees Special Funds (TFSF), and Research and Training Revolving Funds (RTRF)—more commonly known as the return of indirect cost from contracts and grants. Expenditures are categorized by personnel or payroll costs, and other current expenditures. Personnel costs are broken down further by types of employees. Other current expenditures include, but are not limited to, electricity, water, equipment maintenance, educational and office supplies, software licenses, training fees, airfare, consultant services, travel, janitorial supplies, computers, and equipment. The College further allocates planned expenditures by Program Area (e.g. Instruction, Academic Support, Student Affairs, Career and Continuing Education, and Institutional Support). As part of a general commitment to fiscal responsibility, the College aims at a balanced budget and avoids deficit spending. The College has reserves set aside as described in Standard III.D in the event of emergency.

Printed Budget Status Report summaries are provided to the Chancellor by the Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services upon request. Data can also be obtained online via the University’s Financial Management Information System (FMIS). The current FMIS system will be replaced with the Kuali Financial System on July 1, 2012 as described in Standard III.D above.

Through the Planning and Budget Council, the Chancellor is aware of what programs are planning to do with their allocated funds. The Chancellor’s secretary has access to the College’s FMIS information, and can produce allocations and account status reports at any time. Budget Status Reports are also provided by the Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services for the Chancellor’s review and information.
The Business Office (Ref. 4B-62) and in particular the Fiscal Officer, is responsible for ensuring that the expenditures follow State and University policies and procedures. Significant issues are reported to the Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services and, if necessary, to the Chancellor. Given the formal structure of the accounting system, problems of this nature do not happen on campus. The primary issues are minor concerns related to compliance with purchasing rules, especially related to grants.

In sum, there is improved budget process transparency when compared with previous systems. The system is more open, the input is more varied, and the documentation is more comprehensive. In the previous budget process, it became clear that the budget requests considered by the PBC should be vetted more effectively. That is, minor budget requests should be delegated to the appropriate campus office or unit so that the Council can focus on larger planning and budgeting issues.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


The IEC will re-evaluate appropriate data to be collected and included in Departmental Reports and Unit Reviews to provide standardized data elements for subsequent budgetary and other recommendations.

The Office of Planning and Program Evaluation will formulate a process for posting assessment and budget documents on the web to ensure that they can be easily found.

IV.B.2.e. The Chancellor works and communicates effectively with the communities served by the institution.



Descriptive Summary:


The Chancellor’s effort to reach out to organizations on the Windward side of O‘ahu is important for Windward CC, because our mission is to provide the communities we serve with liberal arts, career, and lifelong learning. The Chancellor’s efforts mean that opportunities offered at the College are better known in the community and that the community’s needs are better represented by the College.

The College also has taken the lead in supporting the Hakipu‘u Charter School as it searches for a temporary campus after its ouster from the State Hospital property adjoining the Windward CC campus. Windward CC is allowing the charter school to use cottages on Windward CC property that were recently turned over to the College from the State Hospital. According to the Chancellor (Ref. 4B-63), providing this support to a fellow educational institution in distress is a meaningful way of supporting a source of students for the dual credit program known as Running Start. Although the Charter School is small, several graduating students each year matriculate at Windward CC.

The Chancellor indicated in an interview (Ref. 4B-63) with the Standard IV.B Self Evaluation team that he has spent much time and effort in developing and enhancing relationships and connections with community organizations, specific client groups served by the College, and significant leaders in the community. He cited his efforts to reach out to the community by working with and meeting with organizations such as:




  • Department of Education (DOE) K-12: Windward CC encourages partnerships for Environmental Studies and connects K-12 school students with science and higher education through the Hōkūlani Imaginarium, NASA Flight Training Center, Lanihuli Observatory and the Aerospace Exploration Lab.




  • DOE Community School for Adults (Ref. 4B-64): Windward CC is one of the DOE’s unique sites and services on the Windward Coast for adult learners.




  • Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities Board Member: The Windward CC Chancellor has been selected as a member of the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities Board of Directors as of October 22, 2010, for a three-year term.




  • Hawai‘i Job Corps Center (Ref. 4B-65, p. 3): Waimānalo: Assists Windward CC Waimānalo Extension Program.




  • Hawai‘iLiteracy’s Run and Read Program (Ref. 4B-66): Star Poets is part of the Run and Read event at Windward CC.




  • Kailua Chamber of Commerce: The Windward CC Chancellor has been a member since 2011, and selected as a member of the Board of Directors in January 2012, which provides opportunities for Windward CC to publicize events, programs and achievements to the Chamber.




  • Kāne‘ohe Business Group: Co-coordinates the Windward Ho‘olaule‘a (Ref. 4B-67), as well as offering ascholarshiptoWindward CCstudents who are planning a career in the field of business, nursing, or education (Ref. 4B-68).




  • Kāne‘ohe Marine Corps Base: One of the participating employers at the Windward CC College and Career Fair (Ref. 4B-69).




  • Kāne‘ohe Neighborhood Board: Windward CC requested a regular reporting slot on their agenda (Ref. 4B-70).




  • State Hospital Community Advisory Board Member: The Windward CC Chancellor attends a Community Advisory Board meeting that discusses State Hospital issues as the State Hospital is one of the College’s closest neighbors (Ref. 4B-71).




  • Windward Arts Council: The Council supports Windward CC’s Star Poets Project (Ref. 4B-72) and gives the Golden Plover Awards annually for excellent writing by a writer in Rain Bird (Ref. 4B-73), Windward CC’s annual literary and art journal.




  • Windward Ho‘olaule‘a Committee: The Windward CC Chancellor is on the committee that organizes the Windward Ho‘olaule‘a (Ref. 4B-74).




  • Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities: The Council collaborates with the College on the Star Poets Project (Ref. 4B-72).




  • Aloha United Way Steering Committee (Ref. 4B-46): The Chancellor is on the Steering Committee that supports the annual O‘ahu Aloha United Way campaign.

Campus facilities such as the Palikū Theater, Gallery ‘Iolani, and the Imaginarium have served as popular venues to attract community members to the campus. In addition, the meeting rooms in Hale ‘Ākoakoa have been used by numerous community groups and non-profit agencies for meetings and gatherings at affordable rates. Community-based committees (including Friends of Lanihuli, Friends of WCC and Kokua Palikū) support the above-related activities. These efforts are important for Windward CC because, again, our mission is to provide the communities we serve with liberal arts, career and lifelong learning.

A new effort to enhance the educational relationship with communities was the addition of the Lanihuli Observatory, and renovation of the Hōkūlani Imaginarium. This enhances the educational relationship with the communities we serve by connecting K-12 school students with science and higher education at Windward CC. This connection is further strengthened through DOE participation at the NASA Flight Training Center, and the Aerospace Exploration Lab.

Also, in 2006, Windward CC obtained a $26.28 million appropriation from the State ($ 2.7 million for design, $22 million for construction, $1.58 million for furniture and equipment) and started the construction of new Library Learning Commons. The building, which will enhance student learning by providing a supportive learning environment, will open in Fall 2012.

Since 2004, the Chancellor’s Office has managed marketing and private fundraising with the assistance from various College staff and faculty. As indicated in the Chancellor’s Office 2010 Annual Report (Ref. 4B-75), the office’s external leadership functions include: meeting with the public, attending public functions and events, analyzing and presenting information to various constituencies, gaining politicians support, and building rapport and relationships with community leaders.

The Marketing and Public Relations Office (MPRO) staff reports directly to the Chancellor. MPRO’s mission is to promote public awareness and understanding of the College, its programs, policies and services to internal and external constituencies including prospective students, the news media, the community, potential donors, current students, faculty and staff. A marketing theme “Define Your World” was developed in 2008. As indicated in the Chancellor’s Office 2010 Annual Report (Ref. 4B-75), approximately 87 press releases and media advisories were sent to various media resulting in free publicity valued at approximately $250,000.

The University of Hawai‘i Foundation, the 501 (c) 3 fundraising arm of colleges in the UH System has assigned one Development Officer, to assist in Windward CC’s fund raising efforts. This Officer also reports to the Chancellor. The Foundation's website is located at http://www.uhfoundation.org/ (Ref. 4B-76). Its mission is to transform and create a better future for Hawai‘i through alumni and community philanthropic support for public higher education, to be a trusted manager of private investments, and to build and sustain the university's relationships with donors, alumni, the community, and institutional and university partners (Ref. 4B-77).
The Development Officer cultivates and builds rapport with alumni, friends, parents, community leaders and others to ask for support for Windward CC. For example, the Chancellor and the Development Officer raised $103,000 for the naming rights to the upstairs lobby in Palikū Theatre and have hosted numerous fund-raising related activities to bring additional funds to the campus. According the Development Officer, during the last two academic years, she and the Chancellor have raised $141,058 (2010) and $216,547 (2011) through such events. As of February, they have raised $624,941 for AY 2012.

The Chancellor also uses the College’s website as an important tool to communicate with both stakeholders and communities served by the institution. Since the last Self Evaluation, a major redesign of the website was completed in January, 2008. The website’s functionality and content were both expanded, responding to the needs of the College, the students, and the community. Under the direction of the Dean of Academic Affairs, Division II, the College website is a key communication tool for the institution.

Thus, during the reporting period, extensive and successful College-community relationships and connections have been developed and enhanced, resulting in greater awareness, appreciation, and tangible support for the College's programs, services, and special events. The increased awareness, in turn, has helped student learning by providing opportunities and resources to Windward CC students. For example, as reported in the Ka ‘Ohana (Ref. 4B-78), Windward CC received $40,000 from UH Regent Kitty Lagareta and $10,000 from the Harold K.L. Castle Foundation for a scholarship in 2008. To enhance the educational relationship with the communities, Windward CC received $800,000 for a purchase of Waikalua Loko (Ref. 4B-79), a fishpond, from the Department of Housing and Urban Development in 2009, $41.6 million for a construction of a new library/learning center in 2006, approximately $287,000 in grant funds for the aeronautical studies program from NASA, $12.5 million to serve the Native Hawaiian population through a Title III Grant, and approximately $1.5 million for student support services from a 5-year TRiO grant.

The annual Windward Ho‘olaule‘a (Ref. 4B-67) serves as an excellent model of College-community. This event, which provides free entertainment and other activities, attracts thousands of community members to the Windward CC campus every year, and also allows the College to reach out to the community and showcase its programs and services to potential students and community groups.

Another annual event with a similar promotional impact for the College is the Haunted Village Halloween family and community event, which attracted over 1,800 people to the campus according to 2010 statistics. It provides an Imaginarium (planetarium) show, haunted house, knightly combat show, jack-o-lantern carving competition and more. This event is supported by many community groups, including the Safeway store in Kāne‘ohe, and connects the Ko‘olau communities and beyond with the science and higher education facilities available at Windward CC.

To collaborate with the community and expand its higher education opportunities, the Windward CC Chancellor has reached out to Waimānalo, which has had a very low percentage of students pursuing higher education. Windward CC is committed to raising the bar of achievement in the community (Ref. 4B-67). Additionally, one of Windward CC’s goals for 2010-2011 resulted in Windward CC’s Career and Community Education Office partnering with the Department of Labor and the Hawai‘i Community Foundation to start a remedial education non-credit program Ready Set Grow Hawai`i to address the basic skills and work readiness gaps for out-of school adults. This program is a state-wide initiative that addresses the basic skills, career exploration, and work readiness gap for those who are not equipped to acquire a living wage in their present lives.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets this standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.3. In multi-college districts or systems, the district/system provides primary leadership in setting and communicating expectations of educational excellence and integrity throughout the district/system and assures support for the effective operation of the colleges. It establishes clearly defined roles of authority and responsibility between the colleges and the district/system and acts as the liaison between the colleges and the governing board.
IV.B.3.a. The district/system clearly delineates and communicates the operational responsibilities and functions of the district/system from those of the college and consistently adheres to this delineation in practice.

Descriptive Summary:


The UHCC System includes the seven community colleges as discussed in Standard IV.B.1, UH Maui College is now accredited by WASC Senior, but administratively still under the UHCC System. The colleges are located on the main Hawaiian islands: Hawai‘i, Kaua‘i, Maui, and O‘ahu. The islands of Lāna‘i and Moloka‘i are served by Education Centers staffed and operated by UH Maui College. The

UHCC System office is located on O‘ahu at a central site independent of the seven colleges. The seven colleges of the System form an interdependent network that is nested within the ten-institution UH System.

Community College Chancellors have dual reporting roles: to the President of the UH System for system-wide policy making and decisions impacting the campuses and to the VPCC for leadership and coordinating community college matters. According to the June 2005 Reorganization Functional Statement (Ref. 4B-80), the dual reporting relationship is designed to preserve BOR actions promoting and facilitating campus autonomy in balance with System-wide academic and administrative functions and operations.

The VPCC’s functional statement and position description include descriptions of the executive leadership the Vice President will provide in setting and communicating expectations of educational excellence and integrity throughout the UHCC System. The functional statement also makes clear that the Chancellors have full responsibility and authority to implement and administer delegated System policies and are accountable for the operation of the each individual college.
Through a series of meetings in Spring 2006, the VPCC, the seven Community College Chancellors, and senior staff from the VPCC Office, developed and agreed upon a functional roadmap delineating the operational responsibilities and functions of the UH System Offices, the UHCC System Office, the BOR, the State of Hawai‘i, and the colleges. The functions are regularly reviewed by the Council of Community College Chancellors and updated as necessary. Following a major review of BOR policies in the spring of 2011, and the delegation of additional functions to the President, Vice President, and Chancellors, UHCC Chancellors reviewed and revised the UHCC Functional Road Map (Ref. 4B-81).

A number of UH System and UHCC System committees/workgroups exist. These organizations allow for discussions, information sharing, and consultation to advise/inform/recommend to the Chancellors and Vice President and the leaders of the System pertinent information for sustainable quality improvement. Several UHCC faculty and administration groups continue to work on developing new UHCC Policies and converting the former Chancellor for Community College Memoranda (CCCMs) to UH Community College Policies, as appropriate. This CCCM Conversion (Ref. 4B-82) begun in 2005 is on-going.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.3.b. The district/system provides effective services that support the colleges in their missions and functions.


Descriptive Summary:


The OVCPP provides centralized support services in the areas of Administrative Affairs and Academic Affairs. The Associate Vice President for Community Colleges for Academic Affairs (AVPCCAA) is responsible for providing leadership in internal operational policy making that has an impact on the development and implementation of UHCC System academic plans, goals, objectives, and assessments. According to the June 2005 Reorganization Functional Statement (Ref. 4B-80), the AVPCCAA provides leadership, assistance, and coordination in the areas of:




  • Academic Support Services.

  • Academic Planning, Assessment, and Policy Analysis.

  • Career and Technical Education.

  • Student Affairs.

  • Workforce Development.

The Office of the Associate Vice President for Community Colleges for Administrative Services (AVPCCAS) is responsible for facilitation and coordination in all aspects of administrative services for the UHCC System community colleges. The AVPCCAS provides leadership, assistance, and coordination in the areas of:




  • Budget and Planning.

  • Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action (EEO/AA).

  • Facilities, Environmental Health, and Human Resources.

  • Marketing Communications.

  • Research, Training, Commercial Enterprises and Emergency Management.

All UH System Capital Improvements Projects (CIP) are managed at the System-level by the UH Office of Capital Improvements (Ref. 4B-83). All UHCC System Repair and Maintenance and Capital Improvement Projects are under the AVPCCAS. However, colleges are responsible for routine maintenance, and health and safety issues. Therefore, as stated in the June 2005 Reorganization Functional Statement (Ref. 4B-80), colleges have worked with consultants to develop Long Range Development Plans (LRDP) which are used by the UHCC System to develop capital improvement plans.



Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.3.c. The district/system provides fair distribution of resources that are adequate to support the effective operations of the colleges.

Descriptive Summary:


The VPCC has functional responsibility for providing a fair distribution of resources that are adequate to support the effective operations of the community colleges (Ref. 4B-80). The Vice President’s work is reviewed by the President for results and effectiveness. The budgeting process is described in detail below.


The development process of the UHCC System Budget request is described earlier in this report and is available online (Ref. 4B-84). At the UHCC System-level, the seven Community College Chancellors, with support from the Associate Vice Presidents and their staff collaboratively review, categorize, and prioritize the individual college budget requests. A key determinant in approving budget requests are quantifiable and measurable goals supporting the achievement and advancement of strategic planning goals. Although budget details are maintained at the individual college-level, the UHCC Budget is summarized and consolidated at System-level.
In accordance with State law, the UH System submits a biennial budget request, program and financial plan, and program performance report to the Governor and Legislature for consideration when the Legislature convenes in regular session in every odd-numbered year. A Supplemental Budget request to amend any appropriations for the current fiscal biennium may also be submitted to the Legislature for approval when it convenes in regular session in even-numbered years. Operating and Capital Improvement Projects (CIP) funds for the UH System are given to its major organizational units (UH Mānoa, UH Hilo, UH West O‘ahu, UH Community Colleges, System-wide Support, etc). The statutes governing the State of Hawai‘i budget preparation process are primarily reflected under Hawai‘i Revised Statutes Chapter 37 (Ref. 4B-85).

The UHCC System Office coordinates the budget development and request process for UHCC System colleges, as a single unit in the UH System Budget request. The budget process is grounded in the UH System, the UHCC System, and the individual college Strategic Plans. The Community College Strategic Planning Council (SPC) is the primary body for ensuring System-wide participation in the UHCC System Strategic Planning Process. SPC Membership consists of the Chancellor, Faculty Senate Chair, and Student Government chair from each college, and the Vice President and Associate Vice Presidents for the community colleges. The guiding principles of the Community College Strategic Academic Planning Process, which defines the role of the SPC, are codified in UHCCP 4.101(Ref. 4B-16).


The SPC develops a planning context that identifies System budget request categories and priorities to ensure consistency with the UHCC System and college’s Strategic Plan goals and objectives. This oversight ensures that strategic planning and budget development remain closely linked processes. Thus, all major organizational units participate in the University’s Budget Preparation Process and present budget proposals to the UH Biennium Budget Committee (Ref. 4B-86). This committee is composed of representatives from the baccalaureate campuses, the UHCC System, the All-Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs, the Pukoa (Native Hawaiian) Council, the UH Student Caucus, and members of the UH System Senior Management Team. The Biennium Budget Advisory Committee formulates and submits recommendations to the University Executive Budget Committee. These recommendations are made in accordance with the FB 2011-13 Biennium Budget Policy Paper (Ref. 4B-87)issued by the President, and set forth the process, strategic priorities, and timeline for the biennium budget process.
The President, then, reviews the budget proposal, and submits the UH System recommended budget proposal to the BOR for final approval. Finally, the BOR approved budget is presented to the Governor and Legislature for consideration and approval. Although position counts and funding are appropriated by the Legislature occur at the UHCC System-level, details on decisions related to individual campus budget requests are provided to each campus through Legislative worksheets. At their discretion, the Governor and Legislature may add budget items to address high priority areas of concern of the State or remove items due to lack of general funds. The UHCC System has appropriated college funds in accordance with Legislative intent.
While State general funds provide the most significant funding resource for the colleges, tuition revenues are a critical, growing component of college revenue streams. Tuition revenues have risen considerably over the past few years as a result of higher tuition rates and rapid student population growth. The Fall 2011 credit headcount enrollment for the UH System was 35,233 students, an 3.8 percent increase from Fall 2010 (Ref. 4B-88). Other non-general funding resources (e.g. Special funds, Revolving funds, Extramural funds, UH Foundation, as described in Standards III.D and IV.B.2 above.) are also generated and retained by each college.
In 2008, Act 188 (Ref. 4B-89) was adopted by the State Legislature. It established a task force to make recommendations on a budgetary system that, “…includes an equitable, consistent, and responsive funding formula for the distribution of fiscal resources to the various University of Hawai‘i campuses.”

After deliberating and consulting with the UH System President and the BOR, the Act 188 Task Force recommended to the Hawai‘i State Legislature that the University FB 2011-13 biennium budget include:




  • An outcomes component that provides funds to the University based on actual strategic outcomes related to graduation, Native Hawaiian graduation, Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) graduation, enrollment of low income students, and student transfers.




  • An enrollment component that provides funds to the UH System based on actual enrollment increases.

Due to the downturn in the State economy, the legislature did not approve funding for the components listed above in the FB 2011-13 biennium budget; however, in FY 2012, the UHCC System, internally reallocated $3.5 million in incentive funding for meeting the goals contained in theUHCC Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures, 2008 - 2015 (Ref. 4B-15) and $1.5 million to supplement $1.7 million in general funds (total $3.2 million) for enrollment growth. Enrollment Growth (Ref. 4B-18) allocations are based on the increase in the number of credit hours taught over a FY 2007 baseline, and include a differential calculation to recognize the different resource requirements for remedial and non-remedial instruction.

An additional $2 million was also identified for UHCC System reallocation: to expand financial aid programs through Financial Aid Scholarship reallocation (Ref. 4B-90), improve remedial/developmental education, augment the Achieving the Dream initiative, and address other Strategic Plan related requirements such as differential repairs and maintenance allocations to ensure that high priority repairs are addressed at each campus on a timely basis (Ref. 4B-91).


Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.3.d. The district/system effectively controls its expenditures.

Descriptive Summary:


The statutes governing the State of Hawai‘i budget execution process are primarily reflected in Hawai‘i Revised Statutes Chapter 37 (Ref. 4B-85). As required by State law, the UH System implements the budget execution process as provided in the Governor’s Budget Execution Policies (Ref. 4B-92) although it is exempt from some of the special requirements set forth in the instructions. The maintenance of allocations, ceilings, quarterly allotments, and the Form A-19 approval process provide for appropriate monitoring, control, and safeguarding of the budget executive process.

The UH System Financial Management Information System (FMIS) was implemented on July 1, 1996, and provides the basic mechanism for monitoring and controlling the financial resources of the System. It is designed to adhere to Federal, State, and UH System requirements, address management information needs, and comply with accounting principles for colleges and universities (Ref. 4B-93). The quarterly allotment (Form A-19) monitoring and control requirements are programmed into FMIS with transactions edit rejections currently maintained at the campus/fund level. A separate project-based expenditure category for contracts and grants is in place to administer these types of funds. Other funds (e.g. endowments, agency, bond, and financial aid,) are also maintained and controlled as appropriate under FMIS.

Fund management is accomplished through the Budget Level Summary System (BLS). The BLS System is a management tool designed to provide campus administrators with relevant data with which to appropriately manage available resources as well as providing them with a reporting mechanism to inform the financial status of individual campuses to both the UH and UHCC Systems, the BOR, and the Legislature throughout the fiscal year. The BLS System projects the current fiscal year-end financial status of each fund based upon current cash balances, projected current year expenditures/encumbrances (allotments), projected current year revenues, projected transfers/loans, and other relevant factors. The BLS System is integrated with the formal budget execution and control process established under FMIS and the State budget allocation system. The BLS System is updated on a quarterly basis, and its reports are available at each campus (Ref. 4B-94).

The BLS System is also used to monitor the status of Special and Revolving Fund cash reserves as based upon the standards set by the UHCC’s Unrestricted Reserve Policy UHCCP 8.201 (Ref. 4B-95), which was established to ensure financial stability through the maintenance of adequate reserves for unforeseen or emergency situations. The status of Special and Revolving fund cash reserves is provided with BLS System information on a quarterly basis to the campuses.

The UH System is in the process of developing and testing a replacement to FMIS. The new system, the Kuali Financial System (KFS; Ref. 4B-96) is scheduled to go online on July 1, 2012. KFS is an open source financial system, collaboratively designed among partner schools to meet the needs of all Carnegie Class Institutions by integrating best practice processes into its core design. The new system will improve efficiency, bring business practices up to date and provide improved data driven decision-making. The new system will also provide a mechanism to ensure compliance with all applicable Federal, State and UH System requirements.

An independent audit is conducted annually for the entire UH System. These independent audits include a combined balance sheet and income statement for the UHCC System as supplemental information to the UH System’s Consolidated Financial Statements (Ref. 4B-97).
The audits are prepared in accordance with Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) principles, which establish the standards for external financial reporting for public colleges and universities. The audits provide external, independent reviews of the University’s financial information and are key indicators of fiscal health and sound financial management.


Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.3.e. The chancellor gives full responsibility and authority to the presidents of the colleges to implement and administer delegated district/system policies without the chancellor’s interference and holds them accountable for the operation of the colleges.

Descriptive Summary:


The UH System has a single president, a Vice President for Community Colleges (VPCC), and college Chancellors. The Vice President for Community Colleges has the functional responsibility to ensure that Community College Chancellors have full responsibility and authority to implement and administer delegated System policies without interference. The VPCC holds the Chancellors accountable for the operation of the colleges and evaluates each of them (Ref. 4B-80). The Vice President’s work is reviewed by the President for results and effectiveness. Therefore, Community College Chancellors have authority and leadership responsibility for the immediate operation, management, administration, and governance of their campuses within BOR governing and Presidential administrative policy (Ref. 4B-98). The position description of a Chancellor (GE102) gives full responsibility and authority to the Chancellor for all administrative and academic matters of the campus (Ref. 4B-99).


The BOR approved reorganization of the UH President’s Office, the creation of the Office of the Vice President for Community Colleges, and the realigning of functions established an organizational infrastructure for the UHCC System while retaining the integrity of the individually accredited colleges. When approving the structure and positions, the President stated, “that the new Vice President for Community Colleges will be responsible for community college-related system policies, resource allocation within the community colleges, and central service and support for the seven community colleges.” When asked who would control the funding at each of the community colleges, the President responded that, “Funding would be influenced by the Vice President’s decision, but campus operations and management would be the responsibility of the Chancellors. The decision as to how the money is distributed to each of the campuses ultimately would rest with the University President” (Ref. 4B-100).


Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.



Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.3.f. The district/system acts as the liaison between the colleges and the governing board. The district/system and the colleges use effective methods of communication, and they exchange information in a timely manner.

Descriptive Summary:


The OVPCC acts as liaison between the community colleges and the BOR (Ref. 4B-101; Ref. 4B-80). The VPCC serves as an Administrative Representative to the BOR’s Community College Standing Committee. When presentations regarding the UHCC System are made to the standing committee or to the full BOR, it is the VPCC who speaks for the System (November 2005 and April 2006 BOR Standing Committee minutes, full BOR minutes). Items forwarded to the BOR for approval, such as college Strategic Plans and college Institutional Self Evaluation Reports are forwarded under the signature of the VPCC. The functional road map provides more detail (Ref. 4B-81).

The VPCC is a member of the President’s Executive Council as well as a member on the 10-campus Council of Chancellors. The VPCC also convenes regular meetings of the seven-campus Council of Community College Chancellors.

The VPCC visits each campus at least twice a year. During the Spring Campus Visits (Ref. 4B-102),the VPCC holds an open campus forum to discuss UHCC System and college-level performance based on their Strategic Plan Performance Measures. In the Fall, the VPCC reviews UHCC System major initiatives and the UHCC System budget for the upcoming year. These regular opportunities to meet with the VPCC and to discuss campus issues and concerns are well received and appreciated.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:


None.


IV.B.3.g. The district/system regularly evaluates district/system role-delineation and governance and decision-making structures and processes to assure their integrity and effectiveness in assisting the colleges in meeting educational goals. The district/system widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the basis for improvement.

Descriptive Summary:


The UHCC System is compiling best practices and processes into polices which are posted on the community college website (Ref. 4B-103). Written policies are aligned with BOR and UH System Executive Polices and provide for regular policy review and assessment.

The VPCC and the Chancellors have agreed to and made public a UHCC Campus – System Functions Map (Ref. 4B-81). One of the UHCC System’s first polices (Ref. 4B-104) delineates the role of faculty governance and defines its advisory role to the VPCC.

UHCC Strategic Planning is codified in UHCCP 4.101 (Ref. 4B-16). This policy provides the process and establishes the UHCC Strategic Planning Council (SPC) as the primary body for ensuring System-wide participation in the UHCC Strategic Planning Process. The policy identifies roles and responsibilities and includes the relationship to and responsibility of campus academic planning.




Self Evaluation:


The College meets the standard.




Planning Agenda:

None.


Standard IV.B Evidence


  1. Act 9 (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/rcac/docs/Act9.pdf

  2. Act 58 (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/rcac/docs/Act58.pdf

  3. UH Regents Candidate Advisory Council (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/rcac/members.php

  4. Hawai‘i Revised Statutes: Chapter 304A-104 Regents; Appointment; Tenure; Qualifications; Meetings (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-0319/HRS0304A/HRS_0304A-0104.htm

  5. Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 9 Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch9.pdf

  6. Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 2 Administration (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch2.pdf

  7. Hawai`i Revised Statutes: Chapter 92 Public Agency Meetings and Records (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol02_Ch0046-0115/HRS0092/HRS_0092-.HTM

  8. Office of the Board of Regents (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/

  9. Board of Regents Meeting Minutes and Agendas (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/archive/

  10. UH System-wide Administrative Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/sysap.php

  11. Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2002/11/ 22 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20021122.regular.html

  12. UHCC Strategic Plan 2002-2010 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan_2002-2010.html

  13. Achieving the Dream Goals (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/achieving_the_dream_goals.php

  14. Appendix A: The Hawai`i Planning Context Fall 2007 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/Appendix_A_The_Hawaii_Planning_Context_Fall_2007.pdf

  15. Appendix B: UHCC Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures 2008-2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/Appendix_B_UHCC_Strategic_Outcomes_and_Performance_Measures_2008_2015%20.pdf

  16. UHCC Policy #4.101 Strategic Academic Planning (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/4.101.pdf

  17. Annual Performance Data: 2011 Update (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/2011_Actuals.html

  18. CC Enrollment Growth Cost Differential Funding - Final FY 2011 Allocations (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/downloads/FY2011_Enrollment_Growth.pdf

  19. Hawai‘i Revised Statutes: Chapter 304A-105 Powers of Regents; Official Name (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-0319/HRS0304A/HRS_0304A-0105.htm

  20. Board of Regents’ Meeting on Briefing and Workshop on Best Practices for Board of Regents’ Policies and Bylaws, meeting minutes, 2011/01/20 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20110120.special.pdf

  21. All Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/accfsc/

  22. All Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs, meeting minutes, 2011/02/25 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/accfsc/minutes/accfsc_min_20110225.doc

  23. Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2011/04/21 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20110421.regular.pdf

  24. Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2010/04/01 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20100401.special.pdf

  25. Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2012/02/23 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20120223.regular.pdf

  26. Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2012/03/15 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20120315.regular.pdf

  27. Board of Regents Reference Guide (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/app/bor/Reference_Guide_05_2011.pdf

  28. Bylaws of the Board of Regents of the UH (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/bylaws.pdf

  29. Hawai`i Revised Statutes: Chapter 84 Standards of Conduct (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/ethics/constitution/chap84

  30. Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2006/08/24-25 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20060824.regular.pdf

  31. System Level Reorganization of the CCs and Establishment of the New Executive Class, Vice President for CCs (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/vpaa/posts/053105-signed-cc-reorg.pdf

  32. Organization Chart (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2011/WCC_Organization_Charts_2011.pdf

  33. 360° Evaluations (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/360/

  34. Governance Survey Information Page 2010-11 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/2010-11/GovernanceMenu_2011.html

  35. Governance Subcommittee of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee Evaluation Process at WCC: Report of the Consultant (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2012/GSIEC_Report_2012.pdf

  36. Faculty Senate (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/index.php

  37. Chancellor’s Administrative Staff (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Chancellor_Staff/index.php

  38. Master Planning and Space Allocation Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Master_Planning/index.php

  39. Aesthetics Committee Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Aesthetics/Directives.php

  40. Student Government (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/Student_Government/index.php

  41. Assessment and Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/

  42. Discussions (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/discussions/

  43. Kāne`ohe Business Group (Archived Copy) http://kaneohebusinessgroup.com/

  44. Kailua Chamber of Commerce (Archived Copy) http://www.kailuachamber.com/

  45. Hawai`i Council for the Humanities (Archived Copy) http://hihumanities.org/

  46. Aloha United Way (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/United_Way/

  47. Rotary Club of Kāne`ohe, Hawai`i (Archived Copy) http://kaneohe-rotary.org/wordpress/

  48. Kāne`ohe Neighborhood Board (Archived Copy) http://www1.honolulu.gov/nco/nb30/index.htm

  49. Tactical Targets for WCC in Pursuit of Strategic Plan Goals to 2015 and Beyond (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/VisionPBCDraft2_1-31-12.pdf

  50. Institutional Effectiveness Committee, meeting minutes, 2011/12/05 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Institutional_Effectiveness/2011/IEC_2011_12_05_Notes.pdf

  51. Windward CC Convocation Week, Spring 2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Calendar/2012/Convocation_Spring/

  52. Planning and Budget Council Summary Sheet: Office of Planning and Program Evaluation and Office of Institutional Research (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/ChanOffice/Programmer%20PBC%20Summary%20Sheet11-16-09%20%282%29.pdf

  53. Strategic Plan Goals and Outcomes 2012 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/WIN_CC_2012_Actuals.pdf

  54. Mission, Vision, and Core Values Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Mission_Values/

  55. About WCC (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/index.php

  56. Budget (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/budget/

  57. Windward CC Policy 4.4: Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Policies/4_4_program_review.pdf

  58. Windward CC Office of Institutional Research (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/

  59. Assessment Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/Documents.php

  60. Planning and Budget Council Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Planning_Budget/Directives.php

  61. Planning and Budget Council Rubric (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Planning_Budget/2011/PBC_Rubric_2011.pdf

  62. Business Office (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Business_Office/index.php

  63. Chancellor, e-mail, 2010/12/02 (Archived Copy)

  64. Windward School for Adults (Archived Copy) http://winsa.k12.hi.us/Windward_School_for_Adults/Our_Community.html

  65. Ke Kumu Pali, meeting minutes, 2010/04/05 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/ke_kumu_pali/Documents/2010/KeKumuPali_2010_04_05_Minutes.pdf

  66. Star Poets Events for Fall 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/poets/STAR%20Poets%20Fall%202011%20events.pdf

  67. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hoolaulea/

  68. Scholarships at WCC (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/Financial_Aid/Scholarships.php

  69. College and Career Fair, Tuesday, April 12, 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Calendar/2011/Career_Fair/

  70. Administrative Staff, meeting minutes, 2010/10/25 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/committees/Chancellor_Staff/2010/Admin_Staff_2010_10_25_Notes.pdf

  71. Administrative Staff, meeting minutes, 2010/10/04 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/committees/Chancellor_Staff/2010/Admin_Staff_2010_10_04_Notes.pdf

  72. Star Poets Project (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/poets/

  73. Rain Bird: Literary and Art Journal (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/rainbird/

  74. Windward Ho‘olaule‘a Food Vendor Agreement (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hoolaulea/2008/Food_Vendor_Agreement.pdf

  75. Annual Assessment Report for the UH-WCC Chancellor’s Office for AY 2009-2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2010/Units/Chancellor%20Office/ChancellorsOfficeAnnualRreport_2-10-11corrected.pdf

  76. UH Foundation (Archived Copy) http://www.uhfoundation.org/

  77. UH Foundation: About us (Archived Copy) http://www.uhfoundation.org/about/index.aspx

  78. Ka 'Ohana “$50,000 Gift for WCC Students” (Archived Copy) http://kaohana.windward.hawaii.edu/story.php?aID=154

  79. Waikalua Fishpond Purchase and Renovation (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Discussions/2010/Waikalua_Fishpond/

  80. President’s System Level Reorganization: CCs (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/vpaa/system_aa/accreditation/reorg.pdf

  81. UHCC Campus-System Functions Map (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/UHCC_Map_of_College-System_Functions_Jan_27_2012.pdf

  82. UHCC Policy Conversion Analysis (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/UHCC_Policy_Conversion_Analysis.pdf

  83. UH Office of Capital Improvements (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/oci/main.html

  84. Budget Preparation (Archived Copy) http://uhcc.hawaii.edu/OVPCC/budget/budgetPrep.php

  85. Hawai`i Budget Preparation Statues (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol01_Ch0001-0042F/HRS0037/

  86. 2007-2009 Biennium Budget Committee Members (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/vpaa/vpaa_memo/042106_BienniumBudget.pdf

  87. 2011-2013 Biennium Budget Policy Paper (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/budget/pdfs/2011-2013BIBudgetpolicypaper.pdf

  88. Opening Enrollment Daily Summary Fall 2008-Fall 2012 (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/institutionalresearch/openingEnrollment

  89. Report of the Act 188 Task Force to the Hawai`i State Legislature (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/eaur/govrel/reports/2011/act188-slh2008_2011_funding-formula-tf_report.pdf

  90. FY 2012 Need Based Tuition Scholarships/Waivers: TSTF Reallocations Letter (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/downloads/FY12_Need_Based_Scholarship_Allocations.pdf

  91. Facilities Repairs and Maintenance Plans for FY 2012 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/downloads/FY2012_R&M_Plan.pdf

  92. EM 11-10 September 9, 2011, FY 12 Budget Execution Policies & Instructions (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/budget/executivememorandums/2011/em-11-10-september-9-2011

  93. A8.600 Accounting (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/apm/a8600.html

  94. BLS System Status: FY 2011 Closing and FY 2012 Initial Allocations (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/downloads/BLS_FY11_Closing_and_FY12_Allocations.pdf

  95. UHCC Policy #8.201 Unrestricted Fund Reserve Policy – General, Special, Revolving Funds (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/UHCCP_8.201.pdf

  96. Kuali Financial System (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/kualifinancial/?page=home

  97. UHCC Office of Budget, Planning, and Finance (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/ccadminbp_budgetDevelopment.html

  98. Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 4 Planning (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch4.pdf

  99. Chancellor position description (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/bor/classpdf/ge102.pdf

  100. Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2005/06/21-22 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20050621.regular.pdf

  101. Vice President for Community Colleges (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/bor/classpdf/cc100.pdf

  102. Access and Success: Planning, Tracking, and Innovating presentation (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2011/VP_Morton_Campus_Visit_Spring_2011_WinCC.pdf

  103. UHCC Policies (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/policies.html

  104. UHCC Policy #1.102 Community College Council of Faculty Senate Chairs (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/policies/UHCCP_1.102_CC_Council_Fac_Sen_Chairs.pdf


Documentation and Evidence

A3.101 UH Organizational and Functional Changes (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/a3101/a3101.pdf

A7.022 Procedures Relating to Protection of the Educational Rights and Privacy of Students (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/a700/a7022a.pdf

A8.200-A8.295 Procurement (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/a8200.html

A8.600 Accounting (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/apm/a8600.html

A9.075 Personnel Records: Board of Regents Appointees (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9075.pdf

A9.170 Performance Evaluation of Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT) Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9170.pdf

A9.210 Classification and Compensation plan for Administrative, Professional and Technical Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9210.pdf

A9.325 Political Activity (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9325.pdf

A9.335 Employment of Relatives (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9335.pdf

A9.400 Guidelines for Sabbatical Leave for Faculty (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9400.pdf

A9.540 Recruitment and Selection of Faculty and Administrative, Professional and Technical (APT) Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9540.pdf

A9.620 Recruitment and Reassignment of Executive and Managerial Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9620.pdf

A9.890 Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9890.pdf

A9.920 Discrimination Complaint Procedures for Students, Employees, and Applicants for Admission or Employment (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/apm/pers/a9920.pdf

AA Degree Assessment at WCC (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2000_Assess_AA_Degree.pdf

About Educational Talent Search (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ETS/

About the Community College Success and Student Engagement (CCSSE) Survey (Archived Copy) http://www.ccsse.org/aboutsurvey/aboutsurvey.cfm

About the ITS Help Desk (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/its/about/helpdesk.html

About WCC (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/index.php

Academic Advising Syllabus (Archived Copy)

Academic Probation Policy (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/success/Academic_Probation.php

Academic Subject Certificate in Psycho-Social Developmental Studies (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academics/PSDS_ASC/

Academic Support Division Program Review Report AY 2004-2005 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2005/Academic_Support_Program_Review_2005.pdf

Academic Support Services 2009-2010 annual report (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2010/Program_Review_2010_Academic_Support.pdf

Academic Support Units Annual Reviews 2010-2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Instruction/Academic Support/AcadSupportExecSummary_2011.pdf

Access and Success: Planning, Tracking, and Innovating presentation (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2011/VP_Morton_Campus_Visit_Spring_2011_WinCC.pdf

ACCJC (Archived Copy) http://www.accjc.org/

ACCJC Letter and Acceptance of Windward CC’s Midterm Report 2010/01/29 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2010/ACCJC.MidtermRecommendation.1-29-2010.pdf

ACCJC Letter and Evaluation Report 2007/01/31 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2007/2007_01_31_ACCJC_eval.pdf

ACCJC letter and Progress Visit Report 2008/01/31 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2008/2008_01_31.Letter_From_ACCJC.pdf

ACCJC letter re: Follow-Up Report 2009/06/09 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2009/2009_06_30_Letter_from_ACCJC.pdf

ACCJC Letter to Chancellor Dykstra Re: Substantive Change (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/academic_Affairs/Documents/2011/Substantive_Change_online_Letter.pdf

ACCJC Substantive Change Report: Employment Training Center (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2004/2004_Change_Report_WASC.pdf

Accreditation Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/documents.php

Accreditation Follow-up Report of Windward CC 2009/03/15 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2009/2009_Follow-Up_Report.PDF

Accreditation Midterm Report of Windward CC (Archived Copy) http://wcc.hawaii.edu/accreditation/Documents/2009/Midterm_Report_2009_Final.pdf

Accreditation Policies and Procedures of the American Veterinary Medical Association Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities (Archived Copy) http://www.avma.org/education/cvea/cvtea_pp.asp

Accreditation Progress Report of Windward CC 2007/10/15 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2007/2007_15_10_ProgressReport.PDF

Accreditation Reference Handbook (Archived Copy) http://www.accjc.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Accreditation-Reference-Handbook_20111.pdf

Accreditation Self Study Report of Windward CC 2006 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2006/2006_Self_Study.pdf

Accreditation Steering Committee Membership (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Accreditation/Membership.php

Accreditation survey data (Archived Copy) http://www.windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Accreditation%202011/Accreditation2012.html

Accuity LLP (Archived Copy) http://www.accuityllp.com/

Achieving the Dream (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/atd/index.php

Achieving the Dream First Year Experience Report (Archived Copy)

Achieving the Dream Goals (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/achieving_the_dream_goals.php

Achieving the Dream Implementation Plan (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Planning/Plans/AtD/ATD%20implementation%20plan%20Final%20%283%29.pdf

Achieving the Dream Implementation Plan, Updated 2009/08/11 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/atd/Implementation_plan_Final.pdf

Achieving the Dream, Inc. (Archived Copy) http://www.achievingthedream.org/

Achieving the Dream Windward CC Web page (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/AchievingDream/AchievingDreamdefault.htm

Achieving the Dream: Gatekeeper Courses (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/AchievingDream/GatekeeperCourses.html

Act 58 (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/rcac/docs/Act58.pdf

Act 9 (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/rcac/docs/Act9.pdf

ACT Discover (Archived Copy) http://www.act.org/discover/

Administrative Services (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Administrative_Services/index.php

Administrative Staff, meeting minutes, 2010/10/04 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/committees/Chancellor_Staff/2010/Admin_Staff_2010_10_04_Notes.pdf

Administrative Staff, meeting minutes, 2010/10/25 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/committees/Chancellor_Staff/2010/Admin_Staff_2010_10_25_Notes.pdf

Admissions and Records (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Admissions_Records/index.php

Aesthetics Committee Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Aesthetics/Directives.php

Agreement between the UH Professional Assembly and the UH Board of Regents, July 2009-June 2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.uhpa.org/uhpa-bor-contract/100129-2009-2015-agreement-for-website.pdf/view

Agricultural Technology Subtropical Urban Tree Care (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academics/Urban_Tree_Brochure.pdf

All Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/accfsc/

All Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs Charter (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/accfsc/charter.html

All Campus Council of Faculty Senate Chairs, meeting minutes, 2011/02/25 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/accfsc/minutes/accfsc_min_20110225.doc

Aloha United Way (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/United_Way/

American Veterinary Medical Association (Archived Copy) http://www.avma.org

American Veterinary Medical Association Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities accreditation process (Archived Copy) http://www.avma.org/education/cvea/cvtea_process.asp

Ann Lemke, Disabilities Advisor (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/People/Ann_Lemke/

Annual Assessment for Office of Career and Community Education for FY 2010-2011 (Archived Copy) http://www.windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/OCET/2011%20Annual%20CCE%20Jan%202012.pdf

Annual Assessment for Office of Continuing and Community Education for FY 2008-2009 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2009/Program_Review_2009_OCET.pdf

Annual Assessment Report for the UH-Windward CC Chancellor’s Office for AY 2009-2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2010/Units/Chancellor%20Office/ChancellorsOfficeAnnualRreport_2-10-11corrected.pdf

Annual Assessment Report for Windward CC Employment Training Center Programs Health Programs Certified Nurse Aide Training for FY 2008-2009 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/Documents/2009/Program_Review_2009_CNA.pdf

Annual Assessment Report Windward CC Employment Training Center Programs Essential Skills FY 2008-2009 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2009/Program_Review_2009_Essential_Skills.pdf

Annual Performance Data: 2011 Update (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/2011_Actuals.html

ANSC 190, Fall 2011, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/2011_Fall/syllabi/63272.pdf

ANSC 252 Diagnostic Imaging for Veterinary Technicians Sample Student Radiograph Portfolio (Archived Copy)

ANTH 200, Fall 2011, face-to-face syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/2011_Fall/syllabi/63128.pdf

ANTH 200, Fall 2011, online course syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/2011_Fall/syllabi/63077.pdf

ANTH 200, Spring 2012, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Classes/2012_Spring/64004.pdf

Appendix A: The Hawai`i Planning Context Fall 2007 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/Appendix_A_The_Hawaii_Planning_Context_Fall_2007.pdf

Appendix B: UHCC Strategic Outcomes and Performance Measures 2008-2015 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/strategicplan/Appendix_B_UHCC_Strategic_Outcomes_and_Performance_Measures_2008_2015%20.pdf

Archive of Catalogs and Schedules of Classes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/Documents.php

Ardis Eschenberg, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/people/ardis_eschenberg/

ART 260, Fall 2011, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/2011_Fall/syllabi/63093.pdf

Articulation & Transfer, General Education at UH-Mānoa (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/gened/articulation.htm

Articulation Agreement Between Brigham Young University-Hawaiʻi and the UHCCs (Archived Copy)

Articulation Agreement Between Chaminade and the UHCCs (Archived Copy)

Articulation Agreements Within the UH System (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/app/aa/articulation/articulation.html

Assessment and Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/

Assessment Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/assessment/Documents.php

Associate in Arts Degree (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academics/Associate_Arts.php

Associate in Arts of Liberal Arts Program Learning Outcomes (Archived Copy)

Associate of Science in Veterinary Technology (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/academics/Vet_Tech/

ASTR 110L, Spring 2012, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Classes/2012_Spring/64018.pdf

ASTR 180, Fall 2009, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/2009_Fall/syllabi/62298.pdf

ASTR 281, Spring 2011, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/2011_Spring/Syllabi/61312.pdf

ASUH WCC Facebook profile (Archived Copy) https://www.facebook.com/wccasuh

AY 2011 Testing Services System Program Review (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Instruction/Academic%20Support/Testing%20ServicesAR2010-2011.pdf

BIOL 100, Spring 2012, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Classes/2012_Spring/64140.pdf

BIOL 171, Spring 2012, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Classes/2012_Spring/64329.pdf

Bioprocessing Medicinal Garden Complex (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/Medicinal_Garden/

BLS System Status: FY 2011 Closing and FY 2012 Initial Allocations (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/downloads/BLS_FY11_Closing_and_FY12_Allocations.pdf

Board of Regents Meeting Minutes and Agendas (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/archive/

Board of Regents Policies and Bylaws (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/index.html

Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 2 Administration (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch2.pdf

Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 4 Planning (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch4.pdf

Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 5 Academic Affairs (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch5.pdf

Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 6 Tuition, Financial Assistance, and Fees (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch6.pdf

Board of Regents Policy: Chapter 9 Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/borpch9.pdf

Board of Regents Reference Guide (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/app/bor/Reference_Guide_05_2011.pdf

Board of Regents, meeting agenda, 2009/06/08 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/notice/20090608.regular.pdf

Board of Regents, meeting agenda, 2012/05/17 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/notice/20120517.regular.pdf

Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2002/11/ 22 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20021122.regular.html

Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2005/06/21-22 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20050621.regular.pdf

Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2006/08/24-25 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20060824.regular.pdf

Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2010/04/01 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20100401.special.pdf

Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2011/04/21 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20110421.regular.pdf

Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2011/05/19 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20110519.regular.pdf

Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2012/02/23 (Archived copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20120223.regular.pdf

Board of Regents, meeting minutes, 2012/03/15 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20120315.regular.pdf

Board of Regents’ Meeting on Briefing and Workshop on Best Practices for Board of Regents’ Policies and Bylaws, meeting minutes, 2011/01/20 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/regular/minute/20110120.special.pdf

Botany Club (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/Botany/index.php

Brian Richardson, Dean, Division II (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/people/brian_richardson/

Budget (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/budget/

Budget Preparation (Archived Copy) http://uhcc.hawaii.edu/OVPCC/budget/budgetPrep.php

Buildings on Campus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/Buildings.php

Business Office (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Business_Office/index.php

Bylaws of the Board of Regents of the UH (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/bor/policy/bylaws.pdf

Calculation of Survey Statistics Cited in Standard III.A Human Resources (Archived Copy)

Calculation of Survey Statistics Cited in Standard III.B Human Resources (Archived Copy)

Calculation of Survey Statistics Cited in Standard III.C Technology Resources (Archived Copy)

Calendar of Events (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Calendar/

Campus Directory (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Directory/

Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education (Perkins IV) Act (Archived Copy) http://systemattic.wtcsystem.edu/Grants/Perkins-4/perkins4.htm

Catalogs and Schedules of Classes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Catalogs_Schedules/index.php

CC Enrollment Growth Cost Differential Funding - Final FY 2011 Allocations (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/downloads/FY2011_Enrollment_Growth.pdf

Center for Aerospace Education (Archived Copy) https://laulima.hawaii.edu/access/content/group/7f13b953-c1b5-4532-00fe-072e1311e8a4/uslipub/USLI%20KFC%20Editor/ABOUT%20CAE/USLI%20KFC%20Page%20Template

Certificate of Achievement in Veterinary Assisting (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academics/Veterinary_Assisting_CA/index.php

Certificate of Competence in Applied Business and Information Technology (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academics/Business_and_Information_Technology_CC/

Certificate of Competence in GIS and GPS (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academics/GIS_GPS_CC.php

Certificate of Competence in Web Support (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academics/Web_Support_CC/index.php

Certificates of Completion in Plant Landscaping and Agricultural Technology (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/academics/Agriculture_Technology_CC/

Certified Nurse Aide Program: Community Partners (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/CNA/Community%20Partners.html

Certified Nurse’s Aide: Course Expectations (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/cna/cource_expectations.html

Chancellor for Community College Memo Numerical Index (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CCCM_PDF/cccm.html

Chancellor position description (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/bor/classpdf/ge102.pdf

Chancellor, e-mail, 2010/08/13 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/Calendar/2010/ETC_Integration/

Chancellor, e-mail, 2010/12/02 (Archived Copy)

Chancellor, e-mail, 2012/02/24 (Archived Copy)

Chancellor’s Administrative Staff (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Chancellor_Staff/index.php

Chancellor’s Administrative Staff Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Chancellor_Staff/Documents.php

Chancellor’s Office Annual Assessment 2010-2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Chancellor%20Office/ChancellorsOfficeAnnualRreport_12.15.11FINAL.pdf

Change to the COMPASS Retesting Policy (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/placement/2010_MAY_UHCC_Policy_Retesting.pdf

Charge for Campus Safety Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Campus_Safety/Documents/Safety_Committee_2011_Charge.pdf

CHEM 151, Fall 2011, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/2011_Fall/syllabi/63070.pdf

Class Information for Fall 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/index.php?year=2011&semester=Fall

Class Information for Fall 2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/index.php?year=2012&semester=Fall&list=All

Class Information for Fall 2012: Online (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/index.php?list=Online

Class Information for Spring 2012: Service Learning (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/index.php?year=2012&semester=Spring&list=Service%20Learning

Classification and Compensation Plan for UH Executive Classes (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/bor/emcompp.htm

Clifford Togo, Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/people/clifford_togo/

Climate-controlled Green House (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/About_WCC/Green_House/index.php

College and Career Fair, Tuesday, April 12, 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Calendar/2011/Career_Fair/

CollegeSource Online (Archived Copy) http://www.collegesource.org/idxsearch.asp

CollegeView (Archived Copy) http://www.collegeview.com/index.jsp

Comments to 2010 Draft of Windward CC Mission Statement (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/mission_values/documents/2010/comments_first.php

Committees and Councils (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/

Common Book 2012-2013 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/commonbook/

Community College Success and Student Engagement Windward CC 2008 miscellaneous data (Archived Copy)

Community College Success and Student Engagement Windward CC 2010 miscellaneous data (Archived Copy)

Community Colleges 2011-2012 Tenure/Promotion Timelines (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Faculty_Staff/Tenure_Promotion/Documents/2011/2011-2012_Tenure_Promotion_Timeline.pdf

Community Colleges Council of Faculty Senate Chairs (Archived Copy) https://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/ccfsc.html

COMPASS Repeaters Study (Archived Copy)

COMPASS Retesting at Kapi`olani Community College and Leeward Community College (Archived Copy)

Competitive Recruitment for Civil Service Positions (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/dhrd/0300003.pdf

Completion Report Form for Achieving Standards, Program Improvement, and Leadership Strategies and Projects (Archived Copy)

Computer and Information Literacy Preparation Workshops Spring 2008 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20080115043828/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/workshops.shtml

Computer and Information Literacy Preparation Workshops Spring 2009 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20090328190237/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/workshops.shtml

Computer and Information Literacy Preparation Workshops Summer 2008 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20080604095831/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/workshops.shtml

Computer and Information Literacy Schedule Fall 2008 (Archived Copy) http://web.archive.org/web/20080926151432/http://www.hawaii.edu/wccil/schedule.shtml

Computer and Information Literacy Tutoring Sessions by Semester and Topic AY 2009 (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/_SelfStudy/CIL%20Tutoring%20&%20Workshop%20Statistics%20AY09.pdf

Computing on Campus (Archived Copy) http://www.windward.hawaii.edu/Computing/

Computing with Comfort presentation (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Staff_Development/2009/Computing_with_Comfort_Miles.pdf

Consolidated Financial Statement and Supplementary Information June 30, 2006 and 2007 (Archived Copy) http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/sites/programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu.intranet/files/UH%206-30-2007%20CFS_0.pdf

Consolidated Financial Statements and other Supplementary Information: June 30, 2008 and 2009 (Archived Copy) http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/cfo/reports/Financial%20Reports%202009/UH%206-30-2009%20FS.pdf

Consolidated Financial Statements, June 30, 2005 and 2006 (Archived Copy) http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/cfo/reports/Financial%20Reports%202006/Year%20Ended%20%202006.pdf

Consolidated Financial Statements, Required Supplementary Information and Other Supplementary Information: June 30, 2007 and 2008 (Archived Copy) http://programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/sites/programs.honolulu.hawaii.edu.intranet/files/UH%206-30-2008%20CFS.pdf

Consolidated Financial Statements, Required Supplementary Information and Other Supplementary Information June 30, 2009 and 2010 (Archived Copy) http://www.fmo.hawaii.edu/cfo/reports/Financial%20Reports%202010/UH%206-30-2010%20CFS.pdf

Consolidated Financial Statements, Required Supplementary Information and Other Supplementary Information, June 30, 2010 and 2011 (Archived Copy)

Constitution of the Faculty Senate (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/Faculty_Senate/Faculty_Senate_Constitution.pdf

Continuing Education (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/continuing_education/index.php

Continuing Education Enrollment, UH Spring 2011 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/iro/maps?ceuhs11.pdf



Counseling and Advising (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/counseling_advising/

Counseling and Advising Directory (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Counseling_Advising/Directory.php

Counseling Services Evaluation (Archived Copy)

Counselor, e-mail, 2011/01/28 (Archived Copy)

Creation of Schedule of Classes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Scheduling/

Credit Courses (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/

Credit Curriculum and Academic Affairs Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/CCAAC/index.php

Credit Curriculum and Academic Affairs Committee Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/CCAAC/Documents.php

Credit Curriculum and Academic Affairs Committee, meeting minutes, 2010/09/28 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/CCAAC/Documents/2010/CCAAC_2010_09_28_minutes.pdf

Credit Curriculum and Academic Affairs Committee, meeting minutes, 2011/04/26 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/CCAAC/Documents/2011/CCAAC_2011_04_26_Minutes.pdf

Curriculum (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Curriculum/

Curriculum Central Presentation (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/app/aa/cms/cc-2011-07-28.pdf

Curriculum Procedures (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/curriculum/Procedures.php

Dashboard Report for the Academic Subject Certificate in Bio-Resources and Technology Development and Management for AY 2006-2007 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2007/ASC_Plant_Tech_2007.pdf

Dashboard Report for the Academic Subject Certificate in Bio-Resources and Technology: Plant Biotechnology for AY 2006-2007 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2007/ASC_Plant_Res_2007.pdf

Data for Online Classes Offerings (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/online/Data/Class_Offerings.php

Deadlines for Department Chairs (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/governance/deadlines_department_chairs.php

Degree and Certificate Program Sheets (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/academics/Program_Sheets/

Degrees and Certificates (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/academics/degrees_certificates.php

Description of Duties and Responsibilities of Department Chairs in Credit Instruction (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Documents/2008/Duties_of_Department_Chairs.pdf

Developmental Kāko`o Ko`olau grant abstract (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Title_III/2010/T3%2010-15%20Developmental%20KakooKoolau%20Abstract.pdf

Director of Career and Community Education, e-mail, 2010/04/21 (Archived Copy)

Directory Listing for files/compliance/a133/ (Archived Copy) http://www.ors.hawaii.edu/files/compliance/a133/

Disabilities Counselor, e-mail, 2012/03/19 (Archived Copy)

Disabilities Handbook (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Disabilities/Disabilities_Handbook.pdf

Disabilities Services (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Disabilities/

Discussions (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/discussions/

Discussions Archive (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/discussions/archive.php

Dissolution of the Enrollment Management Committee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Enrollment_Management/Enrollment_Dissolution.pdf

Distance Learning at the UH (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/dl/

Diversity and Equity Initiative (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/diversity/dei/index.html

Douglas Dykstra, Chancellor (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/people/doug_dykstra/

Duties and Responsibilities of Department Chairs in Credit Instruction (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Academic_Affairs/Department_Chairs/

E1.202 University Statement of Nondiscrimination and Affirmative Action (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e1/e1202.pdf

E1.203 Policy on Sexual Harassment and Related Conduct (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e1/e1203.pdf

E10.201 Facilities Use (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e10/e10201.pdf

E11.201 Illegal Drugs and Substance Abuse (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e11/e11201.pdf

E11.203 Illegal Drugs and Alcohol Abuse (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e11/e11203.pdf

E2.210 Use and Management of Information Technology Resources (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e2/e2210.pdf

E2.214 Security and Protection of Sensitive Information (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e2/e2214.pdf

E5.209 UH System Student Transfer and Inter-campus Articulation (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e5/e5209.pdf

E5.214 Conflicts of Interests (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e5/e5214.pdf

E5.221 Classification of Faculty (Archived Copy) http://manoa.hawaii.edu/ovcaa/faculty/tenure_promotion_contract_renewal/pdf/Appendix_A.pdf

E5.228 Credit Hour (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e5/e5228.pdf

E7.208 UH System-wide Student Conduct Code (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e7/e7208.pdf

E9.000 Personnel (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e9/personnel.php

E9.203 Evaluation of Board of Regents Appointees (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/apis/ep/e9/e9203.pdf

E9.210 Workplace Non-Violence (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/svpa/ep/e9/e9210.pdf

eCAFE (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ecafe/

Ellen Ishida-Babineau, Dean, Division I (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/people/ellen_ishida-babineau/

EM 11-10 September 9, 2011, FY 12 Budget Execution Policies & Instructions (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/budget/executivememorandums/2011/em-11-10-september-9-2011

Employee headcounts e-mails (Archived Copy)

Employment Training Center (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ETC/

Employment Training Center Course Catalog 2006-2007 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/ETC/2006-07_ETC_Catalog.pdf

Employment Training Center Course Catalog 2007-2008 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/ETC/2007-08_ETC_Catalog.pdf

Employment Training Center Course Catalog 2008-2009 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/ETC/ETC_Catalog_2008-2009.pdf

Employment Training Center Course Catalog 2009-2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/ETC/ETC_Catalog_2009-2010.pdf

Employment Training Center Course Catalog 2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/ETC/2010_ETC_Catalog.pdf

Employment Training Center Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/etc/documents.php

Employment Training Center Student Support Unit Program Review 2005-2009 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/Student%20Services/ETCStudentSupportProgramReview11-29-09.pdf

Employment Training Center Termination Reports (Archived Copy)

Energy Savings Performance Contract RFP #10-0141 Section E WCC (Archived Copy)

ENG 100, Spring 2012, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Classes/2012_Spring/64398.pdf

ENG 19, Spring 2012, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Classes/2012_Spring/64478.pdf

ENG 271 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/ENG271/

ENG 272 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/ENG272/

Enrollment Management Committee, meeting minutes, 2009/11/30 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Enrollment_Management/Enrollment_2009_11_30_Minutes.pdf

Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/eeo/index.html

Evaluating APT Employees presentation (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ohr/download/aptdocs/APTEvalProcess2009.pdf

Executive Biennium Budget FB 2011-13 Budget in Brief (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/budget/bienniumbudget/budgetinbrief

Executive/Managerial position descriptions (Archived Copy)

Expand Proctoring Services at a Standardized fee (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/placement/2010_JUNE_UHCC_Policy_Compass_Test_Proctoring_Servics_at_a_Standardized_Fee.pdf

Facilities (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Facilities/index.php

Facilities Repairs and Maintenance Plans for FY 2012 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/downloads/FY2012_R&M_Plan.pdf

Faculty Evaluation Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/ccc/Docs/CCCM_PDF/7200-031982.pdf

Faculty Senate (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/index.php

Faculty Senate Directives (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Directives.php

Faculty Senate Documents (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Documents.php

Faculty Senate New Initiatives Subcommittee (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/faculty_senate/New_Initiatives/

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2006/03/07 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Documents/2006/FS_2006_03_07_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2007/02/21 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Documents/2007/FS_2007_02_21_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2007/03/07 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Documents/2007/FS_2007_03_07_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2007/03/21 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Documents/2007/FS_2007_03_21_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2008/11/18 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Documents/2008/FS_2008_11_08_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2010/04/06 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Documents/2010/FS_2010_04_06_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2010/10/05 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Faculty_Senate/2010/Faculty_Senate_2010_10_05_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2010/10/19 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Faculty_Senate/2010/Faculty_Senate_2010_10_19_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2011/03/01 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Faculty_Senate/Documents/2011/FS_2011_03_01_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2011/11/01 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Faculty_Senate/2011/Faculty_Senate_2011_11_01_Minutes.pdf

Faculty Senate, meeting minutes, 2012/02/21 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Committees/Faculty_Senate/2012/Faculty_Senate_2012_02_21_Minutes.pdf

Fall 2006 Recommendations on COMPASS Placement Testing Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/placement/2007_APRIL_Testing_Procedures_Retesting_SAT_Uniform_Math_Instructions.pdf

FB 2011-2013 Biennium Budget Request Summary (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Planning_Budget/Documents/2011/PBC_PCR_Priority_Summary_2010_07_06.pdf

Federal Perkins Loan Program Status of Default as of June 30, 2008 (Archived Copy) https://www.ifap.ed.gov/perkinscdrguide/attachments/0708PerkinsCDR.pdf

FERPA and Confidentiality of Student Records (Archived Copy) http://www.windward.hawaii.edu/ir/Ferpa/WCCFERPAmemo8-31-05.pdf

Fifth Interim Budget Execution Policies and Instructions for FY 11 - Revised FY 11 General Fund Allocation Only (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/budget/executivememorandums/2011/EM%2011-03%20Fifth%20Interim%20Budget%20Execution%20Polices%20and%20Instructions%20for%20FY%2011%20-%20Revised%20FY%2011%20General%20Fund%20Allocation%20Only.pdf

Film Club (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Life/Film/

Financial Aid (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Financial_Aid/index_Secondary.php

Financial Aid Application Process (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/financial_aid/Application_Process.php

Financial and Compliance Audit June 30, 2011 (Archived Copy) http://www.ors.hawaii.edu/files/compliance/a133/FY_2011_A-133.pdf

“First-ever Ko‘olauloa Educational Expo on July 23” (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Calendar/2011/Education_Expo/

First Year Experience (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/FYE/Index.php

5-Year Assessment Report for WCC Employment Training Center Health Program Nurse Aide Training for FY 2007-2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/ETC/ETC_CNA_5-Year_Report_2007-10.pdf

Flowchart on Proposal on French Report on ACCJC Recommendation 5 (Archived Copy)

“Forwarding Your UH Mail to Another Email Account” (Archived Copy)

Foundations Board (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Foundations/index.php

“Free Apple GarageBand Class in Kahuku” (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/spotlight/2011_garageband/

From Here to There: Transition Counseling Under Title III (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Title_III/2010/T3%2005-10%20Transition%20Summary.pdf

Frosh Camp (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Services/Frosh_Camp/Index.php

Frosh Camp flyer (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Student_Services/Frosh_Camp/Frosh_Camp_2012_Spring.pdf

FY 2012 Budget Allocation Methodology (Archived Copy) http://uhcc.hawaii.edu/OVPCC/financing_cc/allocation.php

FY 2012 Need Based Tuition Scholarships/Waivers: TSTF Reallocations Letter (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/downloads/FY12_Need_Based_Scholarship_Allocations.pdf

G. Kabei & J. Uyetake, personal communication, February 29, 2012 (Archived Copy)

Gallery `Iolani (Archived Copy) http://gallery.wcc.hawaii.edu/

General Education (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/general_education/

General Education Foundations Hallmarks and Explanatory Notes (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Committees/Foundations/Documents/Foundations_Hallmarks_Explanatory_Notes_2006.pdf

General Education Requirements of the AA Degree, Program Review for AY 2001-2005 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2005/Program_Review_Gen_Ed_2005.pdf

GEOG 101, Spring 2012, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Classes/2012_Spring/64035.pdf

GEOG 151 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/GEOG151/

GG 103 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/GG103/

GG 211 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/facstaff/mccoy-f/GG211.html

Giving to WCC (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/giving/index.php

Google@UH Frequently Asked Questions (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/google/faq.html#faq1

Governance Subcommittee of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee Policies and Procedures (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/2008-9/PoliciesAndProcedures2-24-09.pdf

Governance Subcommittee of the Institutional Effectiveness Committee Evaluation Process at WCC: Report of the Consultant (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/documents/governance/2012/GSIEC_Report_2012.pdf

Governance Subcommittee of the Intuitional Effectiveness Committee sample perception survey (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/Laulima/Examples/SurveyExample2-13-09.pdf

Governance Survey Information (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/GovernanceMenu.htm

Governance Survey Information Page 2008-09 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/2008-9/GovernanceMenu.htm

Governance Survey Information Page 2010-11 (Archived Copy) http://www.wcc.hawaii.edu/ir/GIC/2010-11/GovernanceMenu_2011.html

Grievance (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Grievance/

Guide to the STAR Advisor (Archived Copy) https://www.star.hawaii.edu:10012/includes/PDFs/advising/StarOverview.pdf

Guidelines for Tenure and Promotion: UHCC 2011-2012 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Faculty_Staff/Tenure_Promotion/Documents/2011/2011_2012_Tenure_Promotion_Guide.pdf

Hawai`i Budget Preparation Statues (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol01_Ch0001-0042F/HRS0037/

Hawai`i Council for the Humanities (Archived Copy) http://hihumanities.org/

Hawai`i Great Teachers Seminar Windward CC Web page (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/great_teachers/index.php

Hawai`i Great Teachers Seminar (Archived Copy) http://www.greatteacher.hawaii.edu/Seminar.html

Hawai`i Music Institute (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hawaii_Music_Institute/

Hawai`i Music Institute Music Workshops, April 24-May 22, 2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hawaii_Music_Institute/Documents/2010/Mele_Workshop.php

Hawai`i Public Schools (Archived Copy) http://doe.k12.hi.us/

Hawai‘i Revised Statutes: Chapter 304A (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-0319/HRS0304A/HRS_0304A-.htm

Hawai‘i Revised Statutes: Chapter 304A-104 Regents; Appointment; Tenure; Qualifications; Meetings (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-0319/HRS0304A/HRS_0304A-0104.htm

Hawai‘i Revised Statutes: Chapter 304A-105 Powers of Regents; Official Name (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol05_Ch0261-0319/HRS0304A/HRS_0304A-0105.htm

Hawai`i Revised Statutes: Chapter 84 Standards of Conduct (Archived Copy) http://hawaii.gov/ethics/constitution/chap84

Hawai`i Revised Statutes: Chapter 84-14 Conflicts of interests (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol02_Ch0046-0115/HRS0084/HRS_0084-0014.htm

Hawai`i Revised Statutes: Chapter 92 Public Agency Meetings and Records (Archived Copy) http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol02_Ch0046-0115/HRS0092/HRS_0092-.HTM

Hawai`i Space Grant Consortium (Archived Copy) http://aerospace.wcc.hawaii.edu/HSGC.html

Hawai`i Strategy Institute 2011 Schedule of Presenters (Archived Copy)

Hawai`i Strategy Institute e-mails (Archived Copy)

Hawai`i Voyager Catalog (Archived Copy) http://windwardcc.lib.hawaii.edu:7008/vwebv/searchBasic?sk=windward

Hawaiian Music Workshops 2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Hawaii_Music_Institute/Documents/2011/Hawaiian_Music_Workshops_2011.pdf

Hawaiian Studies WCC Facebook profile (Archived Copy) http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hawaiian-Studies-at-WCC-Windward-Community-College/282538480689

Hawaiian, Asian, and Pacific Issues Board (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/committees/hap/

Hazardous Materials and Hazardous Waste Management Program (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Security/Hazardous_Materials.php

Headcount Enrollment of Credit Students, by Campus, UH Fall 2011 to Fall 2011 (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/iro/pdf/Fall_Enr_SSH.pdf

Health Clearances (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Admissions_Records/Health_Clearance.php

Higher Education Act of 1965: Title IV: Student Assistance (Archived Copy) http://www.tgslc.org/pdf/HEA_Title_IV_Oct02.pdf

HIST 151 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/HIST151/

HIST 152 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/HIST152/

HIST 224 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/HIST224/

HIST 241 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/HIST241/

HIST 242 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/HIST242/

HIST 281 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/HIST281/

HIST 282 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/HIST282/

Hōkūlani Imaginarium (Archived Copy) http://aerospace.wcc.hawaii.edu/imaginarium.html

Honor with Books (Archived Copy) http://library.wcc.hawaii.edu/Honor/default.html

http://windward.hawaii.edu/Accreditation/Documents/2007/2007_15_10_ProgressReport.PDF

Hūlili 2011 Annual Performance Report (Archived Copy)

Hūlili grant abstract (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Documents/Title_III/2010/T3%2010-15%20Cooperative%20Hulili%20Abstract.pdf

Hūlili Transfer Program (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/hulili/

Humanities Annual Department Report 2006-2007 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Assessment/Documents/2007/Program_Review_2007_Humanities.pdf

Humanities Annual Department Report 2010-2011 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2011/Units/Instruction/Humanities/HumanitiesAnnualReport12.5.11%20copy.pdf

Humanities Annual Department Report 2009-2010 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/ir/PBCouncil/2010/Units/Instruction/Humanities/DCAnnualReportHumanities2010.pdf

HWST 107 (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Credit_Courses/HWST107/

ICS 100, Spring 2009, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/2009_Spring/syllabi/60117.pdf

ICS 115, Fall 2011, syllabus (Archived Copy) http://windward.hawaii.edu/Classes/2011_Fall/syllabi/63371.pdf

Implementing the Agreed Upon COMPASS Test Practices (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/offices/cc/docs/placement/2005_SEPTEMBER_Implementing_Agreed_Upon_Compass_Test_Practices.pdf

“Important Web Pages” (Archived Copy)

Information Security Officer, e-mail, 2011/19/01 (Archived Copy)

Information Technology Services Computer Support Policy (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/askus/588

Information Technology Services Documents (Archived Copy) http://www.hawaii.edu/askus/716

Information Technology Services Supported Software (Ar