Setting up running heads and page numbers in Word 2007/2010



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APA 6th

  • Sullivan Library @
  • Dominican College
  • Updated 11/30/2012

What is APA?

      • APA = American Psychological Association.
      • Psychology, Education, and Health Sciences
      • Used for publication of manuscripts
        • “Conformity” is the goal

What are the style rules?

  • 12 point Times New Roman font
  • 1” margins around all edges
  • Double spaced throughout
  • Running head (not author’s name) on each page
  • Page number in the upper right of each page

What do I need?

  • Title page (beginning)
  • Main body of paper (middle)
  • List of References (end)

General Formatting Rules

  • Paper title – no more than 12 words in length. Capitalize significant words.
  • Running head - No more than 50 characters, including spaces. This is a shortened version of your title. Use capital letters for the entire running head.
  • Setting up running heads and page numbers in Word 2007/2010:
  • Insert > Header. Choose “Blank” or the first option.
  • IMPORTANT: Make sure you click “different first page” in Design > Options before you start typing.
  • Type your running head,
  • Running head: TITLE OF YOUR PAPER
  • Running head: EFFECTS OF SLEEP DEPRIVATION
  • Tab over your cursor to the far right side of the page, where your page number goes.
  • It might be helpful to view the ruler before you add a page number, to see where the edge of the page is.
  • View > “Show” Section > Ruler.
  • Insert > Page Number > Current Position > Plain Number
  • A page number should be inserted on the far right side.

General Formatting Rules

  • Go down to page 2 by pressing the enter key or similar to set up page 2 and higher.
  • Insert > Header. Choose “Blank” or the first option.
  • Type the running head (without Running head: …Compare to #3 on previous slide)
  • TITLE OF YOUR PAPER
  • EFFECTS OF SLEEP DEPRIVATION
  • Thus, Running head: does not appear in the rest of your paper. This is why you need a different first page.
  • Tab over your cursor to the far right side of the page, where your page number goes.
  • Insert > Page Number > Current Position > Plain Number
  • A page number should be inserted on the far right side.
  • Your paper should now be formatted appropriately in terms of the running head and page numbers.

Title Page

Start of your paper

  • If you need an abstract as page 2, this would be page 3.

Why cite?

  • Gives credit to the researchers
  • Shows which sources contributed to your learning and intellectual growth
  • Allows readers to easily find the sources to further their own knowledge
  • Prevents accidental plagiarism by you

Did you know. . . ?

  • That it is plagiarism to:
    • Copy the words, ideas, graphs, images, etc. of others without proper credit
    • Cut and paste various ideas together from different sources without proper credit
    • Use the same paper in more than one class without permission
    • Edit material between quote marks without proper notice (look in the APA 6th manual for instructions on how to do it properly)

Citing what you found

  • Author / Date system:
    • Underwood and Findlay (2004) found that the problem occurred when . . .
  • In-text citations
  • are a roadmap to
  • your references page

Ways to cite properly

  • Two places to put Author / Date info:
    • In the starting signal phrase:
    • The experiments by Davis and Smith (2004) found that “a further variable was needed: time” (p. 13).
    • In parentheses at the end:
    • … found that “a further variable was needed: time” (Davis & Smith, 2004, p. 13).

Rules you shouldn’t try to memorize . . . in-text citing

  • 1 author (for both first and subsequent citations)
  • Signal phrase… Williams (2001)*
  • In the parentheses… (Williams, 2001, p. 13)
  • 2 authors (for both first and subsequent citations)
  • Signal phrase … Williams and Robinson (2001) *
  • In the parentheses … (Williams & Robinson, 2001, p. 13)
  • 3 authors (first citation)
  • Signal phrase … Williams, Robinson, and Smith (2001)*
  • In the parentheses … (Williams, Robinson, & Smith, 2001, p. 13)
  • 3 authors (subsequent citations)
  • Signal phrase … Williams et al. (2001)*
  • In the parentheses … (Williams et al., 2001, p. 13)
  • * = do not forget the page number goes at the end of the quotation!

Rules you shouldn’t try to memorize . . . in-text citing

  • 4 authors (first citation)
  • Signal phrase … Williams, Robinson, Smith, and Hu (2001)*
  • In the parentheses … (Williams, Robinson, Smith, & Hu, 2001, p. 13)
  • 4 authors (subsequent citations)
  • Signal phrase … Williams et al. (2001)*
  • In the parentheses … (Williams et al., 2001, p. 13)
  •  
  • 5 authors (first citation)
  • Signal phrase … Williams, Robinson, Smith, Hu, and Margt (2001)*
  • In the parentheses … (Williams, Robinson, Smith, Hu, & Margt, 2001, p. 13)
  • 5 authors (subsequent citations)
  • Signal phrase … Williams et al. (2001)*
  • In the parentheses … (Williams et al., 2001, p. 13)
  • 6 or more authors (first and subsequent citations)
  • Signal phrase … Williams et al. (2001)*
  • In the parentheses … (Williams et al., 2001, p. 13)
  • * = do not forget the page number in the parentheses at the end!

Paraphrasing vs. Quoting

  • Two ways to insert an idea into your paper
    • Direct quotation
      • Requires author/date information
      • requires a page number
    • Paraphrasing
      • Requires author/date information
      • Page number optional, but highly encouraged (might be required by your professor)

Direct Quotation Example

  • Examples with required page number
    • Interpreting these results, Robbins et al. (2003) suggested that the “therapists in dropout cases may have inadvertently validated parental negativity” (p. 541), contributing to an overall climate of negativity.
    • Author / date / page # in parentheses
    • … and furthermore, “therapists in dropout cases may have inadvertently validated parental negativity” (Robbins et al., 2003, p. 541), contributing to an overall climate of negativity.

What is paraphrasing?

  • More than changing the word order of a few words
  • More than just summarizing
    • Synthesizing (putting together) the information
    • Expressing what you have learned to the reader

Paraphrasing Example

  • Using a signal phrase for author / date to begin the sentence has the advantage of letting your reader know in advance that it is not your idea(s), but parenthetical citations are okay, too.
  • Page number is optional but encouraged.
  • The researcher stated that the therapist might have seemed to take the parents’ side, which then caused the session to take a negative turn (Robbins et al., 2003, p. 541).

Unique phrases in paraphrases

  • If you want to use a small unique phrase from the original text within your paraphrase:
    • The researcher stated that one of the issues was a therapist who “inadvertently validated parental negativity” and thus caused the session to take a negative turn (Robbins et al., 2003, p. 541).

Paraphrasing Tips

  • Re-read the text until you grasp its meaning
  • Physically cover the text up!
  • Re-write the quote from memory
  • Look over your work:
    • Any unique phrases you would not normally use need to be put in quotes (with a page number!)
    • Try to use different words than the author did
    • If it is close to the original idea, try again or ask for help

Citing a source mentioned in the source you have

    • Williams stated that “Nursing is fun” (as cited in Kaymen, 2009, p. 245).
      • Williams has the information you want to state/quote, but you don’t have his article
      • Kaymen is the text you have in your hands
      • Kaymen is the text you include in your reference list, because that is where you got the (secondary) information from, in case there is a discrepancy.
    • It is recommended that you try to find the original/primary source (Williams) rather than using the secondary source (Kaymen)

Two or more works in the same parentheses

    • If multiple items have the information, arrange in the parentheses by the order they would appear in the reference list:
      • Several studies (Miller, 1999; Shafranske & Mahoney, 1998) reinforce the claim…
    • Exception: major citations which should be consulted first by the reader:
      • (Minor, 2001; see also Adams, 1999; Storandt, 2007)

Personal Communication

    • Private letters, interview, telephone conversations, and etc. Sometimes includes online material, but be careful to make sure it is applicable for scholarly work.
      • R. A. Bates (personal communication, March 18, 2007)
      • T. K. Lithman (interview, April 2, 2012)
      • As the information is not recoverable by the reader, it is not included in the reference list, only the text of the paper.

Reference List Formatting

  • Located at the end of your paper, on a new page
  • Every source in the paper has an entry
  • One word at the top of the page, centered:
  • References
  • [Not bolded, italicized, or in quote marks]

Reference List Formatting

  • Entries in alphabetical order by (the first) author’s last name usually, or, if needed, the title of the work
  • Double spaced
  • Hanging indents used for references of 2+ lines
  • Cite the work of individuals whose ideas, research, or theories have influenced your paper
  • Citing an item implies you have read it

Author info (all items)

  • Two authors
    • Last Name, F. M., & Last Name, F. M. (1985). …
      • Commas should separate last names and other authors. There is also a comma before ampersands ( & )
  • Three to seven authors
    • Last Name, F. M., Last Name, F. M., & Last Name, F. M. (1985).
  • More than seven authors
    • Last Name, A. A., Last Name, B. B., Last Name, C. C., Last Name, D. D., Last Name, E. E., Last Name, F. F., . . . Last Name, H. H. (1985).

Reference List - Books

  • Last Name, F. M. (Year). An italicized title with only the
  • first word capitalized: Except proper nouns or after colons. Location of Publisher: Publisher.
  • Smith, T. S. (2004). Running home: An American
  • sprinter’s story. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.
  • Jones, B. Y., & James, C. A. (Eds.). (2009). Geriatric physical therapy within the hospital. Philadelphia, PA: F.A. Davis.

Reference List - Articles

  • Last Name, F. M., & Last Name, F. M. (Year). An article title that is not italicized with only the first word capitalized: Except proper nouns or after colons. Name of Journal Italicized, vol#italicized(issue#), page#-page#. doi:##.######
  • EBSCOhost: ProQuest:
  • (citation/abstract page)
  • Note: some articles might
  • not have DOIs.

Reference List - Articles

  • If the DOI is not available, you can use the URL of the journal’s homepage instead:
  • . . . vol#(issue#), page#-page#. Retrieved from http://jopst.org
  • Or the name of the database (APA states only use this if that is what your professor wants).
  • . . . vol#(issue#), page#-page#. Retrieved from Academic Search Elite.

Article Examples

  • Sledziewski, L., Schaaf, R. C., & Mount, J. (2012). Preview use of robotics in spinal cord injury: A case report. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 166(1), 51-8. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2012.000943
  • Passier, L. N., Nasciemento, M. P., Gesch, J. M., & Haines, T. P. (2010). Physiotherapist observation of head and neck alignment. Physiotherapy Theory & Practice, 26, 416-423. Retrieved from: http://www. informahealthcare.com/ptp
  • Note: If a journal uses continuous pagination (issue 1 is pg. 1 – 76, issue 2 is 77 – 183, etc.) you are not required to state the issue number in APA 6th, as shown in the 2nd example.
  • Note: Technically, example 1 comes from A.J.O.T., which also uses continuous pagination and thus the (1) should not be included.

Reference List - Websites

  • Last Name, F. M. (Publication or last update date). A website title with only the first word capitalized: Except proper nouns or after colons. Retrieved from: http://www.website.com
  • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. (2012, Jan. 9). NINDS stroke information page. Retrieved from: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/
  • disorders/stroke/stroke.htm

Reference List - Websites

  • No author – alphabetize by website title.
  • No date – use n.d.
  • Stroke statistics. (2008, Nov. 30). Retrieved from: http:// nyp.org/health/neuro-strkstats.html
  • Stroke statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved from: http:// nyp.org/health/neuro-strkstats.html

Reference List: Magazines

  • Chamberlin, J., & Novotney, A., Packard, E., & Price, M. (2008, May). Enhancing worker well-being: Occupational health psychologists convene to share their research on work, stress, and health. Monitor on Psychology, 39(5). Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/monitor/index.aspx
  • Magazines do not have DOIs, so use the magazine’s URL home page.
  • You probably won’t have a page number if you find it online. If you find it offline, you can use the page numbers instead of the retrieved from.

More help with APA

  • Paper formatting video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pbUoNa5tyY
      • Title: APA Format Citations-Sixth (6th) Edition
      • Username: peakdavid
      • Occupation: University Professor, Media and Communications
  • APA Reference List Sample
    • http://flash1r.apa.org/apastyle/basics/data/resources/references-sample.pdf
  • APA Sample Paper
    • http://supp.apa.org/style/PM6E-Corrected-Sample-Papers.pdf
  • APA Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
    • http://www.apastyle.org/learn/faqs/index.aspx


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