Purdue University Department of Curriculum and Instruction edci 361 (B): Social Studies in the Elementary School



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Purdue University

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

EDCI 361 (B): Social Studies in the Elementary School

Spring 2002
Instructor: Mrs. Kim Thompson Secretary: Kathy Reppert

4158 LAEB LAEB 4115

494-6213 494-4755

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EDCI 362 Instructor:

Chad Becker

LAEB 4127

496-3023

beckerca@purdue.ed



Office Hours: Tuesdays, 9:15 –10:15, on campus; Thursdays, 2:30-3:30 (at Hillcrest)
Meeting Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays; 12:15 - 2:20 p.m. (includes University class and Theory-Into-Practice observation and participation)
Meeting Place: WTHR 360 (1/8, 1/10 and 3/26 and 3/28). Hillcrest Elementary School, Delphi School Corporation, Delphi, IN (from 1/15)
HomePage http://www.edci.purdue.edu/vanfossen/361/361page.html
Required Reading
Parker, W. (2000). Social studies in elementary education (11th Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall, Inc.
Readings packet (EDCI 361: Social Studies in the Elementary School) available at CopyMat in Chauncey Hill Mall.
Block III Theory Into Practice Materials. Included as part of the EDCI 362 Coursepack at CopyMat.
Freedman, R. (1980). Immigrant Kids. New York, NY: Puffin Books. (Available at Von’s)
Hesse, K. (1992). Letters from Rifka. New York, NY: Puffin Books. (Available at Von’s)
Bartone, E. (1997). (Lewin, T., illus.). Peppe the Lamplighter. Mulberry Books (Available at Von’s)


A teacher affects eternity; one can never tell where the influence stops.

--Henry Brooks, Historian, 1905





Course Description:

This course provides students with an overview of the field of social studies, of selected issues in the field, and of best practice strategies for teaching social studies to young children. Encourages participants to reflect on what social studies knowledge, skills and dispositions are most important? How do students learn these most effectively? Given answers to these, how can we best teach social studies? Includes a field-based experiential component. EDCI 361 is taken concurrently with EDCI 362: Literacy in the Elementary School, I, and includes a required, field-based, Theory-Into-Practice component in elementary classrooms.


Rationale for the Course

American public education was developed, in part, to prepare future generations of Americans to take their place as active, thoughtful democratic citizens. Every widely held rationale for social studies education highlights the important role of the social studies in the preparation of these democratic citizens (Barr, Barth and Shermis, 1977; Engle and Ochoa, 1988; Parker and Jarilomek, 1997). Indeed, the National Council for the Social Studies (1994) has defined the primary purpose of the field as helping "young people make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world (p. 3).


Central to this mission of citizenship education is the development in young students of what Parker and Jarilomek (1997) called "civic efficacy" or "the readiness and willingness to assume citizenship responsibilities (p. 11)." What then should 'good' democratic citizens be able to do? What do democratic citizens need to know? What dispositions or values should 'good' democratic citizens possess? Engle and Ochoa (1988) argued that, because of the decision-making inherent in democratic societies, successful citizens also need to possess certain intellectual and political skills. This course will examine the nature of democratic citizenship, how the social studies curriculum fosters this citizenship and will introduce 'best practice' strategies for teaching social studies.
In spite of the important mission that the social studies possess, it often goes untaught, or "undertaught" in elementary schools. For example, Goodlad (1984) found that elementary school teachers spent an average of less that 20 minutes per day (about 1.5 hours per week) teaching social studies!
Because the development of future democratic citizens is so critical to our democratic, civil society, the aim of this course is help preservice teachers begin to see how to achieve the broader goals of citizenship education outlined above in their own students. It is likely that new elementary teachers in Indiana will be expected to demonstrate that they are meeting the goals of social studies education (i.e., developing competent democratic citizens). In fact, recent legislation (Public Law 221) will make social studies part of the ISTEP+ state test beginning with 5th grade in 2003. Eventually, social studies will be tested at grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 Thus, the overarching organizing principle of the course is to expose students to a wide range of approaches for developing social studies knowledge, skills and dispositions in elementary students, hopefully ensuring--through democratic citizenship education--the continuation of our democratic traditions and culture.


I touch the future….I teach.

--Christa McAuliffe, Teacher/Astronaut, 1986


Connection to Other Courses in Block III:

EDCI 361 is part of Block III of the new Elementary Teacher Education Program. EDCI 361 shares the block with EDCI 362: Literacy in the Elementary School I and you are part of the same cohort of students in both courses. In addition, EDCI 361 and EDCI 362 are connected through common and linked expectations and assignments for the Theory Into Practice (TIP) component of the course with the TIP in EDCI 362 (e.g., informal and formal observations of preservice teachers’ pedagogy; formal lesson plans/reflection papers, reflection journal, outlined later in this document). Finally, these courses share a commitment to developing reflective practitioners who seek to foster children’s intellectual, social, and emotional development.


EDCI 361 Learning Goals:
EDCI 361 will seek:

1. To provide pre-service social studies teachers with opportunities to develop awareness of their role as democratic citizens; to help pre-service teachers develop their own definition of democratic citizenship and corresponding rationale for teaching social studies; and to help pre-service teachers identify curricular opportunities to foster civic efficacy in their students. [Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) Principles 1 and 4]


2. To help pre-service social studies teachers understand the various disciplines that comprise the social studies and the content knowledge that stems from these disciplines; and to help pre-service teachers identify the various ways in which these disciplines view the world. (INTASC Principles 1, 7)
3. To provide pre-service social studies teachers with opportunities to experience sound pedagogical techniques, grounded in the disciplines of the social studies, for facilitating the development of civic efficacy in their students, including the development of decision-making skills and the adoption of democratic dispositions. (INTASC 4, 7)
4. To increase pre-service social studies teachers' knowledge and understanding of the ways in which elementary students experience the civic world, both within and outside of school, in a democratic society and of ways in which elementary students can participate in the larger civic society (e.g., service learning, community projects) (INTASC 2, 5, 9, 10)
5. To increase pre-service social studies teachers' knowledge of state and national curriculum documents in social studies and to help pre-service teachers employ these documents in the development of sound instructional plans. (INTASC 1)
6. To help pre-service social studies teachers gain experience in sound instructional strategies such as: discrepant event inquiry, integration of children's literature in the social studies, concept attainment, multicultural education and the use of current events in social studies instruction. (INTASC 4, 6, 7)


  1. To help pre-service social studies teachers develop skills needed to review various instructional materials for validity and appropriate pedagogy including social studies textbooks, World Wide Web sites and computer-based technologies. (INTASC 6)

Course Requirements and Assignments:
1. University Classroom Participation (75 pts.). Informed, relevant participation is expected by all students. The success of this course depends in large part on the amount of sharing, dialogue, and debate that goes on among all of us. Part of any educational experience, and particularly one aimed at professional socialization, involves building a community of active, engaged, reflective participants. To this end, all of you are asked to become full members of our classroom community from the beginning. This means that you will come to each class having done all assigned readings, that you will be prepared to engage in classroom discussions and activities, and that you have prepared responses/questions about concepts and issues you found difficult to understand or simply wish to discuss further (you can find the Classroom Participation Rubric at the 361 HomePage under the "Classroom Participation" link in "Assignments"). Additionally, you are expected to be prepared for the daily Theory Into Practice (TIP) experiences and activities mentor teachers ask you to participate in. You will also maintain a reflection log associated with the TIP. Clearly, attendance is critical for your success in the class and TIP. If you do not attend class, you cannot complete the requirements for the TIP. Thus, a very strict attendance policy has been instituted. It is as follows: You are expected to attend every class and be on time for class. You will be allowed one absence for illness. You will lose 10 points for each subsequent absence (illness, etc.). You will lose 5 points if you are tardy for class.

It is important to note that I view education as a profession, with a professional body of knowledge. In this course you will be introduced to that body of knowledge for the social studies. This course will help you develop the tools necessary to become a successful social studies teacher at the elementary level. Please approach the course with this attitude. Always think like an educator. Ask yourself "how is what we're doing in this class beneficial to my future students?" Always act like an educator. Successful educators go beyond the basic requirements of any task.


This course is intended to provide a number of interactive opportunities, all of which depend upon your informed (e.g., doing the assigned reading) and active (e.g., contributing to class discussions) participation. I would suggest using the Classroom Participation Rubric to guide your participation--if you can answer "yes" to the questions on the rubric, you'll score well in this portion of the course (you can find this rubric at the 361 HomePage under the "Classroom Participation" link in "Assignments").



2. "Good Citizen" Essay (50 pts.) This assignment will be due the second class meeting. You will be asked to write a short (3 pages maximum) essay outlining what you believe are the most important characteristics of "good" democratic citizens. That is, in order for democracies to work, what must the citizens of those democracies know, be able to do and believe? We will be using "citizenship education" as the focal point of this course and so this assignment serves as a starting point for that discussion. See the 361 HomePage for more details.
3. Current Event Team (CETs) Presentations (50 pts.) You will be randomly assigned to a "Current Event Team." Each team will be responsible for presenting a brief (6-8 minute) summary of an appropriate local, state, national or international news item that might be used to teach social studies at the elementary level. Team reports should briefly summarize the current event, provide some "teacher" background information (what else do we need to know?), and indicate how this current event can be used to teach one or more of the proficiencies outlined in the Indiana Social Studies Standards or how this current event might help facilitate citizenship education. Teams should also present at least one lesson "idea" that this news item might be used to develop. Teams may use newspapers, current newsmagazines or the Internet as sources.



4. Social Studies Reflective Paper (100 pts.) You will write a reflective paper that will be a hypothetical response to a school corporation that is considering doing away with the social studies. Thus, you'll use a theme like: “Why Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School is Essential.” The paper is not to exceed 5 pages. A detailed assignment sheet and rubric for this assignment will be posted on the EDCI 361 WebPage.
5. Social Studies Literature Circle Write-ups (50 pts.). This assignment seeks to introduce you to literature circle use in social studies by having you participate in one yourself. You will be assigned to a literature circle with 3-4 other members (4-5 total) that will read a literature set (one chapter book, one piece of children's literature and one resource/fact book) on "immigration." For approximately two weeks, we will begin our class meetings with 15-20 minutes of literature circle time. For one week, half the group will be responsible for leading the circle, for the second week the other half will lead the circle. Leading the circle requires that you decide on 'stop and respond' points you want the group to discuss, activities you want to share with the group and extension activities that might be appropriate for this literature set. Each student will produce a write-up of their participation in the literature circle including the activities you developed when you led the circle, your responses to the literature used and what you learned in the process. You will earn points for your preparation to lead, and your level of involvement in, the circle time as well as your write-up.
6. Integrated Literature Unit (200 points). With one or two colleagues, you will develop an integrated, social studies topic-driven, literature unit for children at a particular grade level. Your team will develop a complete set of learning experiences and materials for conducting a two‑week or three‑week integrated thematic unit that could be used in an elementary school classroom. Students may choose the teammate with whom they will be working, but assessment for this project will be shared equally. That is, one grade will be given for the team project. Choose your partner carefully. More information on this assignment with be forthcoming and a more detailed overview of this assignment will located at the 361 WebPage.
Note: The Integrated Literature Unit project is challenging and labor intensive. You are encouraged to get started on it early, to share ideas with each other, and to discuss your ideas with your instructor and your Mentor Teacher.

7. Integrated Literature Unit Overview Presentations (50 pts.) Each Unit Plan Team will develop and share a presentation of their Integrated Literature Unit. A schedule of presentations will be made shortly after all groups have chosen a topic. These presentations will be approximately 15 minutes in duration and should provide an overview of your Integrated Literature Unit and an introduction to two (2) of the lesson plans in your presentation. Your Team is not expected to completely 'teach' both lessons, but you must demonstrate at least one activity from each lesson plan. You will also develop a one-page handout with an outline of the Integrated Literature Unit and of key literature used. As with the Unit Plan assignment, each presenter will be given the same grade. Keep this in mind when dividing up the presentation. Dates for team presentations will be posted on the EDCI 361 WebPage.



8. Theory into Practice (TIP) Component (300 total pts.). The TIP component of EDCI 361 is the application component of the course and has been designed to allow teams of 2-3 you, the Purdue Teacher (at Hillcrest all Purdue University students will be called 'Purdue Teachers') to work in a variety of elementary classrooms. For the EDCI 361 TIP, you will work in either a primary (grades K-2) classroom or an intermediate classroom (grades 3-5) for the first half of the semester (or vice versa) and then rotate during the second half of the semester. Purdue Teachers participation in the TIP for both EDCI 361 and EDCI 362 will be assessed as follows:


  1. TIP Journal (100 pts.). (Note: Purdue Teachers must meet minimum expectations to earn full points). Purdue Teachers will write an entry in the TIP Journal after each day in the classroom describing what took place and reflecting on what students learned about and about their own teaching (See the Block III Theory Into Practice Materials packet for the journal sheets). Journals will be reviewed at least twice per Rotation. In addition, please bring your TIP Journal to class each day as we will often read and discuss your entries.




  1. Social Studies Lesson (1) and Integrated Lesson (1) Plans (100 pts.) With the guidance of their Mentor Teacher, each TIP team of Purdue Teachers will develop and teach a social studies lesson during Rotations 1 (worth 50 pts.) and an integrated (literacy and social studies) lesson during Rotation 2 (50 pts.). Before they teach the lesson, Purdue Teachers will design and write a lesson plan (using the guidelines presented in EDCI 361 and EDCI 362) that will be reviewed by both their Hillsdale Mentor Teacher and their Purdue Instructor. After they teach the lesson, each Purdue Teacher will analyze and reflect upon the lesson and their teaching to determine strengths, weaknesses, and potential changes. Each Purdue Teacher will then write a reflective paper that focuses on: (1) the integrity (or not) of the plan, (2) the effectiveness (or not) of their teaching, (3) whether the learning outcomes met the goals (and what evidence you have for this), and (4) what they would do differently next time. These lesson reflections will be due with the lesson plans. See the “Lesson Planning Guidelines” description in the Block III TIP Packet for more details on these lessons and the reflection.




  1. Mentor Teacher TIP Assessment (100 pts.). Each Mentor Teacher will complete a mid-point and final assessment (See the Block III Theory Into Practice Materials packet for these forms) of each Purdue Teacher for each Rotation. Purdue Teachers will be evaluated each Rotation across five categories using a 5-point scale. Each Purdue Teacher’s score (out of 50) will be based on each Rotation’s final Mentor Teacher assessment. Purdue Teachers are responsible for giving evaluations to Mentor Teachers

9. Miscellaneous Assignments (100 pts.) Occasionally, we will begin the class with a 'quick-write' over the assigned readings where you will be asked to respond to several questions, which, if you've done the readings, should be quite easy to complete. We will also have several other minor assignments that will be assessed over the course of the semester including an in-class analysis of a social studies textbook and one or two Internet-based assignments. More information on these assignments will be provided and the semester develops.



NOTES:

All written assignments are to be in APA format,

(see or for help), typed, and are due at the beginning of class on the designated day. If an assignment is turned in late, 5% of the points allocated to the task will be deducted for each “late day.” Assignments will not be accepted if they are over one week late. This policy will apply to all students, even those absent from class. If problems arise, contact me immediately! I am much more flexible before the deadline than after it! If you experience difficulties with any of your obligations, take the responsibility to talk to me. Feel free to come to the office and/or call me there or to e-mail me at any time. Unless you take the responsibility to raise questions/concerns about an assignment, I assume that you understand what is expected of you. Finally, because clear writing is an important professional/educational component, errors in spelling/grammar/punctuation will be noted. Don’t needlessly lose credit!

Schedule of Topics, Readings, and Assignments:
WEEK 1
Meet On-Campus in WTHR 360 Meet On-Campus in WTHR 360

Tuesday, January 8

Thursday, January 10

Topic(s):

Course Introduction: assignments, etc.

What is social studies?
Reading(s):

None
Assignment(s) due:

None


Topic(s):

What is social studies? (con’t.)

Citizenship education defined

Core values of democracy


Reading(s):

Parker, Ch. 1

Engle & Ochoa: "The Citizen We Need in a Democracy" (CP)

Indiana Clearinghouse for Citizenship and Character Education: "Good Citizenship Instruction" (CP)

"Wisconsin Citizenship Initiative" (CP)
Assignment(s) due:

"The Good Citizen" essay




WEEK 2

Meet at Hillcrest, Room 419 beginning Tuesday

Tuesday, January 15

Thursday, January 17


Topic(s):

Core democratic values (con't.)



We the People…Project Citizen

Citizenship in Action


Reading(s):

Parker, Ch. 3

"Jackson Elementary: Kids in Action" (CP)
Assignment(s) due:

Bring 'core values' artifact bag assignments




Topic(s):

Core democratic values (con't.)

Citizenship in Action (con’t.)
Readings:

Nalle: "A Democracy of Third Graders" (CP)


Assignment(s) due:

Integrated Unit Proposal due

TIP: Meet with Mentor Teacher (MT) to discuss Rotation 1






WEEK 3


Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, January 22

Thursday, January 24


Topic:

Citizenship in Action (con’t.)

Teaching "In the News": Current Events in the Classroom
Reading(s):

Parker: pp 178-195

Passe: "Developing Current Events Awareness in Children" (CP)
Assignment(s) due:



Topic(s):

Teaching "In the News": Current Events in the Classroom

(Instructional planning in the social studies)
Reading(s):

McBee: "Can Controversial Topics be Taught in the Early Grades?" (CP)

Parker, Ch. 7

Bloom's Taxonomy (CP)

EDCI 361 HomePage: "Instructional Planning" link
Assignment(s) due:

Begin “Writing Instructional Objectives” assignment

TIP: Meet with MT to plan social studies lesson






WEEK 4

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, January 29

Thursday, January 31


Topic(s):

“Things That Make You Go Hmm…”: An Intro to Inquiry Teaching


Reading(s):

Parker, pp. 268-72


Assignment(s) due:

Current Events Team (CET) #1 presents

Writing Instructional Objectives” assignment




Topic(s):

Inquiry Teaching continued


Reading(s):

Assignment(s) due:

CET #2 presents

Bring an inquiry problem to discuss

Give MTs the Mid-Rotation evaluations




WEEK 5

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, February 5

Thursday, February 7


Topic(s):

How long ago was 'long ago?' History and young children


Reading(s):

Parker, pp. 98-113

Hatcher: "Children's Homes & Neighborhoods" Untapped Treasures from the Past" (CP)

Haas & Tipton: "Studying WWII in Elementary School" (CP)


Assignment(s) due:

CET #3 presents

Integrated Literature Unit: Step 1 due


Topic(s):

How long ago was 'long ago?' History and young children (continued)


Reading(s):

Rule & Sunal, "Buttoning Up a Hands-on History Lesson" (CP)


Assignment(s) due:

CET #4 presents

MTs return the mid-Rotation evaluations

(place in Purdue mailbox)




WEEK 6

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, February 12

Thursday, February 14


Topic(s):

Teaching Economics: Decision-Making and Young Children


Reading(s):

Parker, pp. 125-131

Schug, "Economics for Kids" (CP)

Murphy & Walsh, "Economics and the Real-Life Connection" (CR)


Assignment(s) due:

CET #5 presents

TIP: Draft of social studies lesson due to MT and PU instructor




Topic(s):

Teaching Economics: Decision-Making and Young Children (con't.)


Reading(s):

Laughlin & Hartoonian, "Decision-Making Skills" (CP)


Assignment(s) due:

CET #6 presents




WEEK 7

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, February 19

Thursday, February 21

Topic(s):

Teaching Economics: Decision-Making and Young Children (con't.)

Cooperative Learning in Social Studies Classrooms
Reading(s):

Stahl & VanSickle, "Cooperative Learning as Effective Social Study…" (CP)

Colomb, Chilcoat & Stahl, "Elementary Students Can Learn to Cooperate…"(CP)
Assignment(s) due:

CET # 7 presents

Integrated Literature Unit: Step 2 due

Give final Rotation 1 evaluation to MTs



Topic(s):

Cooperative Learning in Social Studies Classrooms

Tribute to President’s Day (Feb. 18)

Reading(s):
Assignment(s) due:

CET # 8 presents

TIP: Social studies lesson plan and reflection due



WEEK 8

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, February 26

Thursday, February 28

Topic(s):

What Country Did Grandma Come From? Using Literature Circles to Teach Social Studies


Reading(s):

Hofstedt, "Learning that Keeps on Going…." (CP)

Zarnowski, "Learning about Contemporary Women…" (CP)

Cobblestone Readings (CP)


Assignment(s) due:

TIP: Meet with MT to plan Rotation 2 assignments



MT's Rotation 1 Assessment due

TIP: Rotation 1 ends



Topic(s):

What Country Did Grandma Come From? Using Literature Circles to Teach Social Studies (con't.)

Tribute to President’s Day (Feb. 18)

Reading(s):

Freedman, R. (1980). Immigrant Kids.

Hesse, K. (1992). Letters from Rifka.

Bartone, E. (1997). (Lewin, T., illus.). Peppe the Lamplighter


Assignment(s) due:

TIP:Meet with MT to plan Rotation 2 assignments

MT’s Rotation 1 Assessment due

Rotation 2 begins





WEEK 9

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, March 5

Thursday, March 7

Topic(s):

Analyzing Social Studies Textbooks (in class)



Reading(s):
Assignment(s) due:

Social studies literature circles begin (A's lead)

TIP: all Rotation 1 assignments due (Tip Journal for Rotation 1)

Topic(s):

Analyzing Social Studies Textbooks (in class assignment)


Reading(s):

Assignment(s) due:

Social studies literature circles (A's lead)

TIP: Meet with MT to plan integrated lesson


WEEK 10


Tuesday, March 12

Thursday, March 14



NO CLASS—PURDUE SPRING BREAK




NO CLASS—PURDUE SPRING BREAK



WEEK 11

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, March 19

Thursday, March 21

Topic(s):

One Nation, Many Peoples? Multicultural Education


Reading(s):

Topic(s):

One Nation, Many Peoples? Multicultural Education


Reading(s):

Little Soldier: "Making Anthropology Part of the Elementary Social Studies Curriculum" (CP)

Sesow, VanCleef & Chadwick: "investigating Classroom Cultures" (CP)

Weatherford: "Indian Season in American Schools" (CP)


Assignment(s) due:

Social studies literature circles (B's lead)


Topic(s):

One Nation, Many Peoples? Multicultural Education


Reading(s):
Assignment(s) due:

Social studies literature circles (B's lead)



WEEK 12

Meet at ON CAMPUS

Tuesday, March 26

Thursday, March 28

Topic(s):

Internet Workshop: Ameritech classroom


Reading(s):
Assignment(s) due:

Reflection Paper due


Topic(s):

Internet Workshop: Ameritech classroom


Reading(s):
Assignment(s) due:

Draft of integrated lesson to MT’s and PU instructors




WEEK 13

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, April 2

Thursday, April 4

Topic(s):

Where is That? Geography in the Elementary Classroom


Reading(s):

Parker: pp. 117-120

Murphy, "Using the 5 Themes of Geography…" (CR)
Assignment(s) due:

Integrated Literature Unit: Step 3 due


Topic(s):

Where is That? Geography in the Elementary Classroom


Reading(s):

Mazzuchi, "Map-Making and Neighborhood Exploration in a Multi-Age Classroom" (CP)


Assignment(s) due:

Social Studies Literature Circles write-up due


WEEK 14

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, April 9

Thursday, April 11


Topic(s):

Where is That? Geography in the Elementary Classroom


Reading(s):
Assignment(s) due:


Assignment(s) due:




WEEK 15

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, April 16

Thursday, April 18

Topic(s):

Social Studies and Citizenship Revisited: Service Learning and Community Service in Elementary Schools



Reading(s):

Parker: pp. 78-82 (review)

"We the People…Project Citizen (CP)

Indiana Clearinghouse on Citizenship and Character Education: "Good Citizenship and Service Learning" (CP)


Assignment(s) due:


Topic(s):

Integrated Unit Overview Presentations


Reading(s):
Assignment(s) due:

Give final Rotation 2 evaluation to MTs

Integrated Unit Overview Presentations

TIP: Integrated lesson plan and reflection due

and MT evaluation of the lesson.


WEEK 16

Meet at Hillcrest

Tuesday, April 23

Thursday, April 25

Topic(s):

Integrated Unit Overview Presentations


Reading(s):
Assignment(s) due:

Integrated Literature Unit: Step 4 due

Topic(s):

Integrated Unit Overview Presentations


Reading(s):
Assignment(s) due:

Rotation 2 ends; all Rotation 2 assignments (TIP Journal) must be in

Rotation 2 MT evaluations due (Purdue mailbox)


ASSIGNMENTS AND KEY DATES

(You may turn in ANY assignment earlier than its due date.)


Assignment

Points

Date Due

Theory Into Practice (TIP) Component

300

Various dates (please see course calendar)

Mentor Teacher Assessment (100 pts.)**







TIP Journal (100 pts.)**







Social Studies Lesson Plan (50 pts.)*

Integrated Lesson Plan (50 pts.)*









Citizenship Essay**

50

1/10

Current Event Teams Presentation

50

See calendar beginning 1/29

Reflective Paper*

100

3/26










Social Studies Literature Circle Write-Up**

50

by 4/4

Integrated Literature Unit*


200

Unit Steps due at various times; final Unit due 4/23 (see calendar)

Unit Overview Presentations

50

See calendar beginning 4/18

Miscellaneous Assignments

100

Various dates

University Classroom Participation

75

4/25


TOTAL POINTS 975
*Indicates assignments that must be part of your Purdue Professional Portfolio.

**Indicates assignments that might become part of your Purdue Professional Portfolio.



Grade Breakdown:
878 - 975 A

780 - 877 B

683 - 779 C

585 - 682 D



000 - 584 F

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