Uf institute on Aging Professional Development Seminar Insights into Teaching College Courses. Presented By



Download 11.05 Kb.
Date15.02.2017
Size11.05 Kb.
#11433

UF Institute on Aging

  • Professional Development Seminar
  • Insights into Teaching College Courses.
  • Presented By:
  • Terry L. Mills, Ph.D.
  • October 22, 2002

The purpose of this seminar

  • To present some key ideas about developing courses.
  • To help identify some components of effective instructing.
  • To assure you that these skills are acquirable.

The Plan for Today’s Session

  • We will examine several general areas of teaching and course development, with the goal of generating a lively interactive discussion.
  • You are encouraged to actively participate, and to ask questions or raise issues at any point in my presentation.

A Process for Planning Courses

  • Before you can begin to develop your actual course plan, there are a couple of self-assessment steps that you should go through:
    • Know thyself - what is your comfort zone for public speaking? There are various teaching styles ranging from the “pure lecturer”, to the “Phil Donahue.” Where do you fit along this continuum?

A Process for Planning Courses

  • Define your view of the Purposes of Education.
    • What do you think is your most important task?
      • that you teach your students to think effectively?
      • assure that your students are engaged in personally enriching experiences?
      • emphasize the great ideas and discoveries from your discipline?

Setting Course Goals

  • The goals for your course should reflect some of those identified for the department or program.
  • Usually your course can be located on a "curricular map." For example, it might be described as:

Setting Course Goals

  • a general education course for students with limited background in the discipline.
  • a general education course for prospective majors and others .
  • a general education course for all university students.
  • an introductory course for prospective majors
  • an advanced course for majors
  • a graduate course

Setting Course Goals

  • Careful selection of content will reflect the most important topics. Questions to ask include:
  • Does your topic:
    • 1. illustrate a method of inquiry?
    • 2. indicate guiding principles in your field?
    • 3. teach a valuable skill among course goals?

Setting Course Goals

  • Setting course goals requires a balance so that there is sufficient content to make the course challenging and not so much content that the pace of the course is too rushed.
  • Leave room in case a topic takes longer or other unpredictable events occur.
  • Use student feedback devises to adjust coverage rate.

Organizing the Course Content

  • Content can be arranged in several ways:
    • Structurally based content is consistent with the way relationships in the field occur, e.g., spatial, chronological, physical, etc.
    • Conceptually based content uses major ideas or concepts to show important relationships such as: relationships of theory to application of theory, or evidence to conclusion.

Organizing the Course Content

  • Content can be arranged in several ways:
    • relationships of logical sequence in which one idea is necessary to comprehend the next.
    • relationships that proceed from simplest ideas to those of more complexity, and abstractness.

Other Types of Course Objectives:

  • Learning based content is organized by principles such as:
    • students should understand an idea or concept before attempting to interpret and use it.
  • Knowledge utilization content is arranged so:
    • problem-solving situations encourage students to take responsibility for developing logical, organized solutions.

Other Types of Course Objectives:

  • Knowledge utilization content is arranged so:
    • problem-solving situations encourage students to take responsibility for developing logical, organized solutions.
  • Knowledge-creation based content:
    • is organized around processes of generating, discovering, or verifying knowledge in the field. It shows how scholars discover relationships and draw valid inferences.

How will you deliver the Materials?

  • Use both active and passive modes of instruction.
  • Lecture is the most common passive mode.
  • Active modes include discussion, case studies, labs, clinics, and field experiences.
  • Research about teaching and learning shows that students learn more content, more quickly, and retain what they have learned longer if they are actively engaged.
  • A combination of the two modes often works well.

Developing Your Syllabus

  • The syllabus formally communicates your expectations, grading procedures, and assignments.
  • It may take many forms, but the the following elements are often included:

The Syllabus

  • SYP 4730 - Sociology of Aging and the Life Course
  • Dr. Terry L. Mills
  • 3356 Turlington Hall - 392-0265 ext 252
  • email: tlmills@soc.ufl.edu
  • OFFICE HOURS: Monday and Wednesday - 4:05pm - 5:10 pm, OR BY APPOINTMENT.
  • Teaching Assistant: Lula DaWit

The Syllabus

  • PURPOSE OF COURSE: This course is intended to provide an overview of the social processes of aging. To do this we will critically evaluate macro- and micro-level factors that influence aging in our society. Most of us have at least a common-sense understanding of aging on a personal and individual level, having experienced our own maturation and aging process. Each of us has experienced life course transitions, or turning-points such as becoming an adolescent or entering college. A deeper understanding of aging requires, however, that we move beyond our individual experiences and broaden our view to understand how processes from the level of the individual cell to overall society influence us, and in turn are influenced by us as we progress through life. During this semester, we will examine various factors that affect aging in our society.

The Syllabus

  • Procedures and Course Requirements: Your course grade will be based upon three areas of accomplishment. First, there will be three (3) in-class multiple-choice and/or essay exams worth 100 points each. Second, there is an OPTIONAL-REQUIRED community service component to this course. While I realize that some of you may be unable to volunteer for community service due to other commitments, it is expected that each of you will contact ELDERCARE OF ALACHUA COUNTY, ALTRUSA HOUSE, The UF OFFICE FOR COMMUNITY OUTREACH, or other approved elder care facilities to sign-up for at least 10 hours of community service during this semester. Those of you who volunteer for community service will also be required to submit a five (5) page report on your experiences dealing with the elderly in our community.

The Syllabus

  • Attached to this syllabus is the contact information and a brief description of the possible community service opportunities. Third, for those of you who are unable to participate in the community-service component, you are expected to write a 12-15 page term paper on some aspect of aging that is of interest to you. All term papers and community-service reports will be due on Monday, March 11th. It is suggested that you make an appointment with me to discuss your paper topic before you begin to write your paper or report.

The Syllabus

  • CLASS POLICIES
  • Attendance Policy: Unless you have a documented medical emergency, official university absence, or official religious holiday, you are expected to be in class on time, and prepared to participate in class discussions.
  • Cell-phone Policy: Please turn off your cell phones and beepers before class begins.
  • Grading Policy: Your final grade will be based upon an accumulation of up to 400 points. There are two components to your final grade: (1) you will have three multiple-choice and/or essay exams worth up to 100 points each (75% of your grade); (2) you are expected to write a 12-15 page research paper, or 5 page community service paper on some aspect of aging and the life course. The paper will be worth up to 100 points (25% of your grade).
  • Late Assignment Policy: Late assignments, term papers, or exams will not be accepted. There will be no partial credit for any late assignments.
  • Students with disabilities: If you need special accommodations, please see me during my office hours.

The First Day

  • What will you (should you) do on the first class meeting?
  • Involve students quickly.
  • Identify the value and importance of the subject.
  • Set clear expectations.
  • Establish rapport with students.
  • Reveal something about yourself.
  • Establish your own credibility.
  • Establish the “climate” for the class.
  • Introduce the subject matter.


Download 11.05 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©www.sckool.org 2023
send message

    Main page