Research Paper: Career Expository Essay Research Paper Requirements



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Research Paper: Career Expository Essay

Research Paper Requirements

  • Research Paper Requirements
  • Works Cited 5 sources 10
  • Note Cards 10 cards 10
  • Note Cards 10 cards 10
  • Outline/Thesis 10
  • Rough Draft covering all of outline 40
  • Final Draft 200
  • Class work/ You will earn points for 20
  • Participation your participation during class.
  • Total = 300

**Supplies Needed** 1. 8 1/2 x 10 manilla or plastic envelope 2. 3 1/2 x 5 or 4x6 note cards (not neon colored) 3. highlighters 4. change for making copies -- Library time is limited, so you must make copies on those days!!

Library/Lab Research

  • Time will be limited
  • Select topic swiftly – no more than a few people per class may have same topic
  • Find at least 5 to 6 sources in library
  • Check out books or make copies/prints on those days –must have these in class
  • If you do not get your sources during assigned time, you will get behind on other parts.
  • Class participation points – you will be monitored for progress and utilization of time

Finding Sources

  • MLA (Modern Language Association) - a style of documentation that sets forth the format guidelines for a paper
  • primary source - gives you firsthand information about topic; in literature the primary source is the literature itself
  • secondary source - a critical study of the literature that you use in your paper to back up your point

Career Expository Essay: Choosing A Topic

  • Choose a career to explore
  • Find statistics, definitions, education level, and other background info. about the topic
  • Find three to four benefits of the career to discuss

Alabama Virtual Library

    • Alabama Virtual Library
    • Career Library
    • Vocational and Career Collection
      • Occupational Outlook Handbook Online http://www.bls.gov/ooh/ (published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics).
  • Credible Sites for Career Exploration Papers

Guidelines for Career Essay

  • Two pages double spaced typed (12 point Times New Roman font style)
  • OR
  • Five pages neatly handwritten on notebook paper skipping every other line only on front in blue or black ink

Works Cited: an alphabetized record of sources that you use in your paper

  • Use at least five sources
  • Alphabetize entries
  • Double space and use hanging indent
  • Follow MLA format
  • (see reference packet, citationmachine.net, or owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/)

Works Cited

  • “Chef." Coin Career Library. Web. 26 Mar 2012.
  • .
  • “Chef: Educational Requirements of Becoming a
  • Chef.” U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Web. 26 Mar 2012.
  • .
  • “Culinary Art Salaries.” All Culinary School. Web. 26 Mar
  • 2012. .
  • Example

Note Cards: index cards that hold your notes from a particular source

  • Either paraphrase, summarize, or use direct quotes!
  • Do not plagiarize
  • Only one note per card!
  • Three parts to card: note, aspect of subject, and source information

Note Card Terminology

  • slug or subject - a heading placed on a note card that sums up the note and will correspond to a heading on your outline
  • source information – information placed at bottom of an index card that corresponds to the source the notes came from
  • paraphrase - a restatement of someone else's statement in your own words that must be documented
  • direct quote - quotations or material taken word for word from another source that must be documented
  • plagiarism - using someone else's words or using someone else's ideas as if they were your own

Subject

  • Note (paraphrase, summary or quote)
  • *Only one note per card
  • *If you change subjects or source numbers, change cards
  • (Source)

Skills Needed

  • Interpersonal and social skills needed by potential dental hygienists include being patient, cooperating with others, and working as a member of a team.
  • (“Dental Hygienist,” Coin Career Library)
  • Clustering
  • Career choice
  • Clustering
  • dental
  • hygiene
  • II. work environment
  • III. benefits
  • I. education or training
  • IV. financial
  • advancement

Thesis

  • Make a claim about your topic.
  • Your thesis statement is something you plan to prove through the course of the paper.
  • Ex. Dental hygiene provides benefits including personal satisfaction, employment stability, and financial advancement.

Formula for Writing a Thesis Statement

  • A specific topic
  • + about three particular features, feelings, or stands
  • ------------------------------------------------------------------
  • = an effective thesis statement.
  • Outlining:
  • includes a formal statement of your thesis and all of the supporting points that relate to your subject headings
  • Form thesis statement with what you want to prove in your paper
  • Show main points of topic as the Roman numerals
  • Use keyword phrases to complete outlining
  • Follow rules of spacing and margination in outlining

Outline

  • Thesis
  • I. Point one
  • A.
  • B.
  • C.
  • II. Point two
  • A.
  • B.
  • C.
  • III. Point three
  • A.
  • B.
  • C.
  • IV. Point four
  • A.
  • B.
  • C.
  • Double space throughout
  • or skip every other line.
  • Leave a one inch bottom margin
  • Thesis: In exploring dental hygiene, one must consider education or training, work
  • environment, benefits, and financial advancement.
  • I. Education or training
  • A. High school diploma
  • B. Technical apprenticeship
  • C. On-the-job training
  • II. Work environment
  • A. Preparation of patients
  • B. Sterilization of instruments
  • C. Recording of medical records
  • III. Benefits
  • A. Allowance for uniforms
  • B. Paid vacations
  • C. Insurance benefits
  • IV. Financial advancement
  • A. Annual earnings
  • B. Job promotions
  • C. Good job outlook

Drafting

  • Follow outline
  • Develop thesis or plan
  • Give support from sources
  • Document sources
  • Present in formal manner
  • (do not write on backs of paper and follow one inch margins)
  • Expository Essay 1 ½-2 pages typed

Essay Format (Expository Essay)

  • Introduction ending in thesis
  • Background information
  • Idea #1 topic sentence; transitions and supporting details/ex.; clincher
  • Idea #2 topic sentence; transitions and supporting details/examples; clincher
  • Idea #3 topic sentence; transitions and supporting details/examples; clincher
  • Conclusion beginning with restatement of thesis; other general sentences leading reader out of paper

Expository: Essay Template

  • Thesis Sentence
  • Topic Sentence 1
  • Topic Sentence 2
  • Topic Sentence 3
  • Restatement of Thesis
  • Introduction
  • Body
  • Conclusion

Documentation

  • Types of information to document:
  • Direct quotations
  • Opinions, statistics, definitions, data, etc. from other authors
  • What not to document:
  • Your own thoughts or general information that is accepted as common knowledge
  • General information that is found in more than one reference work

Examples of Parenthetical Citations which Correspond with Works Cited: parenthetical citation - used to provide concise documentation directly where a source is quoted or paraphrased within your paper

  • end of sentence (“Chef," Coin Career Library).
  • “words in a quote” (“Culinary Art Salaries,” All Culinary School).
  • end of sentence (“Plastic Surgery,” EHow).
  • Sample of how to insert parenthetical documentation

Indented Quote

  • Wayne Martino draws attention to the impact of masculinity in the literacy practices of boys by addressing why boys reject reading and English as a subject. Martino found that,
    • […] boys were caught up in a gender bind in which they perceived the subject English as a feminized learning practice that conflicted with their tenuous masculinity[…]Some boys tended to explain their lack of motivation for reading in terms of girls’ predisposition for this kind of literacy practice. Thus, on the basis of this study it would appear that the acquisition of literacy seems to be hindered by a set of cultural practices through which boys learn to establish their masculinity (230).

Style

  • Use strong verbs
  • Display appropriate spelling, grammar, and punctuation
  • Limit use of dead verbs
  • Use a variety of sentences
  • Avoid contractions; write out the words

Introductory Paragraph (at least five sentences)

  • Attention Grabber or Hook (question, quote, statistic, startling fact, controversial statement, etc.)
  • Sentences with Significance to Topic (a bridge from hook to thesis)
  • Thesis Statement
  • (one from outline)

A Way to Start the Attention Grabber or Hook

  • Share some thought-provoking details about the subject.
  • Ask your reader a challenging question.
  • Begin with an informative quotation.
  • Provide a dramatic, eye-opening statement.
  • Open with some thoughtful dialogue or an engaging story.

Sample Hook Sentences Expository Essay

  • Even though dental hygienists spend much of their day removing deposits and stains from patients' teeth, this career can promote many social skills.
  • Patience with and a strong respect for a canine partner is essential to safely and accurately carry out the work of a K-9 unit police officer.
  • In noticing how the grounds of a golf course are perfectly manicured, have you ever wondered who is responsible?

Expository Beginning

  • Use formal word choices; avoid contractions
  • Use third person objective “a person,” and not the first person perspective “I want to be . . .”
  • Thesis statement clearly
  • states career and lists three benefits as support.
  • Exploring Dental Hygiene
  • Rachel Hughes
  • English 10
  • Mrs. Hughes
  • 11 March 2013
  • of their day removing deposits and stains from
  • patients' teeth, this career promotes personal
  • Even though dental hygienists spend much

Paragraph Structure

  • Top of hamburger bun = topic sentence
  • Lettuce = supporting detail
  • Onion = supporting detail
  • Cheese = supporting detail
  • Meat = supporting detail
  • Bottom of bun = clincher or restatement of topic

Body Paragraph Guideline

  • Topic Sentence – general with no examples
  • Supporting sentence – sentence with info. from A. idea on outline and evidence (“Title,” Web Page Name).
  • Supporting sentence – sentence with info. from B. idea on outline and evidence (“Title,” Web Page Name).
  • Supporting sentence – sentence with info. from C. idea on outline and evidence (“Title,” Web Page Name).
  • Clincher – restates topic sentence using different words

Sample Body Paragraph

  • In exploring dental hygiene, one must consider __________.
  • A (“Title,” Web Page Name).
  • B (“Title,” Web Page Name).
  • C (“Title,” Web Page Name).
  • Therefore, _______ is an important factor in becoming a dental hygienist.

Expository Middle

  • Each paragraph should tell the reader of one benefit area of the career.
  • The essay should have three or four benefit areas ranked from least to greatest of importance in logic.

Expository Middle cont.

  • Each paragraph should have at least three details or facts supporting the benefit in that paragraph. Use info. from sources and cite it.
  • Paragraphs should organize benefits from least to greatest of importance.

End

  • Restate the thesis statement in the conclusion
  • You should have at least five sentences in the last paragraph
  • It is as important as the introduction.
  • ****Lead the reader out with general information in the end like the info. you used in introduction
  • Remember to add a clincher as the last sentence which reflects back to hook

Remember to Use Transition Words!

  • Middle paragraphs and the last paragraph should begin with transition words.
  • Examples: first, second, third, finally, in addition, also, last, equally important, in the first place, likewise, besides, as a result, therefore, on the other hand, nevertheless, in conclusion

Revision Tips

  • Include the following parts in your paper: 1) introduction, 2) exact following of the outline as the body, and 3) conclusion to sum up all ideas presented.
  • Do not use contractions in a formal paper.
  • Use transitions to link ideas. Examples are as follows: for example, in addition, likewise, moreover, furthermore, similarly, finally, in conclusion, consequently, on the other hand, and also.

Revision Tips

  • Avoid the use of “there is” and “there are” because this is a weak sentence construction. The preferred structure is to insert a strong action verb.
  • Weak: There are many reasons to take dental hygiene courses.
  • Better: Many reasons exist to take dental hygiene courses.
  • Spell out most numbers that can be written in two or fewer words unless it is a technical number.

Revision Tips

  • Cite at least five different sources within the body of your paper in the form of parenthetical citations (discussed in the reference packet). Only these sources should appear on the final works cited page.
  • Use lead ins to introduce quotes.
  • Example: According to one source, “Dental ... “ (Smith 5).

Revision Tips

  • Use objective third person reference. Do not use I, we me, us and you.
  • Wrong: You should avoid dangerous work conditions.
  • Better: A person should avoid dangerous work conditions.
  • Use topic sentences to introduce each body paragraph.
  • Examples: Also, teens should not use alcohol to avoid health risks.
  • Furthermore, teens should not use alcoholic substances to avoid violence and criminal activity.

Revision Tips

  • Rewrite or type all of your paper for the final copy, including outline, rough draft of body, and works cited. Number paper starting with first page of body. (Also, number the works cited page.)
  • These are the following items for the turn in date in your enclosed envelope: 1) copies of sources (not books), 2) all note cards, rough draft of outline, body, and works cited, 3) final copies of outline, body, and works cited, 4) reference packet, and 5) criteria sheet.

Staple Final Draft in This Order

  • 1.Grade Scale
  • 2. Copy of outline
  • 3. Body of paper written
  • following outline
  • 4. Copy of works cited

Pulling It All Together

  • Works Cited
  • Rough Draft
  • Final Product

Staple Rough Draft in This Order

  • 1.Grade Scale
  • 2. Copy of outline
  • 3. Body of paper
  • following outline
  • 4. Copy of works cited

Deadline Day

  • Turn in these items in your envelope:
  • Sources
  • Note cards
  • Rough Draft (outline, paper, works cited)
  • Final Draft (outline, paper, works cited)
  • Grade Scale
  • Reference Packet (or $1.00 if lost)

Research Paper Evaluation Criteria

  • Title suits paper and suggests the main point
  • Thesis statement well stated at end of first paragraph
  • Topic sentence/clincher for each paragraph
  • Subtopics develop each topic sentence
  • Paragraphs arranged logically
  • Outline followed
  • Transitional words used within and between paragraphs
  • Paragraphs present well-organized development of thesis statement
  • Personal opinions/conclusions avoided
  • Spelling/Usage/Mechanics (margins, punctuation, capitalization, neatness, pagination, spacing, etc.)
  • Sentences varied in length and structure
  • Faulty sentences avoided
  • Conclusion contains reference to thesis statement
  • Quotations and non-original facts cited
  • Sources listed correctly in works cited
  • Sufficient number of sources
  • Appropriate sources

Research Paper Terminology

  • MLA (Modern Language Association) -a style of documentation that sets forth the format guidelines for a paper
  • outline - includes a formal statement of your thesis and all of the supporting points that relate to your subject headings
  • plagiarism - using someone else's words or using someone else's ideas as if they were your own
  • primary source - gives you firsthand information about topic; in literature the primary source is the literature itself
  • secondary source - a critical study of the literature that you use in your paper to back up your point
  • note card - an index card that holds your notes from a particular source
  • slug - a subject category heading placed on a note card that corresponds to a heading on your outline
  • source number - a number placed in the top right corner of an index card that corresponds to the bib card/source the notes came from
  • paraphrase - a restatement of someone else's statement in your own words that must be documented
  • direct quote - quotations or material taken word for word from another source that must be documented
  • parenthetical citation - used to provide concise documentation directly where a source is quoted or paraphrased within your paper
  • works cited - an alphabetized record of sources that you use in your paper


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