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Welcome to Presentation Plus!

  • Presentation Plus! Glencoe World Geography
  • Copyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Developed by FSCreations, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
  • Send all inquiries to:
  • GLENCOE DIVISION
  • Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
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Splash Screen

Contents

  • Chapter Introduction
  • Section 1 The Land
  • Section 2 Climate and Vegetation
  • Chapter Summary & Study Guide
  • Chapter Assessment
  • Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides.

Intro 1

Intro 2

  • Chapter Objectives
  • Describe the dominant landforms and natural resources of the United States and Canada.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Discuss climate and vegetation in the United States and Canada.

Intro 3

  • As you read this chapter, note in your journal unusual facts about the physical geography of the United States and Canada–facts that make you ask how or why. Consider using these facts as the main ideas for essays or reports.

End of Intro

Section 1-1

  • The Land
  • Identify some key similarities and differences in the physical geography of the United States and Canada.
  • Explain why rivers have played such an important role in this region’s development.
  • Examine geographic factors that have made the United States and Canada so rich in natural resources.
  • Objectives
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Section 1-2

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • headwaters
  • tributary
  • fall line
  • fishery
  • Terms to Know
  • divide
  • The Land

Section 1-3

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Rocky Mountains
  • Canadian Shield
  • Appalachian Mountains
  • Colorado River
  • Rio Grande
  • Mackenzie River
  • Mississippi River
  • St. Lawrence River
  • Great Lakes
  • Mount McKinley
  • Places to Locate
  • The Land

Section 1-4

  • Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

Section 1-5

  • The lower 48 states of the United States contain a number of active volcanoes. Two of the best known are in Washington, on the Pacific coast: Mount Rainier and Mount Saint Helens. At 14,410 feet (4,392 m), Mount Rainier is the third-tallest volcano in North America. It has been dormant for over a century. Mount Saint Helens, at a height of 8,365 feet (2,550 m), violently erupted in 1980, killing 57 people and damaging an area of about 70 sq. mi. (180 sq km).

Section 1-6

  • Landforms
  • They include Alaska’s Mount McKinley, the highest point on the continent.
  • The Rocky Mountains link the United States and Canada and stretch northwest from New Mexico to Alaska.
  • (pages 115–116)
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • The Western Mountains and Plateaus The western mountains of North America are called the Pacific Ranges.

Section 1-7

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Landforms (cont.)
  • Dry basins and plateaus, featuring Death Valley and the Grand Canyon, fill the area between the mountain ranges.
  • (pages 115–116)
  • Interior Landforms East of the Rockies, the land falls and flattens into the Great Plains, which extend across the center of North America.

Section 1-8

  • Eastern Mountains and Lowlands North America’s oldest mountain chain, the Appalachians, extends from Quebec in Canada to Alabama in the United States.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • The Canadian Shield, a giant core of rock, makes up the eastern half of Canada and the northeastern United States.
  • Landforms (cont.)
  • (pages 115–116)

Section 1-9

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • The Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific are volcanic mountaintops.
  • Greenland, the world’s largest island, is just off the coast of Canada’s Ellesmere Island.
  • Islands North American islands include Manhattan, home to a major world cultural and financial center, in the northeast.
  • Landforms (cont.)
  • (pages 115–116)

Section 1-10

  • Which areas of the region would you predict are the most densely populated? Why do you think so?
  • People tend to settle near sources of freshwater and in mild climates. Mountaintops are too cold and the deserts are too dry for many people to live there. People would settle in the Great Plains because the farmland is rich and abundant. Some of the islands are probably crowded, as are most coastal areas where large cities are located. Other populated areas border lakes and rivers that serve as transportation arteries.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Landforms (cont.)
  • (pages 115–116)

Section 1-11

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  • A Fortune in Water
  • Water flows west of the Divide toward the Pacific Ocean and east of the Divide into the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Rivers from the Rockies The high ridge of the Rockies is called the Continental Divide.
  • (pages 116–119)

Section 1-12

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • A Fortune in Water (cont.)
  • It begins in Minnesota as a stream and ends as a broad river that empties into the Gulf of Mexico.
  • The Mississippi drains all or part of 31 U.S. states and 2 Canadian provinces. It is one of the world’s busiest commercial waterways.
  • The Mighty Mississippi One of North America’s longest rivers, the Mississippi flows 2,350 miles (3,782 km) from its source.
  • (pages 116–119)

Section 1-13

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • The Canadian cities of Quebec, Montreal, and Ottawa developed along the St. Lawrence River and its tributaries.
  • Eastern Rivers The St. Lawrence, one of Canada’s most important rivers, forms part of the United States-Canada border.
  • A Fortune in Water (cont.)
  • (pages 116–119)

Section 1-14

  • Niagara Falls, located on a river connecting Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, is a major source of hydroelectric power for Canada and the United States.
  • A Fortune in Water (cont.)
  • (pages 116–119)

Section 1-15

  • Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • A Fortune in Water (cont.)
  • (pages 116–119)

Section 1-16

  • The Great Lakes–Lakes Superior, Erie, Michigan, Ontario, and Huron–are basins created by glacial activity.
  • The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway is a network of canals, rivers, and waterways linking the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean.
  • From Glaciers to Lakes Glacial dams created Canada’s Great Bear Lake and Great Slave Lake.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • A Fortune in Water (cont.)
  • (pages 116–119)

Section 1-17

  • What is the importance of the Mississippi River in U.S. history and economics? Explain.
  • The river stretches almost the full length of the country’s interior, so it provides a means for transporting people and goods. European explorers used the Mississippi to venture into new territories.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • A Fortune in Water (cont.)
  • (pages 116–119)

Section 1-18

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Natural Resources
  • Fuels An abundance of resources, such as fossil fuels and minerals, has contributed to the prosperity of the United States and Canada.
  • (pages 119–120)

Section 1-19

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Minerals Gold, silver, and copper are found in the Rocky Mountains. Nickel and iron are mined in parts of the Canadian Shield.
  • (pages 119–120)
  • Natural Resources (cont.)
  • Deposits of low-grade iron ore exist in northern Minnesota and Michigan.
  • Canada supplies much of the world’s potash, copper, and silver.

Section 1-20

  • Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • Natural Resources (cont.)
  • (pages 119–120)

Section 1-21

  • Commercial loggers face the challenge of harvesting trees while preserving the remaining forests.
  • Timber Today forests cover less than 50 percent of Canada and just 30 percent of the United States.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Natural Resources (cont.)
  • (pages 119–120)

Section 1-22

  • Because of overfishing, however, the Grand Banks, off Canada’s southeast coast, are now off limits to cod fishers.
  • Fishing The coastal waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Gulf of Mexico are important sources of fish and other sea animals.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Natural Resources (cont.)
  • (pages 119–120)

Section 1-23

  • Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • Natural Resources (cont.)
  • (pages 119–120)

Section 1-24

  • If you were a commercial fisher, how would you resolve the dilemma between earning a living from the sea and conserving the fish population?
  • Possible answers: A commercial fisher might identify new species for harvest, work to establish protected hatching areas, or find alternative uses for equipment and fishing boats, such as tourism. The fisher might also observe limits and seasons for catching fish, and seek other, part-time employment in off seasons.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Natural Resources (cont.)
  • (pages 119–120)

Section 1-25

  • Checking for Understanding
  • __ 1. a boundary in the eastern United States where the higher land of the Piedmont drops to the lower Atlantic Coastal Plain
  • __ 2. the sources of river waters
  • __ 3. a high point or ridge that determines the direction rivers flow
  • __ 4. smaller river or stream that feeds into a larger river
  • __ 5. areas (freshwater or saltwater) in which fish or sea animals are caught
  • A. divide
  • B. headwaters
  • C. tributary
  • D. fall line
  • E. fishery
  • Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column.
  • D
  • B
  • A
  • C
  • E
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Section 1-26

  • Critical Thinking
  • Drawing Conclusions Why might fishing disputes arise in the region?
  • Possible answer: More intense competition for decreasing numbers of fish might cause disputes.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

Section 1-27

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Critical Thinking
  • Identifying Cause and Effect How did the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway influence the development of cities in the region?
  • Early cities depended on the lakes and waterways for transportation.

Section 1-28

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Critical Thinking
  • Drawing Conclusions In what ways did the actions of glaciers alter the physical geography of this region and what effects did those alterations have on the region’s development?
  • Possible answer: Settlers could search for helpful geographic features, such as gaps or low-lying areas, through which they could pass.

Section 1-29

  • Analyzing Maps
  • Location Study the physical-political map on the right. Describe the landscapes found in the following places: Montana, Texas, and Ontario.
  • Plains and mountains are found in Montana. Plains, coastlines, hills, and mountains are found in Texas. Lowlands lakes and plateaus are found in Ontario.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

Section 1-30

  • Applying Geography
  • Effects of Location Write a paragraph describing the effects of a physical process, such as weather or gravity, on the flow of rivers in the United States and Canada.

Section 1-31

  • Close
  • Look through travel magazines for photos of a region of the United States or Canada. Then reread “A Geographic View” on page 115 of your textbook. Write a description about the photo you chose.

End of Section 1

Section 2-1

  • List the climate zones found in the United States and Canada.
  • Climate and Vegetation
  • Describe how winds, ocean currents, latitude, and landforms affect the region’s climates.
  • Identify the kinds of weather hazards that affect the United States and Canada.
  • Discuss how human settlement has affected the natural vegetation of the United States and Canada.
  • Objectives
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Section 2-2

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • chinook
  • prairie
  • supercell
  • hurricane
  • blizzard
  • Terms to Know
  • timberline
  • Climate and Vegetation

Section 2-3

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Great Plains
  • Everglades
  • Newfoundland
  • Yukon Territory
  • Death Valley
  • Places to Locate
  • Climate and Vegetation

Section 2-4

  • Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.

Section 2-5

  • Tornadoes are a common phenomenon in the Great Plains region. “Tornado” comes from the Spanish word for thunderstorm. Tornadoes are usually brief, but they are very destructive. During the 1990s alone, 378 people lost their lives in tornadoes in the United States.

Section 2-6

  • A Varied Region
  • Most of the continental United States and the southern one-third of Canada enjoy temperate climates, depending on elevation.
  • Hawaii, in the South Pacific, has a tropical climate.
  • Two-thirds of Canada and the U.S. state of Alaska experience long, cold winters and brief, mild summers.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • (page 121)

Section 2-7

  • Which climate regions in the United States and Canada do you think attract the greatest number of people? Explain.
  • Possible answer: Many people prefer living in mid-latitude and tropical climates because of relatively mild or warm temperatures and the variety of ways of earning a living.
  • A Varied Region (cont.)
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • (page 121)

Section 2-8

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  • Winter temperatures can fall as low as -70ºF (–57ºC).
  • Large parts of Canada and Alaska lie in a subarctic climate zone with very cold winters and extensive coniferous forests.
  • (page 122)

Section 2-9

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Northern Climates (cont.)
  • Greenland boasts only a few ice-free areas with some extremely hardy trees.
  • Bitter winters and cool summers in the tundra along the Arctic coastline make the area unsuitable for most plants or people.
  • (page 122)

Section 2-10

  • What everyday effects does climate have on people who live in subarctic and tundra climate zones?
  • They probably spend a lot of their time indoors. They must wear layers of warm clothing and heavy socks and boots. For travel, they need vehicles that function in icy conditions. They must take precautions against frostbite. They need to keep their kitchens stocked with supplies for the times when they are snowed in. Many fresh fruits and vegetables are expensive or unavailable. Occupational opportunities are limited.
  • Northern Climates (cont.)
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • (page 122)

Section 2-11

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Western Climates
  • This amount of precipitation, combined with cool temperatures, is ideal for coniferous forests, ferns, and mosses.
  • (pages 122–124)
  • Marine West Coast A marine west coast climate brings nearly 100 inches (254 cm) of rainfall every year to the Pacific coast from California to southern Alaska.

Section 2-12

  • Western Climates (cont.)
  • The region between the Pacific Ranges and the Rocky Mountains includes deserts and steppes.
  • The weather is hot and dry. Cacti and wildflowers bloom during the brief spring rains.
  • Elevation gives the higher reaches of the Rocky Mountains and Pacific Ranges a highlands climate.
  • Plateaus, Basins, and Deserts
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • (pages 122–124)

Section 2-13

  • Western Climates (cont.)
  • In the spring, the warm, dry chinook wind thaws the snows at the base of the eastern slopes of the Rockies.
  • Beyond the timberline, coniferous forests give way to only lichens and mosses.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • (pages 122–124)

Section 2-14

  • Why are trees unable to grow on high mountaintops?
  • At high altitudes, the temperatures are too cold for trees to grow. Soils are generally shallow, rocky, and frozen, so seeds do not germinate.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Western Climates (cont.)
  • (pages 122–124)

Section 2-15

  • Interior Climates
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Some prairie grasses grow up to 12 feet high (3.7 m) as a result of rainfall ranging from 10 to 30 inches (26 to 76 cm) every year.
  • Prairies Prairies, or naturally treeless expanses of grasses, spread across North America’s midsection.
  • (pages 124–125)

Section 2-16

  • Interior Climates (cont.)
  • During the 1930s, several seasons of drought and dry winds blew the soil away, and the area was nicknamed the Dust Bowl.
  • The Dust Bowl When farmers settled the Great Plains, they plowed up the sod formed by prairie grasses, leaving the soil without protection.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • (pages 124–125)

Section 2-17

  • Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • (pages 122–124)
  • Interior Climates (cont.)

Section 2-18

  • What steps have farmers today taken to prevent future dust-bowl disasters?
  • Farmers have planted shelter belts of trees to moderate wind damage, rotated crops, allowed some areas to remain in grass, adopted no-till farming practices, contour plowed to conserve moisture, and planted cover crops. Many participate in government-sponsored conservation programs.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Interior Climates (cont.)
  • (pages 124–125)

Section 2-19

  • Eastern Climates
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Much of the original deciduous forest has been cleared for agriculture.
  • Wetlands and swamps shelter a great variety of plants and animals.
  • Every summer, the region prepares for hurricanes.
  • The southeastern United States, with a humid subtropical climate, has mild winters and long, muggy summers.
  • (page 125)

Section 2-20

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Eastern Climates (cont.)
  • Much of this area is prone to winter blizzards–snowstorms with high winds, heavy or blowing snow, and little visibility.
  • The northeastern United States and southeastern Canada have a humid continental climate with bands of deciduous and mixed forestland.
  • (page 125)

Section 2-21

  • Click the Speaker button to listen to the audio again.
  • Eastern Climates (cont.)
  • (page 125)

Section 2-22

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • In which region would you prefer to live? Why?
  • Possible answers: The Northeast, because the climate changes during each of the four seasons, or the South, because the winters are mild.
  • Eastern Climates (cont.)
  • (page 125)

Section 2-23

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Southern Florida has a tropical savanna area, and both Hawaii and Puerto Rico have tropical rain forests.
  • Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the southern tip of Florida have tropical climates.
  • Tropical Climates
  • (page 125)

Section 2-24

  • Tropical Climates (cont.)
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Why is southern Florida the only place in the continental United States to have a tropical climate, and what kind of tropical climate exists there?
  • Florida’s southern tip lies in the low latitudes. The rest of the continental United States is too far north to have tropical climates. Florida’s tropical savanna climate zone has seasonal rains, vast grasslands, and high temperatures year-round.
  • (page 125)

Section 2-25

  • Checking for Understanding
  • __ 1. seasonal warm wind that blows down the Rockies in late winter and early spring
  • __ 2. a large, powerful windstorm that forms over warm ocean waters
  • __ 3. a snowstorm with winds of more than 35 miles per hour, temperatures below freezing, and visibility of less than 500 feet for 3 hours or more
  • __ 4. an inland grassland area
  • A. timberline
  • B. chinook
  • C. prairie
  • D. supercell
  • E. hurricane
  • F. blizzard
  • Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column.
  • B
  • E
  • F
  • C
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.

Section 2-26

  • Checking for Understanding
  • __ 6. violent thunderstorms that can spawn tornadoes
  • __ 7. elevation above which it is too cold for trees to grow
  • D
  • A
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.
  • Define Match each definition in the left column with the appropriate term in the right column.
  • A. timberline
  • B. chinook
  • C. prairie
  • D. supercell
  • E. hurricane
  • F. blizzard

Section 2-27

  • Critical Thinking
  • Making Comparisons How do the Pacific winds and the Arctic winds differ in their impact on climate?
  • Pacific winds that warm the west coast of the region account for the mild winters there. Arctic winds chill the region’s mid-section and east coast, bringing severe winter weather.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

Section 2-28

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Critical Thinking
  • Problem Solving How might the conditions that caused the 1930s Dust Bowl disaster have been avoided?
  • Conditions could have been avoided by using different farming and conservation methods.

Section 2-29

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Critical Thinking
  • Comparing and Contrasting How do hurricanes and tornadoes differ?
  • Hurricanes are ocean storms hundreds of miles wide with winds of 74 mph (119 k/h) or more that occur in late summer and early autumn. Tornadoes–twisting funnels of air with winds of up to 300 mph (483 k/h)–result from violent spring and summer thunderstorms called supercells.

Section 2-30

  • Analyzing Maps
  • Region Study the maps below. Identify the three largest climate regions and the vegetation common in each.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

Section 2-31

  • Analyzing Maps
  • The subarctic, humid continental, and humid subtropical regions all have some mixed forests. Coniferous trees are common in the subarctic areas of Canada. Temperate grasslands are common in the region’s mid-section.

Section 2-32

  • Applying Geography
  • Effects of Climate Describe and explain the environmental factors that have affected human migration in the region.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Possible answers: Harbors, waterways, climate and soil differences, and rugged, but passable mountains are all environmental factors that have affected human migration.

Section 2-33

  • Close
  • Compare and contrast the environments of the United States and Canada.

End of Section 2

Chapter Summary 1

  • Canada and the continental United States have similar landforms, shaped by similar geologic processes.
  • Section 1: The Land (pages 115–120)
  • Both have high, sharp mountains and dry plateaus in the west; rolling, grassy plains in the center; and lower, older mountains and coastal lowlands in the east.
  • The region’s waterways, including rivers, lakes, coastal waters, and intracoastal channels, played a vital role in settling the land and continue to serve as commercial highways.
  • Key Points
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Chapter Summary 2

  • The Continental Divide divides the region into two large drainage areas.
  • Section 1: The Land (pages 115–120)
  • To the east of the Divide, waters flow to the Arctic Ocean, to Hudson Bay, to the Atlantic Ocean, or to the Gulf of Mexico. To the west, they flow into the Pacific Ocean.
  • Glacial movement shaped much of the North American landscape.
  • The geologic factors that shaped the United States and Canada also provided the region with a wealth of natural resources.
  • Key Points
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

Chapter Summary 3

  • The region encompassing the United States and Canada experiences a great variety of climates.
  • Some climate regions of the United States and Canada are influenced primarily by latitude.
  • Wind, ocean currents, rainfall patterns, and elevation moderate the effects of latitude in other climate zones of the United States and Canada.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Key Points
  • Section 2: Climate and Vegetation
  • (pages 121–125)

Chapter Summary 4

  • Climatic factors cause hazardous seasonal weather patterns in the United States and Canada, including spring and summer tornadoes, and summer and fall hurricanes, and winter blizzards.
  • The region’s natural vegetation reflects its climatic variety, but human interaction with the environment has greatly altered natural vegetation.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Key Points
  • Section 2: Climate and Vegetation
  • (pages 121–125)

End of Chapter Summary

Chapter Assessment 1

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.
  • Reviewing Key Terms
  • Insert the key term that best completes each of the following sentences.
  • chinook fall line fisheries
  • prairies supercell timberline
  • tributary headwaters divide
  • 1. ___________________ supply great quantities of fish and other sea animals to North America.
  • 2. The warm, dry wind, or ___________________ melts snow at the base of the Rockies.
  • 3. Lichens and mosses grow above the ___________________.
  • 4. Spring and summer tornadoes are spawned by a violent thunderstorm called a(n) ___________________.
  • Fisheries
  • chinook
  • timberline
  • supercell

Chapter Assessment 2

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.
  • 5. Farmers on the wide grasslands, or ___________________ of the Great Plains broke up sod to grow crops.
  • 6. Many North American rivers have their ___________________, or source, in the Rocky Mountains, where a(n) ___________________ determines the direction of the rivers’ flow.
  • Reviewing Key Terms
  • prairies
  • divide
  • Insert the key term that best completes each of the following sentences.
  • chinook fall line fisheries
  • prairies supercell timberline
  • tributary headwaters divide
  • headwaters

Chapter Assessment 3

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.
  • 7. Important cities grew up along the ___________________, where the Piedmont drops to the Atlantic Coastal Plain.
  • 8. A(n) ___________________ of the Mississippi River may be a stream or small river.
  • Reviewing Key Terms
  • fall line
  • tributary
  • Insert the key term that best completes each of the following sentences.
  • chinook fall line fisheries
  • prairies supercell timberline
  • tributary headwaters divide

Chapter Assessment 4

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • How were the Pacific Ranges formed?
  • The Pacific Ranges were formed by collisions between the Pacific and the North American tectonic plates millions of years ago.
  • Reviewing Facts
  • Section 1: The Land

Chapter Assessment 5

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • What effect does the Continental Divide have on the direction rivers flow?
  • Waters west of the Continental Divide flow into the Pacific Ocean. Waters east of the divide flow into the Mississippi River system and then into the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Reviewing Facts
  • Section 1: The Land

Chapter Assessment 6

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • What kind of climate is common in most of the United States and southern Canada?
  • Climates typical of mid-latitudes that vary with elevation are common in most of the United States and southern Canada.
  • Reviewing Facts
  • Section 2: Climate and Vegetation

Chapter Assessment 7

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Name two types of vegetation in this region.
  • Mixed deciduous-coniferous forest and grasslands are found in the United States and southern Canada.
  • Reviewing Facts
  • Section 2: Climate and Vegetation

Chapter Assessment 8

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Critical Thinking
  • Analyzing Information What geologic processes shaped much of this region?
  • Collision of tectonic plates and the movement of glaciers shaped much of this region.

Chapter Assessment 9

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Critical Thinking
  • Drawing Conclusions Why should the United States and Canada protect their natural vegetation?
  • Possible answer: The United States and Canada should protect their natural vegetation to prevent massive erosion and loss of topsoil such as that which occurred during the Dust Bowl era.

Chapter Assessment 10

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.
  • Locating Places
  • Match the letters on the map with the physical features of the United States and Canada. Write your answers on a sheet of paper.
  • __1. Rocky Mountains
  • __2. Great Plains
  • __3. Appalachian Mountains
  • __4. Canadian Shield
  • __5. Great Lakes
  • __6. Mississippi River
  • J
  • F
  • K
  • L
  • A
  • C

Chapter Assessment 11

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.
  • Locating Places
  • Match the letters on the map with the physical features of the United States and Canada. Write your answers on a sheet of paper.
  • __7. Hudson Bay
  • __8. Great Bear Lake
  • __9. Pacific Ranges
  • __10. Mackenzie River
  • __11. Rio Grande
  • __12. Great Slave Lake
  • G
  • D
  • B
  • I
  • H
  • E

Chapter Assessment 12

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Why is vegetation in the United States more varied than that in Canada?
  • The United States has more climate zones, from subarctic to tropical. These zones help determine what types of vegetation will grow in a certain area.

End of Chapter Assessment

Geography Online

  • Explore online information about the topics introduced in this chapter.
  • Click on the Connect button to launch your browser and go to the Glencoe World Geography Web site. At this site, you will find interactive activities, current events information, and Web sites correlated with the chapters and units in the textbook. When you finish exploring, exit the browser program to return to this presentation. If you experience difficulty connecting to the Web site, manually launch your Web browser and go to http://geography.glencoe.com

STP 1

  • Choose the best answer for the following multiple-choice question. If you have trouble answering the question, use the process of elimination to narrow your choices.

STP 2

  • 1. Given the information shown in the bar graph on page 129 of your textbook, which city is most likely located east of the fall line in the eastern United States?
  • A City 1
  • B City 2
  • C City 3
  • D City 4
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Test-Taking Tip To determine which city is east of the fall line, remember that the fall line is where the higher land of the Piedmont drops to the lower Atlantic Coastal Plain to the east. Eliminate those choices that do not indicate a city on the coast, near sea level.

GeoFact 1

  • The Appalachian Trail
  • The National Geographic Society Tree
  • Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.

GeoFact 1a

  • The Appalachian Trail is a 2,000 mile (3,200 km) hiking path through some of the most beautiful scenery in the eastern United States. Earl V. Shaffer distinguished himself by being the first person to hike the entire trail in 1949, the first to hike the trail in both directions, and, in 1999 at the age of 80, the oldest person to complete the trek from Mount Katahdin in Maine to Springer Mountain in Georgia.

GeoFact 1b

  • The National Geographic Society Tree, a coast redwood growing in California’s Redwood National Park, is a leading contender for the world’s tallest living tree. Measured in 1995 at 365.5 feet (111 m), the tree has branches that sweep in 50-foot (15-m) arcs.

Interdisciplinary Connection 1

  • Geology The Canadian Shield is a horseshoe-shaped expanse of rock that covers half of Canada. Some of the rock formations in the Canadian Shield are 2 billion to 4 billion years old, making them some of the oldest formations in the world.

Culture Note 1

  • The Dust Bowl Writer John Steinbeck chronicled the plight of those who lost their farms in the Dust Bowl in his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Grapes of Wrath, written in 1939.

SkillBuilder 1

  • Reading a Relief Map
  • When you plan a walk, do you prefer an easy stroll along flat ground, or do you look for a challenging hike up and down steep hills? By using a relief map, you can determine the elevation of the terrain you are going to cover.

SkillBuilder 2

  • Learning the Skill
  • A relief map is a special purpose map that shows variation in height, or elevation, of land areas. All elevation is measured from sea level, the average level of water in the world’s oceans. Mapmakers label this elevation level zero feet (0 m). The actual elevation of some places is shown as a negative number because they lie below sea level.
  • It is not possible for a relief map to show the elevation of every single inch of land. As a result, areas are grouped together. A map may show all areas with an elevation between sea level and 1,000 feet (305 m) colored green. Within that area no hill will be higher than 1,000 feet (305 m) and no valley lower than sea level.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Reading a Relief Map

SkillBuilder 3

  • Follow these steps to read a relief map:
  • Learning the Skill
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • Note the title of the map. 
  • Study the map key. Relief maps generally use colors or shaded areas to identify elevation.
  • Compare the relief map with other maps. Observe how elevation affects climate, population distribution, and economic activity in an area.
  • Reading a Relief Map

SkillBuilder 4

  • Practicing the Skill
  • Refer to the relief map on page 126 of your textbook to answer the following questions.
  • 1. What is the color of the map’s highest elevation?
  • 2. What elevation range does the color green indicate in feet? In meters?
  • The color of the highest elevation is orange.
  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers.
  • The color green indicates 0 to 1,000 feet, or 0 to 300 meters.
  • Reading a Relief Map

SkillBuilder 5

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answers.
  • Practicing the Skill
  • 3. What color is the elevation range of 2,000 to 5,000 feet (600 m to 1,500 m)?
  • 4. At what elevation is the state of Mississippi?
  • The color of the elevation range is light orange.
  • The elevation of Mississippi is 0 to 1,000 feet.
  • Refer to the relief map on page 126 of your textbook to answer the following questions.
  • Reading a Relief Map

SkillBuilder 6

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display possible answer.
  • 5. What are the elevation levels as you travel west from New Jersey to Ohio?
  • Practicing the Skill
  • The elevation levels are from 0 to 5,000 feet.
  • Refer to the relief map on page 126 of your textbook to answer the following questions.
  • Reading a Relief Map

Maps and Charts Contents

  • Maps
  • The United States and Canada: Physical-Political
  • The United States and Canada: Climate Regions
  • The United States and Canada: Natural Vegetation
  • Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slide.

Maps and Charts 1

Maps and Charts 2

Maps and Charts 3

Political Map Transparency

Daily Focus Skills Transparency 1

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

Daily Focus Skills Transparency 2

  • Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.
  • Latitude; the average temperature decreases as latitude increases.

End of Custom Shows

  • End of Custom Shows
  • WARNING! Do Not Remove
  • This slide is intentionally blank and is set to auto-advance to end custom shows and return to the main presentation.

End of Slide Show



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