Review of the computer science program



Download 5.52 Mb.
Page1/50
Date16.09.2018
Size5.52 Mb.
#69112
TypeReview
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   50
ABET

Computing Accreditation Commission



SELF-STUDY

QUESTIONNAIRE FOR REVIEW

of the

COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM

submitted by



California State University, Northridge

Institution




June 30, 2007

Date



to the

Computing Accreditation Commission


Primary contact:

Steven Stepanek, Department Chair




Telephone number: ______________________ FAX number: __________________

818-677-3398

FAX Number:

818-677-7208




Electronic mail:

sgs@csun.edu



ABET


Computing Accreditation Commission

111 Market Place, Suite 1050

Baltimore, Maryland 21202-4012

Phone: 410-347-7700

Fax: 410-625-2238

E-mail: cac@abet.org

www: http://www.abet.org/

Table of Contents


I. Objectives and Assessments 5

A. Objectives 5

B. Implementation of Objectives 10

C. Assessments 14

D. Program Improvement 25

E. Program Evolution 26

F. Program Current Status 26

II. Student Support 28

A. Frequency of Course Offerings 28

B. Interaction with Faculty 30

C. Student Guidance 31

D. Student Advisement 31

E. Access to Qualified Advising 32

F. Meeting the Requirements 32

III. Faculty 34

A. Faculty Size 34

B. Faculty with Primary Commitment 34

C. Faculty Oversight 35

D. Interests, Qualifications, Scholarly Contributions 35

E. Scholarly Activities 37

F. Support for Advising 38

G. Information Regarding Faculty Members 38

IV. Curriculum 99

A. Title of Degree Program 99

B. Credit Hour Definition 99

C. Prerequisite Flow Chart 99

D. Course Requirements of Curriculum 99

E. Course Descriptions 111

V. Laboratories and Computing Facilities 282

A. Computing Facilities 282

B. Student Access 287

C. Documentation 287

D. Faculty Access 288

E. Support Personnel 288

F. Instructional Assistance 289

VI. Institutional Support and Financial Resources 290

A. Faculty Stability 290

B. Faculty Professional Activities 291

C. Office Support 292

D. Time for Administration 293

E. Adequacy of Resources 293

F. Leadership 294

G. Laboratory and Computing Resources 294

H. Library Resources 294

I. Continuity of Institutional Support 295

VII. Institutional Facilities 297

A. Library 297

B. Classroom Equipment 298

C. Faculty Offices 299

Appendix I. Information Relative to the Entire Institution 300

A. General Information 300

B. Type of Control 300

C. Regional or Institutional Accreditation 300

D. Enrollment 301

E. Funding Process 301

F. Promotion and Faculty Tenure 301

Appendix II. General Information on the Unit Responsible for the Computer Science Program 303

A. Computer Science Program Unit 303

B. Administrative Head 303

C. Organization Chart 303

E. Computer-Related Undergraduate Degree Programs 306

Appendix III. Finances 307

A. Finances Related to the Computer Science Program(s) 307

B. Operating and Computing Expenditures 308

C. Additional Funding 308

Appendix IV. Computer Science Program Personnel 309

A. Term of Appointment of Administrative Head 309

B. Number of Personnel Associated with Program 309

C. Policies 309

Appendix V. Computer Science Program Enrollment and Degree Data 311

Appendix VI. Admission Requirements 313

A. Admission of Students 313

Appendix VII. Program Assessment Reports 316

A. Program 317

Appendix VIII. Support Documents and Forms 318

A. Program Extract from 2004-2006 University Catalog 319

B. Program Information Diagrams 327

C. Senior Elective Packages 328

D. Long Range Upper Division Course Schedule 329

E. DPR (Degree Progress Report) 330

F. Advisement Procedures 331

G. Program Requirements Evaluation Form 332

H. University Accreditation Letter from WASC 334




Introduction
The Criteria for Accrediting Computer Science Programs are divided into seven major Categories, each Criterion containing a statement of Intent and Standards. An intent statement provides the underlying principles associated with a Criterion. In order for a program to be accredited, it must meet the intent statement of every Criterion.
Standards provide descriptions of how a program can minimally meet the statements of intent. The word “must” is used within each standard to convey the expectation that the condition of the standard will be satisfied in all cases. For a program to meet the intent of a Criterion, it must either satisfy all the standards associated with that Criterion or demonstrate an alternate approach to achieving the intent of the Criterion.
For each of the following seven sections, corresponding to each of the seven Categories of the Criteria, answer all of the questions associated with the standards. If one or more standards are not satisfied, it is incumbent upon the institution to demonstrate and document clearly and unequivocally how the intent is met in some alternate fashion.
If you are having more than one program evaluated, particularly if the programs are on separate campuses, the answers to these questions may vary from one program to another. If this is the case, please use separate copies of each section for each program, and clearly delineate which program is being described.
I. Objectives and Assessments
Intent: The program has documented, measurable objectives, including expected outcomes for graduates. The program regularly assesses its progress against its objectives and used the results of the assessments to identify program improvements and to modify the program’s objectives.

Standard I-1. The program must have documented, measurable objectives.

Standard I-2. The program’s objectives must include expected outcomes for graduating students.



A. Objectives
Please attach items that support or precede the measurable objectives, e.g.,

  1. Mission statements from institution, college, department, program

  2. Plans (institution, college, department, etc.)

  3. All objectives including expected outcomes for graduates (itemize)

  4. Process for assessments

  5. Who is involved in assessment and improvement?

  6. Data from assessments

  7. Inputs from any supporting Office of Assessment

1. Indicate below or attach to this document the program’s measurable objectives. These objectives must include expected outcomes for graduates.




Program Educational Objectives: A few years after graduation, graduates of the computer science program will:

  1. Be able to apply the principles of computer science, mathematics, and scientific investigation to solve real world problems appropriate to the discipline.

  2. Be able to apply current industry accepted computing practices and new and emerging technologies to analyze, design, implement, and verify high quality computer-based solutions to real world problems.

  3. Exhibit teamwork and effective communication skills.

  4. Be able to ethically and appropriately apply knowledge of societal impacts of computing technologies in the course of career related activities.

  5. Be successfully employed or accepted into a graduate program, and demonstrate a pursuit of lifelong learning.


Program Outcomes (Student Learning Outcomes): Each of the following Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) with one of the Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) as indicated in parentheses following the outcome. Graduates of the program will:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of algorithms and data structures. (PEO1)

  2. Demonstrate an understanding of computer organization and architecture. (PEO1)

  3. Demonstrate an understanding of programming language concepts and knowledge of a variety of programming language paradigms. (PEO1)

  4. Demonstrate proficiency in using a high-level computer language. (PEO1)

  5. Demonstrate an ability to apply mathematical skills appropriate to the computer science discipline. (PEO1)

  6. Demonstrate an awareness of the evolution and dynamic nature of the foundational core of computer science. PEO1)

  7. Demonstrate proficiency in collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data. (PEO1)

  8. Demonstrate a problem solving ability. (PEO1)

  9. Demonstrate an understanding of emerging technologies and a working knowledge of currently available software tools. (PEO2)

  10. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles and practices for software design and development. (PEO2)

  11. Be able to apply the principles and practices for software design and development to real problems. (PEO2)

  12. Be able to effectively communicate orally. (PEO3)

  13. Be able to effectively communicate in written form. (PEO3)

  14. Be able to work effectively on a team. (PEO3)

  15. Demonstrate knowledge of the social impact of computing. (PEO4)

  16. Demonstrate an understanding of the professional and ethical considerations of computing. (PEO4)

  17. Demonstrate the knowledge and capabilities necessary for pursuing a professional career or graduate studies. (PEO5)

  18. Recognize the need for, and show an ability for, continuing professional development. (PEO5)

2. Describe how the program's objectives align with your institution's mission.


The mission of the University is as follows:
California State University, Northridge exists to help students realize their educational goals. The University’s first priority is to promote the welfare and intellectual progress of students.
To fulfill this mission, we design programs and activities to help students develop the academic competencies, professional skills, critical creative abilities, and personal values of learned persons who live in a democratic society, an interdependent world, and a technological age; we seek to foster a rigorous and contemporary understanding of the liberal arts, sciences and professional disciplines, and we believe in the following Values.

Values

  1. Commitment to Teaching, Scholarship, and Active Learning. We demonstrate excellence in teaching. We honor and reward high performance in learning, teaching, scholarship, research, service, and creative activity. Because the quality of our academic programs is central to our mission, we encourage intellectual curiosity and protect the multiple expressions of academic freedom.

  2. Commitment to Excellence. We set the highest standards for ourselves in all of our actions and activities and support the professional development of faculty, staff and administrators. We assess our performance so that every area of University life will be continually improved and renewed. We recognize and reward our efforts of greatest distinction and through them provide state and national leadership.

  3. Respect for All People. We aspire to behave as an inclusive, cooperative community. Our behaviors, policies, and programs affirm the worth and personal dignity of every member of the University community and contribute to a campus climate of civility, collegiality, tolerance, and reasoned debate.

  4. Alliances with the Community. We seek partnerships with local schools, community colleges, businesses, government and social agencies to advance the educational, intellectual, artistic, civic, cultural and economic aspirations of our surrounding communities.

  5. Encouragement of Innovation, Experimentation, and Creativity. We seek to provide an environment conducive to innovation, experimentation, and creativity. We encourage all members of our community to take intellectual and creative risks and to embrace changes that will enhance the fulfillment of the University’s mission.

Vision

  1. Commitment to Teaching, Scholarship, and Active Learning. We demonstrate excellence in teaching. We honor and reward high performance in learning, teaching, scholarship, research, service, and creative activity. Because the quality of our academic programs is central to our mission, we encourage intellectual curiosity and protect the multiple expressions of academic freedom.

  2. Commitment to Excellence. We set the highest standards for ourselves in all of our actions and activities and support the professional development of faculty, staff and administrators. We assess our performance so that every area of University life will be continually improved and renewed. We recognize and reward our efforts of greatest distinction and through them provide state and national leadership.

  3. Respect for All People. We aspire to behave as an inclusive, cooperative community. Our behaviors, policies, and programs affirm the worth and personal dignity of every member of the University community and contribute to a campus climate of civility, collegiality, tolerance, and reasoned debate.

  4. Alliances with the Community. We seek partnerships with local schools, community colleges, businesses, government and social agencies to advance the educational, intellectual, artistic, civic, cultural and economic aspirations of our surrounding communities.

  5. Encouragement of Innovation, Experimentation, and Creativity. We seek to provide an environment conducive to innovation, experimentation, and creativity. We encourage all members of our community to take intellectual and creative risks and to embrace changes that will enhance the fulfillment of the University’s mission.

The Educational Objectives of the Computer Science Program are designed to help students develop professional skills, to learn problem solving strategies, and to be aware of ethical issues and social concerns. Table I.1 shows the specific alignment of these objectives to the University's mission.

Table I.1 Alignment of Educational Objectives with the Mission of the University


University Mission Statements

Computer Science Program Educational Objectives

Realize educational goals

PEO5: Be successfully employed or accepted into a graduate program, and demonstrate a pursuit of lifelong learning.

Help students develop academic competencies

PEO1: Be able to apply the principles of computer science, mathematics, and scientific investigation to solve real world problems appropriate to the discipline.

Help students develop professional skills

PEO2: Be able to apply current industry accepted computing practices and new and emerging technologies to analyze, design, implement, and verify high quality computer-based solutions to real world problems.

Help students develop critical and creative abilities

PEO2: Be able to apply current industry accepted computing practices and new and emerging technologies to analyze, design, implement, and verify high quality computer-based solutions to real world problems.

Help students develop personal values of learned persons who live in a democratic society, an interdependent world, and a technological age

PEO4: Be able to ethically and appropriately apply knowledge of societal impacts of computing technologies in the course of career related activities.

Foster a rigorous and contemporary understanding of the liberal arts

PEO3: Exhibit teamwork and effective communication skills.

PEO4: Be able to ethically and appropriately apply knowledge of societal impacts of computing technologies in the course of career related activities.



Foster a rigorous and contemporary understanding of the sciences

PEO1: Be able to apply the principles of computer science, mathematics, and scientific investigation to solve real world problems appropriate to the discipline.

Foster a rigorous and contemporary understanding of professional disciplines

PEO2: Be able to apply current industry accepted computing practices and new and emerging technologies to analyze, design, implement, and verify high quality computer-based solutions to real world problems.




Note: On the following page is a table that can be filled out with pertinent information relating to objectives, their measurement, and their effect on the implementation of program improvements.



  1. Implementation of Objectives

Please complete the following table with as many objectives as needed.




Objective (Student Learning Outcome)

How measured

When measured

Improvements

Identified



Improvements

Implemented



SLO1

Demonstrate an understanding of algorithms and data structures.



Direct assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

F 2005
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


There is a need to provide a learning environment to account for a wide range of background knowledge and experience in computing in the introductory courses in the major.

A policy has been established to urge students without previous background in computing to enroll in the non required Comp 108 course prior to taking required courses in the program.

SLO2

Demonstrate an understanding of computer organization and architecture.



Direct assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

F 2006
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


There is an indication that it might be necessary to improve the retention of computer organization and architecture concepts as students progress through the program.

A plan is under development to conduct a more comprehensive assessment of this outcome before any program changes are made.

SLO3

Demonstrate an understanding of programming language concepts and knowledge of a variety of programming language paradigms.



Direct assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

F 2006
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


A preliminary assessment has shown that many students nearing graduation are unable to demonstrate a knowledge of a variety of programming languages.

A decision to revise the assessment instrument and reassess this outcome was made.

SLO4

Demonstrate proficiency in using a high-level computer language



Direct assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

S 2007
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


Assessment results are currently being analyzed.




SLO5

Demonstrate an ability to apply mathematical skills appropriate to the computer science discipline.



Informal Assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

S 2007
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


The results from this assessment are currently being analyzed.




SLO6

Demonstrate an awareness of the evolution and dynamic nature of the foundational core of computer science.



Informal Assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

S 2007
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


This assessment is currently underway.




SLO7

Demonstrate proficiency in collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data.



Informal Assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

S 2007
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


The results from this assessment are currently being analyzed.




SLO8

Demonstrate a problem solving ability.



Informal Assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

S 2007
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


This assessment is currently underway.




SLO9

Demonstrate an understanding of emerging technologies and a working knowledge of currently available software tools.



Informal assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

F 2006
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


There is a need to identify which emerging technologies and software tools students are expected to understand and know how to use before meaningful assessment can be done.




SLO10

Demonstrate an understanding of the principles and practices for software design and development.



Direct assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

F 2005
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each semester


The retention and ability to apply concepts and principles of software engineering among majors needs to be improved.

Course objectives for beginning computer science course were revised to include introduction of software engineering concepts, and the objectives of elective courses with software engineering projects were revised to include the reinforcement of software engineering concepts.

A decision was made to develop a proposal for adding a senior software engineering design project as a program requirement.



SLO11

Be able to apply the principles and practices for software design and development to real problems. .



Direct assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

S 2006
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


Although students seems to do well in applying the principles and practices for software design and development, it appears that there skills in software design could be strengthened.

Further assessment is needed before program changes are recommended or implemented.

SLO12

Be able to effectively communicate orally.



Direct Assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

S 2006
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


Although most students seem to communicate orally well, some have difficulty. There may be a need to improve learning in this area.

Further assessment is needed before program changes are recommended or implemented.

SLO13

Be able to effectively communicate in written form.



Direct assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

F 2005
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


A need to better detect and prevent plagiarism was identified.

A departmental policy was developed to clarify issues for both students and faculty with respect to plagiarism.

SLO14

Be able to work effectively on a team.



Student teamwork surveys
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

Each semester

Each semester


Each semester in selected courses

Each semester


An evaluation of the latest student teamwork surveys is currently underway.




SLO15

Demonstrate knowledge of the social impact of computing.



Informal Assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

S 2006
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


This assessment is currently underway.




SLO16

Demonstrate an understanding of the professional and ethical considerations of computing.



Informal Assessment
Core course exams and graded assignments
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys
Student course evaluations

S 2006
Each semester

Each semester in selected courses

Each year


This assessment is currently underway.




SLO17

Demonstrate the knowledge and capabilities necessary for pursuing a professional career or graduate studies.



Alumni surveys
Employer surveys
Professional Advisory Board Feedback
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys

Every three years
Every three years
Each year

Each semester in selected courses



The results of the latest Alumni surveys are currently being analyzed.




SLO18

Recognize the need for, and show an ability for, continuing professional development.



Alumni surveys
Employer surveys
Professional Advisory Board Feedback
Senior exit and learning outcomes surveys

Every three years
Every three years
Each year

Each semester in selected courses



The results of the latest Alumni surveys are currently being analyzed.





Standard I-3. Data relative to the objectives must be routinely collected and documented, and used in program assessments.

Standard I-4. The extent to which each program objective is being met must be periodically assessed.

Standard I-5. The results of the program’s periodic assessment must be used to help identify opportunities for program improvement.





Download 5.52 Mb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   50




The database is protected by copyright ©www.sckool.org 2023
send message

    Main page