The Sixth Form Cambridge A/as level Programme at Maru-a-Pula Information for Parents & Prospective Applicants. What are Cambridge International Examinations A/as levels?



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Maru-a-Pula School CIE A/AS Level Course Synopses

Maru-a-Pula 6th Form



AS/A Level Course Outlines for 2017
The Sixth Form Cambridge A/AS Level Programme at Maru-a-Pula Information for Parents & Prospective Applicants.
What are Cambridge International Examinations A/AS Levels?

Advanced Level qualifications are globally recognised and provide a passport to higher education.

Each Cambridge International Examinations (CIE) A-Level syllabus is divided into two parts:


  • the Advanced Subsidiary(AS) syllabus content, which is expected to be covered in a year-long course, and

  • part two of the syllabus, commonly referred to as ‘A2’, which is covered in a second year-long course.

This flexible approach enables students to choose between three main options:



  • Take all A Level components in the same examination session at the end of a course of study, usually at the end of the second year.

  • Follow a staged assessment to an A Level by taking the AS qualification in one examination session, and the A2 assessment in a subsequent session.

  • Take the AS qualification only at the end of the one-year course.

Pass grades for AS are A to E, and for A Level are A* to E which can be directly related to the UK AS/A Level grades. Students at MaP will typically follow four courses in their AS year of study. If they then continue to the full A Level in their second year, they continue with four subjects or focus in three subjects having opted to drop one of the four subjects.


Is the one year AS Level a suitable option for you?

Maru-a-Pula recognises that some students wish to pursue a one-year post-IGCSE or equivalent course of studies. The AS Level is a stand-alone qualification in its own right and can be used to meet the entry requirements for tertiary institutions. Many institutions world-wide recognise this qualification in their entry requirements, particularly those in the Republic of South Africa.


Which institutions will grant me entry based solely on my AS results?

Each institution, and indeed each faculty within that institution, will have its own entry requirements. Details of such requirements can be sought on application to the institution.


What are the requirements for joining the sixth form A/AS level programme at MaP?

(i) As a Maru-a-Pula student, predicted grades and Mock Exam results together with the student’s performance over the course of Form 4 and Form 5 are taken into consideration together with comments from teachers, Directors of Co-curricular activities and IGCSE. In certain cases, an interview may be arranged between the Director of Sixth Form Level Studies, the student, and the student’s guardians or sponsor.


The school reserves the right of admission into the Sixth Form course, based on the history of academic performance and behaviour of each student.

(ii) An external student who is applying from outside of Maru-a-Pula must provide predicted grades and Mock Exam results, together with other school reports on performance over the course of Form 4 and Form 5 (or equivalent qualification/courses). These are taken into consideration together with comments from two school referees. All suitable applicants are interviewed by teachers specialising in the subject areas applied for. Certain subjects, such as Mathematics, require a 30 minute entrance test which takes place on the day of the interviews.


In both cases, the minimum requirements for the departments offering A/AS studies are shown below:

MAP Departmental Entry requirements


DEPARTMENT

FOR AS - LEVEL ONLY

FOR A - LEVEL

IGCSE PREREQUISITES

Accounting

B in Accounting

Pass at AS

A/B in English and Maths

Art & Design

Portfolio

Pass at AS

Portfolio

Biology

A/B

C at AS

grade A

Business Studies




Pass at AS

A/B in English and Maths

Chemistry

Mock exam grade A/B + teacher recommendation

Pass at AS

grade A/B

Computing

A/B Maths

Pass at AS

A/B in Computer Studies and Maths

Economics





Pass at AS

A/B in English and Maths

Geography


A/B

C at AS

A/B in English and Maths

History


A/B

C at AS

A/B B in English

Literature in English

A/B

C

A/B Literature & First Language English

English Language

A/B

Pass at AS

B Literature & First Language English

Mathematics

Mock exam grade A/B + teacher recommendation

Pass at AS

grade A

Physics

Mock exam grade A/B + teacher recommendation

Pass at AS

grade AB


Flexibility

Where an applicant had the intention of doing the one-year AS Level only, but then decides to continue with the second-year of study, the student may do so on the condition that their performance during the first-year of study satisfactorily meets the departmental requirements during the AS year.


Where an applicant had the intention to leave before the AS exams to another institution for tertiary education, he/she must follow all regulations for the Sixth Form course during the period of enrolment at the school. The applicant must inform the Director of A-Level Studies of the actual plan.
Co-curricular Activities

In addition to academic studies, the Service, Physical and Enrichment programme (SPE) at MaP offers a full range of services, sporting and self-enriching activities. This programme fulfils an important role for Sixth Form students in that it allows them to demonstrate responsibility and leadership skills in their areas of interest. Participation in such programmes is becoming increasingly important and is seriously considered during university admissions. As in the lower school, SPE is a compulsory part of the curriculum.


Outline of the Sixth Form Programme at Maru-a-Pula School

Lower 6th Term 1

Lower 6th Term 2

Lower 6th Term 3

Commence AS Level L6 course, studying 4 AS
Report back on student progress in all subjects based on internal continuous assessment.

Registration for AS Examinations

Internal Examinations in all subjects – Mock Examinations


Report back on student progress in all subjects based on Mock Examinations.

Completion of Syllabus. Revision.

Formal lessons end mid-October
CIE AS Examinations October/November


Upper 6th Term 1

Upper 6th Term 2

Upper 6th Term 3

Commence A Level U6 course

Subject drops after release of AS results.


Report back on student progress in all subjects based on internal continuous assessment.

Registration for A2 Examinations

Internal Examinations in all subjects – Mock Examinations


Report back on student progress in all subjects based on Mock Examinations.

Completion of Syllabus. Revision.

Formal lessons end mid-October


CIE A Level Examinations October/November


The deadline for applications (Maru-a-Pula students) is at the end of October.
The timetable drives the school’s life of about 700 students and 60 teachers and it is prepared well in advance before the first term commences, beginning as early as October.
A great number of students apply for three pure Sciences plus Mathematics. It generates two or three classes for each of these subjects and, a pattern, which allows many other combinations for the rest of the students. However, some combinations of subjects are not possible. The subject’s blocking limits the possible subject combinations.
Example Subject Blocks
The student chose one subject from each block.

The choices available for the A2 course may be reduced as the number of students at that level is about 30 % of the initial class (AS course). Very rarely, combinations of subjects may not be possible and the students should discuss a possible solution with parents and the Director of A-Level Studies.

Draft - number of classes for AS - The number of places available is limited.


Subject

classes

Maximum

Number of students



Subject

classes

Maximum

Number of students



Accounting

1

15

Mathematics

4

88

Art & Design

1

10

Economics

1

20

Computing

1

10

Business Studies

1

20

Chemistry

3

15-15-15

Geography

1

15

Biology

2

15-15

History

2

15-15

Physics

3

15-15-15

Literature in English

1

20










English Language

2

20-20


ACCOUNTING (9706)
The aims of the A-Level Accounting syllabus are intended to enable students to:

  • develop an ability to apply accounting concepts, principles and practices

  • understand the role of accounting as an information system for monitoring, problem-solving and decision-making and increase awareness of the place of Accounting in changing economic, social and technological environments

  • develop a critical and analytical approach to examining and evaluating accounting policies and practices

  • develop skills of communication, analysis, interpretation and presentation of both qualitative and quantitative accounting information.

These aims are achieved through developing the student’s ability to reason and think logically with more systematic rigour.


The A Level Accounting syllabus takes two years to complete and is based on a combination of financial and managerial accounting.
The AS programme gives an introduction to the concepts and principles which underlie accounting theory and practice and expands their application to a range of accounting situations. It provides a discrete package of material providing those candidates who do not want to progress to A2 with a knowledge and understanding of accounting principles and techniques applicable to the business environment.
The A2 part of the Advanced Level (A2) component incorporates a greater depth of knowledge across a wide range of business situations. It provides an excellent foundation for further study of accountancy at pre-professional and professional levels, as well as forming part of a general education at Advanced Level. Candidates wishing to pursue careers in business management will find the management accounting and reporting and interpretation skills of great benefit.
ASSESSMENT The examination consists of:

ADVANCED SUBSIDIARY LEVEL

Paper 1 Multiple Choice (1 hour) 30 questions, 30 %

Paper 2 Structured Question (1hr 30 min) 3 questions 70%



ADVANCED LEVEL

Paper 1 Multiple Choice (1 hour) 30 questions, 15 %

2 Structured Question (1 h 30 min) 3 questions 35%

3 Multiple Choice (1 hour) 30 questions 15 %

4 Problem Solving (2h) 3 questions 35%




PRE-REQUISITES

It is recommended that candidates who are beginning this course should have previously completed a Cambridge O Level or Cambridge IGCSE course in Accounting or the equivalent.

Other subjects which would go well with Accounting are Business Studies or Economics and the Sciences.

ART & DESIGN (9704)
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Students should have at least a "B" grade pass in GCSE Level Art, and should bring a portfolio of work for interview.


OUTLINE OF AS/A2 COURSE IN BRIEF:

This course is designed to give the student greater choice and flexibility in deciding practical and theoretical areas of study to follow. Students are required to research and develop their work in a course of study where their own ideas are the central focus.


The first-year programme is set out in such a way that students will experience a broad range of media and artwork from a multicultural perspective. The goal of this particular course is that students will learn the importance of selecting and applying appropriate responses to stimuli. It is important to recognise that this course is not a Fine Art course; as much as possible the design is based on a literal interpretation of “ART and DESIGN”.
By the end of the first year the students will have completed the first 2 assessment components and also should have selected their own individual area of study. The second-year programme leads up to the final submission of the last 2 major assessment components.
ASSESSMENT:

There are 4 components to complete for assessment for an A Level. They are as follows:


1. 15 hour controlled test. (Similar to the IGCSE/BGCSE 10 hour controlled test)

2. Course work component. (Similar to the IGCSE/BGCSE course work)

3. Course work component.

4. Related study. (3500 word project based on component 2 or 3)



BUSINESS STUDIES (9707)
This course aims to enable students to:

  • develop an understanding of the objectives, organization and management of business organisations in private and public sector enterprises

  • examine social, economic and technical environments, which constrain firms’ actions and provide opportunities for growth and profitability

  • examine how firms respond to challenges, influenced by their internal structures and the motivation and organisation of individuals within them. (The culture and goals of firms is examined, using case studies)

  • learn simple accounting and investment appraisal techniques. (Students will use statistical evidence to examine and evaluate the performance of businesses)

  • develop critical understanding of marketing - (a broad term covering the development, promotion, pricing and distribution of goods and services)

  • to increase awareness of the organisation, motivation, recruitment and training of people within businesses in parallel with operations management, which reviews the methods of production of both goods and services.

  • examine and evaluate the legal, ethical and social constraints upon businesses and finance.

  • appreciate the conflicting and complementary interests of all stakeholders in the wealth creating process.

  • appreciate the importance of e-commerce to business stakeholders.

The AS course reviews all key areas of the subject giving pupils an overview, which is developed in the second year for A2.


ASSESSMENT:

The examination consists of two papers for AS level and three papers at full A level:



Paper

Level

Duration

Type of Paper

Weighing

AS Level


A Level

1

AS

1 h 15 min

Short Answers
Choice Essay Core

20 %
20 %

10 %
10 %

2

AS

1 h 30 min

Data Response

60 %

30 %

3

A2

3 hrs

Case Study




50 %

A Level Business Studies gives an excellent grounding for courses in:



  • Banking

  • Law

  • Finance




  • Development work;

  • Government Service

  • Insurance

  • Environmental Management

BIOLOGY (9700)
Biology is a popular choice whether taken with the other sciences or in conjunction with non-science subjects. It aims to develop an understanding of biological principles and a realization of Biology's role in today's society.
First Year of Study: The AS

During the first-year, students are introduced to biology at the cellular level through the detailed study of cell structure, biological molecules, enzymes, the cell membrane, genetic control and cell division. After studying transport, students will begin to understand the intricacies of organisation within the whole organism. This is further developed with the study of infectious disease and immunity. A short topic on ecology concludes the first year of study.


The AS Examination is offered to Biology students at the end of the first-year in order to allow a staged-assessment route to the Advanced Level. This involves three examinations including a practical exam.
Second Year of Study: The A2

In the second-year, respiration, photosynthesis and regulation and control are studied together with the more contemporary and controversial topics of inherited change, gene technology and selection and evolution. Also during the second-year, a number of topics are covered which emphasise the applications of Biology. These include biodiversity and conservation, biotechnology, crop plants and aspects of human reproduction. Paper 4, taken at the end of the second-year examines these core A2 topics. A fifth paper is also taken at the end of year two which will test the practical skills of planning, analysis and evaluation.


Biology is at the forefront of scientific discovery and the area of science in which the most exciting discoveries are being made. Today's society is coming to terms with issues such as HIV/AIDS, cloning, genetic engineering and the decimation of the Earth's natural resources. A Level Biology could be the pathway to fascinating areas of study and rewarding careers.


Paper

Type of Paper

Duration

Marks

Weighing













AS Level

A Level

1

Multiple-choice

1 h

40

31 %

15 %

2

AS structured questions

1 h

60

46 %

23 %

3

Advanced Practical Skills

2 h

40

23 %

12 %

4

A2 AS structured questions

2 h

100




38 %

5

Planning, Analysis and Evaluation

1h 15 min

30




12 %


CHEMISTRY (9701)

The course

A-Level Chemistry is a requirement for many undergraduate courses in the Pure and Applied Sciences. These include:




  • Biotechnology

  • Chemical engineering

  • Medicine

  • Metallurgy

  • Pharmacy

  • Veterinary science

  • Geology



The course requires a good understanding and foundation in both Mathematics and Physics at IGCSE or BGCSE Level and also a good command of English.


Students are required to apply subject knowledge in a variety of ways which encourages a methodical and logical approach to solving problems and expressing ideas.
The course components include:

  • Stoichiometry

  • Atomic structure

  • Chemical bonding

  • Energetics




  • Electrochemistry

  • Reaction kinetics

  • Inorganic chemistry

  • Organic chemistry



Students are also required to perform class practicals which will be undertaken once a teaching cycle. The course also touches aspects of modern analytical techniques in the ‘Applications of Chemistry’ section. This part of the course is designed to emphasize the importance of Chemical techniques in the modern world.


Examinations

External examinations are carried out at the end of the first year of study (AS) and at the end of the second year of study (A2).


Entry Requirements

  • A/B grade at IGCSE/BGCSE Chemistry or A/B grade at IGCSE/BGCSE Physical Science

  • A/B grade at IGCSE/BGCSE Mathematics




Paper

Type of Paper

Duration

Marks

Weighing













AS Level

A Level

1

Multiple-choice

1 h

40

31 %

15 %

2

AS structured questions

1 h

60

46 %

23 %

3

Advanced Practical Skills

2 h

40

23 %

12 %

4

A2 AS structured questions

2 h

100




38 %

5

Planning, Analysis and Evaluation

1h 15 min

30




12 %


COMPUTING (9691)
The A-Level Computing course will be of value and appeal to students whose principal interests lie in a variety of subjects, both Humanities & Sciences. It is envisaged that students will utilise the skills and knowledge of computing in one of three ways:

- to provide a general understanding and perspective of the use of computer technology and systems, this will inform their decisions and support their participation in an increasingly technologically dependent society.

- to provide the necessary skills and knowledge to seek employment in areas that utilise computing.

- students may continue to develop their knowledge and understanding of computing through entry to higher education, where this qualification will provide a useful foundation for further study of computing or more specialist aspects of computing.


The aims of the syllabus are that students should be able to:


  • develop an understanding of the main principles of solving problems using

computers;

  • develop an understanding of the range of applications of computers and the

effects of their use;

  • develop an understanding of the organisation of computer systems including

software, data, hardware, communications and people;

  • acquire the skills necessary to apply this understanding of developing computer

based solutions to problems.

  • develop an understanding of the main principles of systems analysis and design,

methods of problem formulation and planning of solutions using computers, and

systematic methods of implementation, testing and documentation.


These aims are achieved through a mixture of practical and theoretical work. Most of the practical activities are done in the programming language, Visual Basic. Students are also expected to master an office suite such as MS Office in the first year. An ability to reason and think logically is required, even more than any particular aptitude in Mathematics.
Mode of Assessment:

A whole class of students in agreement with the teacher may choose:




  • to take all the Advanced Level components in the same examination session leading to the full GCE A Level.




  • to follow a staged assessment route to the Advanced Level by taking the Advanced Subsidiary (AS) qualification in an earlier examination session. Subject to satisfactory performance such students are then only required to take the final part of the assessment (referred to in this syllabus as A2) leading to the full A Level. The Advanced Subsidiary GCE forms 50% of the assessment weighting of the full Advanced GCE to take the Advanced Subsidiary (AS) qualification only.

Advanced Subsidiary GCE Students take papers 1 and 2.



Advanced GCE Students take papers 1, 2, 3 and 4.

The practical programming project may be done using an appropriate programming language such as Visual Basic to solve a programming problem of an agreed area, demonstrate the student’s ability to the full.
Students carrying out project work are expected to complete and submit work before 1 April (for June examination) or before 1 October (for the November examination).
Pre-requisites

There are no special requirements for entry into the ‘A’ Level Computing course. However, the following will be taken into consideration for the acceptance into the course:




  • a good grade (grade A) in IGCSE Computer Studies or Information System

and / or

  • a good grade (grade A) in IGCSE Mathematics.

ECONOMICS (9708)

This course aims to enable students to:



  • develop a sound knowledge and understanding of economic principles

  • use the tools of economic analysis in specific situations

  • employ economic skills with reference to individuals, groups and organisations, in order to understand better the real world

  • participate more fully in decision-making processes, as consumers, producers and citizens at the local, national and international levels

The content areas of the course include:

-The price system -theory of the firm; - government intervention in the market;

- international trade; - national income determination and measurement;

- macroeconomic problems (inflation, unemployment, economic growth, balance of payments stability), government policies.
Assessment:

The examination consists of four papers:


PAPER LEVEL DURATION TYPE % OF MARK

1 AS 1 h Multiple Choice 20

2 AS 1 h 30 m (a) Data response 15

(b) Structured essay 15

3 A2 1 h Multiple Choice 15

4 A2 2 h 15 m (a) Data response 10

(b) Essay 25
Career Paths

Economics, a social science, combines well with either other humanity subjects or with the sciences as a gateway to a wide range of University courses.


A - Level Economics provides an introduction to careers in such fields as:

  • Banking;

  • Law

  • Finance




  • Development work;

  • Government Service

  • Insurance

  • Environmental Management



The A- Level Economics course is designed for candidates with no prior knowledge in the subject. However, it would be an advantage if the candidate has previously studied Economics and achieved a “B” grade or better in English Language and Mathematics.



LITERATURE IN ENGLISH (9695)
Literature in English is the study of a variety of texts in different forms and from different periods and cultures. Study takes the form of discussion, short tasks, drama, as well as writing essays. Literature in English is not only enjoyable but a subject in which you learn a variety of skills:


  • It offers you an insight into other minds, cultures and experiences, encouraging critical thinking.

  • It teaches you to express your ideas logically, clearly and succinctly, demanding personal engagement and a personal response.


Course Requirements

You should have at least a grade A or B in English First Language and Literature in English in IGCSE, BGCSE or an equivalent examination.


Course Content

In the Lower Sixth, all students will prepare for the AS examination by reading at least one novel, a poetry selection and two plays. The examination takes the form of two 2 hour papers:




  • Paper 3 Poetry and Prose - students will be required to answer questions on two texts: one question from each section.

  • Paper 4 Drama - students will be required to answer two questions on two plays.

In the Upper Sixth, those students who wish to achieve an A Level qualification will study a Shakespeare play and a pre-twentieth century novel. In addition, they will examine a wide variety of extracts from prose, poetry and drama in preparation for the Comment and Appreciation paper. Once again the examination takes the form of two 2 hour papers:




  • Paper 5 Shakespeare and Other pre-Twentieth Century Texts - students will be required to answer one question from each section.

  • Paper 7 Comment and Appreciation - students will be required to write a critical appreciation of previously unseen passages, which will cover at least two of the categories prose, poetry and drama.

All examination questions require you to demonstrate a response showing an understanding of the text and an informed independent opinion, and to communicate these clearly.


There is a great deal more freedom attached to A Level work, so students will need to acquire the responsibility of self-discipline. A great deal of background reading, research and note taking must be done independently. Students who are prepared to work hard will find Literature in English a stimulating and rewarding course.

Beyond A Levels

  • Universities consider English an academically rigorous A Level, therefore it will enable you to apply to numerous and diverse degree courses.

  • Many employers recognise that English A Level proves an individual’s competency in a range of key skills.

  • Learning to appreciate different viewpoints helps in everyday relationships.

  • It develops skills and study methods which will prove a firm foundation on which to build your further studies.



ENGLISH LANGUAGE (9093)

AIMS

To encourage:

• A critical and informed response to writing in a range of forms, styles and contexts.

• The interdependent skills of reading, analysis and communication.

• Effective and appropriate communication.
ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVES

Candidates for English Language will be required to demonstrate:

I. Ability to read with understanding written material in a variety 0f forms, and to comment on its effectiveness.

ii. Knowledge and understanding of features of English language.

iii. Ability to write clearly, accurately and effectively for a particular purpose or audience.
DESCRIPTION OF PAPERS — ENGLISH LANGUAGE (9093)
Paper 1 - Passages for Comment (2 hours)

Candidates will answer one compulsory question plus one further question from a choice of two, with questions carrying equal marks. Each question will be based on a passage of text printed in the question paper. These will be taken from a balanced range of sources, and will include informative and narrative writing in a wide variety of styles.

Each question will involve a commentary on use of language in the passage(s) followed by a directed writing task based on the passage(s).

Candidates should be able to identify distinguishing features of passages, and to relate them to the function and context of the writing, and to organise information in their answers. They should be able to comment on aspects such as vocabulary, figurative language (e.g. use of metaphor and simile), word-ordering and sentence structure, formality/informality of tone, and the communication of attitudes, bias or prejudice. In the directed writing tasks they should demonstrate the ability to write for a specific purpose and/or audience using appropriate vocabulary, tone, and style.

Dictionaries may not be used.

Paper 2 - Composition (2 hours)

The paper will be divided into two sections: Section A: Imaginative Writing (Narrative/Descriptive) and Section B: Writing for an Audience (Discursive/Argumentative). There will be a choice of four composition tasks in each section. Candidates will attempt two tasks, one taken from each section. Questions carry equal marks. Candidates should write between 600 — 900 words for each composition.

In both sections candidates are required to demonstrate accurate use of language in an appropriate style, clearly presented. In addition in Section A candidates should demonstrate the ability to write an imaginative piece, using language to create deliberate effects, such as creating s mood or creating a character; in Section B candidates should demonstrate the ability to construct an argument, presenting a view or views clearly, coherently and persuasively.

Dictionaries may not be used.



GEOGRAPHY (9696)
Geography occupies a pivotal position in the understanding of environmental, social, economic and political conditions. Geographers make a specific contribution to both, the understanding of contemporary issues and the complexity of natural systems; as well as their linkages and impact upon the human race. Through geography, students become aware of their physical environment and of the contribution they can make to improve the quality of life through sustainable development.
The syllabus is divided into two separate but interlinked courses as follows:


  1. Physical Geography – the topics studied in the physical component include:

Hydrology and Fluvial Geomorphology; Atmosphere and Weather; Rocks, Slopes and Weathering; Hazards, Arid and Semi-Arid Environments.


  1. Human Geography – a study is made of the following topics in the human component:

Population; Settlement; Agriculture; Industry and Energy.
Case studies drawn from the local, national and international environment provide the detailed knowledge necessary to fully understand concepts. Fieldwork is an important part of the course and students will have the opportunity to undertake field studies. By studying Geography students learn from the real world, about the real world, in the real world.

GEOGRAPHY AS A CAREEER


Geography helps students to develop core skills and specific areas of knowledge. Geographers learn teamwork; presentation skills; map reading and graphicacy. They are able to interpret complex relationships and develop broad analytic skills. The A-Level in Geography is useful and relevant for many careers, such as:


Agriculture

Cartography

Surveying

Housing Management

Teaching


Recreational Management

Armed Services

Estate Management

Landscape Architecture

Town Planning


Hydrology

Geology


Meteorology

Risk Assessment


Scheme of assessment

Advanced Level candidates will take:

Paper 1

Core Geography

3 h 50%





Paper 2

Advanced Physical

1h 30 min 25%





Paper 3

Advanced Human

1h 30 min 25%

Candidates may elect to either sit Paper 1 at an earlier examination session than Papers 2 and 3, or sit all Papers at the same examination session.



Advanced Subsidiary candidates will take:



HISTORY (9389)

Advanced Level History is acceptable as part of the qualification for entry to any university which usually requires a pass at A, B or C in conjunction with other subjects.


Some career prospects with A - Level History are:

  • Education

  • Diplomacy

  • Politics

  • Social Sciences

  • Law

  • Business

  • Administration

  • Management

  • Journalism

The syllabus has been divided into four separate components. Candidates complete two papers for AS and four papers for A Level.


AS LEVEL
Students who are only doing the AS Level course in History will write two examination papers. The paper on component 1 will be a document question and will contribute 40% of the total mark. The exam will be 1 hour. The paper on component 2 will be an outline study and will contribute 60% of the total mark. The exam will be 1 hour 30 minutes.
Component 1: The Search for International Peace and Security, 1919–1945
Component 2: International Relations, 1871–1945

Advanced Subsidiary (AS) candidates take: Duration Weighting

A LEVEL
Students who continue through to A Level will write two additional examination papers in their second year. Components 1 and 2 will make up 50% of their total mark. The paper on component 3 will be an interpretations question and will contribute 20% of the total mark. The exam will be 1 hour. The paper on component 4 will be a depth study and will contribute 30% of the total mark. The exam will be 1 hour 30 minutes.

Component 3: The Causes and Impact of British Imperialism, c. 1850–1939
Component 4: Europe of the Dictators, 1918–1941


MATHEMATICS (9709)

Mathematics is a popular course at A - Level since it is required for many university and college courses. This includes the traditional science-based degrees such as engineering and medicine, and many others including economics, actuarial science and environmental studies.


PREREQUISITES

A grade A in IGCSE Mathematics or equivalent is required to study A Level Mathematics.


COURSE DESCRIPTION

There are two components of A - Level Mathematics, namely, Pure Mathematics and Applied Mathematics.


Pure Mathematics (60% of the course)

In Pure Mathematics students will explore in much greater depth some IGCSE topics such as functions, graphs, vectors and trigonometry. In addition, several new topics are taught, including sequences and series, logarithmic and exponential functions and, differential and integral calculus.


Applied Mathematics (40% of the course)

Applied Mathematics is concerned with modelling real-life situations mathematically in order to draw conclusions and make predictions or decisions. The course divides into two sections, Mechanics and Statistics, each of which counts 20% of the A Level course. All students will study both Mechanics and Statistics.


Mechanics is the study of forces and motion. The course concentrates mainly on Newton’s Laws of Motion.
Statistics is the branch of mathematics that deals with the collection, organisation and analysis of data. The course also involves the study of probability theory and the use of standard probability distributions.
ASSESSMENT

The A Level course is divided into two parts as follows:




  • Year 1 (AS): During the first-year, students will prepare for the AS Level exam by studying the first part of the Pure Mathematics syllabus and the whole of the Statistics section. The exam comprises two papers: Paper 1 (Pure Mathematics) and Paper 6 (Probability and Statistics).




  • Year 2 (A2): During the second-year, students will prepare for the second part of the Pure Mathematics syllabus and the whole of the Mechanics section. The exam for A2 comprises two papers: Paper 3 (Pure Mathematics) and Paper 4 (Mechanics).

The final Mathematics A-Level result is awarded by weighting and averaging the grades from the two exam sessions. The student can use the AS qualification for university entrance in many countries. There is no compulsion to continue on to A2.



PHYSICS (9702)
This syllabus is designed:

  • to give a thorough introduction to the study of Physics and scientific methods

  • to develop skills and abilities that are relevant to the safe practice of science and to everyday life: concern for accuracy and precision, objectivity, integrity, the skills of enquiry, initiative and inventiveness

  • to emphasise the understanding and application of scientific concepts and principles, rather than the recall of factual material

  • to enable candidates to become confident citizens in a technological world and to take an informed interest in matters of scientific importance

  • to promote the use of IT as an aid to experiments and as a tool for the interpretation of experimental and theoretical results.

The Subject Content of the syllabus is:

I General Physics: Physical Quantities and Units; Measurement Techniques.

II Newtonian Mechanics

III Matter

IV Oscillations and Waves

V Electricity and Magnetism

VI Modern Physics



VII Gathering and Communicating Information
Why choose Cambridge International A & AS Level Physics?
Cambridge International A & AS Level Physics qualifications are accepted by universities and employers as proof of essential knowledge and ability.
Cambridge GCE A-Level Physics is a prerequisite for many courses, including all the Engineering disciplines: Electrical; Mechanical; Civil; Aeronautical; Mining; and Chemical. It is a must for any Physics-based course including Astronomy and Geo-physics. It is also a preferred option for many other courses such as Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science and Architecture. An A Level in Physics is a well respected qualification and would stand any student in good stead for their chosen course at a higher level.
Entry Requirements

  • A/B grade at IGCSE/BGCSE Physics or A grade at IGCSE/BGCSE Physical Science

  • A/B grade at IGCSE/BGCSE Mathematics



Paper

Type of Paper

Duration

Marks

Weighing













AS Level

A Level

1

Multiple-choice

1 h

40

31 %

15 %

2

AS structured questions

1 h

60

46 %

23 %

3

Advanced Practical Skills

2 h

40

23 %

12 %

4

A2 AS structured questions

2 h

100




38 %

5

Planning, Analysis and Evaluation

1h 15 min

30




12 %



Behaviour Expectations The A-Level student should:

  • practise self-control and assume responsibility for own behaviour so that maximum learning can occur.

  • obey rules and regulations as set forth in the school:

  • respect authority and behave courteously toward teachers, other school personnel, and peers.

  • work and interact with peers in a productive, cooperative way.

  • respect school property and the rights of others.

Academic Expectations The A-Level student should:

  • be attentive and actively participate in the instructions being given.

  • work independently.

  • complete assignments, using time and materials wisely.

  • complete home learning assignments and return them on time when required.

Dress Code

  • Daily attire need not be expensive to be attractive and entirely acceptable, but all students must wear clothing, which is neat, clean, and safe.

  • The A-Level student should dress appropriately (casual but smart)

Absences and Tardiness The A-Level student should:

  • maintain at least 90% attendance record (no unexcused absences) to be able to follow up all stages of the learning process in each subject.

  • be punctual in attending the daily registration period between 6:55 and 7:05am.

  • avoid arriving late to any lesson

Where the student is absent from school or from specific lessons, the student will provide a covering letter from his/her Parents to explain his/her absence. This letter will be given to the Form teacher.

SPE The A-Level student should ensure that he/she fulfils all of his/her compulsory SPE obligations. The student will endeavour to be punctual and regular in his attendance to these activities.

Time Management and Study The student must organise his/her time more effectively by doing the following:
1. procuring and using a diary to ensure effective usage.

2. constructing a seven-day study timetable in which it clearly indicates times during which he/she will study outside of lessons and at home.

3. a similar study timetable will be constructed for the school break.

4. by maintaining an efficient filing system, the student should organise his/her work by subject and topic.



5. the student should organise books and materials for any given school day well beforehand.






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