Llm international Economic Law (Intensive) Two Pathways: llm international Finance & Economic Law llm international Economic Law Justice & Development



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School of Law



LLM

International Economic Law

(Intensive)

Two Pathways:

LLM International Finance & Economic Law

LLM International Economic Law Justice & Development

Programme Handbook
2015/16


The Intensive Mode of Study 5

Undertaking a master’s degree through an intensive mode of teaching and learning has many advantages. It enables you to combine a busy work life or other commitments with postgraduate study. You can tailor study to fit with your wider plans for retraining, skilling-up, and augmenting your qualifications during a schedule of classes that suits your needs. Birkbeck Law School is very pleased to be able to create this opportunity for you to undertake intellectually rewarding legal studies with the flexibility that your life and work demands. 5

Intensive learning and teaching also poses particular demands that you should be aware of from the outset. While the face-to-face teaching in the degree is undertaken during a concentrated period of time, the arc of learning unfolds over a much longer period – from the time you enrol. We provide you with study guides and readings soon after you enrol and well in advance of face-to-face teaching. We expect you to work through the study guide and complete all your reading before arriving at classes in March and June respectively (the detailed timetable is at the end of this handbook). Your readings for March modules will be sent out to you at the end of January, and your June readings will be sent to you in April. You should also be thinking reflectively about the topics and questions provided for you so that you can make the most of the seminars at Birkbeck. 5

Where possible, we have also made your readings available to you electronically through our virtual learning environment – Moodle. You must become familiar with Moodle as readings, assessment tasks, and other communications will be made through Moodle. There is an individual Moodle site for each module including your dissertation. 5

Your main focus from the time you receive your study guides and reading material is to plan your time so that you can complete the reading for all the modules in the forthcoming teaching period. If you are experiencing any difficulties you should contact Dr Stewart Motha (s.motha@bbk.ac.uk) who will be happy to address your queries. 6

Overview 7

Regulations regarding the structure of programmes, maximum period of registration and other areas are available in the College Regulations for Taught Programmes of Study: 10

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/rules/rules#2008 10

Content 11

Practicalities 20




Postgraduate Taught Intensive Programmes

Important Dates – 2015/16

2016

Tuesday 8th March Induction Day

Wednesday 9th March Week 1 Teaching begins

Wednesday 16th March Week 2 Teaching begins

Monday 13th June 11.30 am Deadline for submission of March term coursework
Submitted online via moodle

Monday 13th June Submission of dissertation application forms


(Full time students only)

Tuesday 21st June Dissertation Workshop

Wednesday 22nd June Week 1 Teaching begins

Wednesday 29th June Week 2 Teaching begins




Tuesday 6th September 11.30 am Deadline for submission of June/July
term coursework
Submitted online via moodle

Monday 19th September 11.30 am Deadline for submission of Dissertation
Submitted online via moodle (Full-time students only)


Welcome

On behalf of all my colleagues I would like to welcome you to what I hope will be an exciting and rewarding period of postgraduate studies.

This handbook is designed to provide you with essential practical information that you will require throughout your studies. Please read it carefully. If you are unsure about anything please talk to the Director of Intensive LLM Programmes, Dr Stewart Motha (s.motha@bbk.ac.uk); web-site:
(http://www.bbk.ac.uk/law/our-staff/ft-academic/stewart-motha).

Birkbeck College is a research-led institution and has one of the highest proportions of research active staff amongst Colleges and Universities in the Greater London area. This expertise is the basis for Birkbeck’s enthusiasm and commitment to postgraduate teaching.

Our intensive LLM programmes are specifically designed to give busy professionals and those wishing to combine work and family life access to postgraduate studies in law. The combination of readings and materials provided in advance, face-to-face teaching at Birkbeck, and independent research undertaken for your dissertation provides you with a unique opportunity to enhance your qualifications in a vibrant intellectual environment.

Since the Law School was established in 1992 it has grown from an undergraduate programme of 76 students and a handful of PhD candidates to one of the largest and most successful Schools in the College. Our qualifying law degree programmes now recruit 300 students a year and we have 9 taught postgraduate degrees. With around 80 PhD candidates, the School hosts a postgraduate community of 350+ students. We continue to grow, but what has remained constant in the School’s history is its commitment to theoretically informed interdisciplinary research, scholarship and teaching that seeks to produce graduates who adopt an unerringly critical approach to law in their studies and hopefully in their work life too.

The School of Law has a thriving community of postgraduate scholars and we hope that you will enjoy being part of it.

Professor Patricia Tuitt

Executive Dean


The Intensive Mode of Study

Undertaking a master’s degree through an intensive mode of teaching and learning has many advantages. It enables you to combine a busy work life or other commitments with postgraduate study. You can tailor study to fit with your wider plans for retraining, skilling-up, and augmenting your qualifications during a schedule of classes that suits your needs. Birkbeck Law School is very pleased to be able to create this opportunity for you to undertake intellectually rewarding legal studies with the flexibility that your life and work demands.

Intensive learning and teaching also poses particular demands that you should be aware of from the outset. While the face-to-face teaching in the degree is undertaken during a concentrated period of time, the arc of learning unfolds over a much longer period – from the time you enrol. We provide you with study guides and readings soon after you enrol and well in advance of face-to-face teaching. We expect you to work through the study guide and complete all your reading before arriving at classes in March and June respectively (the detailed timetable is at the end of this handbook). Your readings for March modules will be sent out to you at the end of January, and your June readings will be sent to you in April. You should also be thinking reflectively about the topics and questions provided for you so that you can make the most of the seminars at Birkbeck.

Where possible, we have also made your readings available to you electronically through our virtual learning environment – Moodle. You must become familiar with Moodle as readings, assessment tasks, and other communications will be made through Moodle. There is an individual Moodle site for each module including your dissertation.


The specialised teaching we provide will be a foundation for you to successfully complete your compulsory dissertation. You will receive support in selecting a suitable dissertation topic, and academic supervision

through the process of writing it. We will advise you about selecting a dissertation topic when we see you in March. We suggest that you not rush to select a topic. The best time would be once you have experienced the intellectual stimulation of the teaching in March.

As a student at Birkbeck you will have access to an excellent research oriented library. A vast amount of the library’s resources are available electronically. Those studying, researching, and completing assessments remotely must take full advantage of these electronic resources. We will arrange for you to have a professional induction to the library coordinated by our specialist law librarian. Lynwood.

Your main focus from the time you receive your study guides and reading material is to plan your time so that you can complete the reading for all the modules in the forthcoming teaching period. If you are experiencing any difficulties you should contact Dr Stewart Motha (s.motha@bbk.ac.uk) who will be happy to address your queries.




Overview


This innovative LLM enables you to tailor your studies to your professional and research interests. You choose 1 out of 2 LLM pathways, electing to combine the study of international economic law with either finance and global markets or with justice and development.

Both pathways draw on cutting-edge critical research to examine contemporary issues and problems.

If you are interested in finance, global markets and international economic institutions, you may select the LLM International Finance and Economic Law (Intensive).

If you wish to study global development issues and economic institutions you select LLM International Economic Law, Justice and Development (Intensive).

The aim of the LLM in International Economic Law is to engage students in a critical examination of the law, institutions and practice constituting global and local economies.

It is by preparing for, and actively participating in, seminars that you will come to appreciate the complexities and nuances of the subjects you have come to study, to generate new ideas and to improve your reasoning and communication skills.

On completion of the programme, you will be able to:


  • Undertake a critical examination of the law, institutions and practice that constitute global and local economies.

  • Understand the history and trajectory of global finance

  • Undertake a critical examination of the law, institutions and practice that constitute global and local economies, through specific, in-depth case studies.

  • Demonstrate an appreciation for the objectives, operation and importance of specific international economic institutions.

  • Demonstrate an appreciation of practical outcomes from theory.

  • Engage in Interdisciplinary analysis.

  • Demonstrate improved written and oral communication skills.

  • Engage in introspection and reflection.



Attendance

You need to complete all the reading before attending for face-to-face teaching in each module.

Attendance in each module is compulsory. You must attend at least 80% of each module. A roll will be taken on each day of teaching in each module.

The major aim of the taught modules is to introduce you to the different elements of multi-disciplinary scholarship in the subject.

Whether you are undertaking this course as a full time or a part time student you should make active participation in the seminars a primary goal. Seminars are the cornerstone on which we seek to build an academic community: a community of researchers with whom you may exchange views, generate ideas and develop skills.

If you are not attending a seminar, please inform the module convenor (your seminar tutor) and the Programme Administrator in writing stating the reasons for non-attendance.

If you wish to take a break in studies, you must inform your Programme Director and the Programme Administrator in writing, non attendance will not be recognised as an interruption of studies or withdrawal.

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/administration/break-in-studies


Structure of the Programme

Students must complete:



  • 3 x core modules + 3 x option modules; OR

Table 1: IEL LLM (1 year full time, 2 years part time)

Full Time (1 Year)

Core 1

Introduction to International Economic Law, Justice and Development

30 Credits

Core 2

Depending on Pathway:

Introduction to the Law of International Finance


OR
Advanced International Economic Law, Justice and Development

30 Credits



Core 3

Dissertation

30 Credits

Option 1




30 Credits

Option 2




30 Credits

Option 3




30 Credits

Total: 180 credits




Part Time (2 Years)

Year 1

Core 1

Introduction to International Economic Law, Justice and Development

30 Credits

Core 2

Introduction to the Law of International Finance

OR

Advanced International Economic Law, Justice and Development



30 Credits

Option 1




30 Credits

Year 2

Option 2




30 Credits

Option 3




30 Credits

Core 3

Dissertation

30 Credits

Total: 180 credits

Please note that:

  • core modules must be taken and passed to allow the student to complete the degree;

  • option modules may be chosen from a range of modules.


Regulations regarding the structure of programmes, maximum period of registration and other areas are available in the College Regulations for Taught Programmes of Study:

  • http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/rules/rules#2008




Content

Core modules

Introduction to International Economic Law, Justice and Development


Professor Fiona Macmillan

The module aims to introduce students to the critical examination of the law, institutions and practice that constitute global and local economies. The key supporting objectives are to offer a balance of:



  • theory and practice

  • geographical coverage

  • general and specific subject matter

  • movements/ideas and counter-movements/ideas



One of the following depending on the LLM IEL pathway:



Advanced International Economic Law, Justice and Development


Prof Michelle Everson

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of international economic law in general and the more recently established concept of the ‘global economic constitution’ in particular. In addition the course will briefly cover growing crisis within the global economic constitution. The core problems examined include:



  • the ‘normative character’ of international economic law

  • the balancing of social, cultural and economic values within competing national supranational and international political-legal jurisdictions (sovereignties)

  • the constitutional function of economic law

  • new ways of thinking about global justice

Introduction to the Law of International Finance

Dr Stephen Connelly


In practical terms, the Module is designed to bridge the gap between the formal understanding of the core principles of the English law of obligations, companies, and the practise of these principles in ‘financial capitals’ across the World. For this purpose, the Module builds on students’ existing legal training to engage in a critical analysis of credit facility agreements and related primary and secondary finance documents, always emphasising the manner in which the economic demands of international finance ‘form’ these agreements and in some instances strain legal doctrine to breaking point.

Indicative syllabus contents



  • Debt-based theories of society and control;

  • the auto-liberation of capital and financial instability;

  • understanding the London-‘form’ of credit agreement and related documentation;

  • financialisation with reference to syndication and securitisation;

  • credit-related restructuring, insolvency, and enforcement; and

  • finance and its regulation in the European Union context.


Option modules


For the full range of options available to you in the current academic year please see the module choices booklet.

Dissertation


Students must complete a dissertation of 8,000 to 10,000 words. You must:

  1. Draw on the instructions provided for you in your Moodle page for dissertations

  2. Attend the scheduled inductions to the library and talks about writing a dissertation.

  3. Identify and plan your research topic;

  4. Find a supervisor from among the academic staff in the law school – Dr Motha will assist in this process

  5. Carry out independent research

  6. Submit the dissertation by 11.30am on 21st September 2015 (for fulltime students); date to be confirmed in 2016 (for part-time students).

Assessment

Submission


You must submit your coursework electronically via Moodle for all modules. Detailed instructions on how to submit will be accessible in the ‘Assessment’ section of each Moodle module area and will also be sent to you via email by the programme administrator.

Please note that assessment feedback is returned in hard copy not via Moodle.

All coursework must be submitted by the deadlines set out in Table 3.

Every effort will be made to return a hard copy of your coursework or dissertation:



  • with a mark, comments and feedback form;

  • via first class post

  • within 6 weeks of submission (except dissertations, resubmissions and coursework submitted following mitigating circumstances procedures);

  • with notification to your email account.

  • Note: provisional marks are subject to approval or change by the External Examination Board.

Format


Assessments (coursework and dissertations) must:

  • Be double spaced and typed

  • Include everything listed in Table 1.

Table 1 Information to include when submitting coursework and dissertations

What

Where

Enrolment number1

Header or footer, every page

Module name

Front page

Coursework/ Dissertation title

Front page

Subject tutor/ dissertation supervisor

Front page



Footnotes and Referencing (Word Limits):


The set assessment word limit excludes both footnotes and the bibliography. Whilst both footnotes and bibliography are important for the form of the essay, the focus of your efforts should be the argument itself.

Footnotes are used to clarify the argument, and a bibliography records the sources that you have used. Extended footnotes and a large bibliography are no replacement for a carefully constructed argument that engages with the major sources and literature relevant for the subject being considered. All students should seek guidance from their module convenor/supervisor about the appropriate length of both footnotes and bibliography given the word limit of the essay. It is important to make use of enough resources to develop your argument, but, not to lose any sense of your central thesis through mere repetition of detail.

There are different ways of referencing an essay. Whilst no one method is stipulated, an essay must be consistent in the convention chosen.

Further information and guidance can be found at: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/facilities/support/workshops






Assessments


The College Policy on Late Submission of Assessment can be found at:

  • http://www.bbk.ac.uk/reg/regs/cas/assessment/latesubmission

Unless a formal Mitigating Circumstances application is accepted (see below), marks will be capped at:

  • 50 % for work submitted by three weeks from the deadline;

  • 0 % for work submitted more than 3 weeks from the deadline.


Procedures


The marking scheme for dissertations and coursework is set out in Table 2. Note the pass mark is 50 %.

Internal markers independently mark assessments, agree their marks, and forward a representative sample to the External Examiner for further consideration.



  • The role of External Examiners is to ensure that staff are marking to a consistent and appropriate standard and in line with the discipline across the College (http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/rules/marking-and-moderation.pdf ).

  • Each External Examiner produces a report which is considered by the module convenor.

Table 2: LLM marking scheme

Mark

Descriptor

Outcome

0-29

Marks in this range indicate general incompetence, with highly serious levels of weaknesses on two or more dimensions. Work in this range will either fail to present any real argument or opinion, or fail to engage at all with the topic in question. Work may quote heavily from a small number of sources, but fail to integrate them and provide little or no narrative to explain their relevance.

Very Low Fail


30-39

Marks in this range display major levels of weaknesses on two or more dimensions. The work may be reliant on a minimal range of reading with poor attention to detail. Work in this range may be characterised by assertions lacking supporting evidence or argument, or by seriously flawed understanding of key concepts. Work in this range shows little ability to develop a clear argument.

Low Fail


40-49

Marks in this range do not quite meet the minimum standards for a pass, with considerable levels of weaknesses on one or more dimensions. Work in this range may suffer from flawed arguments, weak structure and presentation, an inadequate command of course materials, or a serious failure to reflect on those materials. It will however demonstrate a basic understanding of the course being examined and show evidence of reasonable attention to the course materials. Work in this range lacks originality and organisation.

Fail


50-59

Marks in this range indicate general capability, but with moderate levels of weaknesses on one or more dimensions indicated above. Work in this range may contain inaccuracies, the arguments may lack clarity or rigour, or there may be a lack of critical understanding. The work does not sufficiently show awareness of critical debate, alternative arguments or approaches to the subject. It will however be coherently structured and presented, showing a sound command of the subject and the ability to construct a generally coherent argument.


Pass

60-69

Work that demonstrates a good command of the subject and relevant literature(s) as well as a sound grasp of critical issues, with evidence of independent thought and a high standard of argument as well as good presentation. Work in this range will treat issues in a critical yet balanced manner, showing awareness of context, sources and different explanations. Work towards the bottom of this range may have occasional weaknesses and flaws but will nevertheless show a generally high level of competence. Work towards the top of this range will be highly competent on all dimensions.

Pass (Merit)

70-79

Marks in this range indicate high levels of scholarship, excellent knowledge of relevant literature and high performance in terms of all of the dimensions outlined. The work displays a substantial measure of originality. Comprehensively argued research of interest and originality which is also well organized and presented exhibiting a sound, critical and analytical grasp of the relevant literature(s) and drawing on an extensive range of relevant academic sources. The work will display an excellent understanding of underlying theory as well as employing appropriate research methods and analytical techniques, resulting in findings of interest and significance.


Pass (Distinction)

80-100

Marks in this range indicate an exceptionally high level of scholarship and outstanding performance in terms of all of the dimensions outlined. While work at this level exhibits scrupulous completion of the requirements of the assignment, it will also exhibit a high degree of research initiative, high quality of analysis, academic sophistication, comprehension and critical assessment, making a novel contribution to the relevant research area empirically and/or theoretically.


Pass (High Distinction)

Degree Classification

Postgraduate awards may be made with Pass, Merit or Distinction.

Distinctions are normally awarded to students who achieve an average result of 70% or more, including a mark of 70 or over in their dissertation, for all level 7 modules on their programme.

A Merit is normally awarded to students who achieve an average result of 60% or more for all level 7 modules. Level 6 modules included as part of the programme are not included in the calculation for degree classification for postgraduate programmes.














Mitigating Circumstances


Mitigating Circumstances are defined as unforeseen, unpreventable circumstances that significantly disrupt your performance in assessment (coursework, examinations, or other form).

  • This should not be confused with long term issues such as medical conditions, for which the College can make adjustments before assessment, and which are explained under the heading Disability.

The College Policy on Mitigating Circumstances, which explains the procedure to follow, can be found at:

  • http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/administration/assessment/coursework/mitigating-circumstances

Guidance on what may constitute acceptable mitigating circumstances is available as an appendix to the policy.

  • Note: this is not an exhaustive list, and that each case will be treated on its merits by the relevant sub-board or delegated body.

All cases in which mitigating circumstances have been pleaded are referred to a sub-committee of the exam board which reviews the documentary evidence provided by the student and makes a decision about how to deal with the case, this is then reported to the Exam Board.

Exam boards


Internal Exam Boards sit in June and November, and are composed of all the School of Law staff who teach on the Masters programmes and are chaired by the Director of Taught Masters programmes. The discussions of the Board are strictly confidential. It considers profiles of each student’s marks, along with the advice of external examiners, in order to:

  • ensure the accuracy and consistency of marking across subjects; and

  • identify difficult cases on which it would like to take the further advice of the External Examiners.

External Exam Boards are made up of all staff within the School of Law who have taught on the programme, a senior member of the Birkbeck Registry staff and all the external examiners. All the marks allocated are reviewed once again with the Board and problem cases are referred to external examiners for advice.

  • External examiners are invited to make comments on general standards in the school and the assessment process at the Board, as well as a formal written report on standards within the School to the Registrar of Birkbeck College.

  • These reports are forwarded via the Director of Taught Master Programmes to the appropriate staff within the School who are required by the Registrar to answer any queries raised by the External Examiner and address any concerns.

Failure and reassessment


The College Regulations for Taught Programmes of Study outline how an examination board should treat a failed module when considering progression and awards:

  • http://www.bbk.ac.uk/reg/regs/prog_regs/pgt_regs/pgt_examination

The School of Law is responsible for judging, within those regulations, whether you will:

  • have the fail “compensated”—that is, be awarded credit for that module even if you have not actually passed; or

  • need to re-take the module—that is, attend lectures and seminars and re-attempt the assessment; or

  • be able to attempt a ‘re-assessment’—that is, to submit the failed assessment again. This does not require attendance at lectures and seminars and you will not normally be reassessed in elements that you have already passed.

Querying marks


There is no right of appeal on academic grounds against any assessment, module or degree result.

A student who wishes to understand the academic basis for their mark or to query their mark on non-academic grounds should:



  • Talk to the marker of your coursework, who ought to explain and assist you in understanding how the mark has been awarded;

  • If you remain dissatisfied you should meet with your Programme Director, who ought to assist you in understanding how the mark has been awarded;

  • If you remain dissatisfied then you should follow the College procedures for making representations concerning assessment results: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/reg/regs/cas/assessment/representations

  • If the mark is being queried following a decision of the board of examiners then the procedure for appeals against the decision of boards of examiners should be followed:

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/administration/assessment/appeals

Note: where a complaint relates to a decision of the Board of Examiners in relation to plagiarism a separate procedure applies:



  • http://www.bbk.ac.uk/reg/regs/discipline_pdf


Practicalities

Places


The Main College building is on Malet Street.

Law School offices are



  • 14 Gower Street London WC1E: open 12:00-18:00 Monday to Friday

  • Law academic offices are at 4, 12, 14, 16 and 18 Gower St London WC1E;

  • Office hours: 12- 2pm and 4-6pm

Your Birkbeck student ID card allows access to 14 Gower Street between 16:30 and 21:30 during term time.

  • To access 14 Gower Street outside of these times, or other buildings any time when you have an appointment, ring the relevant buzzer on the street door.

Table 3 Important addresses

All Post

School of Law
Birkbeck College
Malet Street
London
WC1E 7HX

Main Law Office

14 Gower Street, G02

T: 020 7631 6508/ 6626


E: law@bbk.ac.uk
W: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/law/

Contacting you


Our primary form of communication is through your nominated email account. You are responsible for checking that account regularly.

Information is regularly posted on our websites (See Table 3). You will need your ITS username and password to access some information:



  • http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/facilities/computing/username

People


Academic Staff

Maria Aristodemou

Room 102, 14 Gower

m.aristodemou@bbk.ac.uk

Professor Bill Bowring

Room B03, 14 Gower

b.bowring@bbk.ac.uk

Eddie Bruce Jones

Room 102, 12 Gower

e.bruce-jones@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Ana Chamberlen

Room 202, 12 Gower

a.chamberlen@bbk.ac.uk

Fred Cowell

Room 201, 18 Gower

f.cowell@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Marinos Diamantides

Room 203, 16 Gower

m.diamantides@bbk.ac.uk

Professor Costas Douzinas

Room 102, 16 Gower

c.douzinas@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Nadine El-Enany

Room 202, 14 Gower

n.el-enany@bbk.ac.uk

Basak Ertur

Room 201, 12 Gower

b.ertur@bbk.ac.uk

Professor Michelle Everson

Room 302, 4 Gower

m.everson@bbk.ac.uk

Professor Peter Fitzpatrick

Room 102, 4 Gower

p.fitzpatrick@bbk.ac.uk

Professor Adam Gearey

Room 201, 4 Gower

a.gearey@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Zeina Ghandour

Room 2.05, 18 Gower

z.ghandour@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Oscar Guardiola-Rivera

Room 101, 12 Gower

o.guardiola-rivera@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Piyel Haldar

Room 303, 16 Gower

p.haldar@bbk.ac.uk

Professor Patrick Hanafin

Room 301 16 Gower

p.hanafin@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Sarah Keenan

Room 201, 14 Gower

s.keenan@bbk.ac.uk

Sarah Lamble

Room G01, 4 Gower

s.lamble@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Elena Loizidou

Room 101, 4 Gower

e.loizidou@bbk.ac.uk

Professor Fiona Macmillan

G02 4 Gower

f.macmillan@bbk.ac.uk

Daniel Monk

Room 301, 4 Gower

d.monk@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Nathan Moore

Room B03, 4 Gower

nathan.moore@bbk.ac.uk

Professor Les Moran

Room 201, 16 Gower

l.moran@bbk.ac.uk

Craig Reeves

Room 204, 18 Gower

c.reeves@bbk.ac.uk

Victoria Ridler

Room 203, 4 Gower

v.ridler@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Stewart Motha

Room 202, 12 Gower

s.motha@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Anton Schütz

Room 302, 16 Gower

a.schutz@bbk.ac.uk

Professor Patricia Tuitt

Room 202, 16 Gower

p.tuitt@bbk.ac.uk

Dr Sappho Xenaxis

Rom 101, 14 Gower

s.xenakis@bbk.ac.uk

Full details of all staff at Birkbeck School of Law can be found at: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/law/our-staf

Part time and visiting staff


Part time teaching staff and visiting staff can be contacted via the postgraduate pigeonhole in room G01 at 16 Gower Street. Alternatively messages may be left for them with the administrative staff.





Enrolment and registration


Membership of Birkbeck is not complete until you enrol and register

  • These processes are dealt with by Student Administration, NOT the School of Law.

  • Will not receive your student ID, library card or Union membership until you enrol.

You must register once at the beginning of your programme of study.

Fees


Fees are dealt with by the Fees Office ONLY.

  • Exam results are not issued until you pay fees and other debts.

  • If you defer or withdraw you must write to the School of Law office stating your last date of attendance. If you withdraw after attending for part of a term you are liable to pay fees for the whole of the term.

Details of the Financial Support Office can be found on our website at http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/facilities/studentfinance/pgt_finance

Disability Statement

At Birkbeck there are students with a wide range of disabilities including dyslexia, visual or hearing impairments, mobility difficulties, mental health needs, medical conditions, respiratory conditions. Many of them have benefited from the advice and support provided by the College’s Disability Office.


The Disability Office


The College has a Disability Office located in room G12 on the ground floor of the Malet Street building. We have a Disability Service Manager, Mark Pimm, a Disability Administrator, John Muya and a Mental Health Advisor, Elizabeth Hughes. We will shortly be appointing an SpLD Advisor.

All enquiries should come to the Disability office, who will determine the appropriate referral to specialist staff. They can provide advice and support on travel and parking, physical access, the Disabled Students Allowance, special equipment, personal support, examination arrangements etc. If you have a disability or dyslexia, we recommend you come to our drop in session where we can discuss support and make follow up appointments as necessary. The drop-in sessions are between 4pm and 6pm Monday to Thursday.

The Disability Office can also complete an Individual Student Support Agreement form with you, confirming your support requirements and send this to your School and relevant Departments at the College so they are informed of your needs.

Access at Birkbeck

Birkbeck's main buildings have wheelchair access, accessible lifts and toilets, our reception desks have induction loops for people with hearing impairments and we have large print and tactile signage. Disabled parking, lockers, specialist seating in lectures and seminars and portable induction loops can all be arranged by the Disability Office.


The Disabled Students Allowance


UK and most EU students with disabilities on undergraduate and postgraduate courses are eligible to apply for the Disabled Students' Allowance (DSA). The DSA usually provides thousands of pounds worth of support and all the evidence shows that students who receive it are more likely to complete their courses successfully. The Disability Office can provide further information on the DSA and can assist you in applying to Student Finance England for this support.

The Personal Assistance Scheme

Some students need a personal assistant to provide support on their course, for example a note-taker, sign language interpreter, reader, personal assistant, disability mentor or dyslexia support tutor. Birkbeck uses a specialist agency to recruit Personal Assistants and they can assist you with recruiting, training and paying your personal assistant. Please contact the Disability Office for information on this scheme.


Support in your School

The provision which can be made for students with disabilities by Schools is set out in the Procedures for Students with Disabilities. This is available from the Disability Office and on the disability website (see below).

As mentioned above your School will receive a copy of your Individual Student Support Agreement from the Disability Office. This will make specific recommendations about the support you should receive from the School.

Whilst we anticipate that this support will be provided by the Programme Director, tutors and School Administrator in the School of Arts also has a Student Disability Liaison Officer. If you experience any difficulties or require additional support from the School then they may also be able to assist you. They may be contacted through the School Office or the Disability Office.



Support in IT Services and Library Services

There is a comprehensive range of specialist equipment for students with disabilities in IT Services. This includes software packages for dyslexic students (e.g. Claroread and Inspiration), screen reading and character enhancing software for students with visual impairments, specialist scanning software, large monitors, ergonomic mice and keyboards, specialist orthopaedic chairs etc. For advice and assistance please contact Disability IT Support. There is also a range of specialist equipment in the Library including a CCTV reading machine for visually impaired students as well as specialist orthopaedic chairs and writing slopes. The Disability Office refers all students with disabilities to the Library Access Support service who provides a comprehensive range of services for students with disabilities.



Specific Learning Difficulties (Dyslexia)

Mature students who experienced problems at school are often unaware that these problems may result from their being dyslexic. Whilst dyslexia cannot be cured, you can learn strategies, which make studying significantly easier. If you think you may be dyslexic you should contact the Disability Office who can screen you and where appropriate refer you to an Educational Psychologist for a dyslexia assessment. These assessments cost £225. Some students can receive assistance in meeting this cost from their employer. In exceptional cases students may receive assistance from the Access to Learning Fund.


Examinations


Students with disabilities and dyslexia may be eligible for special arrangements for examinations e.g. extra time, use of a word processor, amanuensis, enlarged examination papers etc. In order to receive special arrangements a student must provide medical evidence of their disability (or an Educational Psychologists report if you are dyslexic) to the Disability Office. For School examinations you should contact your Programme Director to request special arrangements at least 2 weeks before the examination. For main College summer examinations you are given the opportunity to declare that you require special provision on your assessment entry form. Students who require provision should then attend an appointment with the Disability Office to discuss and formalise the appropriate arrangements. The closing date for making special examination arrangements in College examinations is the 15th March and beyond this date consideration will only be given to emergency cases.
Further information

Full information on disability support can be found at: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/facilities/disability

For further information or to make an appointment to see the Disability office, please call the Student Centre on 020 7631 6316 or email disability@bbk.ac.uk. Alternatively you can go to the Disability Office in room G12 between 4pm and 6pm Monday – Thursday for during their drop-in hours.

Libraries

The College Library at Malet Street has a collection of law books, journals, and primary law sources including law reports and parliamentary statutes. This collection has been built up to support the School of Law. The Library’s particular strength lies in the range of electronic resources available and the range of services geared to the needs of part-time students.

A pocket-sized guide entitled Law Library Resources is available from the Library Help Desk, this gives an outline of the print and electronic sources available. An expanded version of this guide and further information about all aspects of the Library service are available from the Library web site at   http://www.bbk.ac.uk/lib/

If you need help in the Library, please ask at the Help Desk or contact your subject librarian by telephone or email.



General aspects of term-time service geared towards the needs of part-time students:

  • Long opening hours (During term time the library is open from 8.30am – 11.45pm seven days a week.)

  • Email and telephone enquiry service

  • Telephone and online book renewal facilities

  • Library web site giving access to the library catalogue, electronic journals and databases, internet links and a range of feedback and request forms

The majority of stock is available for 3 or 1 week loan.  The Library has a Reading Room Collection of heavily used text books and photocopied articles from reading lists which are available for reference use within the Library.

Electronic Resources

Westlaw UK is an electronic database which contains UK cases, statutes, and statutory instruments (primary law sources). Current statutes and some cases are available in full. It also provides references to journal articles on specified topics (secondary sources) and in some instances the articles themselves are available in full. Westlaw also covers EU and international law sources. The service is accessible from outside the College (ask in the Library for details).

LexisLibrary is the other major legal electronic database to which Birkbeck subscribes. Like Westlaw, it contains the full text of UK cases and current legislation, and some full-text journals. It also includes material from the EU and other jurisdictions and can be accessed from home – again ask in the Library for details.

Other electronic services include:

Hein Online - an electronic archive consisting primarily of full text American law journals. It also contains the English Reports.

Nexis UK - an online newspaper database with worldwide coverage.

JSTOR, Project Muse and PAO - all of these can be searched by subject keyword and together contain thousands of full-text journals covering a range of arts and humanities subjects.

Library induction


New students can join one of the introductory sessions to the Library which run as part of the Student Orientation event and during the first few weeks of the Autumn term.

Library hours

Opening hours can be found on our website at http://www.bbk.ac.uk/lib/

Details of the days on which the Library will be closed during the College holidays will be publicised on the Library web site.

Library card


When you enrol, the Registry will send you a College membership card.  This card will also serve as your Library card and will be valid for use in the Library until 30th September 2013.

You will always need your membership card to enter the Library and borrow books. If you wish to use the Internet or Microsoft Office packages you will need to know your IT Services username and password. An IT Services username and password is sent out to new students upon enrolment. If you have not received a letter containing these via email, you can get it from IT Services reception (Ground Floor of the Malet Street building).


Photocopying service


*Your student card is used to operate both printing and photocopying. Credit can be added online, or via machines in the Malet Street building.*

Other Law Libraries in the vicinity

It is recommended that students use other law libraries in the vicinity if they wish to supplement the College Library’s printed collection. Please note: you will not be able to use the electronic resources at other universities.

The nearest and most comprehensive law collection is located at University College Library (UCL). You have free reference use of the UCL Library.

If you are a part-time student and wish to borrow books from other libraries, you can join the SCONUL Access scheme. Ask at the Help Desk for further details.

Local libraries belonging to the scheme which have good law collections include:


  • British Library of Political and Economic Science (LSE Library)

  • School of Oriental and African Studies

  • University of Westminster Law Library (at Little Titchfield Street)

Maintaining High Standards

We have a number of procedures in place at School and College level that Staff in the School of Law help us to ensure that standards of teaching, learning, research and administration are high.


Assessment Offences


For full details of the College Policy on examination offences, including plagiarism, see:

  • http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/administration/assessment/offences/offences

Plagiarism, the act of presenting somebody else's work as your own, is an act of academic dishonesty. The Law School, the College, the University of London and members of the global academic community all take it very seriously.

Student feedback


Student feedback is at the centre of our efforts to maintain high standards. You can always contact your course convenor or your personal tutor as soon as any issue arises. There are also a range of other formal and informal mechanisms for student feedback.

Class representatives are a link between the student body and the staff and their work is vital in the maintenance of good relations in the College. Elections occur at the beginning of the academic year. Training for class representatives is available through the Students’ Union.

Staff-student liaison committee meetings occur once per term. They are open to all postgraduate students, but you can also raise issues through your class representative or send a note of your concern directly to the Postgraduate Administrator. Dates and minutes of meetings will be circulated via email on a termly basis.

Module questionnaires are circulated via email to collect anonymous student reactions to such things as module content, teaching, organisation, administration and library provision. Feedback provided through this medium is invaluable as it helps us to improve on our performance. All the questionnaires are reviewed by the Convenors responsible for the courses and the School’s Learning, Teaching and Quality Committee ensures that action is taken where appropriate.

An elected representative of the student body is invited to all meetings of the School Board and asked to comment on any developments in the School which will have an impact on delivery of the programme to students.


Other mechanisms within the School


New modules are approved at the School and College levels. Once modules are approved, their Convenors are responsible for their implementation. The Convenor reports on their module(s) annually to the Director of Taught Masters Programmes. The module reports are also reviewed at School and College levels for generic concerns and instances of good practice.

Convenors are responsible for supporting and mentoring academics teaching on their course. It is School policy that the convenor or their representative observes the teaching practice of all seminar tutors.


Complaints


For those exceptional instances when a student’s concern cannot be dealt with at School level, there are various College procedures:

http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/aig




1 You can find this on any correspondence from the Student Administration Team and your student ID card.


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