Opening Business



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Pam Bedore, Chair

October 25, 2016
Opening Business

  1. Reminders about pending courses listed at registrar website

  2. News from the Grad School: all Masters degrees require a minimum of 30 credits, effective AY 2017-18


Approvals by the Chair

  1. 2016-118 COMM 1993 Foreign Study (S)

  2. 2016-119 COMM 2993 Foreign Study (S)

  3. 2016-120 COMM 3993 Foreign Study

  4. 2016-121 PNB 3295 Special Topic: Human Neuroanatomy

  5. 2016-124 MCB 5896 Investigation of Special Topics: The Footprints of Natural Selection in the Genome


New Business

  1. 2016-122 EEB 4100 Add Course

  2. 2016-123 EEB 5110 Add Course

  3. 2016-125 HEJS/HRTS 2203 Add Course (G) (S)

  4. 2016-126 Revise Engineering Physics Major


Topics for Discussion/Voting


  1. Minors Substitutions (Higgins). Given that substitutions are now allowed for minors (as per Senate by-laws), we will vote on adding the following language to the catalog: “Substitutions to minor requirements offered by departments or programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences require approval by the dean or dean’s designee.”

  2. Alternate BS Requirements (Plan B BS Subcommittee). Discussion and vote on new documents created by the subcommittee in response to discussion for the 10.11.2016 meeting. See attached.

  3. Dual Degree Credit Requirement (Nanclares). Discussion of elimination of the 150-credit requirement for dual degrees.

Appendix of Materials

2016-122 EEB 4100 Add Course
Proposed Catalog Copy
EEB 4100. Data Science for Biologists

Four credits. Prerequisite: MCB 2400 or 2410 or EEB 2245.


Introduction to basic concepts and approaches associated with big datasets in the biological sciences. Online laboratories include examples from molecular biology, ecology, evolutionary biology, and systems biology. Topics include data creation, integration, curation, manipulation, and visualization.
2016-123 EEB 5110 Add Course
Proposed Catalog Copy
EEB 5110. Writing Research Proposals and Fellowship Applications

Two credits. Open to graduate students in EEB, others with permission.


The craft of writing persuasive fellowship applications and funding proposals in ecology, evolutionary biology, systematics, and conservation biology. Participants apply for financial support from agencies, foundations, and other sources. Participants also review each other’s work.


    1. HEJS/HRTS 2203 Add Course (G) (S)

HEJS/HRTS 2203 Holocaust in Theater and Film



Three credits.
An examination of how authors and directors have represented the Holocaust including choices made in written structure, visual imagery, and the use of language. Readings/screenings will also include first-hand accounts and documentaries. Students will consider issues related to style and genre, point of view, tropes and textuality and the limits of representation. CA1 and CA4-INT.
2016-126 Revise Engineering Physics Major
No catalog copy to review. This proposal is to add two new courses (ECE 3223 and 3225) to the electives as listed in the “Engineering Physics Guide to Course Selection” (https://www.ee.uconn.edu/undergraduate-program/ugdegprograms/epcourseguide). (See Additional Materials)

Additional Materials
2016-122 EEB 4100 Add Course


COURSE ACTION REQUEST

Request Proposer

Wegrzyn

Course Title

Data Science for Biologists

CAR Status

In Progress

Workflow History

Start > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology > Return > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology > College of Liberal Arts and Sciences



COURSE INFO

Type of Action

Add Course

Is this a UNIV or INTD course?

Neither

Number of Subject Codes

1

Course Subject Code

EEB

School / College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Department

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Course Title

Data Science for Biologists

Course Number

4100

Will this use an existing course number?

No



CONTACT INFO

Initiator Name

Jill L Wegrzyn

Initiator Department

Ecology and Evolutionary Bio

Initiator NetId

jlw13012

Initiator Email

jill.wegrzyn@uconn.edu

Is this request for you or someone else?

Myself

Does the department/school/program currently have resources to offer the course as proposed?

Yes



COURSE FEATURES

Proposed Term

Spring

Proposed Year

2017

Will this course be taught in a language other than English?

No

Is this a General Education Course?

No

Number of Sections

1

Number of Students per Section

35

Is this a Variable Credits Course?

No

Is this a Multi-Semester Course?

No

Credits

4

Instructional Pattern

Tuesday/Thursday lectures; laboratories will be presented online and will require students to complete exercises and reports (3 hours per week).



COURSE RESTRICTIONS

Prerequisites

MCB 2400 or 2410 or EEB 2245

Corequisites

None

Recommended Preparation

None

Is Consent Required?

No Consent Required

Is enrollment in this course restricted?

No



GRADING

Is this course repeatable for credit?

No

What is the Grading Basis for this course?

Graded

Will the course or any sections of the course be taught as Honors?

No



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL FEATURES

Do you anticipate the course will be offered at all campuses?

No

At which campuses do you anticipate this course will be offered?

Storrs

If not generally available at all campuses, please explain why




Will this course be taught off campus?

No

Will this course be offered online?

No



DETAILED COURSE INFO

Provide proposed title and complete course catalog copy

EEB 4100. Data Science for Biologists Four credits. Prerequisite: MCB 2400 or 2410 or EEB 2245. Introduction to basic concepts and approaches associated with big datasets in the biological sciences. Online laboratories include examples from molecular biology, ecology, evolutionary biology, and systems biology. Topics include data creation, integration, curation, manipulation, and visualization.

Reason for the course action

This course is applicable to all students in the biological sciences with an interest in research. Today, researchers acquire large datasets from the laboratory and/or field and translate them into meaningful inferences. The course will enable students to distill these complex datasets into information that can lead to reasoned conclusions. The course will introduce a suite of computational tools that are useful for data integration, visualization, and analysis.

Specify effect on other departments and overlap with existing courses

No overlapping courses exist (consulted with MCB and STATS, 20 April 2016).

Please provide a brief description of course goals and learning objectives

This course will provide training in informatics as it pertains to the biological sciences. Students will interact with examples from several fields and the unique challenges they present. Computational laboratory exercises conducted online will teach students how to apply appropriate tools and understand basic statistical concepts. They will apply their knowledge through these laboratories as well as a final independent group research project. Each group will design and analyze ‘big data’ in biology. They will practice concepts related to scientific oral presentation and visualization in web and print format. Additional learning will include readings and interactive blog responses. Course Competencies: 1. Efficiently create and curate meaningful datasets for biological research. 2. Develop basic code in at least two programming languages for data manipulation. 3. Integrate data from disparate sources to understand complex biological phenomena. 4. Apply appropriate computational tools to visualize a variety of data types.

Describe course assessments

Students will have three forms of graded work. First, students are expected to submit lab exercises each week. Second, students are expected to create blog entries summarizing the reading each week. Full participation includes written questions in your blog as well as commenting on the written work of at least two other students. Finally, students will form groups and participate in a data science project that involves the creation, curation, manipulation, visualization, and analysis of a complex biological dataset of their choosing. Students will prepare a 20-minute presentation on this project that will be given during the last week of class/finals week. Students are expected to report their contribution to group assignments honestly. Final grades are submitted as a whole or partial letter grade.

Syllabus and other attachments

Attachment Link

File Name

File Type

Wegrzyn_DataScienceBiologists_4100_v2.docx

Wegrzyn_DataScienceBiologists_4100_v2.docx

Syllabus





COMMENTS / APPROVALS

Committee Sign-Off Date




Post College Routing / Workflow




Comments & Approvals Log

Stage

Name

Time Stamp

Status

F_CommitteeSignOff

Comments

Start

Jill L Wegrzyn

10/10/2016 - 16:31

Submit




Submission for EEB 4100 (Spring 2017)

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Paul O Lewis

10/11/2016 - 20:37

Return




Need to uncheck INTD

Return

Jill L Wegrzyn

10/11/2016 - 21:20

Resubmit




Current submission has been amended to reflect 'Neither'

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Paul O Lewis

10/12/2016 - 13:24

Approve

5/11/2016

Approved by EEB faculty 11-May-2016 (delay due to the need to create this CAR)



EEB 4100 Data Science for Biologists: Syllabus for Spring 2017

Instructor:

Dr. Jill Wegrzyn

Jill.wegrzyn@uconn.edu

Office Location: TLS 75



Course Information:

Credits: 4, Lecture and Lab

Time: Tuesday/Thursday Lecture, Lab Online (3 hr/week)

Course Description: This course will introduce students in the biological sciences to the concepts and approaches associated with big datasets. Students will interact with real data from molecular biology, ecology, evolutionary biology, and systems biology. We will emphasize data creation, integration, curation, manipulation, and visualization.

Course Application: This course is applicable to all students in the biological sciences with an interest in research. Today, researchers acquire large datasets from the laboratory and/or field and translate them into meaningful inferences The course will enable students to distill these complex datasets into information that can lead to reasoned conclusions. The course will introduce a suite of computational tools that are useful for data integration, visualization, and analysis.

Prerequisites:

MCB 2400 or 2410 or EEB 2245



Course Competencies:

1. Efficiently create and curate meaningful datasets for biological research.

2. Develop basic code in at least two programming languages for data manipulation.

3. Integrate data from disparate sources to understand complex biological phenomena.

4. Apply appropriate computational tools to visualize a variety of data types.

Course Format: The course is a mixture of lectures, code demonstrations, and discussions. Labs allow for greater exploration of the lecture material with exercises designed to build core skills. Labs are conducted online.

Grading:

Students will have three forms of graded work. First, students are expected to submit lab exercises each week. Second, students are expected to create blog entries summarizing the reading each week. Full participation includes written questions in your blog as well as commenting on the written work of at least two other students. Finally, students will form groups and participate in a data science project that involves the creation, curation, manipulation, visualization, and analysis of a complex biological dataset of their choosing. Students will prepare a 20-minute presentation on this project that will be given during the last week of class/finals week. Students are expected to report their contribution to group assignments honestly. Final grades are submitted as a whole or partial letter grade.



  1. Lab assignments (55%)

  2. Weekly blog entries from readings (25%)

  3. Final group project/presentation (20%)

Grading scale: A = 93%-100%, A- = 90%-92.9%, B+ = 87%-89.9%, B = 83%-86.9%, B- = 80%-82.9%, C+ = 77%-79.9%, C = 73%-76.9%, C- =70%-72.9%, D = 60%-69.9%, F = 59.9%-0%.

Required Text: No required text. Readings will be provided.

Technical Requirements: Access to a computer with the R programming language, Rstudio, ArcGIS Desktop (available via SkyBox), and an SSH client.

Course Schedule:

Date

Topic

Objectives

Lab

Week 1

Data and Metadata

Understanding data from different disciplines

What spreadsheets cannot do for you

Week 2

Data Creation

Data recording, data collection, and quality control

Data collection and quality control

Week 3

Concepts in Visualization (I)

Best practices for data presentation

(scientific presentations and web-based)



Introduction to R (basic functions)

Week 4

Data Reduction (I)

Considerations for merging and formatting data

Introduction to R (tidyr)

Week 5

Data Reduction (II)

Descriptive statistics and probability

Introduction to R (descriptive statistics)

Week 6

Concepts in Visualization (II)

Best practices for data presentation

(lessons from Tufte)



Introduction to R (ggplot2 and shiny)

Week 7

Relational Databases

Storing and retrieving data

Querying databases with SQL

Week 8

Online Resources (I)

Data resources for bioinformatics and genomics

Comparative genomics and BioMart

Week 9

Online Resources (II)

Understanding and applying biological ontologies

Enrichment in Evo-Devo data

Week 10

Online Resources (III)

Data resources for ecoinformatics and GIS

Python and spatial data

Week 11

Data Integration

Integration and curation of data from disparate sources

Genome-wide association studies

Week 12

Network Analysis

Data resources for systems biology

Visualizing gene networks with Cytoscape

Week 13

Student Presentations







FINALS

Student Presentations

Final project due (written report)




2016-123 EEB 5110 Add Course

COURSE ACTION REQUEST

Request Proposer

Schultz

Course Title

Writing Research Proposals and Fellowship Applications

CAR Status

In Progress

Workflow History

Start > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology > Return > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology > Return > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology > College of Liberal Arts and Sciences



COURSE INFO

Type of Action

Add Course

Is this a UNIV or INTD course?

Neither

Number of Subject Codes

1

Course Subject Code

EEB

School / College

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Department

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Course Title

Writing Research Proposals and Fellowship Applications

Course Number

5110

Will this use an existing course number?

No



CONTACT INFO

Initiator Name

Eric T Schultz

Initiator Department

ECOLOGY & EVOL BIOLOGY

Initiator NetId

ets02002

Initiator Email

eric.schultz@uconn.edu

Is this request for you or someone else?

Myself

Does the department/school/program currently have resources to offer the course as proposed?

Yes



COURSE FEATURES

Proposed Term

Fall

Proposed Year

2016

Will this course be taught in a language other than English?

No

Is this a General Education Course?

No

Number of Sections

1

Number of Students per Section

15

Is this a Variable Credits Course?

No

Is this a Multi-Semester Course?

No

Credits

2

Instructional Pattern

Weekly sessions of 1.5 to 2 hours. Some sessions are presentations by faculty or staff on subjects relevant to proposal writing (e.g. the funding environment; searching for funding opportunities; proposal quality from NSF's perspective), and other sessions are devoted to group discussions (constructive critiques) of participant proposals.



COURSE RESTRICTIONS

Prerequisites

none

Corequisites

none

Recommended Preparation

none

Is Consent Required?

Instructor Consent Required

Is enrollment in this course restricted?

Yes

Is it restricted by class?

No

Is there a specific course prohibition?

No

Will this course NOT count towards any specific major or related subject area?

No

Are there concurrent course conditions?

No

Are there other enrollment restrictions?

Yes

Other restrictions

Open to students in EEB, others by permission of instructor.



GRADING

Is this course repeatable for credit?

Yes

Number of Total Credits Allowed

6

Is it repeatable only with a change in topic?

No

Does it allow multiple enrollments in the same term?

No

What is the Grading Basis for this course?

S/U

Rationale for S/U Grading

There are no exams or similar assessments; participation consists of writing a proposal, the quality of which is not graded by the instructor (but is by the funding agency!), and peer review of other's proposals.

Will the course or any sections of the course be taught as Honors?

No



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL FEATURES

Do you anticipate the course will be offered at all campuses?

No

At which campuses do you anticipate this course will be offered?

Storrs

If not generally available at all campuses, please explain why

Graduate students in EEB, who are almost exclusively at Storrs, are the primary audience for this course.

Will this course be taught off campus?

No

Will this course be offered online?

No



DETAILED COURSE INFO

Provide proposed title and complete course catalog copy

EEB 5110. Writing Research Proposals and Fellowship Applications 2 credits. Open to graduate students in EEB, others with permission. The craft of writing persuasive fellowship applications and funding proposals in ecology, evolutionary biology, systematics, and conservation biology. Participants apply for financial support from agencies, foundations, and other sources. Participants also review each other’s work

Reason for the course action

This course has been offered on an 'experimental' basis for three years and has had a positive effect on proposal writing skills and (anecdotally) on funding rates.

Specify effect on other departments and overlap with existing courses

I am not aware of existing courses that overlap with this course. The course is directed primarily at EEB students. Upperclass biology students who are preparing proposals, such as to NSF's Graduate Research Fellowship Program, will also be encouraged to enroll if their research topic overlaps those of EEB students.

Please provide a brief description of course goals and learning objectives

Students in the course will become familiar with the process of applying for funding. Learning objectives include becoming knowledgeable about different sources of funding, searching for funding opportunities, recognizing the components required for compliance with the grantor's requirements, and developing an approach to effective description of project rationale, methods and expected outcomes.

Describe course assessments

Each participant writes and submits one or more proposals, and conducts peer review of the proposals of other participants. Peer review is both written and in classwide discussions.

Syllabus and other attachments

Attachment Link

File Name

File Type

EEB 5894 Seminar writing proposals fall 2015.docx

EEB 5894 Seminar writing proposals fall 2015.docx

Syllabus





COMMENTS / APPROVALS

Committee Sign-Off Date




Post College Routing / Workflow




Comments & Approvals Log

Stage

Name

Time Stamp

Status

F_CommitteeSignOff

Comments

Start

Eric T Schultz

03/01/2016 - 20:03

Submit




This is the inaugural proposal of the new online form and workflow system!

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Cheryl D Galli

09/27/2016 - 07:12

Return




Eric, there is a new department level approver for EEB. Please resubmit form. No changes needed. The resubmission should update the workflow and route to the correct person - thank you, Cheryl

Return

Eric T Schultz

09/28/2016 - 15:13

Resubmit




I'm running this through again! EEB Curriculum Committee will make some changes to catalog description.

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Eldridge S Adams

10/04/2016 - 17:28

Return




I entered suggested edits for the catalog description of the course. We suggest that a brief justification for the number of credits be added and that the instructional pattern is included.

Return

Eric T Schultz

10/04/2016 - 17:41

Resubmit




I have added justification for the number of credits in the instructional pattern box (course features page) and I have made a minor further modification to the course description.

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Paul O Lewis

10/12/2016 - 13:21

Approve

10/12/2016

Approved by EEB faculty 12-Oct-2016



EEB 5894 Seminar, Fall 2015
Writing Compelling Proposals


General Information

Faculty Coordinator: Dr. Eric T. Schultz; PharmBio 205B, 486–4692; eric.schultz@uconn.edu;
office hours: M 11-12, Tu 9:30-10:30, and otherwise by appointment or just stop by

Meeting Time: Tu 1530-1700, PBB 203 (PharmBio 2nd floor fishbowl)

Content Objectives

This seminar course is designed to get you in touch with your inner persuader.



Process Objectives

We will develop an approach to preparing proposals that includes peer review.



Organization

Some sessions, especially early in the semester, will feature presentations by University experts on subjects pertinent to proposal preparation. The main activity throughout the semester will be group discussion of your proposals in preparation.



Grading

The course is graded S/U.



Date

Subject

9/8

Tom Deans on the process of writing. Also First Day Reflections; ­The funding environment, 1. Where EEB funding comes from; types of funding; sources and trends in funding.

9/15

The funding environment, 2. Introduction to Pivot searches. We will meet in Library EC 1, on Level 1. Preparing for this session: please develop a list of keywords that represent your research interests. Following this session: figure out what proposal(s) or application(s) you will start work on this semester, maybe one you knew about already or an opportunity you learned about through the Pivot search. Bring the URL where we can find instructions for the proposal, or hard copy of the instructions, to our next session.

9/22

Rowena Grainger on features of successful proposals

9/29

Opening text (workshop)

10/6

Discuss Hutson Sigma Xi and any early GRFP drafts

10/13

Discuss GRFP personal statements

10/20

Discuss GRFP research plans

10/27

Break

11/3

Review of Evans manuscript introduction

11/10

Review of Goyes Vallejo presentation to Wildlife Acoustics

11/17

Allison Goldsnider and Kyle Lewis on Budget Preparation

12/1




12/8




Schedule

2016-125 HEJS/HRTS 2203 Add Course (G) (S)



Add Course Request

Directions: Use this form to propose new courses that are not yet in the catalog. This may include W or non-versions of existing courses. To add general education content areas to an existing course, please use the Revise Course Request form. When completed, email this form with a syllabus to geoc@uconn.edu.
** IMPORTANT! PLEASE NOTE: If you are adding or revising a W course, please review the W guidelines posted here: http://geoc.uconn.edu/writing-competency/. Pay special attention to the section on Criteria. The W subcommittee checks to be sure that all of these items are met (i.e. that the syllabus explicitly states the number of pages required, that it states the student must pass the W portion of the course to pass the class, that it details how writing instruction and revision will be incorporated into the course, etc). Failure to include evidence of all of these items frequently holds up course approvals, so please make sure that you have all of these items covered to avoid a delay in your approval.



1. PROPOSED COURSE SUBJECT

HEJS

2. PROPOSED COURSE NUMBER

2203

3. PROPOSED COURSE TITLE

Holocaust in Theater and Film

4. INITIATING DEPARTMENT or UNIT

HEJS

5. NAME OF SUBMITTER

Jeffrey Shoulson

6. PHONE of SUBMITTER

860-486-2271

7. EMAIL of SUBMITTER

Jeffrey.shoulson@uconn.edu

8. CONTACT PERSON

Jeffrey Shoulson

9.U-Box of CONTACT PERSON




10. PHONE of contact person

860-486-2271

11. EMAIL of of contact person

Jeffrey.shoulson@uconn.edu

12. Departmental Approval Date

4/8/2016

13. School/College Approval Date




14. Names and Dates of additional Department and School/College approvals

HRTS Will seek approval from School of Fine Arts for DRAM after CLAS approval

15. Proposed Implementation Term
      

Spring 2017

16. Offered before next printed catalog is distributed?




17. General Education Content Area(s) if applicable.

(Put an X next to all that apply)



CA1 Arts and Humanities: X

CA2 Social Sciences:

CA3 Science & Technology:

CA3 Science & Technology, Lab:

CA4 Diversity & Multiculturalism:

CA4 Diversity & Multiculturalism; X

International


18. General Education Skill Code(s) if applicable. (Put an X next to all that apply)

If W, will there be non-W sections?



W:

Q:

QW:


Yes:

No:



19. Term(s) Offered (Put an X next to all that apply)

 NOTE: If you wish to offer this course in Intensive Sessions of 4 weeks or less, please complete the Intensive Session/Intersession Curricular Action Request Form located on the GEOC website: http://geoc.uconn.edu/faculty-forms/



Fall:

Spring: X

Summer (over 4 weeks):
Every year: X

Odd years:

Even Years:


20. Sections to be taught per semester

Non-W sections, if any:

W sections, if any:



21. Enrollment cap per section, per semester

(Note: W sections are limited to 19 per section)




Non-W sections, if any: 30 total, to be divided among HEJS and HRTS

W sections, if any:



22. Clarification of section, semester, and/or student information if necessary (optional)

 

23. Number of Credits

Credits: 3.0

If variable:

Min: Max:


24. INSTRUCTIONAL PATTERN - Specify number of class periods per week, or describe weekly pattern of time given to lectures, labs, discussions, etc:
1 class per week. 3 hour course block for lectures, discussions, and film/documentary screenings.



25. Will this course be taught in a language other than English?


No: X
If yes, then name the language:


26. Please list any prerequisites, recommended preparation or suggested preparation:



27. Is Instructor, Dept. Head or Unit Consent Required? (Put an X next to all that apply)

No consent required: X

Instructor consent required:

Dept or Unit consent required:


28. Permissions and Exclusions: (Put an X next to all that apply)

Open only to Juniors or higher:


Not open for credit to students who have passed {Insert Course #(s) here}:

Open only to students in the Honors Program:

Open only to Majors:

May not be taken concurrently with{Insert Course #(s) here}:

A reading knowledge of {Insert} is required:
Other:
Specify other:


29. Is this course repeatable for credit?

Are multiple enrollments allowed in same term?



No: X
If yes, total credits allowed:

No:


If yes, total allowed:

30. Grading Basis

Letter graded: Yes

S/U graded:

Other (specify):


31. If satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) grading is proposed, please provide rationale:


32. Will the course or any sections of the course be taught as Honors? No


33. Additional Details: (Put an X next to all that apply and {insert} any relevant information)

May not be used to meet the {insert} requirement:

May not be used as a prerequisite for {insert}:

Offered only at the {insert} campus(es):

Other (specify):


34. Special Attributes: Please explain if the course is…

Taught off campus:


A year-long course:

35. REGIONAL CAMPUS AVAILABILITY - Describe the availability of the proposed course at each Regional Campus. If not generally available, please explain why: No, there is not an instructor available to teach the course at other campuses.



36. PROVIDE THE PROPOSED TITLE AND COMPLETE CATALOG COPY Include standard abbreviation for department or program, course number, skill code (as applicable), course title, term offered, number of credits, instructional patterns, course language if other than English, prerequisites or recommended preparation (as applicable), consent of instructor (as applicable), additional permissions and details, exclusions (as applicable), repetition for credit (as applicable), grading (as applicable), instructor(s) name(s) (if in catalog copy), and complete course description.

HEJS/ENGL/HRTS 2203

Three credits.

Holocaust in Theater and Film:

An examination of how authors and directors have represented the Holocaust including choices made in written structure, visual imagery, and the use of language. Readings/screenings will also include first-hand accounts and documentaries. Students will consider issues related to style and genre, point of view, tropes and textuality and the limits of representation.


37. RATIONALE FOR ACTION REQUESTED
This should include the following as applicable:

a) reason for adding the course,

The course is an important addition to HEJS and LCL (of which HEJS is a subsection) because we currently have no other Holocaust representation themed courses.

b) why course is appropriate for inclusion at 1000 or 2000 level,

The 2000 level seems like a good fit for this course since it requires the students to critically engage with texts/films and be able to successfully communicate their thoughts and ideas in writing without requiring substantial prior knowledge.

c) justification for enrollment restrictions,


d) effect on other departments,

Based upon our conversations from faculty in the Human Rights Institute, this class would be a welcome addition to their curricula.


e) amount of overlap with existing courses,

There is no overlap.


f) other departments consulted,

Human Rights.


g) effects on regional campuses,


h) specific costs approved by dean,
i) if course is to be cross listed supply reason for cross-listing,

Within CLAS, this course will be cross-listed with Human Rights. The course is a natural fit for both HEJS and Human Rights since the subject is the Holocaust which was the largest violation of human rights to occur on European soil and also a significant historical time period for the Jewish people and their history. The course fosters critical student engagement with primary sources and creative works (film, drama, literary texts) from a variety of perspectives to develop a critical awareness of how mass human rights violations, crimes against humanity, and genocide occur.


j) if course is to be offered as an experimental course provide reason.




38. *SYLLABUS: Please attach a syllabus when you email this form, or copy and paste the syllabus into this document at the END of the form.*

39. Course Information: ALL General Education courses, including W and Q courses, MUST answer this question. Provide the following information: (If this course is not being proposed for a content area or competency, please skip this question and proceed to the next section.)

a. A brief (2-3 sentences) course description that includes course goals and learning objectives.


The goal of this course is to examine the Holocaust and how it has been represented. In this class we learn about the details of the Holocaust and are confronted with all the questions that this history raises, including how people respond to and function in their roles as perpetrators, victims, and bystanders. The learning objective of this course is for students to understand that the Holocaust, while being an act of unprecedented evil, occurred with the cooperation of scores of ordinary Europeans. How we understand the Holocaust depends in large part on influential fictional and non-fictional writings and films; and one of the questions at stake in our understanding of the Holocaust is how we avert genocide in the future.

b. Course requirements: Specify exam formats, nature and scope of weekly reading assignments, nature and scope of writing assignments, problem sets, etc.


The course requires a large body of reading including novels based on first-hand accounts as well as plays and criticism. The students also watch some films and documentaries. Each week the students write a short response to the reading and post a question on Blackboard. The students are also given an essay style midterm exam, asked to give a class presentation, and an essay style final exam.

c. List the major themes, issues, topics, etc., to be covered.


The Holocaust is one of the most dramatized historical events for the number of years since its passing. Yet, it is also one of the most difficult moments in history to effectively represent. In this class, we will look at some of the different ways that this subject has been approached. We will investigate the various ways that different dramatizations, both in theater and film, have attempted to communicate this period of history. Comparing styles and themes, we will analyze how these different dramatic works have attempted to make broader statements about humanity, society, and the systemization of the Holocaust. Through this examination, certain re-occurring themes tend to be addressed including the coping strategies utilized by all those involved in the Holocaust as well as the concepts of hope and God and how these beliefs affected the people involved in the Holocaust. For victims, hope and faith in God often stopped them from resisting and ultimately led to their conforming to the Nazi orders (which were designed to kill them). For some bystanders, and even Nazi officers in some cases, their true faith in God and belief in religion or Judeo-Christian ethics and values made them act out against the policies of the Third Reich. We also look at the total commodification of human beings that can be found in the actions of the Nazis who used the hair of their victims to make socks for the crew of German U-Boats, and never let a body be disposed of before being fully searched for any gold teeth or other items of value. Students will be looking at style and genre, point of view, tropes and intertextuality, and the limits of representation as tools to evaluate the works that they study.


40. Goals of General Education: All Courses Proposed for a Gen Ed Content Area MUST answer this question. How does the proposed course meet the overall GOALS of General Education? Please note the overall goals of general education are different from the goals of specific content areas. For more information, please see http://geoc.uconn.edu/criteria/. (If this course is not being proposed for a content area, please skip this question and proceed to the next section.)
This course meets all 7 of the overall GOALS. Class participation is a large focus of this class as we work together to analyze and discuss the materials that are covered. Through this class participation and the assigned presentation, students work toward becoming more articulate in their statements and ideas. This course requires intellectual breadth and versatility by making the students look at the Holocaust in a new way because we take on the concept that all Nazis were bad and all victims were good by looking more deeply at the actions of those involved in the Holocaust, and finding the nuances in the personal choices made by those involved, and how these choices affected the outcomes of the Holocaust. Students are asked to use critical judgment in all of their readings and film critiques. The plays of the Holocaust specifically ask moral questions, and make their audiences (i.e. the students in this class) consider the moral dilemmas faced by those who were involved in the Holocaust. This class raises a lot of awareness about the role that society played in the unfolding of the Holocaust. The Holocaust occurred throughout many European countries. The social climate in these countries differed greatly. Utilizing a broad range of texts and films, the class looks at how the actions of the Nazis (informed by these various cultures) played out differently in various places, including Germany, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, Denmark, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, Italy, and France. The students are asked to create a final presentation, which requires them to conduct additional research into their topic beyond the texts that we cover in class.


41. Content Area and/or Competency Criteria: ALL General Education courses, including W and Q courses, MUST answer appropriate parts of this question.: Describe how the proposed course meets the Specific Criteria for the particular content area and/or competency chosen. For more information, please see content area and competency links at http://geoc.uconn.edu/geoc-guidelines/. NOTE: Please do not simply copy and paste guidelines. Provide explanation as to HOW the course addresses the specific criteria.

    a. Arts and Humanities:



  • Comprehension and appreciation of written, visual, multi-modal and/or performing art forms because students are asked to critically analyze written plays, filmed stage plays, and films in terms of how they represent the Holocaust. The theater and film of the Holocaust often exists as a vehicle for artists to make larger statements or ask bigger questions that surround the Holocaust. Questions about the moral choices that people were forced to make or statements about how physical survival did not mean the same thing as emotional survival, leaving many survivors after the war mentally unable ever to leave the camps.




  • Investigations and historical/critical analyses of human experience because students read novels and testimony as well as watch documentaries based upon first-hand accounts from the Holocaust and are asked to grapple with the various questions raised by these works. Questions that go to the very core of human nature and explore how people functioned in the systematic genocidal Third Reich. What role did these people play as prisoners, bystanders and perpetrators? How did the apparatus constructed by the Nazis often turn people into prisoners, bystanders, and perpetrators at the same time, and how did people who survived this experience maintain their humanity?

    

    b. Social Sciences:  

   

    c. Science and Technology:     


        i. Laboratory: (describe how the laboratory session will be conducted.)       

 

    d. Diversity and Multiculturalism:     



  • Develop an understanding of and sensitivity to issues involving human rights and migration by being exposed to the Holocaust experience and how it affected those involved. Students will learn by watching and reading works including documentary film, first-hand testimony, novels written based on personal experience, and dramatic works depicting the de-humanization and stripping away of human rights and dignity that was thrust upon Jews as well as many other groups targeted for persecution by the Third Reich.




  • Develop an awareness of the dynamics of social, political, and/or economic power in the context of human rights and migration by studying the Holocaust and the policies of the Nazis. The Nazis used the law to disenfranchise the Jewish population. They found ways to legally strip them of their money, possessions, careers, businesses, education, and ability to socialize with the rest of the society. This created a social environment that allowed the Holocaust to unfold without much resistance or protest.

        i. International: (describe how the international component will be part of the course.)



  • This course would fit into this category since the entire class focuses on European communities and their histories. All of the works covered in the course are written/created by members of the international community, primarily Europeans, with the exception of one play which is written by American co-authors.

    e. Q course:  

   


    f. W course:     


42. RESOURCES:
a. Does the department/school/program currently have resources to offer the course as proposed?
Yes: X

No:


If NO, please explain why and what resources are required to offer the course.

b. Do the UConn LIBRARIES currently have resources to support the course as proposed?
Yes: X

No:


If NO, please explain what resources are required to support the course.



43. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: (e.g., other information that you believe will be useful in evaluating the proposal, such as why this course is appropriate for inclusion at the 1000 or 2000 level or as a General Education Content Area or Competency (Q or W) course).


ADMIN COMMENT (For administrative use only):


When completed, email this form with a syllabus to geoc@uconn.edu.

Eng.3623-01, HEJS 3298-002, DRAM 3138-02

The Holocaust in Theater and Film

Spring 2017


Instructor: Grae Sibelman

Email: grae.sibelman@uconn.edu

Phone number: (860) 486- 9242

Office location: Oak Hall 224

Office hour: Tuesday, 1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Course Description: The Holocaust is one of the most dramatized historical events for the number of years since its passing. Yet, it is also one of the most difficult moments in history to effectively represent. In this class, we will look at some of the different ways that this subject has been approached. We will investigate the various ways that different dramatizations, both in theater and film, have attempted to communicate this period of history. Comparing styles and themes, we will analyze how these different dramatic works have attempted to make broader statements about humanity, society, and the systemization of the Holocaust. The course encourages you to interpret primary sources and creative works (film, drama, literary texts) from a variety of perspectives to develop a critical awareness of how mass human rights violations, crimes against humanity, and genocide occur.

We will specifically focus on the use of style and genre, point of view, tropes and intertextuality, and the limits of representation.

Course Goals:

1. To come to a deeper understanding of the Holocaust and its implications for recognizing individual and systemic factors that led to mass human rights violations, crimes against humanity, and genocide.

2. To understand how and why certain types of Holocaust depictions do a better job of capturing this moment in history.


Course Requirements and Grading

20 percent class participation - All students are expected to attend regularly and engage in class discussions related to the weekly reading assignments and films/stage productions that we view in the class. This will be a discussion based course and student input is an important part of the learning process.

30 percent on weekly assignments. Each week students are expected to post a discussion question on Blackboard. This question should be well thought out and complex. The question needs to demonstrate critical thinking and should tease out some aspect of insight that you were provided with from the reading. This question needs to be posted on black board by 10:00 PM on Monday night. Questions will be graded upon based on their merit. Questions may be used for class discussion, so you may be called upon to share your question orally.

25 percent mid-term exam. The mid-term will be a take home exam. It will consist of multiple essay questions. You will need to draw upon the readings, screenings, lectures, and class discussions to complete the essays. The essays should be well constructed papers with a beginning, middle, and conclusion. Attention should also be paid to grammar, spelling, and properly citing all material used from sources.

25 percent final exam with presentation – Students will be assigned three questions. Two will be given in the form of a take home essay exam. The essay questions will draw upon the books and plays that we have read, films that we have screened, lectures, and class discussions. The other question will need to be answered in presentation format. For the presentation question, students are asked to choose one non-fiction text that we read in class and one dramatic piece (play or film) from the course readings/screenings and to compare the benefits/deficits of the different modalities.

Schedule

Weeks 1-2 – Confronting the Holocaust – reading and watching first-hand accounts of the Holocaust experience in order to ground us in our study of the dramatizations.

Assignments:

January. 17th – Film: One Day in Auschwitz – Directed by Steve Purcell.

Read Night by Ellie Wiesel
January 24th - Film: The Pianist – Directed by Roman Polanski.

Read: This Way to the Gas Ladies and Gentleman by Tadeusz Borowski

Recommended to read - “Neither Monsters nor Beasts” section of Facing the Extreme by Tzvetan Todorov, Metropolitan Books 1996.
Weeks 3 – 7 Narrative structured representations that focus on showing the nuances and broader questions raised by the Holocaust.
Assignments:

January 31st – Discuss The Pianist and readings.

Read: Fragments of Memory by Hana Greenfield, Gefen Publishing House, 1998 and Medallions by Zofia Nalkowska, Northwestern University Press, 2000.
February 7th – Film: Ida – Directed by Pawel Pawlikowski.

Read: Resort 76 by Shimon Wincelberg from Theatre of the Holocaust by Robert Skloot, University of Wisconsin Press 1982.

Recommended to read - Introduction to Theatre of the Holocaust by Robert Skloot
February 14th – Film excerpts from: Partisans of Vilna, The Untold Story of Jewish Resistance During World War II – directed by Josh Waletzky, 1986.

Read: Ghetto by Joshua Sobol from Plays of the Holocaust by Elinor Fuchs and excerpts from The Last Days of the Jerusalem of Lithuania: Chronicles from the Vilna Ghetto and the Camps, 1939-1944 by Herman Kruk (pages 173 – 197)


February 21st - Film: Amen – Directed by Costa-Gavras.

Read: The Deputy by Rolf Hochhuth 1964

February 28th - Film: Pope Pius XII Under the Roman Sky – Directed by Christian Duguay.

Read: Articles on Pope Pius XII and the representation of the Clergy in theater.


March 7th – Review of all material covered thus far

Read The Puppetmaster of Lodz by Gilles Segal, Translated by Sara O’Conner, Samuel French 1950.


Weeks 9- 14 – Non-narrative structured representations that focus on dehumanization and the repercussions of the Holocaust on civilization.
March 21st - Midterm Exam will be turned in.

Read: Throne of Straw by Harold and Edith Lieberman from Theatre of the Holocaust.


March 28th - Film: Lodz Ghetto directed by Alan Adelson, Kate Taverna Throne, 1988.

Read: “Theatre is an Encounter” and “Akropolis: Treatment of the Text” from Towards a Poor Theatre by Jerzy Grotowski, Routledge, 1968.


April 4th - Watch: Akropolis by Grotowski - VHS recording and The Theater of Grotowski by Jennifer Kumiega.

Read: The Post-Traumatic Theater of Grotowski and Kantor by Magda Romanska, Anthem Press 2012. Pages 199 -200 and 252-266.


April 11th – Class cancelled in observance of Passover Holiday

Watch: The Dead Class by Tadeusz Kantor on your own during this week.

Read: Who Will Carry the Word by Charlotte Delbo from Theatre of the Holocaust



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