The Adler School of Professional Psychology



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The Adler School of Professional Psychology




Chicago Campus:

17 North Dearborn

Chicago, IL 60602

Phone: 312.662.4000

Fax: 312.662.4099

Email: admissions@adler.edu



Vancouver Campus:

1090 West Georgia Street, Suite 1200

Vancouver, BC V6E 3V7

Canada


Phone: 604.482.5510

Fax: 604.874.4634

Email: vanadmissions@adler.edu




www.adler.edu


Accreditation and Approvals

The Adler School of Professional Psychology holds various accreditations, approvals, recognitions, and memberships, including the following:



  • The Adler School has been continuously accredited since 1978 by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools’ Higher Learning Commission. The Commission can be contacted at NCA-HLC, 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, Illinois 60604-1413; 800.621.7440/312.263.0456; email: info@hlcommission.org; website: ncahlc.org/.

  • The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology has been accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) since 1998. The APA’s Committee on Accreditation can be contacted at the Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation, 750 First Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20002; 800.374.2721 or 202.336.5979; website: apa.org.

  • Adler Community Health Services Internship Program in Clinical Psychology has been accredited by the American Psychological Association since 2005. The APA’s Committee on Accreditation can be contacted at the Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation, 750 First Street, NE, Washington, D.C., 20002-4242; 800.374.2721/202.336.5979; email: apaaccred@apa.org; website: apa.org.

  • The Masters in Counseling Psychology: Specialization in Rehabilitation Counseling is accredited by the Council of Rehabilitation Education (CORE). CORE can be reached at 1699 E. Woodfield Road, Suite 300, Schaumburg, Illinois 60173; 847.944.1345; website: core-rehab.org/.

  • The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology is listed as a Designated Doctoral Program in Psychology by the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. The Register can be reached at 1200 New York Avenue NW, Suite 800, Washington D.C. 20005; 202.783.7663; website: nationalregister.org.

  • The Substance Abuse Counseling program is approved by the Illinois Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Professional Certification Association (IAODAPCA) as an advanced counselor training program. The IAODAPCA can be reached at 401 E. Sangamon Avenue, Springfield, Illinois 62702; 217.698.8110; website: iaodapca.org.

  • The Master of Arts in Counseling: Art Therapy degree program is approved by the American Art Therapy Association (AATA). AATA can be reached at 4875 Eisenhower Avenue, Suite 240, Alexandria, Virginia 22304; 888.290.0878; website: arttherapy.org.

  • All degree programs offered at the Adler School Vancouver campus have ministerial consent under the authority of the Degree Quality Assessment Board (DQAB), Ministry of Advanced Education, Government of British Columbia, P.O. Box 9080 Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, BC, V8W 9E2; website: gov.bc.ca/aeit.

  • The Adler School is approved to operate and grant degrees in the State of Illinois by the Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE). IBHE can be reached at 431 East Adams, 2nd floor, Springfield, Illinois 62501; 217.782.2551; website: ibhe.org.

  • The Adler School’s educational offerings are approved for veterans’ education by the State Approving Agency for Veterans’ Education.

  • The Adler School is authorized under federal law to enroll eligible international students.

  • The Adler School of Professional Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association, the Illinois Department of Financial & Professional Regulation, the Illinois Alcohol and Other Drugs Abuse Professional Certification Association, and the National Board for Certified Counselors as a provider of Continuing Education (CE) programs.

2014-2015 Course Catalog
Table of Contents
The School: An Overview 7

Facilities and Campus Locations

The School’s Mission

Social Responsibility

Nondiscrimination Policy

Diversity

Organization and Governance

Rights Reserved



Library Services 14

Center for Learning and Teaching 14

Writing Boot Camp



Department of Online Education 15

Adler Community Health Services 15

Clinical Training

Community Services

Adler Institutes for Social Change 15

Institute on Social Exclusion

Institute on Public Safety and Social Justice

Admissions Policies and Procedures 17

Application Process

Application Deadlines

Chicago Campus

Vancouver Campus

Evaluation of Applicants

Acceptance of Admission

Deferring Admission

International Applicants

Chicago Campus

Vancouver Campus

Students-at-Large / Non-Degree Seeking

Changing or Adding Programs

Re-admission

Transfer Credit

Academic Policies and Procedures 22

Class Attendance



Chicago Campus

Vancouver Campus

Application of Attendance Polices

Credit Hour Policy

Academic Status

Statement of Student Responsibilities

Student Referral Policy

Student Development Committee (SDC)

Student Comprehensive Evaluation Committee (SCEC)

Appeals

Qualifying Examinations

Registration

Full-Time and Half-Time Status

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Course Drop and Withdrawal



Chicago and Online Campuses

Vancouver Campus

Leave of Absence

Administrative Withdrawal

Withdrawal in Good Standing

Grading System

Chicago and Online Campuses

Vancouver Campus

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) – Chicago and Online Campuses

Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) – Vancouver Campus

Students with Disabilities



Tuition and Fees 33

Chicago Campus



2014-2015 Schedule

Payment Information

Tuition Refund Policy

Vancouver Campus



2014-2015 Schedule

Payment Information

Tuition Refund Policy

Financial Aid – Chicago and Online Campuses 37

Federal Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements

Types of Student Financial Aid

Unsubsidized Stafford Student Loans

Graduate PLUS Loan

Alternative Loans

Federal Work Study Program

Scholarships

Veteran’s Benefits

Financial Aid Eligibility – Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy



Financial Aid Warning and Suspension of Eligibility

Course In-Progress

Repeated Courses

Audited Courses

No Credit, No Pass

Incompletes

Readmitted Students

Leave of Absence

Withdrawal or Administrative Withdrawal

Financial Aid Disbursement Timeline

Debt Management and Loan Counseling

International Students – Chicago Campus



Financial Aid – Vancouver 42

Student Aid BC Information for Students

Loans

Canada Student Loans

British Columbia Student Loans

Grants


Canada Study Grant for Students with Dependents (CSG)

Canada Study Grant for Accommodations of Students with Permanent Disabilities (CSG-PD)

Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities (CAG-PD)

International Students – Vancouver Campus



Programs of Study – Chicago Campus 45

M.A. in Counseling – Art Therapy 45

M.A. in Counseling – Specialization in Clinical Mental Health Counseling 50

M.A. in Counseling – Specialization in Forensic Psychology 53

M.A. in Counseling – Specialization in Rehabilitation Counseling 55

M.A. in Counseling – Specialization in Sport and Health Psychology 58

M.A. in Couple and Family Therapy 62

M.A. in Criminology (Online) 65

M.A. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology (Online) 66

M.A. in Emergency Management Leadership (Online) 70

M.A. in Psychology: Military Psychology Specialization (Online) 73

M.A. in Public Policy Administration – Concentrations in Urban Mental Health

and Human Rights 76

M.A. in Nonprofit Management (Online) 80

Certificate in Substance Abuse Counseling 82

Certificate in Couple and Family Therapy 83

Doctor of Couple and Family Therapy 85

Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology 88

Admission Requirements

Review of Applications

Length of Program

Time to Completion

PsyD Residency Policy

Doctoral Candidacy

PsyD Program Grade Change Policy

Qualifying Examinations

Practicum

Social Exclusion Simulation

Right to Participate or Decline

Internship

PsyD Dissertation

Degree Requirements

Elective Menu

Schedule

Suggested Course Sequences

Graduation Requirements

Degree Requirements for the Military Track

Degree Requirements for the Child and Adolescent Track

Concentration Areas

Doctoral Concentration in Advanced Adlerian Psychotherapy 108

Doctoral Concentration in Clinical Neuropsychology 109

Doctoral Concentration in Primary Care Psychology and Behavioral Medicine 112

Doctoral Concentration in Traumatic Stress Psychology 113

Doctoral Concentration in Substance Abuse Treatment 114

Programs of Study – Vancouver Campus 115

M.A. in Counselling Psychology 115

Master of Counselling Psychology 119

Master of Counselling Psychology: Art Therapy 122

M.A. in Organizational Psychology – Vancouver Campus 125

M.A. in Community Psychology 129

Doctorate of Psychology in Clinical Psychology – Vancouver Campus 132

Course Descriptions 139

Faculty 208

Chicago and Online Campuses

Vancouver Campus

Board of Trustees 210

Staff 211

Chicago and Online Campuses



Vancouver Campus

Academic Calendar 2014-2015 214

Chicago and Online Campuses

Vancouver Campus

The School: An Overview

The Adler School of Professional Psychology is named for Alfred Adler (1870-1937), a physician, psychotherapist, and founder of Adlerian psychology. He is considered the first community psychologist because his work pioneered attention to community life, prevention, and population health. Adlerian psychology emphasizes the human need and ability to create positive social change and impact. Alfred Adler held equality, civil rights, mutual respect, and the advancement of democracy as core values. He was one of the first practitioners to provide family and group counseling and to use public education as a way to address community health. He was among the first to write about the social determinants of health and of mental health. Adler’s values and concepts drive the mission, work, and values at the Adler School today.

Today, the Adler School offers a wide array of graduate-level programs enrolling approximately 1,200 students at campuses in Chicago, Illinois; Vancouver, British Columbia; and online. In addition to education and training in psychological theory, science, and practice, students complete a range of required and elective experiences that extend beyond traditional practitioner training. The School’s mission-driven curricula have earned national and international recognition.

As the oldest independent psychology school in North America, the Adler School continues the pioneering work of Alfred Adler by graduating socially responsible practitioners, engaging communities, and advancing social justice.



Facilities and Campus Locations

CHICAGO CAMPUS:

Adler School of Professional Psychology


17 North Dearborn Street
Chicago, IL 60602
312.662.4000
adler.edu

The Adler School’s Chicago campus is located in the heart of downtown Chicago. The campus boasts LEED Gold Certification for environmental innovation and provides Adler School students with classrooms equipped with state-of-the-art smart technology; a library with dedicated space for instructional support; Mediascape collaborative workspaces; a Wellness Studio for yoga, meditation, and relaxation; and many other features that support a collaborative learning environment.

The Chicago campus is easily accessible by bus, train, or automobile, and also features secure bicycle storage facilities. Located near the campus are a number of prestigious colleges and universities, government centers, public libraries, lakefront parks, theatre and shopping districts, and museums. Major tourist attractions include the Art Institute of Chicago, Water Tower Place, Navy Pier, Auditorium Theater, Chicago Theater, Oriental Theater, Willis Tower, Shedd Aquarium, Adler Planetarium, and the Field Museum of Natural History.

Vancouver Campus:

Adler School of Professional Psychology


1090 West Georgia Street
Suite 1200
Vancouver, BC V6E 3V7
Canada
604.482.5510
adler.edu

The Vancouver campus is located at the corner of West Georgia Street and Thurlow, in the heart of Vancouver's dynamic downtown shopping and business core. With stunning views, the campus boasts state-of-the-art classroom and administrative technology and progressive classroom and community facilities for Vancouver students, faculty, and staff.

The Vancouver campus is conveniently accessible through public transit. The Burrard Skytrain station is easily accessed one block from the campus at Burrard Street (between W. Georgia and Dunsmuir). The Skytrain's Millennium and Expo lines are just one station away from Waterfront, where connections for the Sea Bus and West Coast Express are available. A major bus hub is also located at Burrard and Dunsmuir Streets, which is 20 minutes from the Vancouver International Airport. Located downtown in an area that is internationally known for its shopping (Robson Street and the Pacific Centre Mall) and restaurants, we are also just moments away –either on foot or a brief bus ride – from theatres, the Art Gallery, Stanley Park, and English Bay Beach.

The School’s Mission

The Adler School of Professional Psychology continues the pioneering work of the first community psychologist, Alfred Adler, by graduating socially responsible practitioners, engaging communities, and advancing social justice.

The values held by Adler School as relevant to its mission, include the following:


  • Social Interest: We are part of and invested in community, and we act and collaborate with compassion and social responsibility.

  • Pluralism: We respect and celebrate human diversity and difference.

  • Courage: We encourage leadership, innovation, and creativity, act on principle, and challenge the status quo.

  • Excellence: We embrace the highest level of quality, rigor, and integrity for education, scholarship, performance, and outcomes.

  • Pragmatism: We are outcome-oriented and evidence-based, and we pursue real-world solutions and measurable results.

Social Responsibility

Building on the work of Alfred Adler, the mission of the Adler School of Professional Psychology emphasizes the importance of educating socially responsible practitioners. Today’s social challenges demand highly trained, relevant, and inventive practitioners to address them. No other institution prepares practitioners in the particular way that the Adler School prepares socially responsible practitioners—because we are uniquely and specifically informed by Alfred Adler’s ideas and constructs. Gemeinschaftsgefühl—Adler’s concept of social interest, or the relationship between health and community—is the foundation upon which we engage in the work of social justice and preparing practitioners to work in our communities.

The ability to engage in socially responsible practice has been adopted as a required competency in all Adler School degree programs. Attainment of this competency is achieved through practical training, coursework, and other activities: the Community Service Practicum (CSP) offers students a broad range of community-based experiences; classes provide information on theories and research on the effects of structural and systemic variables on human well-being; and other educational activities provided by the Adler Community Health Services and the Institutes provide students with opportunities to learn how to identify and address a wide range of clinical and social issues.

Socially responsible practitioners possess knowledge, skills, and attitudes that allow them to:



  • Understand the role of social context in conditioning physical and behavioral health;

  • Integrate this understanding into their professional practice; and

  • Collaborate with others to reform social, political, and other structures and systems that adversely affect well-being.


Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy and Procedures
Policy
It is the policy of the Adler School of Professional Psychology that no person shall be the object of discrimination or harassment on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, age, marital status, parental status, family relationship status, physical or mental disability, military status, or other status protected by local, state, or federal law in its employment or its educational settings. The School is committed to maintaining an environment that is free of discrimination and harassment. In keeping with this commitment, we will not tolerate harassment of School employees, students, or others on site by anyone, including any supervisor, co-worker, vendor, client, or student of the School or any third party. The Adler School reserves the right to take actions that are consistent with its policies and procedures to deal with individuals found to have engaged in harassment, discrimination, and/or retaliation in violation of this policy.
Prohibited Discrimination
Examples of discrimination in violation of this policy include treating an employee, student, or other member of the School community differently in the terms and conditions of his or her employment or education, or making decisions about a person’s employment, compensation, or education based upon a person’s race, marital status, parental status, family relationship status, physical or mental disability, military status, or other protected status.
Prohibited Harassment
Examples of harassment in violation of this policy include any behavior (verbal, written, or physical) that has the intent, purpose, or can reasonably be expected to have the effect of abusing, intimidating, victimizing, or demeaning a person based on any protected status identified by this policy or by law so as to interfere with the person’s academic or professional performance or advancement, or which creates a hostile educational, working, or living environment for any person based on any protected status identified in this policy or law. Depending on the specific circumstances and impact on the workplace or academic environment, examples of harassment in violation of this policy include, but are not limited to, verbal abuse, offensive innuendo, derogatory comments, or the open display of offensive objects or pictures concerning a person’s race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, age, marital status, parental status, family relationship status, physical and mental disability, military status, or other protected status.


  1. Sexual Harassment

The Adler School takes all forms of prohibited harassment seriously. In addition to the examples of prohibited harassment above, sexual harassment warrants further explanation.


Sexual harassment includes, but is not limited to, any unwelcome sexual advances, direct or indirect, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:


  • Submission to such conduct is made or is threatened to be made, either explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of instruction, employment, or participation in other School activity;

  • Submission to or rejection of such conduct by any individual is used or is threatened to be used as a basis for evaluation in making academic or employment decisions affecting that individual; or

  • Such conduct has the intent, purpose, or can reasonably be expected to have the effect of interfering with an individual’s academic or professional performance or advancement, or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive education, living, or working environment.

An extreme form of sexual harassment includes sexual assault. Any person who may experience a sexual assault has the right to pursue all options to address this behavior including processes internal to the Adler School as well as any legal and civil options.


To file a complaint of sexual assault, you may contact one of the Title IX coordinators identified in this policy depending on who the complaint is against (student, faculty, staff, or visitor/third party) and you may also get assistance by calling the police (911) and/or by going to a local emergency room. Another non-school resource is the Rape Victim Emergency Assistance Hotline at 1.888.293.3368.


  1. Sexual Harassment –- Consensual Relationships

Amorous relationships that might be appropriate in other circumstances present serious difficulties within the School Community. Relationships between individuals in inherently unequal positions (such as teacher and student, supervisor and employee) may undermine the real or perceived integrity of the supervision and evaluation process, as well as affect the trust inherent in the educational environment. Consensual romantic or sexual relationships in which one party is in a position to review work or influence the career of the other may provide grounds for complaint when that relationship gives undue access or advantage to, restricts opportunities of, or creates a hostile and unacceptable environment for one of the parties to the relationship, or for others.


In such circumstances, consent may not be considered a defense against a charge of sexual harassment in violation of this Policy. The determination of what constitutes sexual harassment depends upon the specific facts and the context in which the conduct occurs.
Prohibited Retaliation
The Adler School prohibits retaliation and the threat of retaliation against any person—including complainants, respondents, and witnesses—exercising his or her rights and/or responsibilities in good faith under the School’s Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy or federal, state, or local law prohibiting discrimination, harassment, or retaliation.
For purposes of this policy, retaliation includes any conduct directed against an individual or someone affiliated with the individual on the basis of or in reaction to the exercise of rights accorded and/or defined by this policy, or federal, state, or local law that is likely to dissuade the individual from exercising his or her rights in the future.
Claims of retaliation will be investigated and, if substantiated, constitute a separate violation of this policy. Any acts of retaliation will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action, including but not limited to reprimand, change in work assignment, loss of privileges, mandatory training, suspension, and/or termination.
The Adler School takes good-faith complaints of discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation seriously. Individuals who knowingly make false allegations under this policy may be subject to disciplinary action, including, but not limited to, reprimand, suspension, and/or termination.
Complaints of Discrimination, Harassment, or Retaliation
The Office of Human Resources (OHR) is responsible for receiving, processing, and investigating complaints of discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation.
There are multiple channels for reporting violations of this policy.  If you believe you have been the subject of, have witnessed, or are aware of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation, you should make a complaint as soon as possible to OHR or to your supervisor, Chair, or Dean. OHR strongly encourages complainants to contact OHR as soon as possible, to the extent practicable, after the challenged conduct, because OHR’s ability to investigate a complaint may be harmed if it is not made within a reasonable time period. OHR advises that complaints be filed within 120 days of the alleged occurrence(s).  All members of the Adler School who serve in a supervisory capacity are responsible for relaying all complaints of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation that come to their attention as supervisors and that may be in violation of this policy to the associate vice president of human resources at 312.662.4415.
A student may also file a complaint with OHR as long as it concerns the actions of a School faculty or staff employee, vendor, client, or any third party.  Student complaints about actions of other students are handled by the Division of Student Affairs.  Students who wish to make such a complaint may contact the associate vice president of student affairs directly at 312.662.4141 or gmacvarish@adler.edu
The Adler School strongly encourages complainants to make a complaint as soon as possible after the challenged conduct. The timelier a complaint of discrimination, harassment or retaliation, the better OHR will be able to investigate the complaint.  A complainant should receive an acknowledgement of receipt from OHR within 10 business days of filing a complaint. If this does not occur, the complainant should directly contact OHR to confirm receipt of the original complaint.
Please note that this policy constitutes the School’s Section 504 grievance procedure and that OHR investigates complaints of discrimination or harassment based on physical or mental disability and does provide accommodations for physical or mental disability.  Students seeking accommodation for a physical or mental disability should contact the School’s Section 504 coordinator for students (associate vice president of student affairs).
If a student under the age of 18 reports an incident of sexual harassment to any faculty or staff member, that faculty or staff member is obligated to report the incident to OHR and to follow any other requirements of the Crime Reporting Clery Act Compliance.
Investigation and Resolution Process
When the OHR receives a complaint of discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation, it will promptly investigate the allegation in a fair and expeditious manner. In rare instances, the OHR may engage an external investigator for some or all portions of the investigation.  Every complaint is based on its own facts and circumstances, which can impact the course of the OHR's investigation. The following is an outline of the procedure generally followed once a complaint has been brought to the attention of the OHR.
At any time in the process, a complaint may be resolved voluntarily prior to the completion of the investigation process when the issues have been addressed to the satisfaction of the parties involved and in consultation with the OHR.

A.         Filing a Complaint

  • Contact the OHR:
    17 North Dearborn Street
    Suite 16-200
    Chicago, IL 60602
    312.662.4415

B.         Processing a Complaint

In processing a complaint, the OHR will:



  • Acknowledge receipt of the complaint in writing and inform complainant of his/her right to file a criminal investigation by contacting the Chicago Police at 911. Criminal investigations can be done concurrent to any internal investigation done by the Adler School.

  • Collect and retain in the OHR documents and information related to the complaint.

  • Conduct a preliminary assessment of allegations to determine whether the alleged conduct, if substantiated, could constitute a violation of this policy.

 

C.         Fact-Finding

The specific fact-finding steps may vary depending on the facts and circumstances of the complaint. Generally speaking, an investigator will:



  • Inform the complainant and respondent of the start of the investigation.

  • Collect and review relevant documentation.

  • Interview complainant, respondent, and witnesses to the reported event or events.

  • Prepare a summary of the investigation and the findings for the OHR.

D.         Resolution of Complaint

The OHR is charged with responsibility for investigating complaints of discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation; making findings; and reporting its findings to the appropriate relevant School officials, including, but not limited to, the supervisors or department heads of the complainant and respondent, the vice president of administration, the vice president of finance and technology, the vice president of academic affairs, the applicable chair or program director, and the Office of the President.  The OHR will provide written notification to the complainant, respondent, and the appropriate School officials of its finding.

If the OHR, following its investigation, determines that the Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy has been violated, it will work with the appropriate School officials to recommend appropriate corrective action, up to and including discharge/expulsion.

Supervisors, department heads, and other Adler School managers have the responsibility for implementing appropriate corrective action. The OHR may advise in the implementation of corrective action and may monitor the implementation of the corrective actions. To the extent that the OHR concludes that other School policies may have been violated by the reported conduct, the appropriate School official(s) will be notified.



E.         Confidentiality

The OHR is committed to balancing the interests of all parties involved in discrimination, harassment, and/or retaliation complaints.  To the extent possible, the OHR will limit the disclosure of information related to the complaint and its investigation.  Nonetheless, the OHR cannot promise confidentiality of any information received in a complaint or during an investigation.

The files of complaints will be maintained in the OHR.  Documents and information collected by OHR through its investigation of the complaint will not be kept in relevant personnel or academic records, however any discipline or sanction imposed as a result of a policy violation will be documented in the disciplined individual's personnel or academic record in accordance with applicable School procedures.

Other Resources

Although the School encourages employees to utilize the complaint process described above to resolve any complaints, use of this process does not prohibit an employee or student from filing a complaint with external agencies at any time.  Employees or students may file a formal complaint with various external agencies, to include, but not limited to, the government agencies listed below.



The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

500 West Madison Street, Suite 2800

Chicago, IL 60661

312.353.2713



Illinois Department of Human Rights
James R. Thompson Center
100 West Randolph Street, Suite 10-100
Chicago, IL 60601
312.814.6200

The Office of Civil Rights/Chicago

U.S. Department of Education

Citigroup Center

500 W. Madison Street

Suite 1475

Chicago, IL 60661



Diversity

Celebrating the richness of human diversity is at the heart of Adler School's commitment to social responsibility and is reflected in the content of our curricula and makeup of our community. Apparent differences in race, ethnicity, language, religion, values, beliefs, abilities, class, sexuality, gender, and age are woven into the fabric of excellence at Adler School. At every level of our organization, we invite and embrace diversity of faculty, staff, students, sponsors, trustees, vendors, and our wide range of business partners. The curricula for all programs provide the opportunity for students to acquire knowledge, skills, and values related to individual and group diversity. Field placements for clinical training are available in areas where the clientele is partly or primarily from traditionally underserved communities.

Recruitment and retention of a diverse student body is important to prepare students to enter a world in which the understanding of individual and cultural diversity is essential for peace and progress. Student organizations provide support and fellowship for members of diverse and marginalized groups. Our commitment to honoring diversity is not only a concept, it is practiced.

Organization and Governance

The Adler School of Professional Psychology is a private, independent, not-for-profit institution of higher education. The School is incorporated in and operates under the provisions of the state of Illinois General Not-For-Profit Corporation Act and is declared a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization by the U.S. Department of the Treasury, and is extra-provincially registered under the laws of British Columbia as the Adler School of Professional Psychology.



Rights Reserved

This catalog and its contents are not to be construed as a binding contract between the Adler School and the student. The catalog presents the offerings and requirements in effect at the time of publication. The Adler School may amend, without prior notice, the policies or procedures as stated in this catalog, Adler School handbooks, and other documents. These changes include, but are not limited to, changes in admission or academic requirements, rules, policies and procedures, tuition, fees, curricula, courses, course content, and graduation requirements. Changes to the Adler School’s policies, procedures, and requirements affect all students who have not yet graduated. Clarification of matters contained in this catalog or institutional handbooks can be obtained from the directors of the appropriate administrative or academic departments and offices. The School, while always working to communicate changes that affect its learning community, may make such changes as necessary and with or without advance notice. Degree and course offerings and requirements are continually under examination, and revisions are expected.

The Adler School reserves the right to refuse to admit or readmit any applicant. The Adler School reserves the right to dismiss any student at any time who fails to give satisfactory evidence of academic or clinical ability, earnestness of purpose, acceptable student conduct, or active cooperation in all requirements for acceptable program completion.

Library Services

The Harold and Birdie Mosak Library of the Adler School of Professional Psychology is a dynamic partner in mentoring socially responsible practitioners through learning, research, and individual service. The Library collaborates with faculty, clinicians, and researchers to support students in their progress to achieve the Adler School’s institutional learning outcomes.

The Library is staffed by professional librarians, paraprofessional staff members, and student assistants, who help the Adler Community to make the fullest use of academic resources for research and curricular needs. In the service of our mission, we select, organize, present, preserve, and teach the resources that best address the current and anticipated academic needs of our students, faculty, and community affiliates.

The Library is a member of the I-Share integrated library system that serves as the online catalog for 85 member libraries in Illinois. I-Share member libraries agree to share resources, so that the Adler School community has access to a combined collection of over 9 million unique items.

The Library’s print collection at the Chicago campus comprises approximately 17,000 circulating books, more than 100 print journal titles, and more than 500 instructional audiovisual materials.
The Library also licenses more than 50 research databases in psychology and the related social sciences, as well as full-text electronic content from more than 56,000 unique journal titles, more than 80,000 electronic books, and several collections of newspapers.
Vancouver campus students and faculty have access to all electronic resources, including full-text e-book and e-journal content. Interlibrary loan of articles and books is also available.

Library services for Adler students and faculty include:



  • Individual instruction in the selection and use of databases

  • Interlibrary delivery of books and articles not owned in our collection

  • Individual research consultation for papers, theses, or dissertations

  • Subject-specific classroom instruction sessions

  • Identification of online resources for course enhancement

  • Provision of links to online resources for faculty syllabus development

  • A reserves collection of required and recommended class materials

Active participation in consortial activities facilitates interlibrary loan delivery of materials not held at the Library. The Library is a member of the Center for Research Libraries (CRL) and of Reaching Across Illinois Library System (RAILS), as well as a governing member of CARLI, the Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois. These memberships enable the libraries to participate in resource sharing and collection development programs on a statewide and a national scale.

For individual assistance or group instruction, please contact the Library by e-mail (library@adler.edu) or telephone 312.662.4230.

Center for Learning and Teaching

The Center for Learning and Teaching (CLT) provides academic and professional resources for students, faculty, and staff. Among the services offered by the CLT are individual consultations, workshops, and groups focused on writing and research, presentation skills and poster preparation, time management, and statistics and research methods.

The CLT also offers space to use computers, browse print resources, read, practice presentations, and hold classes and meetings.

Appointments for individual consultations are available in person as well as by telephone. Anyone wanting more information or wishing to set up an appointment with CLT staff may contact the CLT by email (CLT@adler.edu) or telephone 312.662.4200.



Intensive Writing Workshops

The Center for Learning and Teaching offers intensive writing workshops for Adler students. These workshops offer students the opportunity to hone their writing skills, familiarize themselves with available writing resources, and develop strategies for strengthening their writing skills. Students may register by contacting the CLT.



Department of Online Education

The Department of Online Education at the Adler School of Professional Psychology is responsible for ensuring the development of high quality online course and program offerings consistent with the mission, vision, and values of the Adler School. Beyond the development of courses, the Department of Online Education provides education, training, support, and thought leadership in the areas of online learning, online teaching, online course and program development, and educational technology. The Department of Online Education also provides a framework for high-quality delivery of online teaching and learning. The department collaborates with other departments and offices, throughout the school, to promote a cohesive, high-quality learning environment.



Adler Community Health Services

Adler Community Health Services (ACHS), the clinical services division of the Adler School of Professional Psychology, provides psychological services to underserved populations through its clinical training programs. ACHS is comprised of two divisions: Community Services and Juvenile Justice.

Through the Community Services division, ACHS offers a Pre-Doctoral Internship Program in Clinical Psychology which is approved by the American Psychological Association (APA) and is a member of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC). The internship is a fully affiliated program, reserving eight full-time positions for Adler School students. The Adler internship program participates in the APPIC match process. Additionally, ACHS offers practica (externships) for Adler students in psychotherapy and in diagnostic assessment.

ACHS’s Community Services division has partnerships with a number of community based service agencies. Interns and externs (trainees) offer clinical services at and through community based partnerships. A trainee will be assigned to one or more community site(s) based on his/her interests, training and educational needs, and abilities. In addition to providing direct clinical service, trainees receive individual, group, and peer supervision; may participate in case management and case disposition meetings; and attend didactic workshops and seminars.

Through the Juvenile Justice division, ACHS offers a pre-doctoral internship and diagnostic assessment and advanced practica (externships) through a partnership with the Illinois Youth Center–St. Charles. The Adler Juvenile Justice Internship is a member of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC).

Services provided in the community through community partnerships include individual and group psychotherapy; neuropsychological, personality, and cognitive ability assessment; support groups; parenting groups; consultation; and psycho-educational programs.

ACHS programs and services are designed to provide services to underserved and disadvantaged populations. Populations served include currently and formerly incarcerated persons, the homeless, people affected by HIV, students from elementary school through college, and families and elders who are struggling with poverty.

Institute on Social Exclusion

The Adler School Institute on Social Exclusion (ISE) works to increase understanding of the ways in which laws, public policies, institutional behaviors, and other social structures and systems create unfair social outcomes, and understanding that reconstituting them is required to achieve social justice and equity. Our work aims to ensure that all members of society benefit from quality housing, education, and healthcare; fair terms of employment; nutritious food; safety and security; equitable treatment under the law, and all other rights, opportunities, and resources necessary for full social inclusion. The ISE is engaged in three overlapping areas of activity: research, outreach, and education and awareness.

Research: We work with community residents, organizations, non-governmental bodies, and public agencies to conduct participatory research that aims to identify and address the structural origins of social disadvantage. Recent ISE research activities involved investigations of the mental health implications of revisions to the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (U.S. EEOC) Policy Guidance on the Consideration of Arrest and Conviction Records in Employment Decisions under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Another research project involved investigations of the health and mental health implications of open space and access to the Chicago River for the communities of Pilsen and Little Village. All of the research activities undertaken at the ISE target issues that are of concern in low-income communities. In addition to the research, students at the ISE write and publish papers, as well as present their work at conferences.

Outreach: Fundamental to all of our work is responsiveness to community-identified needs. Typically at the request of key community stakeholders, the ISE collaborates with communities to address their self-identified needs. Recent community outreach projects include the development of a community-based advocacy agenda around employment legislation, and the development of a community-based and community-informed violence reduction strategy. Using a train-the trainer model, we are transferring participatory research skills and knowledge to community residents so they can reach out to and engage other community members in the development of a strategy.

Education and Awareness: The research we conduct informs our education and awareness work. Our education and advocacy agenda includes presenting at conferences, leading simulations, and authoring peer-reviewed papers. Recent public awareness programming includes a summit on arrest records as barriers to employment, with the purpose of expanding awareness of the revised U.S. EEOC Policy Guidance and its impact on key health determinants; a series of radio and television interviews, and op-eds and articles in the print media; and community-based informational programming. The ISE has also hosted seminal conferences on topics on the social determinants of mental health, examining the impacts of industrial activity, open space, food insecurity, the built environment, and other social, economic, and physical phenomena on mental health.

The ISE has two flagship activities in which students may become involved:



  • The Social Exclusion Simulation (SES) is a group experiential learning tool for increasing understanding of complex systems and how the structural barriers that comprise them work to block access to key rights, resources, and opportunities for some members of society, rendering them “socially excluded”.

  • Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a process for developing “evidence-based” legislation and public policy to help promote the health and mental health of entire populations of people, especially the most excluded and marginalized. With support from the Chicago Community Trust, ISE-affiliated staff, faculty, and students are conducting theoretical and empirical community-based research that helps ensure that legislation and public policy, through a process not employed at any other school of psychology, promotes population mental health by narrowing mental health inequities.

Application: In September 2012, ISE established the Center for the Social Determinants of Mental Health. The first of its kind in the United States, the Center is solely dedicated to identifying, examining, understanding and addressing the impact of social conditions on population or public mental health. The vision of the Center is a world where social conditions support the health and well-being of all. The mission of the Center is to improve health and well-being, and to narrow health inequities by changing social conditions, particularly those that impact the most vulnerable. The Center is the major vehicle through which the ISE conducts its research, outreach, and education and advocacy work. To learn more about the Institute on Social Exclusion and the Center for the Social Determinants of Mental Health and connect with our work, email ISE@adler.edu.

Institute on Public Safety and Social Justice

The purpose of the Institute on Public Safety and Social Justice (IPSSJ) is to meet public safety challenges with socially just solutions. We work with community groups, peer institutions, and systems partners to address public safety challenges. By forging creative collaborations, we can devise empirically sound methods beyond mere suppression to create environments where a more lasting and meaningful sense of peace and wellness can prevail. We believe that by working together, bringing all concerned into the mix, we can improve urban safety outcomes by enhancing human potential and community wellness.

Rather than rely completely on safety strategies that isolate and confine, we strive to develop transformative alternatives that restore people, families, and neighborhoods to their optimal functionality. By mobilizing the wisdom and assets of stakeholders at all levels, IPSSJ seeks to shift the tide in public safety thinking and to create momentum for 21st century solutions that strengthen communities, protect families, and bring people closer together. We aim to create communities where all people can reach their full potential.

Every time we remove someone from society there are serious long-term consequences. While this is often a necessary step in protecting family and/or community members, our society has become far too reliant on strategies of confinement and control. We must rediscover our capacity for lifting up all members of our society, no matter their needs, challenges, or personal traumas. By focusing on peoples’ potential – rather than just their negative behaviors – we can begin to build stronger and safer neighborhoods. We believe that real safety is the result of vibrant communities and systems that promote self-reliance, interdependence, and accountability.

IPSSJ addresses the following objectives through community collaboration, public education, and applied research:


  • Working to build public safety systems that heal and address trauma rather than recreate it

  • To help organizations plan strategies that promote functionality and wellness

  • To support a cultural shift away from punishment and toward positive human and community development

Admission Policies and Procedures

Application Process

The Adler School of Professional Psychology takes pride in its diverse student body, representing a wide range of professional interests, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and academic and work histories. The School admits individuals with a record of outstanding academic achievement and a commitment to social responsibility. Ideal candidates for admission are those who will make a difference in the lives of the individuals, families, and in the communities they plan to serve upon graduation.

All applicants should fulfill the minimum admission requirements for the program they choose and must demonstrate acceptable proficiency in spoken and written English. Applicants nearing completion of a baccalaureate degree may apply for early admission contingent upon successful completion of the undergraduate degree.

Applicants must submit the following:



  • Adler School Application for Admission;

  • Application fee ($50.00);

  • Autobiographic essay/statement of purpose;

  • Resume or curriculum vitae;

  • Official transcripts from all colleges or universities attended;

  • Three letters of recommendation accompanying the Adler School recommendation form; and

  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) – recommended.*

*The GRE general test is required for applications to the Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology program.

Application forms can be completed online or mailed to the Office of Admissions. Students submitting U.S. or Canadian transcripts should have official transcripts sent directly to the Office of Admissions. Other international transcripts must be evaluated by a transcript evaluation service such as World Education Service (wes.org) or Educational Credential Evaluators (ece.org). Please contact the Office of Admissions for specific transcript evaluation requirements.



Application Deadlines

Priority Deadlines

While applications are accepted throughout the year, the following deadlines ensure that students receive full consideration. Programs fill early, and applicants are strongly encouraged to begin the application process at least six to 12 months before their desired term of entry.



  • Applicants seeking admission to the Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) program (including all tracks) should submit all application materials by the priority deadline of February 15 in order for interviews to be scheduled and notification of acceptance to be completed by April 1. Those who are admitted must notify the Office of Admissions and submit the tuition deposit no later than April 15, indicating their intent to matriculate in the subsequent fall term. Space permitting, applications submitted after the deadline will be accepted subject to the Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology (COGDOP) criteria. These criteria state that acceptance of an offer of admission that is given or left in force after April 15 commits students to not solicit or accept an offer from the Adler School without first obtaining a written release from any institution to which a commitment has already been made.

Chicago Campus

 Admissions Deadlines

Early Consideration

Priority

Space Available

Term of Entry

PsyD Clinical Psychology (including all tracks)

December 1

February 15

August 15

Fall

Doctor of Couple and Family Therapy

December 1

February 15

August 15

Fall

All M.A. programs (Chicago campus)

February 1

April 1

August 15

Fall

All Online programs

Rolling Admissions

Fall and Spring

Specializations/Certificates

Rolling Admissions

All

Vancouver Campus

 Admissions Deadlines

Early Consideration

Priority

Space Available

Term of Entry

PsyD Clinical Psychology

December 1

February 15

August 15

Fall

M.A. in Counselling Psychology

February 1

April 1

August 15

Spring* and Fall

Master of Counselling Psychology

February 1

April 1

August 15

Spring* and Fall

Master of Counselling Psychology: Art Therapy

February 1

April 1

August 15

Fall

M.A. in Organizational Psychology

February 1

April 15

August 15

Fall

* Applications for the spring semester are accepted on a rolling basis.

Evaluation of Applicants

Completed applications will be reviewed by the Admissions Committee. Applicants who are approved by the Admissions Committee will then be scheduled for an interview with a member of the Adler School faculty.

Applicants are evaluated on many factors including the following:


  • Academic performance;

  • Content and clarity of written and verbal communication;

  • Strength of recommendations;

  • Personal and professional presentation throughout the admissions processes;

  • Community service interest and/or experience;

  • Professional and/or prior work experience; and

  • Integrity, motivation, and personal ethics.

Acceptance of Admission

Applicants who are offered admission to an Adler School program have 30 days or until the priority deadline notification to accept the offer. Those who accept must return a signed statement of acceptance along with a $500 (doctoral applicants) or $300 (M.A. and certificate students) nonrefundable tuition deposit which will be credited toward payment of the first term’s tuition and fees. Applicants for admission may receive a refund of the tuition deposit if a letter requesting cancellation is received within five working days after their statement of acceptance is received by the School; otherwise, admitted applicants who choose not to enroll forfeit their deposit.

If a statement of acceptance is not received from applicants within the stated deadline, the offer of admission will no longer be valid, and the applicant’s files will be inactivated.

Deferring Admission

Students who have been fully admitted into a degree program may be able to defer their admission for up to one year from their original term of admission. To defer admission, students must have their statement of acceptance along with the appropriate tuition deposit, a $500 nonrefundable deferment fee, and a statement indicating why they would like to defer their admission on file with the Office of Admissions at the appropriate campus. Students who are approved to defer their admission will be notified in writing and will be subject to program requirements in effect at the time of the new application. Students who defer admission but do not matriculate must reapply for admission as outlined in the Admissions Process section of the current catalog. The Office of Admissions does not maintain student files for students who do not enroll by their intended start date.



International Applicants

Chicago Campus

In addition to submitting a completed application, all transcripts from outside of North America (including Mexico) must be evaluated by an acceptable transcript evaluation service such as World Education Service (wes.org) or Educational Course Evaluation (ece.org). All official transcripts and official translations if not in English, as well as a course-by-course international credential evaluation, must be submitted.

If you order the WES ICAP (wes.org) course-by-course analysis, you will only be required to submit your official international credential evaluation to the Adler School as this service provides a verified copy of your official transcripts and translations to the Adler School. Make sure you send in all your transcripts and order the course-by-course analysis.

English Language Proficiency Assessment

Applicants whose first language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Students who have earned a bachelor’s or master’s degree in an accredited program in Canada or the United States may not be required to take the TOEFL.

Applicants should request that language proficiency test scores be sent directly to the School by the testing service. These test results are valid for two years only.

TOEFL (ets.org/toefl)

The Adler School–Chicago campus’ code number for receiving test scores is 1147.

Applicants who take the paper-based TOEFL must receive a minimum score of 580.

Applicants who take the computer-based TOEFL must receive a minimum score of 240.

Applicants who take the Internet-based TOEFL must receive a minimum of score of 92 with at least 22 on each of the four sections.

IELTS (ielts.org)

Applicants who take the IELTS must receive a minimum Academic score of 7 overall with no band score lower than 7.

International applicants must also submit documentation of sufficient financial resources to complete the program and provide for living expenses while attending the Adler School. Once enrolled in the program, students must pay tuition and fees according to the school’s payment schedule. Current international students will not be allowed to register for classes if they have an outstanding balance which jeopardizes the student’s ability to remain in the U.S. under their F-1 student visa.

Students who have been accepted into a degree program at the School will be issued an I-20 upon receipt of their Statement of Acceptance, the appropriate tuition deposit, and all other financial verification paperwork. Students should allow enough time for securing an F-1 student visa in their country for travel to the U.S. It is the student’s responsibility to provide the Office of Admissions with a current foreign address and mailing address, if different, along with the intended U.S. address. I-20s cannot be mailed to Post Office Box numbers.

Once students arrive on campus, they must notify the Office of Admissions of their arrival and update their U.S. address. This information is required by Homeland Security, and student I-20s cannot be updated until we receive this information.

International students must have their I-20s updated each year they are in attendance at the School. Students must maintain full-time status each term as outlined by the school for their program. If the student has extenuating circumstances that require that they are enrolled less than full time, the student must request an exception from the Office of Student Affairs. If an exception is given, a letter will be issued to be used to update the student’s SEVIS record and to accompany the student’s I-20.

Students should not attempt to enter the United States without their current and updated I-20.

Although the School does not provide financial assistance for international students in the form of financial aid or tuition reduction, students are eligible for Adler School scholarships unless otherwise noted.



Vancouver Campus

In addition to submitting a completed application, all transcripts from outside of North America must be evaluated by a transcript evaluation service, World Education Service (wes.org/ca) or Educational Course Evaluation (ece.org). All official transcripts and official translations if not in English, as well as a course-by-course international credential evaluation, must be submitted.

If you order the WES ICAP (wes.org/ca) course-by-course analysis, you will only be required to submit your official international credential evaluation to the Adler School as this service provides a verified copy of your official transcripts and translations to the School. Prospective students should send all transcripts and order the course-by-course analysis.

English Language Proficiency Assessment

Applicants whose first language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Students who have earned a bachelor’s or master’s degree in an accredited program in Canada or the United States may not be required to take the TOEFL.

Applicants must request that language proficiency test scores be sent directly to the School by the testing service. These test results are valid for two years.

TOEFL (ets.org/toefl)

The Adler School–Vancouver campus’ code number for receiving test scores is 6215.

Applicants who take the paper-based TOEFL must receive a minimum of 580.

Applicants who take the computer-based TOEFL must receive a minimum of 240.

Applicants who take the Internet-based TOEFL must receive a minimum of 92 with at least 22 on each of the four sections.

IELTS (ielts.org)

Applicants who take the IELTS must receive a minimum Academic score of 7 overall, with no band score lower than 6.5. International students possessing citizenship from a country outside of Canada must apply for a study permit. For more information, please contact (in North America) (888) 242-2100 or cic.gc.ca. Once enrolled in the Adler School program, students must pay tuition and fees according to the school’s payment schedule.



Off Campus Work Permit Program (OCWPP)

Adler School’s Vancouver campus participates in the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) off campus work permit program for international students (cic.gc.ca/english/study/work-offcampus.asp). Although the School does not provide financial assistance for international students in the form of financial aid or tuition reduction, students are eligible for Adler School scholarships, unless otherwise noted.



Students-at-Large / Non-Degree Seeking

Students who wish to take classes for personal pursuit not related to a degree program at Adler School, or qualified graduate students and mental health professionals, may be admitted as student-at-large/non-degree seeking (SAL/NDS). Qualified professionals may take courses as SAL/NDS students for continuing education credit or for professional enrichment as long as they meet the minimum eligibility for admission. Graduate students in psychology-related degree programs at other regionally accredited institutions bear the responsibility of verifying with their home institutions whether Adler courses will be transferred back and accepted for credit.

Applicants for SAL/NDS must submit a completed application, nonrefundable $50 application fee, an autobiographical essay/personal statement, a resume or curriculum vitae, and official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate schools attended. Applications will be reviewed by the Admissions Committee, and prospective students will not be allowed to register until they have been approved for admission as an SAL/NDS student.

If admitted as SAL/NDS, a student may complete a maximum of nine credits within one academic year and must comply with all prerequisites and course requirements as given in the School Catalog. Graduates of Adler School degree programs who are approved as SAL/NDS may take up to 18 credits within one academic year. SAL/NDS students are not eligible for financial aid and may not enroll in courses which are reserved for students fully admitted to particular degree programs. Appropriate courses taken for credit may apply toward completing a degree for SAL/NDS students who are admitted to a degree program within one year of completing SAL/NDS courses. Successful completion of course work, however, does not guarantee admission to a degree or certificate program. An SAL whose application to a degree or certificate program has been denied may not enroll in further courses or continue as a student-at-large.

Because students-at-large are limited to a total of nine credit hours of course work within one academic year, persons who plan to pursue a degree or certificate program should apply for admission at the earliest opportunity. Students-at-large who have completed nine credit hours of courses may not register for additional courses until such time as they have been formally admitted to a degree or certificate program. Those who seek admission to a degree or certificate program within one year of completing their last course as SAL/NDS will not be required to pay an additional application fee for the admissions application, but will be required to submit additional information as is required to make that degree program application complete.

Changing or Adding Programs

Doctoral students may apply to add a master’s degree program, and M.A. students may apply to change from one Adler School master’s degree program to another by submitting the appropriate application forms. Students must satisfy admission requirements for the degree or certificate program at the time of application to the new program. Acceptance into and/or successful completion of one degree or certificate program neither constitutes nor guarantees admission to another program.

Master’s degree students who wish to apply to a doctoral program are encouraged to have completed at least 24 credit hours of graded course work and be actively engaged in a clinical practicum before applying. Students are required to submit a doctoral program application; three letters of recommendation from Adler School faculty and practicum supervisors, with at least one from their academic advisor and one from their current program director; a 500-word statement of purpose; a resume or curriculum vitae; and an official Adler School transcript. The application deadlines for doctoral applicants apply to Adler School master’s students who are applying to a doctoral program. Once all materials are received, the Admissions Committee will review the application and determine whether the applicant will be scheduled for an interview with doctoral core faculty as the final stage of the application process. Students from M.A. programs who have been accepted to a doctoral program must complete all requirements for their M.A. degree no later than one year after acceptance.

Readmission

Students who were previously enrolled at Adler School, but withdrew from their degree program or were administratively withdrawn, may submit a new application for admission no less than one year from the date of withdrawal and will be evaluated according to current admission requirements. If readmitted, applicants/students are subject to the program requirements in effect at the time of the new application. This also applies to students who seek to return to the School following a withdrawal in good standing.

When previously withdrawn students are granted readmission to the Adler School or when alumni apply for admission to a different program, a case-by-case review of the student’s prior academic record will be done to determine whether credit can be granted for formerly completed coursework. Many factors are pertinent to the school’s determination to give credit for previously completed course work, including but not limited to: (a) the length of time that has passed since the coursework was originally completed, (b) the grade earned in the course, (c) the performance evaluation completed by the student’s advisor/supervisor, and (d) curriculum changes that may have occurred and been formally instituted since the student’s withdrawal from the school. There are no fixed and absolute rules regarding granting credit for previously completed course work. Instead, a formal review of the unique academic and training history of each applicant will occur and a determination will be made at the discretion of the Admissions Committee in consultation with the program director. A formal audit of previously completed coursework will be undertaken only after enrollment into a degree program.

Transfer Credit

Students accepted for admission may be granted transfer credit for graduate level courses previously taken at another accredited institution. Upon enrollment into a degree program, a review of the unique academic and training history will occur and a determination will be made at the discretion of the School. Requesting transfer credit is an extensive process that involves a review of previous academic work, including syllabi and grades earned. It is Adler School policy that transfer credit must be requested with all supporting documentation received by the end of the second semester of enrollment.



Transfer of credit is subject to the following conditions:

  1. Transferred course credit is restricted to graduate-level courses from a recognized, regionally-accredited degree granting institution. 

  2. Completed course matches 80% of the content of the course requirement.

  3. Number of credits earned for the completed course matches or exceeds number of credit hours for the requested course.

  4. Transfer of credit is not granted for practicum or internship.

  5. Transfer of credit is granted only for courses in which the grade earned was a “B” or higher. Pass/Fail or Credit/No Credit courses are ineligible.

  6. No credit will be transferred for coursework that is more than five years old.

A maximum of 12 credit hours from other accredited institutions may be transferred into an M.A. program; a maximum of 24 credit hours into the Doctor of Psychology (PsyD.) in Clinical Psychology program; and a maximum of 39 hours into the Doctor of Couple and Family Therapy program. Students will be charged a transfer of credit fee for each course evaluated for transfer consideration. Please reference the current schedule of fees and tuition schedule for transfer of credit fee information.

Academic Policies and Procedures

Class Attendance
CHICAGO CAMPUS
Students are responsible for maintaining regular and punctual attendance for each class session. Students who expect to miss or arrive late for class should notify the instructor in advance. Students who miss more than two unexcused class sessions, or an accumulation of five hours of class time, due to late arrival or tardiness, may receive a grade of “F” (Fail) and may be required to repeat the course. Students whose absence or tardiness affects the quality of their work or the work of the class may be given a lower grade at the discretion of the faculty instructor.

In those instances in which a class is offered on a weekend intensive format (that is, three or fewer class meetings in a semester), missing one class may result in a grade of “F” (Fail). Due to the unique structure of the practicum seminar courses, students who miss more than one class session in a semester may receive a grade of “NC” (No Credit) and may be referred to the appropriate Student Development Committee for review.



Vancouver Campus

Students are responsible for regular and punctual attendance during each class session. Students who expect to miss or arrive late for a class must notify the instructor in advance. Students whose absence or tardiness affects the quality of their work or the work of the class may be given a lower grade. Students who miss more than two classes in a semester, for courses that meet once a week over a 14-week semester, will receive a grade of “F” (Fail). For courses that meet on a weekend intensive format, which involves three or fewer class meetings in a semester, missing one class will result in a grade of “F” (Fail). For courses that meet once every other week (e.g., seven full-day class meetings) over a 14-week semester, students who miss more than one class in a semester will receive a grade of “F” (Fail). Due to the unique structure of the practicum seminar courses, students who miss more than one class session in a semester will receive a grade of “No Credit” (or “NC”) and be referred to the Training Committee for review.

Summer term – Students who miss more than six hours of classroom instruction in the summer semester, for courses that meet once a week over a 12-week semester, will receive a grade of “F” (Fail). For courses that meet on a weekend intensive format, which involves three or fewer class meetings in a semester, missing one class will result in a grade of “F” (Fail). For courses that meet once every other week (e.g., six full-day class meetings over a 12-week semester), students who miss more than six hours of classroom instruction in a semester will receive a grade of “F” (Fail).

Students who receive a grade of “F” (Fail) for any course must repeat the course.


Application of the Attendance Policy

The above policies establish the obligations of students to adhere to class attendance standards and the rights of instructors to give students lower or failing grades for breaches of the policy. The policy is on an honor system where students are expected to be present for all classes and will notify the instructor if absent. Faculty may use their discretion on how to track attendance and recognize the honor system.

Instructors consider extenuating circumstances and/or student accommodation needs when applying the class attendance policy and, therefore, have some discretion in providing accommodations to students whose attendance breaches the standard. Thus, instructors may develop an alternative plan for students who are unable to comply with the attendance policy, but only if the plan enables the student to meet the course exit competencies.
Credit Hour Policy
The Adler School assigns and awards credit hours that conform to commonly accepted practices in higher education and that comply with the federal standards.

At the Adler School, a credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:


1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately 15 weeks for one semester.
2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other activities as established by an institution, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading toward to the award of credit hours.
The Adler School operates on a semester calendar. A semester is defined as a term of 15 weeks. Instruction is scheduled over three terms. Fall and spring terms are full semesters. The Summer semester is comprised of full semester courses and courses that are offered in two sessions: Summer I and Summer II. The Adler School also offers courses throughout the academic year in sessions of varying lengths shorter than the full semester.

For traditional lecture-discussion and seminar courses, a one-credit hour class meets for no less than 60 minutes per week over the course of a semester.


A one-credit class requires a minimum of:

  • 15 contact hours per semester

  • 30 hours of outside work per semester

  • A total of 45 hours of student engagement per one-credit course, per semester

A two-credit class requires a minimum of:



  • 30 contact hours per semester

  • 60 hours of outside work per semester

  • A total of 90 hours of student engagement per two-credit course, per semester

A three-credit class requires a minimum of:



  • 45 contact hours per semester

  • 90 hours of outside work/semester

  • A total of 135 hours of student engagement per three-credit course, per semester


Short-term courses: Half-semester courses (eight weeks), summer session courses, and other courses offered over an abbreviated period of time will require the same amount of classroom and out-of-class work per credit hour as required of semester-long courses, with work distributed over the shorter period of time.
Practicum, Field Work, and Internship: require the completion of an institutionally sanctioned academic activity that is equivalent to the amount of work stipulated in paragraph (1) that may occur over a different amount of time.
Independent Study: will represent a minimum of three hours of student work per week throughout the course of the semester or the equivalent work distributed over a different period of time.
Online and Hybrid Courses: The expectation of contact time and student effort outside the class is the same in all formats of a course whether online, a hybrid of face-to-face contact with some content delivered by electronic means, or traditional.
Statement of Student Responsibilities

The Adler School of Professional Psychology expects that students will:



  1. Adhere to all applicable School policies and procedures.

  2. Uphold all rules applicable to conduct in off-campus settings including clinical, field, internship, or in-service activities.

  3. Abide by all local, state, and federal laws.

  4. Maintain academic honesty and integrity.

  5. Comply with all ethical and professional standards applicable to their program of study.

  6. Contribute actively to the process of learning, including complying with attendance or participation requirements, completing assignments, and preparing for class.

  7. Conduct themselves in an ethical, professional, and civil manner.

  8. Demonstrate respect for the rights of others.

  9. Regularly monitor their student accounts. 

Academic Status

Academic Good Standing

To remain in academic good standing, a student must:



  1. Maintain consistent enrollment

  2. Take a course load that ensures steady movement toward degree completion within the maximum time limits outlined in the Catalog

  3. Meet all academic, comportment, and professional standards as well as applicable program requirements

  4. Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale

Note: The Department of Education additionally requires that students keep their accounts current, and successfully complete (“B” grade or better) 70 percent of attempted coursework in each term, in order to be eligible for federal student financial aid.

Academic Alert

Students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 who earn a B- grade for the first time will be placed on Academic Alert status for the following semester.



Academic Warning

Students will be placed on Academic Warning when they meet any of the following conditions:



  1. Earn a first grade of C with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0

  2. Earn a second B- with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0

This status will be in effect for one semester subsequent to the receipt of the second low grade.

Academic Probation

Students will be placed on Academic Probation the first time they meet any of the following conditions:



  1. Earn a second grade of C

  2. Earn a single D, F, or NC grade without a prior history of low grades (B- or C)

  3. Earn three or more grades of B-

  4. Fall below a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

Students on academic probation shall have a maximum of two consecutive semesters following the status change in which to address the issue that generated probationary status.
Academic Dismissal

Students may be subject to Academic Dismissal when they meet any of the following conditions:



  1. Earn two or more grades of D, F, or NC

  2. Earn a third grade of C

  3. Fail to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for two semesters

  4. Fail to comply with any prior academic remediation plan.

The transcript of a student who has been dismissed will carry the notation “Academic Dismissal.” Students who have been dismissed are ineligible to re-apply to the School.

Satisfactory Progress

To maintain satisfactory progress, students must remain consistently registered until completion of all degree requirements, and take a course load that ensures steady movement toward degree completion within the maximum time limits for the program.

Students who fail to register each term may be administratively withdrawn from the School, and Administrative Withdrawal will be indicated on the transcript.

Master’s students should complete a minimum of 12 credit hours every 12 months and must satisfactorily complete all of the requirements for graduation within five years of the date of first registration following admission to the program. For degree programs with more than 60 total credits, students may need to take up to 14 credits every 12 months in order to complete their degree requirements within five years.

Doctoral students should complete at least 18 credit hours every 12 months and must satisfactorily complete all requirements for graduation within seven years of the date of first registration following admission to the program. Students enrolled in dissertation or internship are considered to be maintaining minimum credit requirements for satisfactory academic progress.

Student Referral Policy

The Adler School of Professional Psychology requires all students to uphold the highest standards of academic, personal, and professional conduct. The Student Referral Policy applies to all academic and professional training-related conduct, including online, on campus, and at the training sites. The School reserves the right to exercise jurisdiction over events or actions occurring off campus or in virtual communities, where the Adler Schools community interest is affected. This policy is designed to contribute to the personal as well as professional growth of the students and to ensure the welfare of the School and its related communities.



When students breach one or more of the Student Responsibilities, any member of the Adler community may alert the appropriate Student Development Committee by submitting a Student Incident Referral Form (available online).

Referrals will be directed to the Student Development Committee, which will determine the level of severity of the concern in accordance with the criteria, and direct the referral to the students Faculty Advisor, to review by the Student Development Committee, or to the Student Comprehensive Evaluation Committee.


STUDENT DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE (SDC)

The SDC is a standing committee within each academic department that monitors students’ Academic Status and compliance with Student Responsibilities. The primary function of the Committee is to provide early and structured assistance to students in successfully completing their program.



The Registrar forwards to the appropriate departmental Student Development Committee at the beginning of each term a list of students who have fallen below Academic Good Standing. When students breach one or more of the Student Responsibilities, any member of the Adler community may alert the appropriate Student Development Committee by submitting a Student Incident Referral Form (available online).

The Student Development Committee reviews the grade reports and incident forms, determines the level of severity of the concern, and directs the student to take remedial action. Depending upon the seriousness of the concern, the student will be referred to the Faculty Advisor, to meet with the Student Development Committee, or to the Student Comprehensive Evaluation Committee.



STUDENT COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION COMMITTEE (SCEC)

Serious or repeated breaches of Academic Good Standing or of the Student Responsibilities policy will be addressed through the Student Comprehensive Evaluation Committee (SCEC). The Committee will evaluate the referral, provide a plan for remediation if appropriate, and deliver a decision on the outcome, which may include Dismissal.


APPEALS

Students may appeal the referral outcomes by following the Student Grievance and Appeal Policy posted online at adler.edu.



Qualifying Examinations

In addition to satisfying course work, practica, and other program requirements, master’s and doctoral programs require qualifying exams which differ by program. Please consult the requirements for each program. Qualifying examinations are important requirements, providing students with the opportunity to integrate course material and practical training, reflect upon the educational and training experiences, and apply their learning to clinical and social issues. In addition, the exams enable faculty to evaluate students’ progress toward expected learning outcomes.



Registration

Term schedules are published and updated online via WebAdvisor. Students register online and registration deadlines are published each term. Please consult the academic calendar for specific dates. Grades and credit are forfeited if a student is not officially registered for a course or exam. Students who wish to take more than 15 credits within a semester must receive written approval from their Program Director.

Students wishing to add courses or exams after the published add/drop period must submit a written request and written approval from the course instructor via email to the Office of the Registrar. Payment in full is due to Student Finance before the course or exam can be added to the student’s academic record. Financial aid recipients should consult with the Office of Financial Aid. Students risk forfeiture of all earned grades if they are not officially registered for a course or exam.

Full-Time and Half-Time Status
CHICAGO CAMPUS AND BLENDED PROGRAMS

To be considered full time, doctoral students must enroll in 10 or more credit hours each term. Doctoral students enrolled in between five and nine credit hours each term are considered half time. Doctoral students registered for less than five credit hours are considered less than half time and are not eligible for federally funded financial aid.


M.A. and certificate students must enroll in eight or more credits to be considered full time. Master and certificate students enrolled in four to seven credits are considered half time, and those enrolled in fewer than four credits are considered less than half time and are not eligible for federally funded financial aid. Students carrying a full-time load are encouraged to limit employment to part time in order to allow adequate time for classes, practicum work, study, and other student activities.
Students registered for practicum, dissertation proposal, dissertation, or full-time internship satisfy the requirement for full-time study and are eligible to receive Title IV funding and deferments. Students who are registered for only half-time internship, dissertation proposal continuation, doctoral dissertation continuation, or practicum continuation meet the requirement for half-time study and are eligible to receive Title IV funding and deferments. Students who register for Oral Defense only in any given term are not eligible for Title IV funding.
ONLINE CAMPUS PROGRAMS

Students enrolled in an online degree program must enroll in six or more credits to be considered full time. Students enrolled in three to five credits are considered half time, and those enrolled in fewer than three credits are considered less than half time and are not eligible for federally funded financial aid.


Students carrying a full-time load are encouraged to limit employment to part time in order to allow adequate time for classes, practicum work, study, and other student activities.
Students registered for practicum satisfy the requirement for full-time study and are eligible to receive Title IV funding and deferments. Students who are registered for only practicum continuation meet the requirement for half-time study and are eligible to receive Title IV funding and deferments.
Course Drop and Withdrawal

Chicago Campus

Students wishing to drop a course or exam must do so before or during the published add/drop period. Students who wish to drop a practicum or internship course must have prior approval from the Director of Community Engagement or Director of Training. Please consult the academic calendar for specific dates. The official date of the drop is the date the student drops the course via WebAdvisor.

After the published add/drop period of a semester, electronic approval via email from the student’s advisor or program director is required. Notifying the instructor or ceasing class attendance does not constitute an official drop or withdrawal. The official date of the withdrawal is the date the student sends the email request to withdraw from the course to their advisor or program director. Students may not withdraw after the eighth week of a semester during the fall and spring terms. Please consult the academic calendar for the deadline to withdraw from a class during the summer term. Students who stop attending class or fail to complete an exam without submitting an official drop or withdrawal form will receive a final grade for the course that reflects the work completed. In addition, students may not withdraw from a course or exam after the published end date of the course or due date of the exam. Students are not eligible for a refund after the add/drop period.

A drop fee is charged for courses dropped during the add/drop period. Students who drop a course or exam during the add/drop period may receive refunds in accordance with the established refund policy. Students who are withdrawn due to disciplinary or academic reasons may receive a prorated refund. No refunds will be made when students stop attending class without officially withdrawing from the course.



Vancouver Campus

Students wishing to drop a course or exam must do so via the School’s online registration system, WebAdvisor, during registration week. Students wishing to drop a course after registration week must do so in person or via email by submitting the appropriate forms to the Registrar’s Department.

Notifying your instructor or ceasing class attendance does not constitute an official drop or withdrawal. The official date of the withdrawal is the date the drop is processed online via WebAdvisor or the date the drop form is received by the Registrar’s Office. Students may not withdraw after the eighth week of a semester during the fall and spring terms. Please consult the academic calendar for the deadline to withdraw from a class during the summer term. Students who stop attending class or fail to complete an exam without submitting an official drop or withdrawal form will receive a grade of “F,” “NC,” or “NP” for the course. In addition, students may not withdraw from a course or exam after the published end date of the course or due date of the exam.

A drop fee is charged for courses dropped during the add/drop period. Students who drop a course or exam during the add/drop period may receive refunds in accordance with the established refund policy. Students who are administratively withdrawn may receive a prorated refund. No refunds will be made when students stop attending class without officially withdrawing from the course.



Leave of Absence
Students may take a leave of absence (LOA) due to illness or other extenuating circumstances by completing a Leave of Absence form including necessary signatures and submitting it to the Registrar’s Office. An LOA may be taken for up to three terms (one calendar year). If a student has accepted a practicum or internship prior to requesting a leave, or is completing a practicum/internship at the time of the request, the student must contact the director of training and community service prior to submission of the form to their faculty advisor. The LOA will be noted on the student’s transcript for each term until the student returns to school. Time approved for an LOA does not impact the maximum time allowed for degree completion.
In order for a financial aid recipient to be approved for an LOA, the student must also follow the Adler School’s LOA policy as outlined in the Financial Aid and Student Accounts Handbook. Because federal regulations state that LOA is only to be granted for a specific set of circumstances, any leave identified as ineligible per Title IV regulations may not be approved by the director of financial aid and must be reported to the National Student Loan Data System as a Withdrawal. Students are required to speak with the Office of Financial Aid before requesting an LOA in order to receive full information regarding the procedure and the results of the LOA.
Students who do not return from an LOA by the agreed-upon term may be administratively withdrawn from the School. In order to be readmitted, administratively withdrawn students must submit a new application for admission no sooner than one year after the date upon which they were dismissed and, if admitted, must follow the program requirements in effect at the time of the new admission.

Administrative Withdrawal

Once enrolled, students are expected to maintain good academic standing, meet all student responsibilities, and maintain satisfactory progress and register each term until completing the program in which they have been admitted. Students who fail to register for each consecutive term may be administratively withdrawn from the School. The School also retains the right to administratively withdraw students whose accounts are past due and to charge all associated fees.

Administrative Withdrawal will be noted on the transcripts of students who have been administratively withdrawn. Students who have been administratively withdrawn and wish to be reconsidered for matriculation must submit a new application for admission no sooner than one year after their administrative withdrawal and, if admitted, must meet the program requirements and policies in effect at the time of the new admission. Students readmitted to the School may be eligible to receive up to 24 credits for course work completed either at the Adler School or another institution. Students who wish to appeal the decision of administrative withdrawal can follow the procedures of the Student Grievance and Appeal Policy posted online at adler.edu.

In the event a student is administratively withdrawn from the School, the Office of Financial Aid is required by Federal Law to recalculate a students eligibility for financial aid awards.

A calculation is used to determine the amount of “earned and “unearned aid based on the effective date of the administrative withdrawal. If a student completes 60 percent or less of credits taken during a term, the Office of Financial Aid determines the amount of “earned aid based on the proportion of credits successfully completed within the term. If a student successfully completes more than 60 percent of the credits taken in a term, s/he is considered to have earned 100 percent of the awards disbursed for the term. “Unearned awards must be returned to the lender. The student is responsible for repaying the School for any balances owed as a result of the return of financial aid funds.

Withdrawal in Good Standing

Students may withdraw from the Adler School in good standing by completing the Student Withdrawal Form and submitting it to the Registrar’s Office. To withdraw in good standing, students must be in academic good standing at the time of withdrawal, have completed all requirements for courses and clinical work for which they are registered, and may not be subject to pending disciplinary or academic inquiries. Withdrawal is noted on the transcript.

Former students who wish to return to the School after withdrawing in good standing must submit a new application for admission and, if admitted, must follow the policies, procedures, and program requirements in effect at the time of the new admission. Students readmitted to the School may be eligible to receive up to 24 credits for course work completed either at the Adler School or another institution.

Grading System

Traditional letter grades are given for most courses offered. A limited number of courses are evaluated on a credit/no credit basis. The grading system is as follows:



Chicago and online Campuses

Grade Description Grade Point

A Excellent 4.0

A- 3.75

B+ 3.5

B Satisfactory 3.0

B- Marginal 2.75

C At Risk 2.0

D Unsatisfactory 1.0

F Failure 0.0

CR Credit 0.0

NC No Credit 0.0

I Incomplete N/A

IP In Progress N/A

AU Audit N/A

W Withdrawal N/A

TR Transfer N/A



Grade Scale

94 – 100%

A

90 – 93%

A-

88 – 89%

B+

84 – 87%

B

80 – 83%

B-

73 – 79%

C

70 – 72%

D

Below 70%

F

Only two grades of “C”, and no grades of “D”, “F”, “NC”, “and AU” may be counted toward completion of degree requirements. A maximum of six credit hours may be repeated to remediate deficient grades and qualify for graduation. Both the original course grade and the repeated course grade will be calculated in the overall GPA, and both will appear on the transcript.


In Progress

A temporary grade of “IP” (In Progress) can be given to students who are engaged in field experiences, thesis, or courses in which completion of work may typically be expected to exceed the end of the term. The “IP” will be removed from the transcript when the final grade has been posted.


Incomplete

An “I” (Incomplete) grade will be granted only in exceptional situations when requirements for a course cannot be completed in the time allowed. An Incomplete grade is allowed only with the written consent of the instructor and indicates that the student has presented a satisfactory reason for receiving an incomplete grade. Students must request an incomplete grade prior to the due date of the final requirement of the class in question.

For an Incomplete grade to be granted, students must file a completed Incomplete Grade Agreement form with the instructor. The form states specifically what the student must do to satisfy the course requirements, including the instructor’s grading criteria and the agreed-upon completion date. The maximum time limit for finishing incomplete work is the end of the following term. The student and instructor must sign the agreement. The instructor must submit the form to the Registrar’s Office.

Receipt of one or more “I” (incomplete) grades may preclude students from enrolling in subsequent terms; may render the student ineligible for federal student aid; and may result in the student being referred to the Student Development Committee (SDC).

If the course work is not successfully completed within the time limit established by the instructor (less than one term, or within one term following the course), the “Incomplete” grade will be changed to an “F” (Fail) or “NC” (No Credit).

Credit/No Credit

A grade of “CR” (Credit) is assigned upon satisfactory completion of undergraduate prerequisite classes, professional development seminar, practicum seminars, practicum/internship requirements, qualifying examinations, Master’s Thesis, and the Doctoral Dissertation. A grade of “NC” (No Credit) is assigned upon unsatisfactory performance in practicum or a course offered on a credit/no credit basis. Grades of “CR” are not used in calculating the grade point average; however, grades of “NC” are used in calculating the grade point average and are considered failing grades for the purposes of academic satisfactory progress.



Audit

Students registered to audit a course will receive, upon successful completion of the course, a designation of “AU” on their transcripts which signifies neither credit nor a grade. Students cannot change an audited course to the credit option after the add/drop period ends. Audited courses do not count toward graduation requirements and are not eligible for financial aid. Once an audited course is completed, it cannot be changed to credit at a later time.



Grade Corrections / Grade Appeals

Once a grade has been recorded on the student’s academic record, additional work cannot be submitted to change the grade. To change an incorrectly recorded grade, students can notify the course instructor. In order for the grade to be changed, instructors must secure the approval and signature of their immediate supervisor (program director or chair). Grade Change forms should be submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

Students may file a grade appeal by following the procedures of the Grade Appeal Policy, which is posted online at adler.edu. Only grades of “C” or lower can be appealed, and these may be appealed only if a grading standard was not set or not followed by the instructor. PsyD students can appeal PsyD course grades of “B-“ or lower.

In addition, if a student is appealing a grade for a course that is a prerequisite for a subsequent class, he or she cannot register for or attend subsequent classes until the grade for the prerequisite has been resolved.

Grade changes or alterations to student records are not permitted after a degree has been officially posted to the academic record.

Vancouver Campus

Grade Description Grade Point

A+ 4.25

A Excellent 4.0

A- 3.75

B+ 3.5

B Satisfactory 3.0

B- 2.75

C Marginal 2.0

D Unsatisfactory 1.0

F Failure 0.0

CR Credit 0.0

NC No Credit 0.0

I Incomplete N/A

IP In Progress N/A

NP No Progress N/A

AU Audit N/A

W Withdrawal N/A

TR Transfer N/A



Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) – Chicago and Online Campuses

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as amended, sets forth requirements regarding the privacy of student records and affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records. Applicants who are not admitted to the School or who do not matriculate following admission have no right of access to their submitted educational records.

Students have the following rights:


  • To inspect and review educational records by requesting it in writing to the Office of the Registrar. Requests can take up to 30 days.

  • To request the amendment of the student’s educational records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students should submit a written statement to the Office of the Registrar which will be placed in their academic file.

  • To have some control over the disclosure of information from their education records.

Student education records will not be disclosed to anyone outside of those individuals within the Adler School educational community to whom FERPA allows access, without the student’s written consent, unless the request qualifies as one of the legal exceptions. To request release of your information to a third party, please fill out the Document Release Authorization form online at adler.edu.

Adler does not release copies of students’ transcripts from other institutions.  Students are encouraged to contact their previous institutions for copies of their transcripts.

Students who believe their privacy has been violated have the right to file a written grievance with the Office of the Registrar, by following the procedures of the Grievance Appeal Policy posted online at adler.edu.

Students are informed of their rights under FERPA each October by the Office of the Registrar. The annual FERPA notice is located on the Office of the Registrar page on Adler Connect. For the annual notice please go to https://connect.adler.edu/studentservices/registrar.

Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) – Vancouver Campus

The British Columbia’s Personal Information Protection Act (PIPA) sets out the rules for how private sectors and not-for-profit organizations, such as the Adler School of Professional Psychology, may collect, use, or disclose information about its students.

Adler School of Professional Psychology collects relevant personal information about its students and has processes in place to protect the privacy of these records. Student records will not be disclosed to a third party unless the student has given written consent or the request qualifies as a legal exception. To release your information to a third party, students must complete and submit the FERPA – PIPA document release form online at www.adler.edu.

Students have access to their academic file through the Registrar’s Office. Students who wish to see the contents of their academic file should submit written request to the Registrar’s Office. The Registrar’s Office can take up to 30 days to respond to the student request. Students can submit correspondence to be filed in their academic file to the Registrar’s Office.

Students who believe that their privacy rights have been violated have the right to file a written complaint to the School Commissioner. The designated School commissioner is the Vancouver Campus Dean. The commissioner can conduct an investigation and will respond to the complaint in writing. For questions about confidentiality of records and privacy of students, please contact the Dean of the Vancouver Campus at 604-482-5510. If the concern is not resolved with the School Commissioner, students can contact the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner for British Columbia at info@oipc.bc.ca.

Students with Disabilities

It is the policy of the Adler School to offer reasonable accommodations to students with qualified disabilities, in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the B.C. Human Rights Code. If a student with a disability wishes to receive accommodations in order to participate in the courses, programs, or activities offered by the School, the student may request accommodations by contacting the associate vice president of student affairs. The use of these services is voluntary and confidential. Students must request accommodation prior to the implementation of needed accommodation. Accommodations cannot be applied retroactively.

Any student with an appropriately documented disability, including psychological, medical, physical, visual, hearing, and learning disabilities (including ADHD/ADD), is eligible for reasonable accommodations. Faculty should direct all students with inquiries or concerns regarding disabilities or accommodations to the associate vice president of student affairs, who will work directly with the student to develop a reasonable accommodation plan. The associate vice president of student affairs will work with any faculty regarding the provision of reasonable accommodations to students with documented disabilities. Students seeking accommodations on the Vancouver Campus should contact the director of admissions and student services.
Tuition and Fees

Chicago and Online Campuses

2014–2015 Tuition and Fees Schedule  

Admissions Fees and Deposits

      Admissions Application Fee                                                 $50

      Deposit (non-refundable) – MA programs                         $300

      Deposit (non-refundable) – Doctoral program                 $500

      Deferment Fee                                                                       $500

Tuition

      Tuition – Standard MA Credit Hour                                     $1,100

      Tuition – Standard Doctoral Credit Hour                            $1,270

      Tuition – Dissertation Credit Hour                                       $1,270

      Tuition – Full-time Internship (per term)                             $1,270

      Tuition – Half-time Internship (per term)                            $635

Tuition – EML Program – MA Credit Hour $775

      Tuition – 100% Online Programs                                         $775

      Tuition – Audit MA Credit Hour                                             $550

      Tuition – Audit Doctoral Credit Hour                                   $635



Course Fees

      Fee – MA Prerequisite                                                           $1,650

      Fee – Doctoral Prerequisite                                                  $1,905

      Fee – MA Professional Development Seminar                $1,100

      Fee – Doctoral Professional Development Seminar       $1,270

      Fee – Doctoral Dissertation Preparation Seminar           $215

      Fee – Doctoral Dissertation Proposal                                 $1,270   

      Fee – Doctoral Dissertation Proposal Continued             $1,270  

      Fee – Doctoral Dissertation Continuation                          $2,540

Fee – Community Service Capstone Paper $1,270

      Fee – MA Qualifying Exam                                                 $1,100 

      Fee – Doctoral Qualifying Exam                                       $1,270

      Fee – Dissertation Defense                                                  $490

Fee – Practicum Continuation $75

Fee – CMHC Internship Continuation (CMHC-699) $75
Lab/Testing Material Fees

      Fee – PCO-569                                                                   $30

      Fee – MAO-584                                                                     $189.50  

Fee – COUN-629 $30

Fee – PSY-661 $350

      Fee – PSY-662                                                                      $350

      Fee – PSY-663                                                                      $350

      Fee – PSY-683                                                                      $300

      Fee – PSY-720                                                                      $350

Registration Based Fees

      Fee – Student Services                                                         $270

      Fee – Professional Liability Insurance (per term)            $75

      Fee – Professional Liability Insurance for

      Community Service Practicum (per term)                    $45

Degree Completion Fees

      Fee – Graduation (per degree)                                            $180

      Fee – Continuing Ed Certificate Processing                     $45

      Fee – Replacement Diploma                                               $55



Other Fees

      Fee – Course Drop                                                         $65

      Fee – Late Registration                                         $380 

      Fee – Returned Check (per occurrence)                            $65

      Fee – Official Transcript                                                        $10

      Fee – Transfer Credit Evaluation (per course)                 $55

      Fee – Late Payment Fee                                                       2% of balance

Fee – Check Stop Payment $35

Fee – UPASS (per term for full-time students) $113.42

Fee – UPASS New Card (one-time) $4.97

Fee – UPASS Replacement Card $50

Payment Information

Online tuition payments are accepted through WebAdvisor. Students may pay tuition and fees by e-check or MasterCard, Discover, American Express, or Visa. Payments made through WebAdvisor will be assessed a convenience fee: 2.5 percent of the payment amount for credit card payments, and $3 for e-check payments.

Payment may also be remitted by paper check or money order on campus at the Office of Student Accounts. Checks are to be made payable to the Adler School of Professional Psychology. Unless otherwise indicated, tuition and fees are listed in U.S. dollars, and remittance must be made in U.S. dollars.

Tuition and fees are due and payable in full two weeks prior to the start of the term. Payments made to the School are first applied against any previously existing balance, then to current charges.

Students are responsible for all tuition and fees at the time due regardless of pending employer or third-party reimbursement, unless other financial arrangements have been made. Students approved for financial aid funds are exempt for the amount of aid anticipated, until those funds are disbursed.

Students whose financial accounts are delinquent are not in good standing and are not eligible to register for subsequent terms, begin a practicum or internship, obtain transcripts, or graduate until all outstanding balances are paid in full. The School retains the right to administratively withdraw students whose accounts are past due, and to charge all associated fees. It is the policy of the Adler School to submit delinquent accounts to external collection agencies.



Tuition Refund Policy

Students who have officially withdrawn from the School or specific courses may be entitled to a tuition refund to be paid within 14 business days of receipt of the official withdrawal form (via the Registrar page on Adler Connect) or from the date the course is dropped (via WebAdvisor). Refunds will be based upon the total charge incurred rather than the amount paid by the student. Mandatory fees, which include but are not limited to the Student Services Fee, are not refundable once the term has begun. Only tuition charges will be refunded based on the following schedule:



Fall & Spring Terms – On Campus and Online Classes

End of 7th calendar day of the term (11:59 PM) 100%

End of 14th calendar day of the term (11:59 PM) 50%

Third week through the end of term 0%



Summer Term – On Campus and Online Classes

End of 7th calendar day of the term (11:59 PM) 100%

End of 14th calendar day of the term (11:59 PM) 50%

Third week through the end of term 0%

Students who formally withdraw from the Adler School will be refunded in accordance with the school’s refund policy based on the official withdrawal date processed by the Registrar’s Office.

Students who are approved for a leave of absence and are currently registered for coursework will be refunded in accordance with the school’s refund policy based on the official drop date processed by the Registrar’s Office.

Students who are administratively withdrawn from the School are subject to the School’s tuition refund policy. In addition, those students who participate in financial aid programs are subject to the return of Title IV funds as mandated by the federal government. Please see the Financial Aid section of the catalog for more information.

Vancouver Campus

2014–2015 Tuition and FeeS Schedule

Admissions Fees and Deposits (in Canadian Dollars)

Admissions Application Fee $50

Deposit (non-refundable) – Master’s programs

(will be applied to first semester’s tuition) $300

Deposit (non-refundable) – PsyD Program $500

(will be applied to first semester’s tuition)

Start Date Deferral Fee $500

Tuition

Tuition – Standard Master’s Credit Hour $820

Tuition – Standard PsyD Credit Hour $980

Tuition – Audit Master’s Credit Hour $410

Tuition – Audit PsyD Credit Hour $490
Registration-Based Fees

Fee – Student Activity/Library Fee (per term) $200

Fee – Late Registration Fee (per occurrence) $50

Fee – Course Add Fee (per occurrence) $50

Fee – Pre-Practicum Skills Lab $500

Fee – MA Research Preparation Fee $600

Fee – MA Thesis Continuation $820

Fee – Masters Qualifying Exam $950

Fee – PsyD Clinical Qualifying Exam $980

Fee – PsyD Research Proposal and Project Fee $980

Fee – PsyD Internship Fee $980
Miscellaneous Fees

Fee – Course Drop Fee: See Tuition Refund Policy – Vancouver for details

Fee – Returned Cheque (per occurrence) $25

Payment Information - Vancouver

Tuition and fees are due and payable during the week of registration. Vancouver students may pay tuition and fees by cheque or money order made payable to the Adler School of Professional Psychology. The School also accepts Interact Direct payment.

Students are responsible for all tuition and fees at the time due regardless of pending employer or third-party reimbursement, unless other financial arrangements have been made. Students approved for financial aid funds are exempt for the amount of aid anticipated, until those funds are disbursed.

Students whose financial accounts are delinquent are not in good standing and are not eligible to register for subsequent terms, begin a practicum or internship, obtain transcripts, or graduate until all outstanding balances are paid in full. The School retains the right to administratively withdraw students whose accounts are past due, and to charge all associated fees. It is the policy of the Adler School to submit delinquent accounts to external collection agencies.

Vancouver students who opt for a deferred payment plan at the time of registration are responsible for paying their tuition and fees over a three-part payment plan. The first installment is due at the time of registration. Subsequent payments are listed on the registration form published each term. The deferred payment plan is an additional $15/credit hour.

Tuition Refund Policy - VANCOUVER

Students who have officially withdrawn from the School or specific courses may be entitled to a tuition refund to be paid within 14 business days of receipt of the official withdrawal or drop form. Refunds will be based upon the total charge incurred rather than the amount paid by the student.

The percentage of tuition refunded, excluding the nonrefundable tuition deposit and all other fees, is determined in accordance with the following schedule:

1) Refunds before the program of study begins:

a) 100 percent tuition refund excluding the nonrefundable tuition deposit and all other fees, including a
$50 drop fee.

2) Refunds after the program of study starts:

a) If written notice of withdrawal is received by the institution, or a student is dismissed, within 10 percent of the program of study’s duration, the institution may retain 30 percent of the total fees due under the contract.

b) If written notice of withdrawal is received by the institution, or a student is dismissed within 30 percent of the


program of study’s duration, the institution may retain 50 percent of the total fees due under the contract.

c) If a student withdraws or is dismissed after 30 percent of the program of study’s duration, no refund is required.

To initiate a refund, written notice must be provided:

(a) By a student to the institution when the student withdraws; or

(b) By the institution to the student where the institution dismisses a student.

Refund entitlement is calculated on the total fees due under the contract, less the applicable nonrefundable application or registration fee. Where total fees have not yet been collected, the institution is not responsible for refunding more than has been collected to date, and a student may be required to make up for monies due under the contract.


Financial Aid – Chicago and Online Campuses

The Adler School of Professional Psychology offers student financial assistance to eligible students via the U.S. Department of Education (DOE) – Title IV Federal Assistance Program. A variety of financial tools are available to students while enrolled at the Adler School. These financial tools include the following options:



  • Scholarships

  • Direct Stafford Loans

  • Direct Graduate PLUS Loans

  • Alternative Loans (Available to U.S. Citizens and International Students)

  • Federal Work Study

  • Veterans Benefits

  • Yellow Ribbon GI Education Enhancement Program

  • DOD/MOU Military Active Duty Benefits

In order to be awarded financial assistance through the Office of Financial Aid, a student must complete a financial aid file and must meet all eligibility requirements. Students begin the financial aid process by completing and submitting a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to the DOE at FAFSA.ed.gov using our school code, G20681.

Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements

Students wishing to receive financial aid at the Adler School must meet the following eligibility criteria:



  • Be actively enrolled in a degree or certificate program at the Adler School.

  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress: completion of at least 70 percent of all attempted coursework and a cumulative GPA of at least a 3.0.

Doctoral students receiving federal financial aid are eligible for a maximum of seven years of federal financial assistance from the initial date of registration. All qualified master’s students receiving federal financial aid are eligible for a maximum of five years of federal financial assistance from the initial date of registration. All qualified certificate students receiving federal financial aid are eligible for a maximum of two years of federal financial assistance. Students who reach the maximum enrollment limit for receiving federal financial aid would need to file an appeal. Students must maintain at least half-time enrollment as defined by their academic program:

  • M.A. and Certificate candidates: at least four credit hours per academic term

  • Doctoral candidates: at least five credit hours per academic term

  • OR enrollment in any of the following: Practicum, Practicum Continuation, Internship
    (part time or full time), Dissertation Proposal, Dissertation, Dissertation Continuation

In addition to the above, students who wish to receive federal financial aid must also:

  • Hold U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status

  • Be in good standing on all previously awarded federal funding.

Types of Financial Aid

We understand financing your graduate education is very important. As you are aware, graduate students are eligible for various types of loans and scholarships. The following types of aid are available at the Adler School.



Unsubsidized Stafford Student Loans

It is important to note that most students are eligible for unsubsidized Stafford loans regardless of credit history. Stafford loans are eligible for consolidation, in-school deferment, and six-month grace period.

Repayment of federal loans does not begin until a student graduates, withdraws from school, or ceases to maintain at least half-time enrollment. Students are informed of Direct Stafford loan awards in their Financial Aid Award Notice email. If students require additional aid, they can apply for either a Direct Graduate PLUS loan or alternative (private) loan.

Direct Stafford loans for the 2014–2015 academic year have a fixed interest rate of 5.41 percent with a 1.072 origination fee. Interest begins to accrue on unsubsidized loans immediately upon disbursement.



Graduate PLUS Loans

Students may apply for the Grad PLUS loan to supplement Stafford loan funds. The Grad PLUS loans have a fixed interest rate of 6.41 percent and 4.288 percent origination fee. They have many of the same benefits as the unsubsidized Stafford loans such as eligible for consolidation, in-school deferment, and discharge upon the death or disability of the borrower.

Direct Grad PLUS loans require credit approval. Grad PLUS loans disbursed during the 2014–2015 academic year have a fixed interest rate of 6.41 percent, with a 4.288 percent origination fee. Grad PLUS loans go immediately into repayment after the last term in which a student is enrolled at least half time, unless the student applies for a deferment or forbearance to take effect upon graduation

Alternative Loans

Alternative loans are private loans that cannot be consolidated with Direct loans. Alternative loans are not federal loans and are therefore available to international students and borrowers without a FAFSA. Interest rates on alternative loans are not fixed and can vary by lender and by borrower’s credit rating.

Alternative loans require credit approval and can require an additional endorser. International students may qualify for alternative loans if they have a co-signer who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

Federal Work Study Program

The Federal Work Study Program provides meaningful work experience for eligible students who demonstrate financial need. While earning money to help pay educational expenses, students are encouraged to find work related to their course of study or interest as well as community service work.

Students who have filed a FAFSA, demonstrate financial need, and have room in their financial aid budget are eligible to participate in the Federal Work Study Program. Eligible students may apply for federal work study positions that are posted on the School’s intranet campus community.

There are a limited number of Institutional Work Study positions available for International students. Positions are posted on the School’s intranet campus community.



SCHOLARSHIPS

Adler School Scholarships

The Adler School is committed to enrolling a diverse and outstanding student body. As such, we offer scholarships for both incoming and current students ranging up to $10,000. Adler School applicants and full-time students are eligible to apply for institutional scholarships. Descriptions of each scholarship and application information can be found on both the Adler School website and the School’s online learning community portal.



Other Scholarships

The Office of Financial Aid provides information regarding opportunities for external scholarships through the Adler School’s online campus community.

For more information, please see the Financial Aid and Student Accounts Handbook, available on the school’s website or through the Office of Financial Aid.

VETERAN’S BENEFITS

Students eligible for U.S. Veterans’ benefits are encouraged to consult with the Office of Financial Aid regarding opportunities for veterans educational benefits. Funds are processed according to Title 38, Sections 1651 and 1701, of the State Approval Agency for Veterans Education.



Yellow Ribbon GI Education Enhancement Program (Yellow Ribbon Program)

The Yellow Ribbon Program is a provision of the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008. The Post-9/11 GI Bill pays up to the highest public in-state undergraduate tuition and fees. The Adler School is a proud participant of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Yellow Ribbon Program through which the School is able to fund additional tuition expenses that exceed those covered by the Post 9/11 GI Bill. Funds are available to eligible students on a first-come, first served basis. Students are notified by the VA if they are eligible for this funding. Eligibility requirements are set by VA and are as follows:



  • Student is a veteran who served an aggregate period of active duty after September 10, 2001, of at least 36 months.

  • Student is a veteran who was honorably discharged from active duty for a service-connected disability and served 30 continuous days after September 10, 2001.

  • Student is a dependent eligible for Transfer of Entitlement under the Post-9/11 GI Bill based on a veteran’s service under the eligibility criteria listed above.

For more details about this program, please contact the Office of Financial Aid. To view the information online, visit gibill.va.gov, click on “Post-9/11 GI Bill and Other Programs” at the bottom of the page and then click “The Yellow Ribbon Program” on the right.

Financial Aid Eligibility Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is used to define successful completion of coursework to maintain eligibility for federal student financial aid. The U.S. Department of Education’s federal regulations require the Adler School to establish, publish, and apply standards to monitor student progress toward completion of a certificate or degree program. If a student fails to meet these standards, they will be placed on a financial aid warning and/or suspension. Students who are under review by the Student Comprehensive Evaluation Committee will have their financial aid funds held until the Office of Financial Aid receives a favorable decision letter from SCEC.

There are three parts to the SAP Policy:


  1. Grade Point Average (Overall GPA)

  2. Cumulative Progress (Overall)

  3. Timely Degree Completion

Students need to comply with all requirements to remain eligible for federal financial aid, as detailed below:

1. Grade Point Average (Overall GPA)

The SAP Policy requires that students maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) in order to remain eligible for federal financial aid. If a student drops below a cumulative GPA of 3.0, he or she will be placed on a financial aid warning. Once a student is on a financial aid warning, he/she may continue to receive financial aid, but will be expected to meet the minimum standards (3.0 cumulative) in the following term. However, the student will be expected to maintain satisfactory academic progress until the end of the warning term in order to continue to receive financial aid for future terms.



2. Cumulative (Overall) Progress

The SAP Policy contains a quantitative component, meaning that students are required to make steady progress toward a degree by completing at least 70 percent of all attempted credit hours. For example, if a student has attempted 30 credit hours total, then he or she would be expected to complete at least 21 of these credit hours in order to comply with the minimum quantitative standards (Note: all transfer credits figure into the attempted credit hours calculation). If a student does not successfully complete at least 70 percent of all credit hours attempted, he/she will be placed on a financial aid warning at the end of the term. Once a student is on a financial aid warning he/she may continue to receive financial aid for the following term. However, the student will be expected to maintain satisfactory academic progress until the end of the warning term in order to continue to receive financial aid for future terms.



3. Timely Degree Completion

All qualified doctoral students receiving federal financial aid are eligible for a maximum of seven years of financial assistance from the initial date of registration. All qualified master students receiving federal financial aid are eligible for a maximum of five years of financial assistance from the initial date of registration. All qualified certificate students receiving financial aid are eligible for a maximum of two years of financial assistance. Students who reach the maximum enrollment limit for receiving federal financial aid would need to file a financial aid appeal.


Financial Aid Warning and Suspension of Eligibility

When a student fails to meet one or more of the SAP requirements, he/she is placed on a financial aid warning at the end of that term. Once a student is on a financial aid warning he/she may continue to receive federal financial aid for the following term. However, the student will be expected to maintain satisfactory academic progress until the end of the warning term in order to continue to receive financial aid for future terms. Failure to meet the requirements after the warning term will result in a financial aid suspension.

Students on a financial aid suspension will have all financial aid cancelled for future terms. Once a student's financial aid eligibility has been suspended, notification will be sent to the student stating the reason and the procedure for appealing the decision. Financial aid will not be reinstated unless the student’s appeal is granted.

For information regarding the financial aid appeal procedure, please see the 2014-2015 financial aid handbook.



Course In-Progress

Satisfactory academic progress is calculated until two weeks after the term ends. At this time final grades should be posted to students’ transcripts. If a student has a Course In Progress (CIP) on his/her transcript this means that no grade was assigned to the course. If a student is missing a grade(s) for any term, financial aid satisfactory academic progress cannot be calculated. Due to the DOE regulation, the Office of Financial Aid must put a hold on all future financial aid disbursements and student refund checks until a passing grade is posted.



Repeated Courses

Both grades will be calculated in their financial aid satisfactory academic progress cumulative grade point average and overall hours attempted/completed.



Audited Courses

Audited courses do not affect students’ GPA or overall cumulative completion rate. Audited courses are not covered by federal financial aid funds.



No Credit, No Pass

A No Credit grade (NC) for financial aid satisfactory academic progress is considered a failing grade on a program requirement. NC grades will not be calculated into a student’s cumulative GPA or overall completion rate. Receiving this grade could result in a full or partial loss of financial aid funds. If a student receives NC for a program requirement, the student may repeat the class one time only and still receive financial aid.



Incompletes

An Incomplete grade (I) for financial aid satisfactory academic progress will calculate into a completion rate as credit hours attempted but not successfully earned. A student will have until the last day of the following term to successfully complete and earn a passing grade of A, B, P, IP, or CR. If a student does not complete or earn a passing grade by the end of the following term, an F grade will be posted.



Readmitted Students

Students who have been readmitted must be in compliance with the financial aid satisfactory academic progress policy to be eligible for financial aid funds.



Leave of Absence

A Leave of Absence (LOA) is a temporary interruption in a student’s program of study. LOA refers to the specific time period during a program when a student is not in attendance. In order for a financial aid recipient to be approved for an LOA, the student must follow the Adler School’s LOA policy as outlined below:

1. The student is required to use the official Leave of Absence form, located on the Registrar page on Adler Connect, and include on the form the reason for the LOA request.

2. In order for the Office of Financial Aid to approve an LOA status, the student must provide documentation of extenuating circumstances (i.e. medical, death, divorce).

3. There must be a reasonable expectation that the student will return from the LOA.

4. The LOA request must be approved in accordance with School policy. Since federal regulations are very clear that LOA is only to be granted for a specific set of circumstances, any leave not approved as an official LOA by the director of financial aid will be reported to the National Student Loan Data System as a Withdrawal.



5. The LOA together with any additional leaves of absence must not exceed a total of 180 days in any 12-month period. Please note that 180 days are less than two academic terms at the Adler School. After 180 days have passed, the LOA automatically becomes a withdrawal and any unearned Title IV funds will be immediately returned, causing the student to owe balance. The student’s failure to return from an LOA may have an effect on the student’s loan repayment terms, including the expiration of the student’s grace period.

Students are required to speak with the Office of Financial Aid before requesting an LOA in order to receive a full explanation of the procedures and the consequences involved in an LOA.



Withdrawal and Administrative Withdrawal

If a student withdraws from all classes or drops below half-time enrollment during the 100 percent or 50 percent drop period, all financial aid funds are returned.

If a financial aid recipient finds it necessary to withdraw from all classes after the 50 percent drop period, the student may be required to return some or all financial aid funds. The Adler School is required to determine the earned and unearned portions of Title IV aid as of the date the Office of Financial Aid is notified through a completed and signed Student Withdrawal form. This form is located on the Registrar page on Adler Connect.

Until the 60 percent point in each period of enrollment, a prorated schedule is used to determine the amount of Title IV funds the student has earned at the time of withdrawal. After the 60 percent point in the period of enrollment, a student has earned 100 percent of the Title IV funds he or she was scheduled to receive during the period.

It is the student’s responsibility to speak with the Office of Financial Aid before withdrawing from any or all courses in order to receive a full explanation of the procedure and the consequences of withdrawal.

If the student is administratively withdrawn, a Return of Title IV calculation may be performed in order to determine the percentage of financial aid the student is allowed to retain for the term; any remainder will be canceled and the student will owe a balance. If a student is under review by SCEC, the Office of Financial Aid holds the student’s financial aid funds until a final decision is made. After the final SCEC decision is made, the Office of Financial Aid may be required to return part or all of a student’s financial aid. As a result, the student will be responsible for any remaining balance.



Financial Aid Disbursement Timeline

To ensure that student loan refund checks are distributed each semester in a timely manner, the Office of Financial Aid calculates students' financial aid budgets the week prior to the start of a term. In order for students to receive their financial aid disbursements in a timely manner, we strongly recommend that financial aid recipients finalize their course registration at least two weeks prior to the start of a term. Students may add courses after their financial aid budget has been calculated and any necessary loan reductions have been made; the student may contact the Office of Financial Aid to request additional funds.



Debt Management and Loan Counseling

Recipients of financial aid must attend at least one debt management seminar prior to graduation. Seminars are offered each term by the Office of Financial Aid. Federal regulations stipulate that all students awarded Direct Stafford loans must complete an online entrance loan counseling session before their loans can be disbursed. Additionally, an exit loan counseling session is required upon graduation or withdrawal from the Adler School.



International Students – Chicago Campus

International students are eligible for alternative loans. Alternative loans are approved based on credit ratings and require a co-signer who is a U.S. citizen. Students should also contact their appropriate government and provincial agencies to find out about additional sources of aid to help cover expenses while completing their course work.



Financial Aid – Vancouver Campus

Student loans are offered by the Canadian and U.S. governments to help students pay for their post-secondary education.  Canadian students (including permanent residents, landed immigrants, and protected persons) apply for loans through their home province or territory. U.S. students attending the Vancouver campus must file loan applications through the Chicago Financial Aid office: financialaid@adler.edu

Government student loans take into consideration many factors, including:


  • Income and assets

  • Tuition, mandatory fees, and book costs

  • Living expenses

School Information for Loan Applications

  • School Code: APRY

  • Program Code for MAC: WAG5

  • Program Code for MCP: XCZ5

  • Program Code for MAOP program: ZID5

  • Program Code for MACD program: WFJ5

  • Program Code for PSYD program XCZ6

Course Load Info: Students must be enrolled in a minimum of seven credits per term to be considered full time.

STUDENTS FROM BRITISH COLUMBIA

Government student loan assistance is available to B.C. residents enrolled in full-time studies.

Interest is not charged while you remain full time in a loan eligible program at an approved post-secondary institution. Additionally, interest is not charged during the summer break (August) if you return to full-time study each September and update your full-time status with your lenders (by receiving a new loan or submitting a confirmation of enrollment). You will be required to begin repaying your loan six months after you leave full-time studies. Grant funding does not have to be repaid.

HOW TO APPLY

Students from B.C. can apply online through studentaidbc.ca to be considered for federal and provincial loans and grant funding.

How much loan funding will I receive?

The amount of funding you receive depends on the financial information you submit in your online application. After you have submitted your application, you will receive an assessment from SABC. This assessment will tell you how much funding you are eligible for and when you will receive it.



STUDENTS OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA

Students from a province or territory other than B.C. are eligible to receive government student loan assistance, but they must apply through their home province.



Grants

CANADA STUDENT GRANT FOR STUDENTS WITH DEPENDENTS (CSG)

CSG funding is for students with dependents (includes children or other wholly dependent relatives, but does not include your spouse).

The CSG is not ”additional” assistance. The weekly program maximum of $510 per week of study applies.

Students with one or more dependents under the age of 12 are eligible to receive $200 per month of study for each child.



CANADA STUDY GRANT FOR THE ACCOMMODATION OF STUDENTS WITH PERMANENT DISABILITIES (CSG-PD)

The Canada Study Grant program for students with permanent disabilities (CSG-PD) is designed to help students overcome educational barriers that they may have due to their permanent disability. Only students with permanent disabilities creating barriers to post-secondary education are eligible to receive non-repayable grants (for up to $10,000 per program year) to purchase adaptive equipment and support services to help access public or private post-secondary institutions.



If these services are not provided by your school, CSG-PD funding can be used for:

  • Sign language interpretation

  • Specialized tutoring services (for disability-related learning barriers)

  • Note-takers

  • Readers

  • Attendant care (while at school)

  • Specialized transportation (e.g., handyDART to and from institution only)

  • Alternate formats (e.g., large or Braille print, talking textbooks)

  • Technical or recording equipment, including Braille, talking calculator, and tape recorders

  • Computers and other adaptive technical aids and software

  • Reimbursement of 75 percent of the cost of a Learning Disability Assessment up to $1,200 (if the assessment meets ministry criteria)

To be eligible for reimbursement, students must require the assessment for further accommodation at the school they are attending.

Canada Access Grant for Students with Permanent Disabilities (CAG-PD)

This program assists students with permanent disabilities in both full-time and part-time programs with a grant of up to $1,000 per program year. The $1,000 will be applied before any other funding to reduce the assessed need for full-time students. For part-time students, the grant will be awarded before part-time loans.

To qualify automatically, students must have applied and been approved for the British Columbia Student Assistance Program (BCSAP) or for the part-time studies program and have:


  • previously received a Canada Study Grant for the Accommodation of Students with Permanent Disabilities, or

  • previously been approved to study at a 40 percent reduced course load for BCSAP through the Appeal Process – Appendix 6: Appeal Request.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS – VANCOUVER CAMPUS

International students attending the Vancouver campus are not eligible for Canadian federal or provincial student loans. However, international students are eligible to work off campus through the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) off campus work permit program. For more information about this program, please visit cic.gc.ca/english/study/work-offcampus.asp.



Programs of Study – Chicago Campus

The Adler School is committed to serving students with diverse needs through multiple degree options. A number of degree programs, certificates, and concentrations can be completed on either a full-time or part-time basis via online, blended, or traditional on-ground delivery methods. It is strongly recommended that students pursuing a counseling or clinical psychology degree enroll full time in order to focus the necessary time and attention to their studies and clinical training. Degree programs and concentrations are offered in the following areas:

Master of Arts (M.A.) in:


  • Counseling: Art Therapy

  • Counseling: Specialization in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

  • Counseling: Specialization in Forensic Psychology

  • Counseling: Specialization in Rehabilitation Counseling

  • Counseling: Specialization in Sport and Health Psychology

  • Couple and Family Therapy

  • Criminology (Online)

  • Industrial and Organizational Psychology (Online)

  • Emergency Management Leadership (Online/Hybrid)

  • Psychology: Specialization in Military Psychology (Online)

  • Public Policy and Administration: Urban Mental Health Concentration

  • Public Policy and Administration: Human Rights Concentration

  • Nonprofit Management (Online)

Certificate Programs in:

  • Substance Abuse Counseling

  • Couple and Family Therapy

Doctor of Couple and Family Therapy
Doctor of Psychology in Clinical Psychology (PsyD)

Tracks offered (PsyD Program):



  • Military Psychology

  • Child and Adolescent Psychology

Concentrations offered (PsyD program):

  • Advanced Adlerian Psychotherapy

  • Clinical Neuropsychology

  • Primary Care Psychology and Behavioral Medicine

  • Traumatic Stress Psychology

  • Substance Abuse

M.A. in Counseling – Art Therapy

Program Overview

The Adler School Counseling: Art Therapy program provides education and clinical training in art therapy and counseling within the context of the Adlerian principles of social responsibility, service in the community, and cultural competence. The program focuses on the process of art-making for self-expression and communication.

After completing graduate studies and 1,000 hours of supervised clinical art therapy practice, a graduate may apply for art therapy registration (ATR) through the Art Therapy Credentials Board (ATCB). ATR requires 1,000 hours of clinical art therapy (direct client contact) including at least 100 hours of supervision or at least one hour of supervision for every 10 hours of direct client contact. A minimum of 500 hours of this work experience needs to be supervised by a credentialed art therapist. Up to 500 hours may be supervised by a clinical supervisor who is credentialed in a related field (e.g., social worker, counselor, or psychologist). After an art therapist is awarded an ATR, she/he may work to complete additional requirements in order to apply for the board certification examination. With successful completion of this examination, an art therapist is awarded the credential of ATR-BC by the Art Therapy Credentials Board.

Immediately upon graduation from this program, a graduate may apply to take the Illinois Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) examination. After receiving this license, a practitioner may work to complete additional requirements in order to apply to take the Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) examination. This program provides students with the academic and clinical training needed to meet the education requirements to apply for registration as an art therapist and to seek counselor licensure in the state of Illinois. Students wishing to seek licensure outside of the state of Illinois are strongly encouraged to research the requirements to sit for licensure for each state or province in which they wish to practice. An online search on a state’s or province’s website is a useful source of this information. An online search on a state’s website is a useful source of this information.

Art therapists work in a wide variety of clinical, educational, and social service settings including medical and psychiatric hospitals, schools, wellness centers, drug and alcohol treatment programs, community mental health centers, correctional institutions, shelter programs and treatment centers for those who experience interpersonal violence, and community programs for immigrants and refugees.

Program-Specific Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants to this program are typically required to present the following:



  • An undergraduate/baccalaureate degree or the equivalent from an accredited institution.

  • A grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for all undergraduate and graduate course work.

  • The equivalent of 15 semester credit hours in psychology with grades of "C” or better. These courses need to include general or introductory psychology, abnormal psychology, theories of personality, life span development, and psychometrics or research methods. All prerequisites should be completed by the end of a student’s first semester at Adler School.

  • Eighteen semester credit hours or 27 quarter-hour credits in studio art that demonstrate proficiency and disciplined commitment to visual art in three or more visual art media.

  • A portfolio of original art work (15 examples in three or more different media) demonstrating competence with art materials is required to be presented at the admissions interview.

As a final step in the application process, applicants who meet the admission standards will be invited for an individual interview with Art Therapy faculty.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the following courses is required for this degree:

* MAT-210 Professional Development Seminar 0 cr.

* PCO-211 Community Service Seminar I 1 cr.

PCO-212 Community Service Seminar II 1 cr.

* PCO-213 Community Service Practicum I 1 cr.

* PCO-214 Community Service Practicum II 1 cr.

* MAT-344 Historical and Theoretical Perspectives of Art Therapy, 3 cr.

Counseling and Psychotherapy

* MAT-345 Appraisal in Art Therapy, Counseling and Psychotherapy 3 cr.

(w/ lab)

* MAT-346 Use of Art Therapy in Group Psychotherapy and 3 cr.

Psychopathology

MAT-350 Community Psychology 3 cr.

* MAT-402 Introduction to Adlerian Psychology and Psychopathology 3 cr.

MAT-433 Parent Education: Adlerian Theory and Interventions 2 cr.

MAT-438 Introduction to Addictive Disorders 3 cr.

* MAT-450 Lifespan Development in Art Therapy, Counseling 3 cr.

and Psychotherapy

MAT-451 Sociocultural and Multicultural Approaches in Art Therapy, 3 cr.

Counseling and Psychotherapy

MAT-452 Theories and Methods of Intervention in Art Therapy I: 3 cr.



Couples, Families and Older Adults

* MAT-453 Theories and Methods of Intervention in Art Therapy II: 3 cr.

Trauma, Loss, Grief and Bereavement

MAT-466 Studio Art in Therapy, Counseling and Psychopathology 3 cr.

MAT-467 MAT Practicum Seminar I 2 cr.

MAT-468 MAT Practicum Seminar II 2 cr.

* MAT-472 Basic Skills for Psychotherapy and the Use of Art 3 cr.

Therapy (w/ lab)

MAT-480 MAT Practicum I 1 cr.

MAT-481 MAT Practicum II 1 cr.

MAT-497 Research Methods in Art Therapy, Counseling and 3 cr.

Psychotherapy

* MAT-505 Professional Development, Issues and Ethics in Art Therapy, 3 cr.

Counseling and Psychopathology

MAT-506 Neuroscience in Art Therapy, Counseling and Psychology: 3 cr.

Special Populations

MAT-569 Lifestyle and Career Development 3 cr.

MAT-647 Biopsychosocial Bases of Health and Dysfunction for Counselors 3 cr.

MAT-995 Master’s Clinical Qualifying Examination 0 cr.

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: 63

* = Required before beginning art therapy practicum

Elective Option:

MAT-507 International Immersion and Cross-Cultural Studies 0 cr.



Curriculum Sequence

YEAR ONE

Fall Term

MAT-210 Professional Development Seminar 0 cr.

MAT-344 Historical and Theoretical Perspectives of Art Therapy,

Counseling and Psychotherapy 3 cr.

PCO-350 Community Psychology 3 cr.

MAT-450 Lifespan Development in Art Therapy, Counseling 3 cr.

and Psychotherapy

MAT-647 Biopsychosocial Bases of Health and Dysfunction 3 cr.


for Counselors

Term Credits = 12

Spring Term

PCO-211 Community Service Seminar I 1 cr.

PCO-213 Community Service Practicum I 1 cr.

MAT-345 Appraisal in Art Therapy, 3 cr.

Counseling and Psychotherapy (w/ lab)

MAT-346 The Use of Art Therapy in Group Psychotherapy and 3 cr.

Psychopathology

MAT-402 Introduction to Adlerian Psychology and Psychopathology 3 cr.

MAT-472 Basic Skills for Psychotherapy and the Use of Art Therapy 3 cr.

Term Credits = 14

Summer Term

PCO-212 Community Service Seminar II 1 cr.

PCO-214 Community Service Practicum II 1 cr.

MAT-451 Socio-Cultural and Multi-Cultural Approaches

in Art Therapy, Counseling, and Psychotherapy 3 cr.

MAT-466 Studio Art in Art Therapy, Counseling and Psychotherapy 3 cr.

MAT-505 Professional Development – Issues and Ethics in Art Therapy 3 cr.

Term Credits = 11

YEAR TWO

Fall Term

MAT-438 Introduction to Addictive Disorders 3 cr.

MAT-453 Theories and Methods of Intervention in Art Therapy II: 3 cr.
Trauma, Loss, Grief and Bereavement

MAT-467 Art Therapy Practicum Seminar I 2 cr.

MAT-480 Art Therapy Practicum I 1 cr.

MAT-506 Neuroscience in Art Therapy, Counseling, and Psychotherapy 3 cr.



Term Credits = 12

Spring Term

MAT-452 Theories and Methods of Art Therapy Intervention I: 3 cr.

Couples, Families and Older Adults

MAT-468 Art Therapy Practicum Seminar II 2 cr.

MAT-481 Art Therapy Practicum II 1 cr.

MAT-497 Research Methods in Art Therapy, Counseling, 3 cr.

and Psychotherapy

Term Credits = 9

Summer Term

MAT-433 Parent Education: Adlerian Theory and Interventions 2 cr.

MAT-569 Lifestyle and Career Development 3 cr.

MAT-469 Art Therapy Practicum Seminar III (if needed) (1 cr.)

PCO-610 Practicum Continued (if needed) 0 cr.

MAT-995 Master's Clinical Qualifying Examination 0 cr.



Term Credits = 5(6)

Total Credit Hours = 63 (64 credits if MAT-469 is needed)

Graduation Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion of all required credit hours, including all required courses

  2. Satisfactory completion of at least 200 clock hours of community service practicum

  3. Satisfactory completion of 700 minimum clock hours of art therapy practicum/internship with 350 of those
    hours in direct client contact

  4. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades (or six credit hours)
    of "C” grade

  5. Successful completion of the Master's Clinical Qualifying Examination

  6. Successful second year portfolio review

  7. Completion of application for graduation and full payment of any outstanding tuition or other fees

  8. Faculty approval for graduation and recommendation to the Board of Trustees for the conferral of
    the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology: Art Therapy

Practicum

An integral part of all master’s programs offered at Adler is the acquisition of practical counseling and scholarly skills gained in field placements. Ongoing involvement in counseling and scholarly activities at professional training sites, including Adler Community Health Services (ACHS) at the Chicago campus, gives students the closely supervised opportunity to apply and further develop the knowledge, skills, values, and competencies they gain in course work. Practicum training requirements begin with a first year Community Service Practicum (CSP) that focuses on developing skills related to community-based interventions, advocacy, social justice, and systemic interventions that benefit human welfare and well-being. Counseling training provided in students’ second practicum (sometimes referred to as practicum/internship) focuses on developing the competencies needed to prepare students for entry-level practice upon graduation. Because the focus is on integrating master’s level education at Adler with master’s-level supervised counseling training, no transfer credit is granted for practicum credits earned elsewhere. Students must successfully complete course prerequisites specific to their degree program prior to being approved to begin their counseling practicum.

First year students will spend 8-10 hours per week over the course of six months at an approved CSP site and must concurrently enroll in required coursework. A minimum of 200 clock hours of CSP is required. At least one of the following courses must be taken concurrently with CSP I & II (PCO-213 and PCO-214): Community Psychology (MAT-350), Professional Development, Issues and Ethics (MAT-505), and/or Introduction to Adlerian Psychology and Psychopathology (MAT-402).

The Master of Arts in Counseling: Art Therapy program combines education and clinical training in the field of art therapy, core counseling education and training, with the theories and practices of Adlerian psychotherapy. The program requires 63 credit hours in coursework including 700 hours of art therapy practicum that is completed over a nine- to 12-month period. Some students may not be able to complete their 700 supervised hours within the nine-month time frame and will need to continue their MAT Practicum and Practicum Seminar into the summer term of their second year. They would then enroll in Practicum Continued, PCO-610, and MAT Practicum Seminar, MAT-469, both of which were developed for students who need more time for completion. The art therapy program can be completed in two years with a full-time course load over three terms for each of the two years. All placements require a Master’s Pre-registration Contract, which must be submitted to the Department of Training and Community Engagement at least three weeks prior to starting practicum. For further information, consult the Master’s and Certificate Clinical Practicum Handbook.



This program provides students with the academic and clinical training needed to meet the education requirements to apply for registration as an art therapist and to seek counselor licensure in the state of Illinois. Students wishing to seek licensure outside of the state of Illinois are strongly encouraged to research the requirements to sit for licensure for each state or province in which they wish to practice.

M.A. in Counseling: Specialization in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Program Overview

The Master of Arts in Counseling: Specialization in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CMHC) prepares skilled and socially responsible counselors who are culturally competent and socially aware to meet the needs of diverse communities. It prepares students with knowledge in theories and methods of clinical mental health counseling. Graduates of the program may work in a wide variety of mental health positions such as in human service agencies and organizations in both the public and private sectors.

The M.A. in Counseling–CMHC program consists of:


  • A comprehensive theoretical curriculum (counseling and Adlerian foundations) and supervised field experiences of 61 credit hours. These may be completed in two years as a full-time student or three years on a part-time (evening/weekend/online) basis.

  • The clinical field experience is conducted through a supervised practicum (100 hours) and internship (600 hours). Through our vast network of community partners, students are able to complete their practical training in a variety of settings.

  • A Community Services Practicum (CSP), a 200-hour social responsibility immersion experience created to develop in graduates an identity as social justice advocates and agents of social change

  • A CMHC Comprehensive Examination (CPCE)

Instructional Modality

This program may be completed on a full-time day or part-time/evening basis. Courses required for this program are offered in a combination of weekday, evening, weekend, online, and blended options, giving students the flexibility to complete the program in a time frame that may be realistic with other obligations they have.



Licensure

The program curriculum is designed to meet the current requirement for the Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) credential in the state of Illinois. Per the approval of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, graduates may be able to take the National Counselor Exam which was adopted by the state for the LPC credential. With additional post-master’s supervised experience, graduates may apply for the Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) credential in Illinois. Students should be advised that licensure criteria may change frequently and that some states may require courses and/or training beyond those currently required by the program. Therefore, students should plan their curriculum according to specific state requirements. Details regarding application for these credentials can be found at nbcc.org/directory.

CMHC students also have the opportunity to apply for the National Certified Counselor (NCC) credential and to take the National Counselor Examination (NCE) on campus during the last semester of the program before graduation. Upon degree completion, students can submit their passing NCE scores to the state board toward the fulfillment of state LPC requirements.

Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants to this program are required to have:



  • A baccalaureate degree earned from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international college or university.

  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate course work. Exceptions may be made for applicants who demonstrate improved academic performance or academic ability in other ways.

Approved applicants will be invited in for a personal interview as the final step in the application process.

Degree Requirements

Core Courses

CMHC-510 Professional Development Seminar 0 cr.

COUN-518 Adlerian Theory and Counseling 3 cr.

* CMHC-531 Foundations of Clinical Mental Health 3 cr.

* COUN-532 Professional, Legal, and Ethical Issues 3 cr.

* COUN-533 Counseling Theories 3 cr.

*#COUN-534 Counseling Skills 3 cr.

*#COUN 535 Diagnosis of Maladaptive Behavior 3 cr.

* COUN-536 Counseling Multicultural Communities 3 cr.

*#COUN-540 Group Counseling 3 cr.

#COUN-617 Treatment Planning and Intervention 3 cr.

COUN-618 Couple and Family Counseling 3 cr.

COUN-622 Human Growth and Development 3 cr.

COUN-625 Research and Program Evaluation 3 cr.

COUN-626 Appraisal and Assessment 3 cr.

COUN-629 Career Development Theories and Interventions 3 cr.

COUN-630 Addictions Counseling 3 cr.

CMHC-635 Advanced Clinical Mental Health Counseling 3 cr.

CMHC-599 Special Topics in Clinical Mental Health Counseling            3 cr.
Field Training and Seminars

PCO-211 Community Service Seminar I 1 cr.

PCO-212 Community Service Seminar II 1 cr.

PCO-213 Community Service Practicum I 1 cr.

PCO-214 Community Service Practicum II 1 cr.

CMHC-693 CMHC Practicum and Seminar 2 cr.

CMHC-694 CMHC Internship and Seminar I 2 cr.

CMHC-698 CMHC Internship and Seminar II 2 cr.



CMHC Comprehensive Examination

CMHC-995 CMHC Comprehensive Examination (CPCE) 0 cr.



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED 61
Note:

  1. Courses denoted with an asterisk are practicum prerequisites, which students need to complete prior to their counseling practicum. Students are required to attain a grade of B or higher in these courses. Students will need to retake the courses with a B- or lower grade prior to or concurrently with their practicum and attain the required grade.

  2. Courses with # are offered only on-ground (campus), 15 weekly format.

Graduation Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion of all required courses and seminars

  2. Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 100 hours of practicum and 600 hours of internship

  3. Satisfactory completion of at least 200 hours of community service practicum

  4. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours of
    B

  5. Passing grade on the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam

  6. Submission of Graduation Application and full payment of all outstanding tuition and fees

  7. Faculty approval for graduation and recommendation to the Board of Trustees for the conferral of the Master of Arts in Counseling-CMHC.

Professional Practice and Field Training

An integral part of all master’s programs offered at Adler is the acquisition of practical counseling and scholarly skills gained in field placements. Ongoing involvement in counseling and scholarly activities at professional training sites, including Adler Community Health Services at the Chicago campus, gives students the closely supervised opportunity to apply and further develop the knowledge, skills, values, and competencies they gain in course work.



Community Service Practicum

Practicum training requirements begin with a first year Community Service Practicum (CSP) that focuses on developing skills related to community-based interventions, advocacy, social justice, and systemic interventions that benefit human welfare and well-being. First year full-time students will typically spend 8-10 hours per week over the course of six months at an approved CSP site and must concurrently enroll in required course work. A minimum of 200 clock hours of CSP is required. Part-time students may spend less hours per week at the site and may finish the CSP in a longer period of time.



Clinical Mental Health Counseling Practicum and Internship

Professional practice is a key element of the training of a student to become a professional counselor. During field training, students are provided with opportunities to apply theory, develop counseling skills, and formulate treatment goals and strategies with actual clients under supervision both from the site and the School.

CMHC field training is composed of two phases which typically both take place at the same site. Practicum is the first phase of clinical field training in mental health settings as a counselor trainee. In this phase, students are to complete a minimum 100 hours field work, consisting of 40 hours of direct client service contact, which must include both individual and group counseling experiences. Internship is the second phase of field training, which consists of a minimum of 600 hours field work, consisting of 240 direct client hours of various services, including but not limited to individual and group counseling, assessment, and intake.

The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) defines practicum as supervised clinical experience in which the student develops basic counseling skills and integrates professional knowledge. The practicum is completed prior to internship; and internship as a supervised “capstone” clinical experience in which the student refines and enhances basic counseling or student development knowledge and skills, and integrates and authenticates professional knowledge and skills appropriate to his or her program and initial postgraduate professional placement.

During the academic year, the Adler Training Department will assist students with the application process prior to the actual field placement. The School has a pool of approved training sites in various mental health settings and service themes. Details of the requirements and application process for the CMHC practicum and internship can be found in the CMHC Practicum and Internship Training Manual. You may obtain a copy of this manual from the Adler Connect portal at adler.edu, or from the program faculty advisor and program director.

Counseling Comprehensive Examination

The CMHC program uses the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination (CPCE) as a comprehensive examination of students. It is developed and published by the Center for Credentialing and Education and is offered by the National Board of Certified Counselors. Students can take the comprehensive examination upon completion of all their core courses and consultation with their advisors.



M.A. in Counseling – Specialization in Forensic Psychology

Program Overview

The Master of Arts in Counseling: Specialization in Forensic Psychology (MACF) prepares students to apply theory and foundational counseling skills as well as forensic psychology. The program offers traditional graduate degree training coupled with an emphasis on education and training in socially responsible practice. The specialization in forensic psychology consists of specialized course work in forensic evaluation and treatment in all four forensic populations including criminal, civil, corrections, and first responders. The specialized forensic courses are part of the comprehensive counseling education curriculum, and graduates are well prepared for a wide variety of mental health positions in human service agencies and organizations in both the public and private sectors, and forensic services. The program combines rigorous academic instruction with field placements through which students achieve hands-on experience under the supervision of licensed professionals. This comprehensive program can be completed in a two-year period as a full-time student, including summer semesters. Graduates are eligible to apply for licensing as a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the state of Illinois. In addition, students are provided with the opportunity to apply for the National Counselor Credential (NCC) and to take the National Counselor Exam (NCE) prior to graduation. Upon degree completion, students can submit their passing NCE scores to the state board toward the fulfillment of state licensing requirements. It should be noted that while not all states require the NCE exam, students are strongly encouraged to take it.

Although this program satisfies the current academic and pre-degree training and education requirements for the Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) credential in the state of Illinois, students should be aware that licensure requirements in some states may require them to take courses beyond those currently required by the Adler School. Students should consult state boards and licensure requirements in other jurisdictions and plan their curriculum accordingly. Applicants should check credentialing requirements in the jurisdiction in which they intend to practice following graduation. Links to state and provincial credentialing boards can be found on the website of the American Counseling Association at counseling.org and the National Board of Certified Counselors at nbcc.org.

Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants to this program are required to have:



  • A baccalaureate degree earned from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international college or university.

  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate course work. Exceptions may be made for applicants who demonstrate outstanding academic performance or academic ability in other ways.

Approved applicants will be invited in for a personal interview as the final step in the application process.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the following courses is required for this degree:

PCO-211 Community Service Seminar I 1 cr.

PCO-212 Community Service Seminar II 1 cr.

PCO-213 Community Service Practicum I 1 cr.

PCO-214 Community Service Practicum II 1 cr.

MACF-500 MACF Professional Development Seminar 0 cr.

MACF-506 Roles and Directions in Forensic Psychology 3 cr.

MACF-507 Counseling in Forensic Populations 3 cr.

MACF-508 Violence, Aggression, and Social Deviance 3 cr.

MACF-509 Trauma, Victimology, Theory, Practice & 3 cr.

Advanced Counseling Skills

COUN-518* Adlerian Theory and Counseling 3 cr.

COUN-532* Professional, Legal, and Ethical Issues 3 cr.

COUN-533* Counseling Theories 3 cr.

COUN-534* Counseling Skills 3 cr.

COUN-535* Diagnosis of Maladaptive Behavior 3 cr.

COUN-536 Counseling Multicultural Communities 3 cr.

COUN-550 Preparation for Applied Thesis (for Canadian students only) 0 cr.

COUN-551 M.A. Thesis I (for Canadian students only) 1 cr.

COUN-552 M.A. Thesis II (for Canadian students only) 1 cr.

COUN-540 Group Counseling 3 cr.

COUN-618 Couple and Family Counseling 3 cr.

COUN-622* Human Growth and Development 3 cr.

COUN-625 Research and Program Development 3 cr.

COUN-626 Appraisal and Assessment 3 cr.

COUN-629 Career Development Theories and Intervention 3 cr.

COUN-630 Addictions Counseling 3 cr.

MACF-680 MACF Counseling Practicum and Seminar 2 cr.

MACF-682 MACF Counseling Internship and Seminar 2 cr.

MACF-683 MACF Counseling Internship and Seminar Continuation 2 cr.

MACF-995 Master’s Clinical Qualifying Examination 0 cr.

Choose One Elective (see options below) 3 cr.
*Indicates courses are required prior to practicum/internship.

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED 64 (66 for Canadian students)

Elective Options:

MACF-515 Forensic Psychology for Law Enforcement 3 cr.

MACF-516 Sex Offender Treatment Theory and Practice 3 cr.

MACF-517 Psychology of Juvenile Justice Populations 3 cr.



Graduation Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion of all required credit hours, including all required courses.

  2. Satisfactory completion of 700 minimum hours of practicum.

  3. Satisfactory completion of at least 200 hours of community service practicum.

  4. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours
    of C.

  5. Successful completion of the MAC Comprehensive Examination.

  6. Successful completion of the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE).

  7. Successful completion of an M.A. thesis for students interested in license eligibility in Canada.

  8. Submission of completed Graduation Application and full payment of all outstanding tuition and fees.

  9. Faculty approval for graduation and recommendation to the Board of Trustees for the conferral of the M.A. in Counseling: Specialization in Forensic Psychology degree.


Counseling Practicum and Internship
Professional practice is a key element of a student’s training to become a professional in the field. During field training, students are provided with opportunities to apply theories, develop skills, and formulate goals and strategies with actual clients under supervision both from the site and the School.
MACF Counseling field training is composed of two phases which typically both take place at the same site. Practicum is the first phase of clinical field training in mental health settings as a counselor trainee. In this phase students are to complete a minimum 100 hours of field work, consisting of 40 hours direct client service contact, which must include both individual and group counseling experiences. Internship is the second phase of field training, which consists of a minimum of 600 hours field work, consisting of 240 direct client hours of various services, including but not limited to individual and group counseling, assessment, and intake.
The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) defines practicum as supervised clinical experience in which the student develops basic counseling skills and integrates professional knowledge. The practicum is completed prior to internship; and internship as a supervised “capstone” clinical experience in which the student refines and enhances basic counseling or student development knowledge and skills, and integrates and authenticates professional knowledge and skills appropriate to his or her program and initial postgraduate professional placement.
During the academic year, the Adler Training Department will assist students with the application process prior to the actual field placement. The School has a pool of approved training sites in various mental health settings and service themes. Details about requirements and application process for the MACF Counseling practicum and internship can be found in the MACF Counseling Practicum and Internship Training Manual. You may obtain a copy of this manual from the Adler Connect portal at adler.edu, or from the program faculty advisor and program director. 
Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination
One of the graduation requirements for MACF students is successful completion of the comprehensive counseling examination. The Department of Counseling and Counselor Education at the Adler School utilizes the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination (CPCE) issued by the Center for Credentialing and Education under the National Certified Counselor Board. The CPCE is designed to assess counseling students’ knowledge of counseling information viewed as important by counselor preparation programs.
The CPCE is usually administered once every semester. Students are eligible to take the exam after their successful completion of all the core courses. 
Thesis
The M.A. thesis is a student-directed study conducted in consultation with an approved faculty member in any theoretical, methodological, or applied psychological area relevant to the curriculum. The research culminates in the completion of a scholarly paper of publishable quality in accordance with Adler School guidelines and American Psychological Association standards. The thesis is a requirement for credentialing in Canada. 

M.A. in Counseling: Specialization in Rehabilitation Counseling

Program Overview
The mission of the Master of Arts in Counseling: Specialization in Rehabilitation Counseling (MACR) program is to educate students in the profession of rehabilitation counseling, with a special emphasis on the provision of services that enhance the independence and quality of life for persons with disabilities. Special emphasis is placed on training students to become socially responsible practitioners who embrace diversity perspectives and who empower individuals with disabilities to build bridges across social, economic, cultural, racial, and political systems. The program will foster the development of social equality, justice, and respect for individuals with disabilities in the global community.
The MACR program is designed to provide students with a foundation in theories and methods of counseling with practical, supervised training in counseling techniques, in addition to specific training in the field of rehabilitation counseling. The program combines the best features of a traditional counseling program with Adler School’s emphasis on education and training in socially responsible practice, systems change, and leadership in service to individuals with disabilities. Graduates of the program are well prepared for a wide variety of rehabilitation counseling and community mental health positions in human service agencies and organizations in both the public and private sectors.

The MACR program consists of:



  • A comprehensive theoretical curriculum (counseling, rehabilitation counseling, and Adlerian foundations) and supervised field experiences of 64 credit hours. This comprehensive graduate program can be completed in 24 months of full-time attendance.

  • Clinical field experience, which is conducted through a supervised practicum (100 hours) and internship (600 hours). Through a large network of community partners, students are able to complete their clinical training in a variety of settings.

  • A Community Services Practicum (CSP), a 200-hour social responsibility immersion experience created to develop in graduates an identity as social justice advocates and agents of social change.

Instructional Modality
This program is designed to be completed on a full-time basis. Students seeking a part-time schedule must consult with the program director. Courses required for this program are offered in a combination of weekday and evening options; some classes are offered in an online format.

Licensure and Credentials

Upon completion of this program, students are prepared to take the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) examination, a nationally recognized credential. This degree program exceeds the academic and pre-degree training and education requirements for the Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in Illinois. In addition, students who pass the CRC examination are eligible to apply for the LPC in Illinois with no additional examination requirement. The program is accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE).

Although this degree program satisfies the current academic and pre-degree training and education requirements for the Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) credential in the State of Illinois, students should be aware that licensure requirements in some states may require them to take courses beyond those currently required by the Adler School. Students should be advised that licensure criteria may change frequently and that some states may require courses and/or training beyond those currently required by the program. Therefore, students should plan their curriculum according to specific state requirements. Details regarding application for these credentials can be found at nbcc.org/directory. More information about the field of rehabilitation counseling can be found at arcaweb.org and crccertification.com.

Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants to this program are required to have:



  • A baccalaureate degree earned from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international college or university

  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate course work. Exceptions may be made for applicants who demonstrate improved academic performance or academic ability in other ways

Approved applicants will be invited in for a personal interview as the final step in the application process.

Degree Requirements

Core Courses

* MACR-500 Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling 3 cr.

MACR-502 Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disability 3 cr.

MACR-510 Professional Development Seminar 0 cr.

COUN-518 Adlerian Theory and Counseling 3 cr.

* CMHC-531 Foundations of Clinical Mental Health 3 cr.

* COUN-532 Professional, Legal, and Ethical Issues 3 cr.

* COUN-533 Counseling Theories 3 cr.

* COUN-534 Counseling Skills 3 cr.

* COUN 535 Diagnosis of Maladaptive Behavior 3 cr.

* COUN-536 Counseling Multicultural Communities 3 cr.

* COUN-540 Group Counseling 3 cr.

COUN-618 Couples and Family Counseling 3 cr.

COUN-622 Human Growth and Development 3 cr.

COUN-625 Research and Program Evaluation 3 cr.
COUN-630 Addictions Counseling 3 cr.

MACR-638 Advocacy, Community Outreach & Case Management 3 cr.

in Rehabilitation Counseling

MACR-639 Individual Appraisal and Assessment Methods in RC 3 cr.

MACR-642 Career Development, Vocational Rehabilitation, & 3 cr.

Job Placement

Elective 3 cr.

Field Training and Seminars

MACR-211 Community Service Seminar I 1 cr.

MACR-212 Community Service Seminar II 1 cr.

MACR-213 Community Service Practicum I 1 cr.

MACR-214 Community Service Practicum II 1 cr.

MACR-557 MACR Practicum and Seminar 2 cr.

MACR-657 MACR Internship and Seminar I 2 cr.

MACR-658 MACR Internship and Seminar II 2 cr.



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED 64

* Courses denoted with an asterisk are practicum prerequisites, which students need to complete prior to their counseling practicum. Students are required to attain a grade of B or higher in these courses. Students will need to retake the courses with a B- or lower grade prior to or concurrently with their practicum and attain the required grade.



Graduation Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion of all required courses and seminars.

  2. Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 100 hours of practicum and 600 hours of internship.

  3. Satisfactory completion of at least 200 hours of community service practicum.

  4. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours of B- or C.

  5. Submission of Graduation Application and full payment of all outstanding tuition and fees.

Professional Practice and Field Training

An integral part of all master’s programs offered at Adler is the acquisition of practical counseling and scholarly skills gained in field placements. Ongoing involvement in counseling and scholarly activities at professional training sites, including Adler Community Health Services (ACHS) at the Chicago campus, gives students the closely supervised opportunity to apply and further develop the knowledge, skills, values, and competencies they gain in course work.



Community Service Practicum (CSP)

Practicum training requirements begin with a first year Community Service Practicum that focuses on developing skills related to community-based interventions, advocacy, social justice, and systemic interventions that benefit human welfare and well-being. First year full-time students will typically spend 8-10 hours per week over the course of six months at an approved CSP site and must concurrently enroll in required course work. A minimum of 200 clock hours of CSP is required. Part-time students may spend fewer hours per week at the site and may finish the CSP in a longer period of time.



Rehabilitation Counseling Practicum and Internship

Professional practice is a key element of the training of a student to become a professional counselor. During field training, students are provided with opportunities to apply counseling theories, develop counseling skills, and formulate treatment goals and strategies with actual clients under supervision both from the site and the School.

The MACR field training is composed of two phases: a 100-hour minimum practicum and a 600-hour minimum internship. They typically both take place at the same site. The Adler Training Department will assist students with the application process during the academic year prior to the actual field placement. The School has a pool of approved training sites of various mental health settings and service themes.

The MACR practicum is a supervised clinical experience in which the student develops basic counseling skills and integrates professional knowledge. The practicum is completed prior to internship. The MACR internship is a supervised “capstone” clinical experience in which the student refines and enhances basic counseling or student development knowledge and skills, and integrates and authenticates professional knowledge and skills appropriate to his or her program and initial postgraduate professional placement.

The Adler Training Department will assist students with the application process during the academic year prior to the actual field placement. The School has a pool of approved training sites in various mental health settings and service themes. Details about requirements and application process for the MACR practicum and internship can be found in the Adler School Practicum and Internship Training Manual. You may obtain a copy of this manual from the Adler Connect portal at adler.edu, or from your academic advisor or program director.

M.A. in Counseling: Specialization in Sport and Health Psychology

Program Overview

The M.A. in Counseling: Specialization in Sport and Health Psychology (MASH) provides students with a foundation in theories and methods of counseling that will allow them to counsel people who wish to maximize their sport performance and health. Sport and health psychology share many synergies, including the necessity to manage overt and covert behaviors that often conflict with challenges posed by social environments and physiological states. Counselors with specialized training in sport and health psychology are employed in health promotion programs, high school and university counseling centers, amateur and professional sport programs, physical rehabilitation centers, community health and recreation agencies, retirement communities, and medical facilities.

The focus of this degree is on sport and health programs and how they contribute to community health. Graduates will be prepared to impact issues such as childhood obesity, develop sport and wellness programs for those who are underserved and marginalized, and assist youth and adult athletes, coaches, and other professionals working within sports and health with the development of performance enhancement programs and character-building programs. The program offers the best features of traditional graduate degree training programs coupled with Adler School’s emphasis on the education and training in socially responsible practice.

Licensure and Credentials

The Sport and Health Psychology program consists of specialized course work integrated within the existing Master of Arts in Counseling degree program. The MASH program has received National Certified Counselor credentialing by the National Board of Certified Counselors. This provides students with the opportunity to apply for the NCC credential and to take the National Counselor Examination (NCE) before graduation. Upon degree completion, students can submit their passing NCE scores to the Illinois board toward the fulfillment of state licensing requirements. It should be noted that not all states require the NCE for the counselor licensure. Students are strongly encouraged to check specific state exam requirements before taking the NCE.

In addition, successful completion of this program will prepare graduates to apply for provisional credentialing in sport psychology as a Certified Consultant through the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (CC-AASP). Although this degree program satisfies the current academic and pre- degree training requirements for the Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) credential in the State of Illinois, students should be aware that licensure requirements in some states may require them to take courses beyond those currently required by the Adler School. Students should consult state boards and licensure requirements in other jurisdictions and plan their curriculum accordingly, and check credentialing requirements in the jurisdiction in which they intend to practice following graduation. Links to state and provincial credentialing boards can be found on the website of the American Counseling Association (counseling.org) or Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards at asppb.org.

Program Overview

The Master’s in Counseling: Specialization in Sport and Health Psychology consists of:



  • A comprehensive theoretical curriculum (counseling, Adlerian foundations, and sport psychology) and supervised field experiences of 70 credit hours.

  • The clinical field experience is conducted through a supervised practicum (100 hours) and internship (600 hours). Through our vast network of community partners, students are able to complete their practical training in a variety of settings.

  • A community service practicum, a 200-hour social responsibility immersion experience created to develop in graduates an identity as social justice advocates and agents of social change.

  • A 400-hour sport and health psychology externship field training experience supervised by Adler faculty who are CC-AASP.

Instructional Modality

This program is designed to be completed on a full-time basis. Students seeking a part-time schedule must consult with the program director. Courses required for this program are offered in a combination of weekday, evening, weekend, online, and blended options, giving students the flexibility to complete the program in a time frame that may be realistic with other obligations they have.



Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants to this program are required to have:



  • A baccalaureate degree earned from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international college or university.

  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate course work. Exceptions may be made for applicants who demonstrate improved academic performance or academic ability in other ways.

Approved applicants will be invited for a personal interview as the final step in the application process.

Degree Requirements

Core Courses

* MASH-500 MASH Professional Development Seminar 0 cr.

COUN-518 Adlerian Theory and Counseling 3 cr.

* COUN-532 Professional, Legal, and Ethical Issues 3 cr.

* COUN-533 Counseling Theories 3 cr.

* COUN-534 Counseling Skills 3 cr.

* COUN-535 Diagnosis of Maladaptive Behaviors 3 cr.

* COUN-536 Counseling Multicultural Communities 3 cr.

* MASH-539 Introduction to Sport and Health Psychology 3 cr.

* COUN-540 Group Counseling 3 cr.

MASH-541 Human Performance Enhancement Using Cognitive 3 cr.
Behavioral Approaches in Sport and Health Psychology

MASH-542 Appraisal of Individual Differences in Sport and Health 3 cr.

COUN-618 Couple and Family Counseling 3 cr.

* COUN-622 Human Growth and Development 3 cr.

COUN-625 Research and Program Evaluation 3 cr.

COUN-629 Career Development Theories and Interventions 3 cr.

COUN-630 Addictions Counseling 3 cr.

MASH-636 Biological Bases of Behavior in Sport and Health Psychology 3 cr.

MASH-643 Exercise Physiology 3 cr.

MASH-645 Critical Evaluation of Contemporary Issues in 3 cr.


Sport and Health

MASH-646 Cognitive Affective Bases of Behavior in 3 cr.


Sport and Health Psychology


Field Training and Seminars

PCO-211 Community Service Seminar I 1 cr.

PCO-212 Community Service Seminar II 1 cr.

PCO-213 Community Service Practicum I 1 cr.

PCO-214 Community Service Practicum II 1 cr.

MASH-680 MASH Counseling Practicum and Seminar 2 cr.

MASH-682 MASH Counseling Internship and Seminar I 2 cr.

MASH-684 MASH Counseling Internship and Seminar II 2 cr.

MASH-681 Sport and Health Externship and Seminar I 1 cr.

MASH-683 Sport and Health Externship and Seminar II 1 cr.

MASH-685 Sport and Health Externship and Seminar III 1 cr.
Comprehensive Examination

MASH 995 MASH Comprehensive Examination 0 cr.



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED 70

* Courses denoted with an asterisk are practicum prerequisites, which students need to complete prior to their counseling practicum. Students are required to attain a grade of B or higher in these courses. Students will need to retake the courses with a B- or lower grade prior to or concurrently with their practicum and attain the required grade.



Graduation Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion of all required courses and seminars

  2. Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 100 hours of practicum and 600 hours of internship

  3. Satisfactory completion of at least 200 hours of community service practicum

  4. Satisfactory completion of at least 400 hours of sport & health psychology externship

  5. Pass the Counseling Preparation Comprehensive Examination

  6. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours of B- or C

  7. Submission of Graduation Application and full payment of all outstanding tuition and fees

  8. Faculty approval for graduation and recommendation to the Board of Trustees for the conferral of the Master of Arts in Counseling: Sport and Health Psychology

Professional Practice and Field Training

An integral part of all master’s programs offered at Adler is the acquisition of practical counseling and scholarly skills gained in field placements. Ongoing involvement in counseling and scholarly activities at professional training sites, including Adler Community Health Services (ACHS) at the Chicago campus, gives students the closely supervised opportunity to apply and further develop the knowledge, skills, values, and competencies they gain in course work.

The Adler Training Department will assist students with the clinical application process during the academic year prior to the actual field placement. The School has a pool of approved training sites in various mental health settings and service themes. Details about requirements and application process for the practicum and internship can be found in the Adler School Practicum and Internship Training Manual. You may download a copy of this manual from the Adler Connect portal at adler.edu.

Community Service Practicum (CSP)

Practicum training requirements begin with a first year Community Service Practicum (CSP) that focuses on developing skills related to community-based interventions, advocacy, social justice, and systemic interventions that benefit human welfare and well-being. First year full-time students will typically spend 8-10 hours per week over the course of six months at an approved CSP site and must concurrently enroll in required course work. A minimum of 200 clock hours of CSP is required. Part-time students may spend fewer hours per week at the site and may finish the CSP in a longer period of time.



Counseling Practicum and Internship

Professional practice is a key element of a student’s training to become a professional in the field. During field training, students are provided with opportunities to apply theories, develop skills, and formulate goals and strategies with actual clients under supervision both from the site and the School.

MASH Counseling field training is composed of two phases which typically both take place at the same site. Practicum is the first phase of clinical field training in mental health settings as a counselor trainee. In this phase students are to complete a minimum 100 hours of field work, consisting of 40 hours of direct client service contact, which must include both individual and group counseling experiences. Internship is the second phase of field training, which consists of a minimum of 600 hours field work, consisting of 240 direct client hours of various services, including but not limited to individual and group counseling, assessment, and intake.

The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) defines practicum as supervised clinical experience in which the student develops basic counseling skills and integrates professional knowledge. The practicum is completed prior to internship; and internship as a supervised “capstone” clinical experience in which the student refines and enhances basic counseling or student development knowledge and skills, and integrates and authenticates professional knowledge and skills appropriate to his or her program and initial postgraduate professional placement.

The Adler Training Department will assist students with the application process during the academic year prior to the actual field placement. The School has a pool of approved training sites of various mental health settings and service themes. Details for requirements and application process of the MASH Counseling Practicum and Internship can be found in the MASH Counseling Practicum and Internship Training Manual. You may find and download a copy of this manual from the Adler Connect Portal at www.adler.edu, or from program faculty advisor and program director.

Sport and Health Externship

Students will complete an externship (minimum of 400 hours) in a setting that allows them to focus on sport and health psychology. The externship experience involves students providing sport and health related services under the supervision/mentorship of a sport psychology consultant (CC-AASP) who is certified by the Association of Applied Sport Psychology (AASP). An externship complements classroom education and provides students the opportunity to work with experienced sport and health professionals and to acquire a professional identity.



Comprehensive Examination

It is one of the graduation requirements for all MASH students successfully complete the Comprehensive Examination. The Department of Counseling and Counselor Education at the Adler School of Professional Psychology utilizes the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination (CPCE) issued by the Center for Credentialing and Education under the National Certified Counselor Board. The CPCE is designed to assess counseling students’ knowledge of counseling information viewed as important by counselor preparation programs.

The CPCE is usually administered once every semester. Students are eligible to take the exam after their successful completion of all the core courses.

Post-Graduate Advanced Training in Applied Sport Psychology

This optional post-graduate training is designed to provide Adler graduates with 300 post-degree hours required for the Association of Applied Sport Psychology Certification (CC-AASP). AASP consultants may provide a variety of services depending on their professional training. The most common services focus on:



  • Providing information about the role of psychological factors in sport, exercise, and physical activity to individuals, groups, and organizations. They may, for example, assist with exercise adherence, communication, teamwork, performance enhancement, or program development and evaluation.

  • Teaching participants specific mental, behavioral, psychosocial, and emotional control skills for sport, exercise, and physical activity contexts. They might, for example, focus on relaxation, concentration, or the use of imagery.

Advanced training is available to graduates who have completed the MASH program in the last three years. The advanced training consists of an externship field placement supervised/mentored by an Adler faculty member who is certified by AASP (CC-AASP). Graduates enroll in one advanced training course, MASH-686: Advanced Sport Psychology Externship and Seminar (two credits).

M.A. in Couple and Family Therapy

Program Overview

The Master of Arts in Couple and Family Therapy (MCFT) program is designed to prepare highly skilled therapists with specialized expertise in treating couples and families. Students are trained to perceive individuals, couples, and families from a systems perspective. The clinically intensive course work and practicum experiences provide students with strong conceptual, assessment, treatment planning, and intervention skills based on the major models of couple and family therapy. The ability to work with families is particularly valuable for clinicians treating children and adolescents.

Graduates of the program have the core professional identity as a Couple and Family Therapist (CFT) qualified for membership in the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). CFTs are mental health professionals who recognize that relationships and patterns of engaging influence individual and relational functioning and therefore need to be part of the therapy process. CFTs work with individuals, couples, and families in a wide variety of clinical settings including community mental health centers, group and private practices, hospitals, schools, substance abuse treatment programs, correctional facilities, and residential treatment programs.

The MCFT curriculum and supervised training are intended to help graduates meet the educational requirements for licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT). The program satisfies the current academic and pre-degree training requirements for Illinois. Students should be aware that LMFT requirements can vary significantly from state to state in their expectations of practicum hours and course work. It is vital that students identify the licensure requirements for the state(s) in which they intend to practice and seek guidance from their advisors to create an educational and training plan that will meet the criteria for each specific state.

The CFT department is dedicated to training quality couple/marriage and family therapists firmly grounded in systemic theories who are culturally competent and socially responsible. An experiential training model is used to:


  • Achieve clinical excellence with individuals, couples, and families

  • Impact relational change

  • Develop the self of the therapist

  • Foster social justice

  • Create cultural competence

Program-Specific Minimum Admission Requirements

In addition to admission requirements common to all of the Adler graduate clinical programs, the MCFT program has requirements for undergraduate course prerequisites that are somewhat flexible since graduates in disciplines related to psychology are encouraged to apply to this program. Additional requirements include

completion of nine semester credit hours in psychology with grades of C or better including general or introduction to psychology, life span development, and research methods or statistics. All prerequisites should be completed by the end of a student’s first semester at Adler School.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the following courses is required for this degree:

* MCFT-210 Professional Development Seminar I 0 cr.

* PCO-211 Community Service Seminar I 1 cr.

* PCO-212 Community Service Seminar II 1 cr.

* PCO-213 Community Service Practicum I 1 cr.

* PCO-214 Community Service Practicum II 1 cr.

MCFT-337 Group Psychotherapy 3 cr.

MCFT-433 Fundamentals of Adlerian Psychology and Parenting
Education: Theory and Interventions 3 cr.

MCFT-438 Introduction to Addictive Disorders 3 cr.

* MCFT-472 Basic Skills of Therapy for CFTs 3 cr.

MCFT-497 Research Methods 3 cr.

* MCFT-505 Professional Development: Issues and Ethics 3 cr.

* MCFT-647 Biopsychosocial Bases of Health and Dysfunction 3 cr.

for CFTs

*MCFT-650 Overview of Post-Modern Approaches to Couple 3 cr.

and Family Therapy

* MCFT-651 Assessment and Treatment Planning with Individual 3 cr.

and Family Systems

* MCFT-654 Individual Life Span and the Family Life Cycle 3 cr.

MCFT-655 Couples Therapy: Theory and Techniques 3 cr.

* MCFT-660 Issues of Culture and Diversity in Couple and 3 cr.

Family Therapy

* MCFT-662 Overview of Modern Approaches to Couple and Family Therapy 3 cr.

MCFT-663 Family Therapy: Theory and Techniques 3 cr.

MCFT-664 Practicum in Couple and Family I 1 cr.

MCFT-665 Practicum in Couple and Family II 1 cr.

MCFT-667 M.A. Practicum Seminar in Couple and Family I 3 cr.

MCFT-668 M.A. Practicum Seminar in Couple and Family II 3 cr.

MCFT-669 M.A. Practicum Seminar in Couple and Family III 3 cr.

MCFT-670 Family Therapy with Children and Adolescents 3 cr.

MCFT-995 Master’s Clinical Qualifying Examination 0 cr.



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED 60

* = Required before beginning counseling practicum



Curriculum Sequence

YEAR ONE

Fall Term

MCFT-210 Professional Development Seminar I 0 cr.

MCFT-472 Basic Skills of Therapy for CFTs 3 cr.

MCFT-505 Professional Development: Issues and Ethics 3 cr.

MCFT-651 Assessment and Treatment Planning with Individual and 3 cr.
Family Systems

Term Credits = 9

Spring Term

PCO-211 Community Service Seminar I 1 cr.

PCO-213 Community Service Practicum I 1 cr.

MCFT-337 Group Psychotherapy 3 cr.

MCFT-654 Individual Life Span and the Family Life Cycle 3 cr.

MCFT-662 Overview of Modern Approaches to 3 cr.


Couple and Family Therapy

Term Credits = 11

Summer Term

PCO-212 Community Service Seminar II 1 cr.

PCO-214 Community Service Practicum II 1 cr.

MCFT-650 Overview of Post-Modern Approaches to Couple and 3 cr.

Family Therapy

MCFT-660 Issues of Culture and Diversity in Couple and Family 3 cr.


Therapy

Term Credits = 8

YEAR TWO

Fall Term

MCFT-497 Research Methods 3 cr.

MCFT-663 Family Therapy: Theory and Techniques 3 cr.

MCFT-664 Practicum in Couple and Family I 1 cr.

MCFT-667 M.A. Practicum Seminar in Couple and Family I 3 cr.

MCFT-647 Biopsychosocial Bases of Health and Dysfunction for 3 cr.

CFTs

Term Credits = 13

Spring Term

MCFT-433 Fundamentals of Adlerian Psychology and Parenting 3 cr.


Education: Theory and Interventions

MCFT-655 Couples Therapy: Theory and Techniques 3 cr.

MCFT-665 Practicum in Couple and Family II 1 cr.

MCFT-668 M.A. Practicum Seminar in Couple and Family II 3 cr.

MCFT-670 Family Therapy with Children and Adolescents 3 cr.

Term Credits = 13

Summer Term

MCFT-438 Introduction to Addictive Disorders 3 cr.

MCFT-669 M.A. Practicum Seminar in Couple and Family III 3 cr.

MCFT-995 Master’s Clinical Qualifying Exam 0 cr.

PCO-610 Practicum Continuation 0 cr.

Term Credits = 6

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED 60

Graduation Requirements


  1. Satisfactory completion of all required credit hours, including all required courses.

  2. Satisfactory completion of 700 minimum clock hours of clinical practicum.

  3. Satisfactory completion of 200 minimum clock hours of community service practicum.

  4. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours of C.

  5. Successful completion of the CFT Master’s Clinical Qualifying Examination (MAQE).

  6. Submission of completed Graduation Application and full payment of all outstanding tuition and fees.

Program-Specific Practicum

Students in the MCFT program acquire and develop practical clinical skills in couple and family therapy through a clinical practicum. The clinical practicum usually occurs in the second year of the program. Students spend roughly 20 hours per week for 12 months at an approved practicum site. The practicum is comprised of a minimum of 700 clock hours, which include a number of direct service hours with individuals, couples, and families determined by the CFT department. The Departments of Training and Community Service and the faculty of the MCFT program work in collaboration with students to identify clinical experiences which will meet the specialized needs of the MFT profession and the goals of the student. Additional resources are available in the Practicum Handbook and the database of practicum sites available from the training department.



Three-Year Option

For a variety of reasons, MCFT students may need to complete the program in three years. In this option, the student does the clinical practicum in the third year of the program. During the second year, the student takes most of the courses for that year. The exceptions are Family Therapy: Theory and Techniques (MCFT-663) and Couple Therapy: Theory and Technique (MCFT-655). These courses are particularly valuable to students during their practicum experience.



M.A. in Criminology (Online)

Program Overview

The Master of Arts in Criminology (Online) degree program is specifically designed to train practitioners in criminological theory, systems organization, processes, and practices in order to prepare them to address current challenges facing the criminal justice system. The program design is accomplished through a blend of course work that focuses on the intersection of criminology, psychology, and social justice. Our unique approach prepares students to examine the causes and consequences of criminal behavior, understand the complexities of modern day criminal justice systems, and apply appropriate methods to develop strategies that address those challenges in meaningful and impactful ways.

The program also prepares students to develop cultural competence and apply it to understanding the larger social context of crime. This perspective will be a guiding factor in understanding, developing, and evaluating intervention, prevention, and response strategies that are practical, effective, socially responsible, and sustainable.

The contemporary criminal justice field faces many challenges in coping with issues such as prison overcrowding due to “the war on drugs” and mandatory sentencing policies, global terrorism, gang violence, disproportionate impacts on under-resourced communities, and rapid advances in science and technology. As a result, the range of employment options for those trained in criminology is broader than ever before. Our goal is to inspire and train students to become agents for social change in a system that is in need of significant improvement. Career paths for individuals with an advanced degree in this field can include academia, corrections, law enforcement, investigations, policy, prevention, and programming. Employment settings may be as diverse as courts, corrections, law enforcement agencies, nonprofit agencies, and government entities.

This 36-credit program is offered entirely online and can be completed in 24 months, making it an attractive option for students who may be currently employed. All components of this program can be accessed through an Internet browser running on an IBM PC (Windows or Linux) or Apple Macintosh (Apple OS). Students must have access to a broadband Internet connection and a personal computer manufactured within the last three years.

Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants to this program are required to have:



  • A baccalaureate degree earned from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international college or university.

  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate course work. Exceptions may be made for applicants who demonstrate improved academic performance or academic ability in other ways.

Approved applicants will be invited for a personal interview as the final step in the application process.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the following courses is required for this degree:



CRIM-500: Criminological Theory 3 Credits
CRIM-501: Juvenile Justice 3 Credits

CRIM-502: Social Psychology and Individual Diversity 3 Credits
CRIM-503: Special Topics: Impacts of Drug Policy 3 Credits
CRIM-504: Mental Health Intersections in Criminal Justice 3 Credits


CRIM-505: Race, Class, Gender and Justice 3 Credits
CRIM-506: Public Policy Issues in Criminal Justice 3 Credits
CRIM-507: Research Methods 3 Credits
CRIM-508: Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 3 Credits
CRIM-509: Criminal Justice Processes and Institutions 3 Credits
CRIM-510: Community Psychology in Criminal Justice 3 Credits
CRIM-511: Examining Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 3 Credits


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED 36

Graduation Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion of all required credit hours, including all required courses

  2. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours
    of C

  3. Completion of application for graduation and full payment of any outstanding tuition or other fees

  4. Faculty approval for graduation and recommendation to the Board of Trustees for the conferral
    of the Master of the Arts in Criminology

M.A. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology (Online)

Program Overview

Industrial-Organizational (I/O) psychology is one of psychology’s fastest-growing specialties: the scientific study of how people shape organizations and how the workplace impacts human beings, the groups to which they belong, and the communities in which they live. I/O professionals apply that expertise to working with individuals, leaders, groups, organizations, communities, and systems to promote both individual and organizational effectiveness.

Our comprehensive Master of Arts in Industrial and Organizational Psychology program trains students in the critical areas of measurement, selection, learning and development, talent management, and performance management. We prepare I/O professionals with insight, innovation, and skills to address today’s complex organizational issues of workplace diversity and inclusiveness, employee performance, change management, organizational culture, team building, and more.

The Adler School applies a unique emphasis on social justice, socially responsible practice, and inclusion. We do so through intensive online course work that culminates with a Socially Responsible Action Plan that addresses real-world organizational issues. Our students and faculty embrace a broad range of perspectives and theoretical approaches. They explore techniques to build and maintain bridges across social, economic, cultural, and racial differences through applied case studies. Our program is designed to give students the skills to identify and address shared problems, and fosters the development of social responsibility, corporate citizenship, social justice, and respect through evidence-based action.

Our students are well prepared for a variety of in-demand positions. I/O practitioners work in:


  • Recruitment and selection

  • Performance management

  • Job analysis

  • Research and statistics

  • Survey design

  • Change management

  • Organiza­tional development

  • Executive coaching

  • Group and team dynamics

  • Instructional design and training development

These positions are available in a wide range of industries including healthcare, technology, education, hospitality, government, marketing, engineering, banking, and manufacturing.

Program Objectives

Upon completion of this degree program, graduates will be able to:



  1. Recognize underlying business challenges and key stakeholders involved.

  2. Integrate social justice to recognize and acknowledge individual differences and how they influence organizations.

  3. Identify and assess organizational efforts toward social responsibility and corporate citizenship.

  4. Use data and evidence-based practices to inform ethical decision-making.

  5. Develop legally defensible talent management systems.

  6. Apply I/O and psychological theories to deliver solutions that promote organizational effectiveness.

  7. Deepen self-awareness and personal growth for life-long learning as an I/O practitioner.

Online Delivery

This 37-credit program is offered entirely online and can be completed in six semesters with at least two admissions (fall and spring entry) per year, making it an attractive option for students who may be currently employed. All components of this program can be accessed through an Internet browser running on an IBM PC (Windows or Linux) or Apple Macintosh (Apple OS). Students must have access to a broadband Internet connection and a personal computer manufactured within the last three years.



Minimum Admission Requirements

At the Adler School, we take great pride in our diverse student body. Students represent a wide range of professional interests, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and academic and work histories. We admit individuals with a record of outstanding academic achievement and a commitment to social responsibility.

To be considered for admission, an applicant must meet the following criteria:


  • A baccalaureate degree from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international school

  • A GPA of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate coursework

Applicants who meet the admission standards will be invited for an interview with faculty.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the following courses is required for this degree

MIO-502 Organizational Theory 3 cr.

MIO-503 Research Methods 3 cr.

MIO-504 Organizational Development and Change 3 cr.

MIO-506 Statistics 3 cr.

MIO-507 Consumer and Employee Attitudes 3 cr.

MIO-509 Group Dynamics 3 cr.

MIO-510 Executive Coaching 3 cr.

MIO-511 Training: Theory, Design, and Evaluation 3 cr.

MIO-512 Talent Selection and Recruitment 3 cr.

MIO-515 Social Responsibility Action Plan 1 cr.

MIO-517 Talent Management 3 cr.

MIO-518 Consulting Skills 3 cr.

MIO-519 Performance Management 3 cr.

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: 37
Note:

Students take two classes concurrently per semester (with the addition of MIO-515 Social Responsibility Action Plan during their final term).

Classes are typically eight weeks long.

Courses in the first year semesters 1, 2, and 3 have a fixed order. Courses in the second year semesters 4, 5, and 6 can be taken in any order except for MIO 515 Social Responsibility Action Plan which is fixed as the final course in the program.

Students are expected to complete first year courses (semesters 1, 2, 3) before those in Year Two and beyond (semesters 4, 5, 6).

Curriculum Sequence

Fall Admissions

YEAR ONE

Fall Term (1)

MIO-517 Talent Management (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-502 Organizational Theory (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term (2)

MIO-504 Organizational Development and Change (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-503 Research Methods (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Summer Term (3)

MIO-506 Statistics (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-518 Consulting Skills (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

YEAR TWO

Fall Term (4)

MIO-509 Group Dynamics (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-512 Talent Selection and Recruitment (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term (5)

MIO-519 Performance Management (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-507 Consumer and Employee Attitudes (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Application for Social Responsibility Action Plan due

Term Credit = 6

Summer Term (6)

MIO-510 Executive Coaching (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-511 Training: Theory, Design, and Evaluation (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-515 Social Responsibility Action Plan (8 weeks) 1 cr.



Term Credits = 7

Total Credit Hours = 37

Spring Admissions

YEAR ONE

Spring Term (1)

MIO-517 Talent Management (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-502 Organizational Theory (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Summer Term (2)

MIO-504 Organizational Development and Change (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-503 Research Methods (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Fall Term (3)

MIO-506 Statistics (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-518 Consulting Skills (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

YEAR TWO

Spring Term (4)

MIO-519 Performance Management (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-507 Consumer and Employee Attitudes (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Summer Term (5)

MIO-510 Executive Coaching (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-511 Training: Theory, Design, and Evaluation (8 weeks) 3 cr.

Application for Social Responsibility Action Plan due

Term Credits = 6

Fall Term (6)

MIO-509 Group Dynamics (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-512 Talent Selection and Recruitment (8 weeks) 3 cr.

MIO-515 Social Responsibility Action Plan (8 weeks) 1 cr.



Term Credits = 7

Total Credit Hours = 37

Graduation Requirements



  1. Satisfactory completion of all required credit hours, including all required courses.

  2. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours
    of C grade.

  3. Completion of application for graduation and full payment of any outstanding tuition or other fees

  4. Faculty approval for graduation and recommendation to the Board of Trustees for the conferral
    of the Master of Arts in Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

M.A. in Emergency Management Leadership

Program Overview

While the profession of emergency management has been described and defined in different ways in many venues, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Higher Education Project working group adopted perhaps the most concise and encompassing definition. The working group synthesized the global framework of the profession when it succinctly wrote, “Emergency management is the managerial function charged with creating the framework within which communities reduce vulnerability to hazards and cope with disasters.”

It is that “managerial function” and the need for a targeted higher education opportunity that served as the impetus for the development and implementation of the Adler School of Professional Psychology’s Master of Arts in Emergency Management Leadership program.

In times of disaster on any scale, communities seek support, direction, and leadership. The field of emergency management is the core of coordination and support for prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery efforts from disaster in communities. This program prepares students in developing the knowledge and skills of practices in the field of emergency management, with unique focus on the human and social factors inherent in all disasters.

Students enrolled in the M.A. in Emergency Management Leadership program will develop the ability to understand complex social, emotional, psychological, and political dynamics to effectively serve and lead support processes addressing an impacted community’s needs. This program takes psychology out of the classroom and private practice and into the community to provide direct, hands-on services to individuals and groups who need professionals with the expertise to provide immediate and long-term support.

Online/Blended Format

The 37-credit program can be completed in two years, when students take two classes per semester. The program will consist of online course work along with three Weekend Residency experiences. During the Weekend Residency experiences, students will convene in Chicago, Illinois, and have an opportunity to participate in field exercises designed to develop their emergency management skills, applying textbook knowledge to simulated emergency situations and decision-making exercises.



Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants for the M.A. in Emergency Management Leadership should have:



  • A baccalaureate degree from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international college or university.

  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate course work. Exceptions may be made for applicants who demonstrate outstanding academic performance or academic ability in other ways.

Approved applicants will be invited to participate in a personal interview as the final step in the application process.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the following courses is required for the M.A. in Emergency Management Leadership degree:

EML-500 Foundations of Emergency Management Systems 3 cr.

EML-501 Law and Politics of Emergency Management 3 cr.

EML-502 Supporting Functional Needs Populations in Disasters 3 cr.

EML-503 Disaster Response, Recovery, and Continuity 3 cr.

EML-504 Psychology of Terrorism 3 cr.

EML-505 Leading In Times of Crisis 3 cr.

EML-506 Essentials of Effective Communication 3 cr.

EML-507 Research Methods for Leaders in Emergency Management 3 cr.

EML-508 Group, Organization, and System Development 3 cr.

EML-509 Private Sector Emergency Management Strategies 3 cr.

EML-510 Disaster Mental and Behavioral Health Applications in 3 cr.

Emergency Management

EML-511 Emerging Issues in Emergency Management and
Homeland Security 3 cr.

EML-512 Capstone Project 1 cr.



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: 37

Curriculum Sequence

Year One
Fall Term

EML-500 Foundations of Emergency Management Systems 3 cr.

EML-501 Law and Politics of Emergency Management 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term

EML-502 Supporting Functional Needs Populations in Disasters 3 cr.

EML-503 Disaster Response, Recovery, and Continuity 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Summer Term

EML-504 Psychology of Terrorism 3 cr.

EML-505 Leading In Times of Crisis 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

YEAR TWO
Fall Term
EML-506 Essentials of Effective Communication 3 cr.

EML-507 Research Methods for Leaders in Emergency Management 3 cr.

Principles of Community Engagement 0 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term

EML-508 Group, Organization, and System Development 3 cr.

EML-509 Private Sector Emergency Management Strategies 3 cr.

Community Engagement Project – Service Learning 0 cr.


and Seminar

Term Credits = 6

Summer Term
EML-510 Disaster Mental and Behavioral Health Applications in 3 cr.

Emergency Management

EML-511 Emerging Issues in Emergency Management and 3 cr.
Homeland Security

EML-512 Capstone Project 1 cr.



Term Credits = 7
Total Credit Hours = 37


Community Engagement Project/Capstone Project

In the fall of the second year in the program, students will enroll in both Principles of Community Engagement and EML 507 – Research Methods for Leaders in Emergency Management, along with one other program course. The Principles of Community Engagement course spans the entire 15 weeks of the fall term and students will receive a foundation to begin their social justice work in community organizations. Student application, placement, and in-processing at their placement site will occur during the Principles of Community Engagement course.

During the Principles of Community Engagement, students will also be oriented to the learning goals for their upcoming community-based learning experiences. During the final eight weeks of the fall term, students will take EML-507 – Research Methods for Leaders in Emergency Management. In EML-507 – Research Methods for Emergency Management Leadership, students will determine a topic or issue to study related to the site(s) they are trying to be placed with for the Community Engagement Project (CEP). In addition, students will begin preliminary research on the topic or issue in order to develop a basic literature review and propose a research methodology to potentially study the topic, or issue during EML-507 - Research Methods for Emergency Management Leaders.

The spring term of the second year will commence with a 15-week CEP – Service Learning and Seminar, along with two additional program courses. While enrolled in the CEP, students will engage with a community partner to further learn about the topic or issue they began researching in EML-507 Research Methods for Emergency Management Leaders. Simultaneous with the service learning, students will complete a five-module seminar on leadership skills and cultural competence in social justice education. At the culmination of the CEP, students will assemble presentations that require them to reflect upon both the service learning experience and the cultural competencies for social justice, explain the topic, or issue, they were working with, describe the methods used by the community organization to address the topic, or issue, and identify the skills they have acquired and how the entire experience has influenced them as a professionals.

Finally, during the summer term of their second year, students will enroll in EML-512 – Capstone Project, along with two other program courses. In the Capstone Project, students will expand upon their knowledge from program courses, EML-507 – Research Methods for Emergency Management Leaders, and CEP to develop a comprehensive paper and presentation that begins by identifying the topic or issue they were working with and current approaches being used in the community to address it. Students will develop the literature review they started in EML-507 – Research Methods for Emergency Management Leadership into a full critical literature review and then proceed to analyze and address the gaps in literature and approaches to addressing the topic, or issue, using a social justice lens. Finally, to wrap up the Capstone Project, students will propose a socially just solution to addressing the topic, or issue they have been researching and engaging with.

Graduation Requirements


  1. Satisfactory completion of all required credit hours, including all required courses.

  2. Satisfactory participation in each of the three Residency Weekends.

  3. Satisfactory completion of the required Community Engagement Project.

  4. Satisfactory completion of the required Capstone Project.

  5. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours of C.

  6. Submission of completed Graduation Application and full payment of all outstanding tuition and fees.

M.A. in Psychology: Specialization in Military Psychology (Online)

Program Overview

The Master of Arts Degree in Psychology with an emphasis in Military Psychology (MAMP) educates students in the discipline of military psychology to be socially responsible graduates who engage both the military and civilian community and promote social justice nationally and globally. This discipline involves the systematic and scientific study of the selection, training, adaptation, and performance of soldiers. It focuses on how the military interacts with larger social, organizational, cultural, and technological systems. Military psychology by necessity is a heterogeneous field of inquiry. It must draw on all sub-disciplines of psychology to understand the variables that affect military performance. Military psychology includes the contributions of clinical, experimental, social, industrial/organizational, and engineering psychology. Military psychology is united by a shared interest in advancing knowledge and application of psychological science toward a specific population and community engagement with social responsibility and a local, regional, and global presence.

Military psychology programming works to improve the lives of those who are serving or have served and their families. Other applications of military psychology impact social policy programs within the military that are designed to promote diversity and equal opportunity. This includes addressing issues such as integrating diverse ethnic, religious, racial, and sexually oriented groups into the military and reducing sexual assault and discrimination. In today’s world, the role of military psychology is being more pragmatic for consideration for national security, military defense, and global policy in order to ensure real-world solutions and measurable results.

Program Vision and Goals

The MAMP degree program will afford students a deeper understanding of military culture from a biological, psychological, and sociological perspective. The program is also designed to provide active, reserve, and national guard military personnel an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of human behavior, especially psychological reactions to distress, particularly for those non-mental health practitioners (e.g., commissioned and non-commissioned personnel including nursing personnel, bachelor-level behavioral healthcare specialists, and resilience trainers).

The goal of the program is to have an impact in a variety of ways by:


  • Providing specialized training in military psychology for Medical Service Officers, Medics, Corpsmen (Active Duty, Reserves and National Guard), as well as Registered Nurses, and bachelor level Behavioral Healthcare Specialists in the military.

  • Enhancing the training and leadership outcomes of non-commissioned and commissioned officers, especially as it relates to personnel management and organizational behavior.

  • Providing an immersion into military culture, systems, specialized education, and clinical treatment considerations for recent college graduates and LCPC, LCSW, LMFT, Certified Substance Abuse Counselors, or Licensed Psychologists who wish to serve military personnel, veterans, retirees, and their families.

  • Assessing and improving the overall mental health of military personnel, veterans, and their families, including risk assessment tools for combat-related stress.

  • Exploring prevention and intervention approaches that address suicidal ideation and/or alcohol and drug abuse.

  • Evaluating how the military interacts with larger social, organizational, cultural, and technological systems.

  • Providing research and evaluation such as selecting recruits for the armed forces and determining suitability for service.

  • Performing analysis on humanitarian and peacekeeping missions to determine procedures that can save military and civilian lives.

Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants to the MAMP program are required to have:



  • A baccalaureate degree from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international college or university,

  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate course work. Exceptions may be made for applicants who demonstrate improved academic performance or academic ability in other ways.

Approved applicants will be invited to participate in a personal interview as the final step in the application process.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the following courses is required for the M.A. in Psychology: Specialization in Military Psychology degree:

MAMP-500 Survey of Military Psychology 3 cr.

MAMP-501 Operational Psychology for the Military 3 cr.

MAMP-502 Mental Health Law and the Uniform Code of Military Justice 3 cr.

MAMP-503 The Psychology of Conflict and Operations Other than War 3 cr.

MAMP-504 Ethics, Morality, and Social Justice in the Military 3 cr.

MAMP-505 War, Trauma, Grief, Death, and Loss 3 cr.

MAMP-506 Psychological Resilience and Positive Psychology 3 cr.

MAMP-507 Research Methods 3 cr.

MAMP-508 Culture and Diversity in the Military 3 cr.

MAMP-509 Department of Defense and the VA Health Care System 3 cr.

MAMP-510 Substance Abuse in the Military 3 cr.

MAMP-511 Social Services and Behavioral Healthcare to Veterans, 3 cr.

Retirees, Military, and their Families

MAMP-512 Capstone Project 1 cr.



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED 37

Curriculum Sequence

YEAR ONE
Fall Term

MAMP-500 Survey of Military Psychology 3 cr.

MAMP 501 Operational Psychology for the Military 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term

MAMP-502 Mental Health Law and the Uniform Code of Military Justice 3 cr.

MAMP-503 The Psychology of Conflict and Operations Other than War 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Summer Term

MAMP-504 Ethics, Morality, and Social Justice in the Military 3 cr.

MAMP-505 War, Trauma, Grief, Death, and Loss 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

YEAR TWO

Fall Term

MAMP-506 Psychological Resilience and Positive Psychology 3 cr.

MAMP-507 Research Methods 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term

MAMP-508 Culture and Diversity in the Military 3 cr.

MAMP-509 Department of Defense and VA Health Care Systems 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6
Summer Term

MAMP-510 Substance Use in the Military 3 cr.

MAMP-511 Social Services and Behavioral Healthcare to Veterans, 3 cr.
Retirees, Military, and their Families

MAMP-512 Capstone Project 1 cr.



Term Credits = 7

Total Credit Hours = 37
Graduation Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion of the 37 credit hours of required course work.

  2. Successful completion of the Capstone Project.

  3. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours of C.

  4. Submission of completed Graduation Application and full payment of all outstanding tuition and fees.

  5. Faculty approval for graduation and recommendation to the Board of Trustees for the conferral of the Master of Arts in Psychology: Specialization in Military Psychology.

M.A. in Public Policy and Administration – Concentrations in Urban Mental Health and Human Rights

The Master of Arts in Public Policy and Administration (MAPPA) is a graduate professional degree that helps students prepare for careers in public policy, governance, and service. With the global growth of urbanization over the past 200 years, more than 50 percent of the world’s population now lives in urban areas. These migratory patterns and other challenges facing urban life span the spectrum of opportunities from prosperity to concerns for sustainable life styles and social inclusion. Considering both the opportunities and problems urbanization generates, the goal of the MAPPA program is to provide students with a quality education that prepares graduates for leadership and advocacy roles in government and community services. The program combines rigorous academic instruction with civic engaged experiences that give students the opportunity for hands-on experience under the supervision of faculty and professionals in the field. The program offers the best features of traditional graduate education and training in policy and administration coupled with Adler School’s emphasis on being a socially responsible practitioner.

The MAPPA program provides students with core knowledge and skills in policy development and analysis, program evaluation, management, and politics necessary for work in the public arena including national, state, and local governments; policy research centers; consulting firms; community action groups’ and direct-service providers in the U.S. and around the world. The program requires 36 hours of course work with a minimum of 27 hours of public policy and administration core course work and nine hours of concentration course work in either Urban Mental Health or Human Rights. In order for students to become effective public policy professionals and administrators, they need to advance their abilities in leadership and management and become participants in and contributors to the process of creating public policy — including the analysis, synthesis, critical thinking, and problem solving that encourages the growth of healthy communities. Learning to communicate and interact with diverse groups within a rapidly changing society is essential, as is the ability to articulate and apply new perspectives in policy discussions. In helping students achieve these competencies, the MAPPA program incorporates both practice and theory into the curriculum.

Minimum Admission Requirements

Applicants to this program are required to have:



  • A baccalaureate degree earned from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international college or university.

  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate course work. Exceptions may be made for applicants who demonstrate outstanding academic performance or academic ability in other ways.

  • The equivalent of one introductory course in micro-economics and one quantitative reasoning course which can be in mathematics, logic, or statistics with grades of C or better. Equivalent course work in other social sciences may also be considered. All prerequisites should be completed by the end of a student’s first semester at Adler School.

Approved applicants will be invited for a personal interview as the final step in the application process.

Degree Requirements

Successful completion of the following courses is required for this degree:



Core Curriculum

PPA-500 Theories of Public Policy and Administration 3 cr.

PPA-501 Political Economy and Economic Analysis in 3 cr.
Public Policy Development

PPA-502 Ethics in Public Service 3 cr.

PPA-503 Collaborative Policy Making and Civic Engagement 3 cr.

PPA-504 Public Finance 3 cr.

* PPA-505 Research Methods I: Quantitative Research Methods 3 cr.

* PPA-506 Research Methods II: Qualitative Research Methods & 3 cr.


Community Consultation

PPA-507 Organization Theory in Public Administration 3 cr.

PPA-508 Capstone/Fieldwork Experience in Public Policy 3 cr.

* = Required before beginning capstone/fieldwork


Nine credit hours within one area of concentration:
Urban Mental Health Concentration Curriculum

PPA-509 Health Determinants and Outcomes 3 cr.

PPA-510 Public Health and Population Mental Health Research 3 cr.

and Promotion

PPA-511 Topics in Urban Policy – Critical Urban Mental Health Issues 3 cr.

Human Rights Concentration Curriculum

PPA-512 Human Rights Policies and Outcomes 3 cr.

PPA-513 The Human Right to Health 3 cr.

PPA-514 Topics in Urban Policy – Contemporary Human Rights Issues 3 cr.



TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED: 36

Curriculum Sequences

Urban Mental Health concentraion

Year One

Fall Term

PPA-500 Theories of Public Policy and Administration 3 cr.

PPA-501 Political Economy and Economic Analysis in
Public Policy Development 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term

PPA-502 Ethics in Public Service 3 cr.

PPA-509 Health Determinants and Outcomes 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Summer Term

PPA-503 Collaborative Policy Making and Civic Engagement 3 cr.

PPA-504 Public Finance 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

YEAR TWO

Fall Term

PPA-505 Research Methods I: Quantitative Research Methods 3 cr.

PPA-506 Research Methods II: Qualitative Research Methods & 3 cr.
Community Consultation

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term

PPA-507 Organization Theory in Public Administration 3 cr.

PPA-508 Capstone/Fieldwork Experience in Public Policy (CEP) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6
Summer Term

PPA-511 Topics in Urban Policy – Critical Urban Mental Health Issues 3 cr.

PPA-510 Urban Mental Health Part II: Diagnosis and Service 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Total Credit Hours = 36

HUMAN RIGHTS CONCENTRATION

Year One

Fall Term

PPA-500 Theories of Public Policy and Administration 3 cr.

PPA-501 Political Economy and Economic Analysis in 3 cr.
Public Policy Development

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term

PPA-502 Ethics in Public Service 3 cr.

PPA-512 Human Rights Policies and Outcomes 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Summer Term

PPA-503 Collaborative Policy Making and Civic Engagement 3 cr.

PPA-504 Public Finance 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

YEAR TWO

Fall Term

PPA-505 Research Methods I: Quantitative Research Methods 3 cr.

PPA-506 Research Methods II: Qualitative Research Methods & 3 cr.
Community Consultation

Term Credits = 6

Spring Term

PPA-507 Organization Theory in Public Administration 3 cr.

PPA-508 Capstone/Fieldwork Experience in Public Policy (CEP) 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Summer Term

PPA-514 Topics in Urban Policy – Contemporary Human Rights Issues 3 cr.

PPA-513 The Human Right to Health 3 cr.

Term Credits = 6

Total Credit Hours = 36

FULL TIME CURRICULUM SEQUENCE (BOTH CONCENTRATIONS)

Students in the M.A. in Public Policy Administration program have the option of completing the program on a full-time basis. Students who choose this option would take 12 credit hours in each semester (as opposed to six credit hours for the part-time sequence), thus completing the required 36 credit hours in one academic year.

YEAR ONE

Fall Term

PPA-500 Theories of Public Policy & Administration 3 cr.

PPA-501 Political Economy and Economic Analysis in Public 3 cr.

Policy Development

PPA-505 Research Methods I: Quantitative Research Methods 3 cr.

PPA-506 Research Methods II: Qualitative Research Methods 3 cr.



Term Credit Hours = 12

Spring Term

PPA-502 Ethics in Public Service 3 cr.

PPA-507 Organizational Theory in Public Administration 3 cr.

PPA-508 Capstone/Fieldwork Experience in Public Policy 3 cr.

Choose one of the following concentration courses:

PPA-509 Health Determinants and Outcomes (UMH Concentration) 3 cr.

PPA-512 Human Rights Policies and Outcomes (HR Concentration) 3 cr.



Term Credit Hours = 12

Summer Term

Summer Term: Session One

PPA-503 Collaborative Policy Making 3 cr.


Choose one of the following concentration courses:

PPA-510 Public Health and Population Mental Health Research 3 cr.

& Health Promotion (UMH Concentration)

PPA-513 Human Right to Health (HR Concentration) 3 cr.



Session Credit Hours = 6

Summer Term: Session Two

PPA-504 Public Finance 3 cr.


Choose one of the following concentration courses:

PPA-511 Special Topics in Urban Mental Health 3 cr.

(UMH Concentration)

PPA-514 Topics in Urban Policy: Contemporary Human 3 cr.



Rights Issues (HR Concentration)

Session Credit Hours = 6

Total Summer Term Credit Hours = 12
Total Credit Hours = 36

Graduation Requirements

  1. Satisfactory completion of all required credit hours, including all required courses.

  2. Satisfactory completion of 100 minimum hours of fieldwork.

  3. Successful completion a capstone project.

  4. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and no more than two grades or six credit hours
    of C.

  5. Submission of completed Graduation Application and full payment of all outstanding tuition and fees.

M.A. in Nonprofit Management (Online)
Program Overview
The Master of Arts in Nonprofit Management (NPM) program is completely online and designed for students already working in, or interested in working in, the nonprofit sector. Students from any undergraduate background are welcome to apply.
The purpose of the NPM program is to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed for a successful leadership position in the nonprofit sector. The nonprofit sector is diverse and dynamic. The sector is growing, as is the need for well-prepared leaders capable of working across multiple environments and stakeholders. The curriculum explores issues facing nonprofit organizations and their leaders, and helps students master relevant skills, theories, and analytic tools for leading and managing effectively. Courses investigate the political, economic, legal, and social environments of nonprofit organizations, the unique role of the sector, and the importance of personal and professional development. Students develop skills in specific areas such as governance, fundraising, human resource management, financial management, grant writing, legal issues, and advocacy. Embedded in the curriculum are both theoretical and practical approaches to understanding and promoting civic engagement and participation.
The course content of the NPM program is centered upon developing socially responsible leaders who understand the important role of the nonprofit sector in promoting social justice and social change. A unique feature of the sector is that it is founded on the belief that individuals can come together to improve the conditions facing a particular community or group. Some activities for improving conditions include advocating for policy change or educating the public about particular issues. Still other activities may be the provision of services like counseling, medical care, employment training, or animal rescue. The cornerstone of this program is that this unique feature should be preserved and promoted, and students will be given the opportunity to learn about civic engagement, social justice, and social responsibility. Wherever possible, real-life issues and cases facing nonprofit organizations are integrated into course content.
Program Vision and Goals
The NPM program is a non-clinical program which prepares nimble nonprofit leaders capable of leading sustainable, innovative, and effective nonprofit organizations that promote social justice and foster civil society. The program will prepare graduates to be ethical, self-aware, accountable advocates capable of collaborating for social change.
The objectives of the program are to provide students with education and experience to develop their capacity to:


  1. Discern and apply appropriate technical skills for managing, modifying, and sustaining the functions of nonprofit organizations, such as grant writing, managing staff and volunteers, working with boards, and planning.

  2. Describe nonprofit administration theory and practice in historical, cultural, political, economic, and social contexts.

  3. Explain the unique function of the nonprofit sector and the importance of preserving this function as a space wherein individuals can come together to address shared issues and needs.

  4. Assess and respond effectively, using leadership skills and ethical decision making, to the myriad situations encountered by nonprofit managers.

  5. Engage a broad range of individuals to identify the needs of the community and strategize ways to meet them.

  6. Align organizational goals and tasks to further social justice and foster civil society in adherence with the Adler School’s mission.

  7. Research organizational issues and propose action strategies.

  8. Identify opportunities for personal and professional development of the self and others.


Minimum Admission Requirements
Applicants to the NPM program are required to have:


  • A baccalaureate degree from a college or university regionally accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or an equivalent degree from an international college or university.




  • A minimum grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale for undergraduate and graduate course work. Exceptions may be made for applicants who demonstrate improved academic performance or academic ability in other ways.

Approved applicants will be invited to participate in a personal interview as the final step in the application process.


Degree Requirements
Successful completion of the following courses is required for the NPM program:

Curriculum Sequence



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