Week 1: ela learning Targets: rl 1



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ELD Quarter 4 Grade 5





Week 1:

ELA Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will quote accurately when drawing an inference.

RL 2: Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) from character development (such as how a character responds to a challenge) and setting development to determine the theme.

Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using a graphic organizer, students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to compare and contrast two or more characters, two or more settings, and two or more events in a story.

RL 6: Students will pull evidence to explain how the point of view impacts the events described in the selection.

RI 1: Students will quote accurately when drawing an inference.

RI 2: Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.

Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to determine two or more main ideas.



RI 3: Using a graphic organizer, students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to explain the relationship (or interaction) by identifying the similarities and differences of two or more individuals, two or more events, two or more ideas, and two or more concepts.

RI 7: Given multiple sources of information (visual, oral, or quantitative), students will use the information gained from those sources to answer questions or solve problems.

RI 9: Using textual evidence, students will write and speak about information gained from several texts on the same topic.

W 2: Students will write a multi-paragraph informative/explanatory essay.

W 9: Students will apply their knowledge (from graphic organizers, charts, discussions) of RL and RI standards to the writing of short answers, paragraph, and/or multi-paragraph essays.

ELD Standards:

Part I: Interacting in Meaningful Ways

  1. Exchanging information/ideas

Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, including sustained dialogue, by following turn‐taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, adding relevant information, building on responses, and providing useful feedback.
Part II: Learning About How English Works

3. Using verbs and verb phrases

Use various verb types (e.g., doing, saying,

being/having, thinking/feeling) and tenses appropriate for the task and text type (e.g., timeless present for science description, mixture of past and present for narrative or history explanation) on a variety of topics.

4. Using nouns and noun phrases

Expand noun phrases in an increasing variety of ways (e.g., adding comparative/superlative and general academic adjectives to noun phrases or more complex clause embedding) in order to enrich the meaning of sentences and add details about ideas, people, things, etc.



5. Modifying to add details

Expand and enrich sentences with adverbials (e.g., adverbs, adverb phrases, prepositional phrases) to provide details (e.g., time, manner, place, cause, etc.) about a variety of familiar and new activities and processes.



TasksThis week focuses on grammar.
Quick Write – Daily, to start the ELD period

  1. Write a sentence that has at least one adjective and one adverb. Label the parts of speech in the sentence.

  2. Make a list of 15 verbs. The teacher may want to provide few books from the classroom library for the students to peruse for verbs.

  3. Make a list of 15 adverbs, using books as needed.

  4. Make a list of 20 nouns. Again, books may be provided.

  5. Make a list of 20 adjectives, using books as needed.


Discussion –

  • Day 1

  • Bring a few students up to share their Quick Write sentences under the document camera or on the board.

  • Ask the class if they agree with the labeling of each sentence.

  • If someone disagrees, they use the proper discussion protocol, “I disagree with _____ because _______.”

  • They need to explain why a word is or is not an adjective or adverb.

  • Teach adjectives and adverbs as needed.

  • Adjectives modify nouns and answer, “How many?”, “What kind?”, or “Which one?

  • Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. They answer, “When?”, “Where?”, or “How?”

  • Day 2

  • Partners compare their Quick Write lists and choose five verbs they think are their best.

  • Partners form groups of four to combine the two lists of verbs.

  • Teacher calls on a group to share a verb and writes it on the board.

  • Each group tries to think of a word that is more specific. Teacher charts those words under the original word.

For example, if the first group says “run”, the other groups may say “race, speed, scamper, scurry, sprint”

  • Teacher may want to provide a thesaurus for each group.

  • Day 3

  • Repeat the process from yesterday with adverbs.

  • Day 4

  • Repeat the process with nouns.

  • Day 5

  • Repeat the process with adjectives.


Save the papers from this week to use next week.


Week 2:

ELA Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will quote accurately when drawing an inference.

RL 2: Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) from character development (such as how a character responds to a challenge) and setting development to determine the theme.

Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using a graphic organizer, students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to compare and contrast two or more characters, two or more settings, and two or more events in a story.

RL 6: Students will pull evidence to explain how the point of view impacts the events described in the selection.

RL 7: Using charts of reactions, students will explain how the visual and/or multimedia element contributes to the meaning, tone, and beauty of the text.

RI 7: Given multiple sources of information (visual, oral, or quantitative), students will use the information gained from those sources to answer questions or solve problems.

W 1: Students will write a multi-paragraph opinion essay with logically sequenced ideas/reasons.

W 9: Students will apply their knowledge (from graphic organizers, charts, discussions) of RL and RI standards to the writing of short answers, paragraph, and/or multi-paragraph essays.

ELD Standards:

Part I: Interacting in Meaningful Ways

  1. Exchanging information/ideas

Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, including sustained dialogue, by following turn‐taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, adding relevant information, building on responses, and providing useful feedback.
Part II: Learning About How English Works

3. Using verbs and verb phrases

Use various verb types (e.g., doing, saying,

being/having, thinking/feeling) and tenses appropriate for the task and text type (e.g., timeless present for science description, mixture of past and present for narrative or history explanation) on a variety of topics.

4. Using nouns and noun phrases

Expand noun phrases in an increasing variety of ways (e.g., adding comparative/superlative and general academic adjectives to noun phrases or more complex clause embedding) in order to enrich the meaning of sentences and add details about ideas, people, things, etc.



5. Modifying to add details

Expand and enrich sentences with adverbials (e.g., adverbs, adverb phrases, prepositional phrases) to provide details (e.g., time, manner, place, cause, etc.) about a variety of familiar and new activities and processes.



TasksThis week focuses on grammar. This will support the informational writing done in ELA.
Quick Write – Daily, to start the ELD period

  1. Using your lists from last week, write three sentences that have at least one adjective or one adverb in each sentence.

  2. Using your lists, write three sentences with direct objects.

  3. Make a list of 15 prepositional phrases.

  4. Add a prepositional phrase to each sentence from Monday and Tuesday.

  5. Using your lists from last week and this week, write three sentences that have at least two prepositional phrases in each sentence.


Discussion –

  • Day 1

  • Bring a few students up to share their Quick Write sentences under the document camera or on the board.

  • Discuss and correct sentences.

  • Lesson on nouns:

  • Nouns have different “jobs”

  • They can be subjects or objects

  • Examples of objects:

  • Direct Object: Maria ate pizza.

  • Indirect Object: Linda gave Sondra a book.

  • Object of the Preposition: The dog ran down the street.

  • Focus on Direct Objects

  • Every sentence has a subject (Who or what did it.)

  • Every sentence has a verb (What did they do?)

  • Some sentences have a Direct Object (What did they __________?)

verb

  • Example: Maria ate pizza.

  • Who or what did it? Maria (subject)

  • What did she do? ate (verb)

  • What did she eat? pizza (direct object)

  • Practice writing sentences with direct objects.




  • Day 2

  • Lesson on prepositional phrases

  • A group of words that generally tell where or when (differentiate from adverbs – one word)

  • The dog hobbled into the kitchen in the morning.

  • The group of words may also describe a noun (differentiate from adjectives – one word)

  • The dog with the broken leg hobbled into the kitchen in the morning.

  • Consist of a preposition, an object of the preposition (noun), and often an article (a, an, the)

  • Examples:

  • down the slide

  • under the table

  • in a jar

  • inside the car

  • into the kitchen

  • in the morning

  • Students identify the preposition, the article, and the object of the preposition in each of the examples

  • Day 3

  • Partners compare their Quick Write lists and choose five prepositional phrases they think are their best.

  • Partners form groups of four to combine the two lists of prepositional phrases.

  • Teacher calls on a group to share a prepositional phrase and writes it on a chart. Continue around the room, writing as many different prepositional phrases as possible.

  • Save this chart for student reference.




  • Day 4

  • Practice writing sentences with prepositional phrases.

  • Day 5

  • Teacher models how to improve a sentence by substituting more specific words or adding adverbs and prepositional phrases for detail.

  • Example:

  • The boy went to the store. (subject, verb, prepositional phrase)

  • The little boy with the chubby cheeks went to the store. (improved the details of the subject with an adjective and a prepositional phrase)

  • The little boy with the chubby cheeks pulled his wagon to the grocery store after lunch. (more specific verb, more specific store, prepositional phrase to tell when)

  • Students practice adding detail to some of their sentences from this week.

Week 3:

ELA Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will quote accurately when drawing an inference.

RL 2: Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) from character development (such as how a character responds to a challenge) and setting development to determine the theme.

Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using a graphic organizer, students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to compare and contrast two or more characters, two or more settings, and two or more events in a story.

RL 6: Students will pull evidence to explain how the point of view impacts the events described in the selection.

RL 7: Using charts of reactions, students will explain how the visual and/or multimedia element contributes to the meaning, tone, and beauty of the text.

RI 7: Given multiple sources of information (visual, oral, or quantitative), students will use the information gained from those sources to answer questions or solve problems.

W 1: Students will write a multi-paragraph opinion essay with logically sequenced ideas/reasons.

W 9: Students will apply their knowledge (from graphic organizers, charts, discussions) of RL and RI standards to the writing of short answers, paragraph, and/or multi-paragraph essays.

ELD Standards:

Part I: Interacting in Meaningful Ways

  1. Exchanging information/ideas

Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, including sustained dialogue, by following turn‐taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, adding relevant information, building on responses, and providing useful feedback.
Part II: Learning About How English Works

3. Using verbs and verb phrases

Use various verb types (e.g., doing, saying,

being/having, thinking/feeling) and tenses appropriate for the task and text type (e.g., timeless present for science description, mixture of past and present for narrative or history explanation) on a variety of topics.

4. Using nouns and noun phrases

Expand noun phrases in an increasing variety of ways (e.g., adding comparative/superlative and general academic adjectives to noun phrases or more complex clause embedding) in order to enrich the meaning of sentences and add details about ideas, people, things, etc.



5. Modifying to add details

Expand and enrich sentences with adverbials (e.g., adverbs, adverb phrases, prepositional phrases) to provide details (e.g., time, manner, place, cause, etc.) about a variety of familiar and new activities and processes.



TasksThis week focuses on grammar.
Quick Write – Display a different picture each day. Students write at least three sentences about the picture using prepositional phrases.
Discussion –

  • Day 1

  • Students work with a partner to label the parts of speech in their sentences.

  • Call on a few students to share the sentences.

  • Point out the parts of speech.

  • Teacher reviews how to improve a sentence by substituting more specific words or adding adverbs and prepositional phrases for detail.

  • Students practice adding details to their sentences.

  • Day 2

  • Repeat the process from yesterday with the new sentences.

  • Days 3-5

  • Repeat the process as necessary with the new sentences each day.

  • Students follow the process independently when able.






Week 4:

ELA Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will quote accurately when drawing an inference.

RL 2: Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) from character development (such as how a character responds to a challenge) and setting development to determine the theme.

Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using a graphic organizer, students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to compare and contrast two or more characters, two or more settings, and two or more events in a story.

RL 6: Students will pull evidence to explain how the point of view impacts the events described in the selection.

RL 9: Given two stories of the same genre, students will use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the themes and topics.

RI 7: Given multiple sources of information (visual, oral, or quantitative), students will use the information gained from those sources to answer questions or solve problems.

W 1: Students will write a multi-paragraph opinion essay with logically sequenced ideas/reasons.

W 9: Students will apply their knowledge (from graphic organizers, charts, discussions) of RL and RI standards to the writing of short answers, paragraph, and/or multi-paragraph essays.

ELD Standards:

Part I: Interacting in Meaningful Ways

  1. Exchanging information/ideas

Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, including sustained dialogue, by following turn‐taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, adding relevant information, building on responses, and providing useful feedback.
Part II: Learning About How English Works

3. Using verbs and verb phrases

Use various verb types (e.g., doing, saying,

being/having, thinking/feeling) and tenses appropriate for the task and text type (e.g., timeless present for science description, mixture of past and present for narrative or history explanation) on a variety of topics.

4. Using nouns and noun phrases

Expand noun phrases in an increasing variety of ways (e.g., adding comparative/superlative and general academic adjectives to noun phrases or more complex clause embedding) in order to enrich the meaning of sentences and add details about ideas, people, things, etc.



5. Modifying to add details

Expand and enrich sentences with adverbials (e.g., adverbs, adverb phrases, prepositional phrases) to provide details (e.g., time, manner, place, cause, etc.) about a variety of familiar and new activities and processes.



TasksThis week focuses on interviewing.
Quick Write –

  • Monday-Wednesday: Pose a list of interview questions on the board. Students choose a few to answer each day for three days.

Examples:

  • What is your favorite thing to do? (not TV or video/computer games)

  • What sports do you like?

  • What is your favorite movie? Why?

  • Do you have pets? If yes, what pets and how many?

  • Do you play cards? If yes, what cards games do you play?

  • Do you play Connect 4, checkers, chess or any other board games? If yes, which games do you play?

  • Have you been on a boat or a plane? If yes, where did you go?

  • Do you have a favorite dish a family member makes for you? What is it? Describe it.

  • What do you want to do when you grow up?

  • Where will you live when you are grown up?

  • What are three words that describe you best?

  • Thursday and Friday: Students complete the Bio Cube Planning Sheet about themselves. (see page 8)



Discussion –

  • Monday-Wednesday, partners or small groups discuss the answers students provided in the quick write. Provide sentence stems to guide their discussions.

Examples:

  • My favorite thing to do is _______ because ________.

  • I like to _________ because _________.

  • I have been on a plane to visit _______________.

  • My favorite dish that _______ makes is __________. I love it because ____________.

  • When I grow up, ________________.

  • One word that describes me is __________ because _____________.

  • Another word that describes me is ___________ because ___________.

  • Thursday-Friday, Students share the information on the Bio Cube Planning Sheet with a partner or small group.

  • Explain to students that next week they will be acting as biographers as they gather information about the lives and interests of their classmates. Explain that they will be creating a short biography called a Bio-Cube in order to gather information about their classmates and that they will be sharing that information with the class.


Grammar –

  • As time permits, review grammar from weeks 1-3 as needed.




Bio Cube Planning Sheet
Use this planning sheet to prepare for the Bio Cube by filling in the information for each side of the cube. Because space on the cube is limited, you will need to

briefly summarize your information.


Side

Prompt

Information

1

Person’s Name, Time Period,

and Place






2

Personal Background

Where and when you were born, where you have lived, and your family information






3

Personality Traits

Two or three traits (e.g., caring, outgoing, animal-lover)







4

Significance

Something you have done that you think is important in the world or to your family






5

Obstacles

One event that was challenging and that made you stronger (e.g., learning to play soccer again after you broke your leg or struggling to get your grade up after you got an F on a test)




6

Important Quote

Something you say often or a favorite quote and where it comes from






adapted from ReadWriteThink.org





Week 5:

ELA Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will quote accurately when drawing an inference.

RL 2: Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) from character development (such as how a character responds to a challenge) and setting development to determine the theme.

Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using a graphic organizer, students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to compare and contrast two or more characters, two or more settings, and two or more events in a story.

RL 6: Students will pull evidence to explain how the point of view impacts the events described in the selection.

RL 9: Given two stories of the same genre, students will use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the themes and topics.

RI 7: Given multiple sources of information (visual, oral, or quantitative), students will use the information gained from those sources to answer questions or solve problems.

W 1: Students will write a multi-paragraph opinion essay with logically sequenced ideas/reasons.

W 9: Students will apply their knowledge (from graphic organizers, charts, discussions) of RL and RI standards to the writing of short answers, paragraph, and/or multi-paragraph essays.

ELD Standards:

Part I: Interacting in Meaningful Ways

  1. Exchanging information/ideas

Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, including sustained dialogue, by following turn‐taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, adding relevant information, building on responses, and providing useful feedback.

9. Presenting

Plan and deliver oral presentations on a variety of topics in a variety of content areas (e.g., providing an opinion speech on a current event, reciting a poem, recounting an experience, explaining a science process) with light support.



Part II: Learning About How English Works

3. Using verbs and verb phrases

Use various verb types (e.g., doing, saying,

being/having, thinking/feeling) and tenses appropriate for the task and text type (e.g., timeless present for science description, mixture of past and present for narrative or history explanation) on a variety of topics.

4. Using nouns and noun phrases

Expand noun phrases in an increasing variety of ways (e.g., adding comparative/superlative and general academic adjectives to noun phrases or more complex clause embedding) in order to enrich the meaning of sentences and add details about ideas, people, things, etc.



5. Modifying to add details

Expand and enrich sentences with adverbials (e.g., adverbs, adverb phrases, prepositional phrases) to provide details (e.g., time, manner, place, cause, etc.) about a variety of familiar and new activities and processes.



TasksThis week focuses on interviewing.
Monday- Tuesday:

  • Model how to complete a Bio Cube about yourself. (Template on page 9) You may want to complete a Planning Sheet ahead of time. (page 8) Model how to take information from the planning sheet to put on the cube.

  • Students complete a Bio Cube Planning Sheet about a partner.

Wednesday:

  • Students create a Bio Cube about a partner, using the information from the Planning Sheet

Thursday-Friday:

  • Students present their partner to the class, using the information from the Bio Cube.

  • Possible sentence frames:

  • This is ______________.

  • He/she was born ________________.

  • He/she has __ brothers and sisters.

  • One personality trait of ____ is _____ because ___________.

  • An important event in _________’s life was _______________ because ___________________.



Weeks 6&7:

ELA Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will quote accurately when drawing an inference.

RL 2: Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) from character development (such as how a character responds to a challenge) and setting development to determine the theme.

Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using a graphic organizer, students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to compare and contrast two or more characters, two or more settings, and two or more events in a story.

RL 6: Students will pull evidence to explain how the point of view impacts the events described in the selection.

RL 7: Using charts of reactions, students will explain how the visual and/or multimedia element contributes to the meaning, tone, and beauty of the text.

RL 9: Given two stories of the same genre, students will use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the themes and topics.

W 1: Students will write a multi-paragraph opinion essay in which they clearly state their opinion followed by their organizational plan in which they state their logically sequenced ideas/reasons.

W 3: Students will write a multi-paragraph narrative (about real or imagined experiences or events).

W 9: Students will apply their knowledge (from graphic organizers, charts, discussions) of RL and RI standards to the writing of short answers, paragraph, and/or multi-paragraph essays.

ELD Standards:

Part I: Interacting in Meaningful Ways

  1. Exchanging information/ideas

Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, including sustained dialogue, by following turn‐taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, adding relevant information, building on responses, and providing useful feedback.

8. Analyzing language choices

Distinguish how different words with related meanings (e.g., fun versus thrilling, possibly versus certainly) and figurative language (e.g., the stream slithered through the parched land) produce shades of meaning and different effects on the audience.



9. Presenting

Plan and deliver oral presentations on a variety of topics in a variety of content areas (e.g., providing an opinion speech on a current event, reciting a poem, recounting an experience, explaining a science process) with light support.



Part II: Learning About How English Works

3. Using verbs and verb phrases

Use various verb types (e.g., doing, saying, being/having, thinking/feeling) and tenses appropriate for the task and text type (e.g., timeless present for science description, mixture of past and present for narrative or history explanation) on a variety of topics.



4. Using nouns and noun phrases

Expand noun phrases in an increasing variety of ways (e.g., adding comparative/superlative and general academic adjectives to noun phrases or more complex clause embedding) in order to enrich the meaning of sentences and add details about ideas, people, things, etc.



12. Selecting language resources

a) Use a wide variety of general academic and domain‐specific words, synonyms, antonyms, and figurative language to create precision and shades of meaning while speaking and writing.



TasksThese two weeks focus on character analysis
Reading and Discussion –

  • Read and discuss the story Elena (HMR Theme 5 Selection 4) over two to three days.




  • Sample discussion questions for Segment 1: (You can also use the comprehension questions in the margins.)

  • Who is telling the story? (Rosa, Elena’s daughter)

  • Is it 1st person or 3rd person narration? How do you know? (1st person, uses “I”)

  • What words can we use to describe Elena at the beginning of the story? (Chart their responses to use later in the week.)

  • How does Elena’s character change on page 554? (Chart their responses to use later in the week.)




  • Sample discussion questions for Segment 2: (You can also use the comprehension questions in the margins.)

  • After reading page 558, what words can we use to describe Elena now?

  • At the end of page 561, what does Rosa mean when she says, “We had all become real Americans – all of us, that is, but Mamá.”? (The next page describes Elena’s feelings, but the students should first try to figure out why she doesn’t feel like a real American.)

  • Compare Elena to characters in Dancing Home. Chart characteristics of Margie and Lupe.


Vocabulary

  • Using the words you charted from the story Elena, show students how to create a Shades of Meaning graphic. For example, if they said Elena was sad, make a graphic for sad. One way to elicit responses is to post the word sad. Ask the students, “What word means sadder than just sad?” Use a thesaurus as needed. Continue adding words that change in level of intensity – more than depressed, more than miserable, etc. Go the other direction from sad to unhappy, then with more intensity to happy, more than happy, more than joyful, etc.


despondent - miserable - depressed – sad – unhappy – happy – joyful – elated

SAMPLE:

These graphics help build student vocabulary in their speaking and writing. Remind them to choose a specific word rather than a general one.


  • You might have partners work on other words to create Shades of Meaning. Start with a word like “small” or “run” or “laugh”.

.
Writing-

  • Bio Cubes

  • In partners, students complete a Bio Cube Planning Sheet about Elena.

  • In partners, students complete a Bio Cube Planning Sheet about either Margie or Lupe in Dancing Home.

  • Individually, students complete a Bio Cube on Elena OR Margie OR Lupe.

  • Students present their cube to the class or to a group.




  • Students use events from the story to describe the character’s reaction to the events.

  • To begin, chart a list of events in the story.

  • Ask students questions such as, “How did Elena respond to her husband’s death?”



Week 8:

ELA Learning Targets:

RL 1: Students will quote accurately when drawing an inference.

Students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to write a summary.



RL 3: Using a graphic organizer, students will use details (both directly from text and inferred) to compare and contrast two or more characters, two or more settings, and two or more events in a story.

RL 9: Given two stories of the same genre, students will use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the themes and topics.

W 2: Students will write a multi-paragraph informative/explanatory essay.

W 9: Students will apply their knowledge (from graphic organizers, charts, discussions) of RL and RI standards to the writing of short answers, paragraph, and/or multi-paragraph essays.

ELD Standards:

Part I: Interacting in Meaningful Ways

  1. Exchanging information/ideas

Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, including sustained dialogue, by following turn‐taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, adding relevant information, building on responses, and providing useful feedback.

Part II: Learning About How English Works

3. Using verbs and verb phrases

Use various verb types (e.g., doing, saying,

being/having, thinking/feeling) and tenses appropriate for the task and text type (e.g., timeless present for science description, mixture of past and present for narrative or history explanation) on a variety of topics.

4. Using nouns and noun phrases

Expand noun phrases in an increasing variety of ways (e.g., adding comparative/superlative and general academic adjectives to noun phrases or more complex clause embedding) in order to enrich the meaning of sentences and add details about ideas, people, things, etc.



5. Modifying to add details

Expand and enrich sentences with adverbials (e.g., adverbs, adverb phrases, prepositional phrases) to provide details (e.g., time, manner, place, cause, etc.) about a variety of familiar and new activities and processes.



  • In ELA, students will be working on the summative assessment this week: Write a multi-paragraph essay to compare and contrast the cultural identity of Margie in Dancing Home to Mitali in “Magic Carpet.” (See Appendix C for Informative Writing Rubric)




  • To practice this type of writing, students can compare and contrast a character from Elena to a character in Dancing Home.

  • Begin by charting traits of each character.

  • Create a graphic organizer to compare and contrast them. (Venn diagram, Double Bubble Map, etc.)

  • Use some type of organizer to set up the writing. Example of a 4-square:



______ and _____ both ______.


_____ and _______ deal with cultural identity in many ways.

In addition, ________ and _______ both _________.


A difference between ________ and _________ is _________.


In conclusion,




  • Use their writing to review common grammatical errors as time permits.




revised 4-25-14



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