Us capitals Test Unit #3 Emergence of Modern America Key Learning



Download 3.45 Mb.
Date16.09.2018
Size3.45 Mb.
#69376

US Capitals Test

Unit #3

  • Emergence of Modern America

Key Learning

  • The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1919): Students will examine primary and secondary sources regarding the emergence of modern America in order to distinguish between historical fact and interpretation using differing points of view.

Unit Essential Question

  • How do primary and secondary sources differ in their descriptions of the emergences of modern America?
  • 2nd MP Project
  • Easy Way or Hard Way?
  • Desks are cleared except for pen/pencil
  • No talking; Test face down when finished
  • Unit #3 Pre-Test

HOMEWORK #1

  • Read –
    • Progressivism
    • Government Regulation
    • National Progressivism

Concept #1 – Progressive America

  • Lesson Essential Question #1 – What government reforms made officials more responsible to the people? Why were they needed?
  • Vocabulary –
  • Civil Service Referendum
  • Patronage Recall
  • Sherman Anti-Trust Act 17th Amend
  • Muckraker
  • Initiative

What do I know?

  • Near the turn of the 20th century (1900s), there were a tremendous amount of problems in American cities, rural areas, etc.
  • Work with a partner to create a list of 5 problems that were going in America in the late 1800s and early 1900s.
  • Be prepared to share with class.

Problems in America (1890-1900)

  • 1.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • 4.
  • 5.

Spoils System

  • Patronage – giving jobs to loyal supporters
    • Corruption – took public money, did not have skills for job
  • Ending System –
    • Rutherford B Hayes James Garfield

THE DEATH OF A PRESIDENT

  • President Garfield shot by Charles Guiteau in July 1881

Regulating Big Business

  • What problems were there with big businesses/monopolies?
  • Solution – Sherman Antitrust Act
    • Difficult to enforce
    • Used to stop unions

Reforming City Government

  • How did city governments become so corrupt?
  • Boss Rule –
    • Powerful politicians
      • Popular – immigrants
      • Controlled all work in city (payoffs)
    • Tweed Ring – Boss William Tweed (NYC)
      • Expose by Thomas Nast

Changing the Public

  • Muckrakers – crusading journalists
    • Burned out tenements, exposed corruption
  • The Jungle – Upton Sinclair
    • Meat packing industry

Progressive Beliefs

  • Government – guided by public interest
  • Women – played leading role
    • Morally superior to men – WHY?
  • Will of the people –
    • Primary
    • Initiative
    • Referendum
    • Recall

Other Reforms

  • Graduated income tax
    • Rich pay higher rate than poor or middle class
  • 16th Amendment – Congress has power to impose income tax
  • 17th Amendment – direct election of senators

Class Work

  • Read excerpts from The Jungle – Upton Sinclair (1906) and Fast Food Nation – Eric Schlosser (2002)
  • Write a one page essay comparing the two excerpts. Your paper should answer the following questions:
    • What is the goal of both excerpts?
    • What kinds of details do both authors include in their excerpts to make their points?
    • What were the effects of The Jungle’s publication and what have been some possible effects of the publication of Fast Food Nation?

HOME WORK #2

  • Read
    • Anti-Trust
    • Theodore Roosevelt
    • William Howard Taft
    • Woodrow Wilson

Exit Ticket

  • America began to change for the “better” in the late 1800s, early 1900s. What impact do those changes still have on America today?

Concept #1 – Progressive America

  • Lesson Essential Question #2 – How did economic, political and social conditions affect the development of political parties during the Progressive Era?
  • Vocabulary –
  • Trust
  • Trustbuster
  • Conservation

Changes in Political Parties

  • As societal values change so do the political parties. How have political parties changed over time and recently?
  • Work with a partner to create a list of 5 examples.
  • Be prepared to share with class

Changes in Political Parties

  • 1.
  • 2.
  • 3.
  • 4.
  • 5.

Rise of Progressive President

  • 1896 – William McKinley elected President
  • 1900 – McKinley chose Theodore Roosevelt as running-mate

Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt

  • Born to wealthy family (NY)
  • 26 yrs old – NY State Legislature
    • Tragedy almost ended political career (1884)
  • Head of NYC Police Department, Assistant Secretary of the Navy
  • 1898 – signed up to fight in Spanish American War
    • Led “Rough Riders”
  • Governor of New York (anti-trust)

Death of another President

  • September 1901 – McKinley assassinated by anarchist Leon Czolgosz

TR takes on the Trusts

  • Good vs. Bad Corporations
    • Good – efficient and fair
    • Bad – cheated public and took advantage of workers
  • Ordered Attorney General to file lawsuits against trusts
    • Northern Securities Company
  • Called trustbuster

The Progressive President Continues

  • 1904 Election: TR – Square Deal
    • All have opportunity to succeed
    • Won in land slide
  • Meat Packing Industry
    • TR read the Jungle
    • Meat Inspection Act of 1906
    • 1906: Pure Food and Drug Act
  • Conservation – “The rights of the public to natural resources outweigh private rights.”

1908 & 1912 Elections

  • 1908 – TR put support behind William Howard Taft
    • TR – Africa to hunt big game
  • 1912 – TR running against Taft
    • Republicans did not trust TR
    • TR sets up new party – Progressive Party
      • “BULL MOOSE PARTY”
    • Democrats – Woodrow Wilson

New President

  • 1912 – Woodrow Wilson
    • TR and Taft split Republican vote
  • Wilson –
    • New Freedom – restore competition in American economy
    • Federal Trade Commission – investigate companies

Class work

  • Political Cartoon Activity
    • May work in partners or individually
    • Work must be completed on separate piece of paper.

HOMEWORK #3

  • Read –
    • Woman’s Suffrage
    • Temperance Movement

Exit Ticket

  • How did the relationship between government and big business change during the Progressive Era? Do you still se those changes today?

Concept #1 – Progressive America

  • Lesson Essential Question #3 – Were the Progressives successful in their goals of expanding rights (in workplace and for women), creating accountability in government and creating a social conscience for issues such as conservation and urban health?
  • Vocabulary –
  • Suffragist
  • 18th Amendment
  • 19th Amendment

Changes in individuals rights

  • “Kansas will win the World’s applause
  • As the sole champion of the woman’s cause
  • So light the bonfires, have the flags unfurled
  • To the banner state of all the world”
  • What feelings/beliefs do you think the author was expressing about women’s rights?
  • Be prepared to share with class

Beginnings of Suffrage Movement

  • Civil War
  • Late 1800s – women gained right to vote in 4 western states – WY, UT, CA, ID
    • Why?
    • Wyoming – 1890 applied for statehood
      • Wanted Congress to change voting law
      • “We may stay out of the Union for 100 years, but we will come in with our women.”

Suffragists

  • Early 1900s –
    • 5 million women earning wages outside home
      • Paid less than men
  • Carrie Chapman Catt
  • Alice Paul

VICTORY FOR WOMEN

  • 19th Amendment - The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. (1919)
    • Doubled number of eligible voters
  • Licenses to practice law, medicine
  • Higher Education

Temperance Movement

  • 1874 – Women’s Christian Temperance Union: Evils of alcohol
  • Movement began in countryside and fear of “big city”
    • What differences are there between the countryside and the “big city”?
    • Why did movement begin?
  • Carry Nation –
    • Took fight to saloons

Temperance Movement

  • Temp Move – wanted Constitutional amendment banning alcohol
  • 1917 – WWI
    • Argued grain used to make liquor should be used to feed soldiers
  • 1917 – Congress passed 18th Amendments – illegal to produce, consume or sell alcoholic drinks anywhere in US

Class Work

  • Video –
  • NO TALKING
  • ANSWER QUESTIONS IN ORDER ON OWN PIECE OF PAPER

Homework #4

  • STUDY FOR QUIZ;
  • Read –
    • The US Becomes a World Power
    • Purchasing of Alaska
    • Annexation of Hawaii

Exit Ticket

  • What future problems do you foresee with the passage of the 18th Amendment?

Quiz

  • Progressive Era

Concept #2 – Imperialism and WWI

  • How has US imperialism affected native cultures both positively and negatively?
  • Vocabulary -
  • Imperialism
  • Annexation
  • Isolation

Cartoon Analysis

  • Work with a partner and analyze the following cartoon on the purchasing of Alaska from Russia.
  • Answer the following questions
    • What is going on in this picture?
    • Who or what is represented by each part of the drawing?
    • What point is the cartoonist making?
  • Be prepared to share with class.

Expanding the US

  • Sectary of State William Seward
      • Annex – Canada, Alaska & Caribbean Islands
      • 1867 – Alaska purchased for $7.2 million
        • Less than 2 cents per acre
  • Hawaii
    • US involvement (early 1800s – sugar)
      • Important military and economically
    • Island controlled by US businesses
    • 1893 – Queen Liliuokalani – give power back to people
    • US businesses led uprising to overthrow queen
    • 1898 – US annexes Hawaii

Class work

  • For or Against Annexation
  • Arguments For :
  • Hawaii too small and weak to maintain independence
  • No protest by any other government
  • "Cordial consent" of both governments
  • Strategic location to secure U.S. fleet and coastline
  • Commercial interests
  • "Outpost of Americanism against increasing Asiatic invasion"
  • Arguments Against:
  • Hawaiian people not consulted
  • American people not consulted
  • Unconstitutional method of increasing domain
  • Too remote; too costly to defend
  • Non-homogeneous population
  • Not commercially necessary
  • Not militarily necessary
  • Secure independence of Hawaiian people with policy rather than takeover
  • Above are the arguments used for and against the annexation of Hawaii in the May 17, 1898, Report of the Committee on Foreign Affairs Report on H.Res. 259. Chose a side and write a letter to a US Congressman explaining your point of view. Use your textbook for more reference information.

Homework #5

  • Read –
    • Spanish American War
    • Sgt York

Exit Ticket

  • Was America correct in its addition of Alaska and Hawaii? Did the government do anything wrong in trying to expand the country?

Concept #2 – Imperialism and WWI

  • How has the US imperialism altered American power and prestige in the international system?
  • How did imperialism result in an unprecedented international conflict?
  • Vocabulary -
  • Rough Riders
  • Platt Amendment
  • Yellow Journalism

Predicting the future…

  • In 1823, US Secretary of State John Quincy Adams said – “Cuba is like a ripe apple. A storm might tear that apple from its native tree—the Spanish Empire—and drop it into American hands.”
  • Was John Q Adams correct in his statement? Why or why not?
  • Be prepared to share with class

Beginnings of Conflict

  • Cuba – Spain’s “Ever-Faithful Isle”
  • 1868 – Revolution broke out
    • Crushed after 10 years
  • 1895 – new revolution
    • Brutal tactics used to crush rebellion
    • Herded millions of Cubans into detention camps (100,000 died)
  • US reaction
    • US businesses - $100 million (SUGAR)
    • Public split

War Fever

  • Presidents Cleveland and McKinley kept US out of war
  • Media (NY World & NY Journal)
    • Yellow journalism

REMEMBER THE MAINE!

  • 1898 – fighting broke out in Havana, Cuba
  • McKinley – USS Maine sent to Havana
  • February 15th – Explosion
    • 260 of 350 sailors and officers killed
  • Controversy
    • Historians – accident
  • REMEMBER THE MAINE! – US battle cry
  • April 25, 1898 – Congress declares war

Spanish-American War

  • War – 4 months long
    • Philippines and Cuba
  • Cuba
    • US Soldiers
      • Teddy Roosevelt = Rough Riders

Spanish American War

Spanish-American War

  • End of war
    • Spanish fleet destroyed (off Santiago)
    • US claimed Puerto Rico
    • Losses
      • 379 men died, 5,000 of malaria and yellow jack

End of War

  • Treaty – signed in Paris
    • Cuba is free
    • Spain gave US two Islands – Puerto Rico and Guam
    • US bought Philippines for $20 million
  • Platt Amendment
    • Limited Cuba’s right to make treaties
    • Allowed US to intervene
    • US naval base at Guantanamo Bay

Class work

  • WWI Video – FOOT SOLDIERS
    • NO TALKING
    • Answer all questions on worksheet
    • All questions go in order
    • Worksheet due once video is completed

Homework #6

  • Read –
    • World War I
    • The Road to War

Exit Ticket

  • Imperialism is when one country imposes its will on another country – politically, economically, socially. What are the positive and/or negative impacts of US Imperialism?

Concept #2 – Imperialism & WWI

  • Lesson Essential Question –
    • How do simple ideas and a single event cause a worldwide conflict?
    • Vocabulary -
    • Nationalism
    • Imperialism
    • Militarism

Predicting the future

  • Otto van Bismarck once said – “A great world war will result from something that happens in the Balkans.” Was he correct? Why or why not?
  • Work with a partner to answer the question above.

Causes to World War I

  • Nationalism – love/pride in your country
    • Not be ruled by foreign power
    • Examples
      • France and Germany – war in 1870
        • France lost Alsace-Lorraine to Germany
      • Eastern Europe – Hungarian Empire
        • Serbs and other minorities being ruled by foreign power

Causes to World War One

  • Imperialism – one country controls another, politically, economically, socially
    • Examples – Africa, Pacific

Causes to World War One

  • Militarism – building up of military
    • Example – Germany expanded navy by building U-boat

Rival Alliances

  • Triple Alliance –
    • Germany
    • Austria-Hungary
    • Italy
  • Triple Entente –
    • France
    • Great Britain
    • Russia

“Shot Hear ‘Round the World”

  • Nationalism causing crisis in the Balkans
    • Countries battle for territory
    • National groups seek
    • Freedom from Austria-
    • Hungary

“Shot Heard ‘Round the World”

  • Austria-Hungary annexed Bosnia
  • Serbia – afraid that they would be next
  • Serbia wanted Bosnia to break away from Austria-Hungary and join them to form their own country

“Shot Heard ‘Round the World”

  • June 28, 1914 – Archduke Franz Ferdinand (heir to Austro-Hungarian throne) visited Sarajevo

“Shot Heard ‘Round the World”

  • Black Hand – Serbian Terrorist Group
    • Along parade route
    • Wanted Bosnia to break away from Austria-Hungary and join with Serbia
  • Gavrilo Princip

Assassination of Franz Ferdinand

War is Declared

  • Austria-Hungary blamed Serbia for death of Archduke
  • How did Austria-Hungary blaming Serbia cause World War I?
  • Triple Alliance –
    • Germany
    • Austria-Hungary
    • Italy
  • Triple Entente –
    • France
    • Great Britain
    • Russia

War is Declared

  • Russia sworn to protect Serbia

War is Declared

  • FRANCE
  • War is Declared
  • FRANCE
  • Who is at fault?

Class work

  • Causes of World War One

Homework #7

  • Read –
    • The Lusitania
    • The US Enters the War
    • Guns of August

Exit Ticket

  • Who is to blame for causing World War One? Explain your answer.

Concept #2 – Imperialism and WWI

  • Lesson Essential Question
    • What impact did the advancements in military weapons have on the war?
    • Vocabulary –
    • Trench warfare
    • Stalemate
    • Propaganda
    • U-boats

The War to End all Wars

  • Why do you think this conflict was originally known by the title above? What aspects of the conflict would support that statement?
  • Work with your partner
  • Be prepared to share with the class

The “Great War” Begins

  • German Kaiser – “You will be home before the leaves have fallen from the trees.”
  • What did he mean by this?
  • How long will the war actually last?
    • 4 years

Changing Sides

  • Sides of War 1914
  • Triple Alliance –
    • Germany
    • Austria-Hungary
    • Italy
  • Triple Entente –
    • France
    • Great Britain
    • Russia
  • Which country will drop out of the war and change sides in 1915? Why?
      • Italy
      • Loosing battles

New Alliances

  • Central Powers –
    • Germany
    • Austria-Hungary
    • Ottoman Empire
  • Allied Powers –
    • England
    • France
    • Russia
    • Serbia
    • Italy
    • Belgium

German advances

  • Germany – fighting 2-front war
    • Battle of the Marne

Trench Warfare

Class work

  • The Trenches
  • Life in the Trenches

Eastern Front

  • Germany and Austria-Hungary fighting Serbia and Russia
  • Mid-1916 – Russia lost over 1 million soldiers

American Neutrality

  • Divided Opinion
    • Allied support vs Central Powers
  • Impact of war
    • Economic Boom
      • Selling supplies to both sides of conflict
        • What problems could this cause?
    • Propaganda War

Freedom of the Seas

  • Submarine Warfare
    • Germans using U-boats to attack any ships near England
      • Violated international law – cannot attack neutral ships
    • US reaction
      • President Wilson hold Germany responsible if Americans die or lose property

Sinking of the Lusitania

  • Germany ignored President Wilson’s threats
  • May 15, 1915 – Germany sank Lusitania
  • American Reaction

Class work

  • Map – Europe in World War One

Homework #8

  • Read –
    • Over There: American Doughboys Go to War
    • Over Here: War Effort at Home
    • The Espionage & Sedition Act
  • Read and Complete
    • Russian Revolution

Exit Ticket

  • Could America have stayed out of the war? Why or why not?

Concept #2 – Imperialism & WWI

  • Lesson Essential Question –
    • What impact did America have on the war? What does it say for the future of the nation?
    • Vocabulary –
    • Zimmerman Telegram Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
    • Selective Service Act
    • Liberty Bonds
    • Bolsheviks

Isolation

  • What does the word above mean?
  • Work with a partner to create a definition for the word above and reasons for its impact on events leading up to US involvement in the war.
  • Be prepared to share with class.

The Road to War

  • US Neutrality - ISOLATION
    • President Wilson kept US out of war
      • Won reelection in 1916
  • Moving towards war
    • Unrestricted submarine warfare
    • Zimmerman Telegram
    • Russian Revolution
  • April 6 1917 – Congress declares war

War Effort at Home

  • Allies Desperate
  • Selective Service Act
  • Food for Victory
    • “Victory Gardens”
  • Factories and Labor
    • War Industries Board & War Labor Board
  • Liberty Bonds
  • Role of Women

War Effort at Home

  • Tension & Protest
    • Great Migration: thousands of African Americans moved from South to North
      • Violence against African Americans
    • Mexican Immigrants
    • Attacks on German Americans
      • Sauerkraut – “liberty cabbage”
      • Bratwurst – “liberty sausage”
    • Jailing critics

Russian Revolution

  • Czar Nicholas II driven from power
    • Romanovs ruled for 300+ years
    • Riots protesting lack of food and war
  • Provisional Government established

Russian Revolution

  • November 1917 – Bolsheviks took over
      • Communist government (Karl Marx)
  • July 1918 – Royal Family is executed
  • March 1918 – Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
    • Allied reaction
  • VIDEO

Western Front - 1918

  • German Push
    • Turned all troops to western front
    • Reached 50 miles east of Paris

US Entry

  • June 1918 – US reached France
    • Led by General John J Pershing
      • Kept US as separate unit – WHY?
  • Key American Battles
    • Battle of Belleau Wood (June 1918)
    • Battle of Argonne Forest (Sept 1918)

Class Work

  • US Attempts to Remain Neutral
  • Battling Through a Forest

Homework #9

  • Read and Complete –
    • End to World War I

Exit Ticket

  • What impact did American involvement have on the war? How will this affect the future of the country?

Concept #2 – Imperialism & WWI

  • Lesson Essential Question – What lessons can be learned from the end of the “Great War”? How will this conflict impact future events?
  • Vocabulary –
  • armistice League of Nations
  • 14 Points reparations
  • Isolation

The End of the “Great War”

  • President Woodrow Wilson called for “Peace without victory” at the end of the war. What do you think he meant by this?
  • Work with a partner to answer this question.
  • Be prepared to share with class

Peace at Last

  • October 1918 – Germany contacted Wilson
    • Called for armistice
    • Wilson – 2 conditions
      • Germany must accept his plan for peace
      • German emperor must give up power
  • November 11th 1918
    • 11th hour, 11th day, 11th month
      • Why do you think such a specific day was picked?

The Cost of War

  • 10-13 million people died
    • Germany = 2 million
    • Russia, France & Great Britain = 4 million
    • US – 50,000
  • Northern France destroyed
  • Germany – millions starving
  • US – influenza = 500,000 died

Wilson’s Plan for Peace

  • Fourteen Points (January 1918)
    • Goal – prevent international problems from causing another war
    • Self-determination
    • League of Nations

Peace Conference

  • Big Four
    • President Woodrow Wilson (US)
    • Prime Minister David Lloyd (England)
    • Georges Clemenceau (France)
    • Vittorio Orlando (Italy)
  • Where are Germany and Russia?

Peace Conference

  • Differing aims
    • Wilson – “peace without victory”
    • Others – “Germany must pay”
      • Reparations
      • Germany accept responsibility for war
      • Protect themselves from future German attacks

Versailles Treaty

  • June 1919 – Compromise between 2 sides
  • 5 Basic Aspects of Treaty
    • Germany blamed for war
    • Germany lost military
    • Germany had to pay huge reparations ($33 billion)
    • Lost colonies
    • Government forced to be democracy
  • Where is Germany’s involvement?

Changes to Europe

  • What differences do you see?

Senate and Versailles Treaty

  • Wilson
  • Took case to people
  • Suffered stroke
  • Isolationists
  • Did not want League of Nations to tell US to enter war
  • November 1919 – Senate rejected Versailles treaty
    • Wilson – “It is dead, and every morning I put flowers on its grave”
  • 1921 – US signed treaty with Germany; never joined League of Nations
  • What problems will occurr for League of Nations without the US?

Class Work

  • Treaty of Versailles

Homework #10

  • STUDY FOR TEST

Exit Ticket

  • Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
  • What lessons can we learn from WWI?

UNIT 3 TEST

  • Progressives, Imperialism & World War One


Download 3.45 Mb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©www.sckool.org 2022
send message

    Main page