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Miami Dade College

English & Communications Department

Kendall Campus

Independent Studies Program

IMPORTANT
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ENC 1102
English Composition 2
3 Credits


SPRING TERM (2011-2)

Spring “A” Term (January 4th – March 1st 2012)


Spring “B” Term (March 2nd – April 27th, 2012)

Reference #s 667793, 667841, 673423


(305) 237-2284 (English & Communications Office)

(305) 237-2709 (Meeting Office)


Meeting Office: Room 2201-01

Welcome to Independent Studies!


Students must see their professor and sign a contract no later than the first week of classes, or they may be dropped from the course.
We welcome you to our program and look forward to working with you throughout the semester. This handbook provides written directions to guide you through your course. Please read it carefully.
Learning as an Independent Study student places primary responsibility for that learning on you, the student. That is not to say that you are alone. Your Independent Studies instructor is your partner and guide. Keeping in contact with the instructor is very important. You will submit written assignments to your instructor and you will receive feedback, information and study suggestions from your instructor.
Completing this course will involve reading the textbook, completing all assignments and discussing your questions with your instructors. There are no regularly scheduled lectures, review sessions, or appointments.
Each student is responsible for designing his or her own study and testing schedule that satisfies the course requirements and meets the semester's deadline dates.
A successful Independent Studies student is self-motivated, self-disciplined, has good reading and comprehension skills and seeks out an instructor whenever there is a question. Taking a course via Independent Studies means that the work is scheduled differently, but there should be about as much work of about the same difficulty as if you were taking the course in a classroom.
Plan to spend about the same amount of time studying as you would spend in lecture plus homework in a lecture course. We highly recommend that you establish a personal study schedule at the very beginning of the semester. By studying every day, you may complete the course in the shortest amount of time.
The option of finishing your course early is one of the benefits of Independent Studies.
We are aware that each student has his/her unique learning style. Our department provides various strategies for the accomplishment of the assigned learning objectives and satisfactory completion of the course. The course description lists the criteria for determining your final grade.
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Statement
Students who have a disability that might affect their performance in the class are encouraged to contact Access Services, in confidence, as soon as possible.  The office will aid in appropriate accommodations for the student. Also please inform your professor. This is in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990.

The following are some departmental rules and guidelines:


Withdrawals and Incompletes
A student’s withdrawal from a course is his/her responsibility. If you do not complete the course work and do not officially withdraw from the course, you will receive a grade of “F” for the course.
Incomplete grades are given only for illness or exceptional circumstances, and only under the following conditions: 1) the student has completed more than half of the course work, is up to date on all assignments, and is passing with at least a “C” average at the time of the emergency; 2) the instructor is notified at the time of the emergency and agrees to the “I” grade; 3) the student has a doctor’s verification or other documentation; and 4) an “Agreement for Grade of Incomplete” form is signed by both student and instructor, and states the dates by which assignments must be completed.

Please read this document thoroughly. It contains the names of the required texts, dates and deadlines, assignments, requirements, and other materials. When you sign and return the contract, you are agreeing to all information in the document.

No cell phones are allowed in the Independent Studies Department while visiting and/or taking an exam.

See next pages for important dates and deadlines


Important Dates – Spring “A” Term (2011-2)

January 4th – March 1st, 2012
**These dates are subject to change. Please verify them with your instructor throughout the semester.
Wed. Jan. 4 Classes begin

Friday Jan. 6 Last day to drop with refund

Fri.-Mon. Jan. 14-16 Holiday – MLK, Jr. Day
Wed. Feb. 8 Last day to drop with “W”

Tues. Feb. 14 Last day for instructor

withdrawal, “IW”
Sat. March 3 Last day to input grades

(Before 12 noon)


Students who are not up to date with their class work/tests and/or are not performing satisfactorily in the course by Tuesday, February 14th, 2012, may be instructor-dropped from the course. However, it is always the student’s responsibility to withdraw from the course if (s)he is unable to complete the work.

No work will be accepted after February 28th, 2012.


Important Dates – Spring “B” Term (2011-2)

March 2nd – April 27th, 2012
**These dates are subject to change. Please verify them with your instructor throughout the semester.
Friday March 2 Classes begin
Tuesday March 6 Last day to drop with refund
Thursday April 5 Last day to drop with “W”
Thursday April 12 Last day for instructor

withdrawal, “IW”


Friday-Sunday April 6-8 SPRING BREAK

Sat. April 28 Last day to input grades

(Before 12 noon)

Students who are not up to date with their class work/tests and/or are not performing satisfactorily in the course by Thursday, April 12th, 2012, may be instructor-dropped from the course. However, it is always the student’s responsibility to withdraw from the course if (s)he is unable to complete the work.

No work will be accepted after April 24th, 2012.

ENC 1102 Assignment Due Dates – Spring “A” Term (2011-2)

January 4th – March 1st, 2012


**These dates are subject to change. Please verify them with your instructor throughout the semester.
Week # Deadlines Assignments Due

1 Beginning Jan. 4th Come to see your professor

during scheduled hours to sign the contract.

#1 Begin considering your
Research Paper topic and
consulting your instructor


3 Week of Jan. 15th #2 Reading selections with

notes and Research

Topic Approval
#3 First At-home essay
#4 Reading selections with notes and Works Cited Page
5 Week of Jan. 29th #5 First In-class essay
#6 Reading selections with

notes
#7 Second at-home essay
6 Week of Feb. 5th #8 RESEARCH PAPER
#9 Second in-class essay
8 Week of Feb. 19th #10 Reading selections with

notes
#11 Third in-class essay
No work will be accepted after Feb. 28th.

No emailed or faxed assignments will be accepted.
Each assignment is due by the last day of the week that your instructor is scheduled to work. Exams must be scheduled with the Testing Center—Room 3306. Students must bring examination booklets and plan on at least one hour to complete in-class essays. See testing center schedule for more information.

ENC 1102 Assignment Due Dates – Spring “B” Term (2011-2)

March 2nd – April 27th, 2012


**These dates are subject to change. Please verify them with your instructor throughout the semester.
Week # Deadlines Assignments Due

1 Beginning March 2nd Come to see your professor

during scheduled hours to sign the contract.

#1 Begin considering your
Research Paper topic and
consulting your instructor


3 Week of March 11th #2 Reading selections with

notes and Research

Topic Approval
#3 First At-home essay
#4 Reading selections with notes and Works Cited Page
5 Week of March 25th #5 First In-class essay
#6 Reading selections with

notes
#7 Second at-home essay


6 Week of April 1st #8 RESEARCH PAPER
#9 Second in-class essay
8 Week of April 15th #10 Reading selections with

notes
#11 Third in-class essay
No work will be accepted after April 24th.

No emailed or faxed assignments will be accepted.
Each assignment is due by the last day of the week that your instructor is scheduled to work. Exams must be scheduled with the Testing Center—Room 3306. Students must bring examination booklets and plan on at least one hour to complete in-class essays. See testing center schedule for more information.

ENC 1102 – Independent Studies
Required Text: Strategies for Successful Writing, by Reinking, Hart,

and Von Der Osten, 9th Ed.
Random House Webster’s Pocket Grammar, Usage and Punctuation, 2nd edition.

Required Supplies: Three (3) blue/green exam booklets, letter size (8 1/2 x 11 inches) from the bookstore, dictionary, thesaurus and pens.
Professors: At the beginning of the term, you will be assigned to a specific instructor. Consultation related to your course must be done only with your professor during his/her scheduled hours.
Scheduling: You are permitted at least one hour and a half for an exam or an in-class essay. You will not be allowed to take a test or write a paper unless you have an hour to do so before the testing center closes. See the testing center schedule for more information.
Tests/essays: You must allow at least one hour for an exam or an in-class essay. An appointment should be scheduled with the Testing Center—Room 3306.
Assignments: In order for you to earn a passing grade for the term, all assignments

listed in this document must be completed to your professor’s



satisfaction. All at-home assignments should contain the student’s name, course number, and the assignment number.
Working

together: Although you and a friend may discuss the reading assignments, your choice of questions and your answers should clearly show that you have done your own work. Instructors will check the work of all students periodically to be sure all work is original.

Late

Assignments: Each school day an assignment is late, one (1) point will be deducted from the grade you earned for that assignment unless prior arrangements are made with your professor.
Competence: A student must demonstrate that he/she has met the course competencies by demonstrating acceptable writing ability on the in-class essays; otherwise, credit for the course will not be granted.

The grading system for ENC 1102 includes a total of 100 possible points. Your final course grade will be determined as follows:
Points
Reading selections 2.5 points

First at-home essay 10 points

Reading selections 2.5 points

First in-class essay (Test 1) 15 points

Reading selections 2.5 points

Second at-home essay 10 points

Research Paper 20 points

Second in-class essay (Test 2) 15 points

Reading selections 2.5 points

Third in-class essay (Final test) 20 points



Grading Scale
90 - 100 A

80 - 89 B

70 - 79 C

60 - 69 D (Must repeat course)



Below 60 F (Must repeat course)

Learning Outcomes
1. Communicate effectively using listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.

2. Use quantitative analytical skills to evaluate and process numerical data.

3. Solve problems using critical and creative thinking and scientific reasoning.

4. Formulate strategies to locate, evaluate, and apply information.

5. Demonstrate knowledge of diverse cultures, including global and historical perspectives.

6. Create strategies that can be used to fulfill personal, civic, and social responsibilities.

7. Demonstrate knowledge of ethical thinking and its application to issues in society.

8. Use computer and emerging technologies effectively.

9. Demonstrate an appreciation for aesthetics and creative activities.

10. Describe how natural systems function and recognize the impact of humans on the environment.


Miami-Dade College

ENC 1102 - English Composition 2
Course Description:
This is the second required general education core course in college level writing. Observing the conventions of Standard American English, students will compose informative and persuasive essays, write responses to a variety of literary genres and/or non-fiction, and produce a documented paper based on research. English Composition II is required for the Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree program.

3 credits

This course fulfills the Gordon Rule requirement.
Note: This course must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.
Prerequisites: ENC 1101 or equivalent with a grade of "C" or better.
Course Competencies:
Competency 1: The student will compose essays that explain an idea, belief or attitude by:
• choosing and limiting a subject that can be sufficiently developed within a given time, for a given purpose and audience;

  1. • formulating a thesis reflecting the subject and purpose of the essay;

  2. • supporting the thesis with specific details and arranging them logically;

  3. • using appropriate transitional devices;

  4. • writing an effective conclusion.


Competency 2: The student will present writing that seeks to persuade an audience to accept a belief, attitude, value, or course of action by:


  1. • using logical, ethical, and/or emotional appeals appropriate to the audience and purpose;

  2. • demonstrating logical reasoning;

  3. • providing sufficient evidence to support the thesis;

  4. • clearly acknowledging any sources by using a standard form of documentation.


Competency 3: The student will write responses to a variety of literary genres and/or fiction by:


  1. • reflecting a literal and critical comprehension of the reading;

  2. • providing suitable support and organization;

  3. • articulating the author's point of view.


Competency 4: The student will write a documented research paper by:


  1. • limiting a topic;

  2. • using library and electronic resources to fulfill research objectives;

  3. taking notes, paraphrasing, summarizing, and quoting sources;

  4. • articulating a thesis that demonstrates a logical connection between research and argumentative techniques;

  5. • organizing the text to be congruent with the subject and purpose of the paper;

  6. • using sources in the text to substantiate the thesis;

  7. • using a standard form of documentation (APA, MLA, Chicago, etc.).

(Previous familiarity with the campus library and with basic research strategies is assumed.)


Assignments
#1. This course requires a short research paper. Refer to the attached guidelines for information on the research project on pages 9 and 10. You should begin considering your topic and consulting your instructor immediately.
#2. Read the 15 essays on pages 459 - 508 in your textbook. It is mandatory that you take very brief notes as you read because these are scored. Make sure you read all essays, as you may be assigned to write on any of the essays when you come for your in-class essay exam, (assignment #5). Have your research topic approved.
#3. At home, write a 700+ word essay on the following topic: Do you believe that “most acts of aggression” are in fact triggered by “a minor act of provocation” (see page 461), or is something more significant involved? Is “walking away” usually the best approach? Use examples from the text to make your points. Use the standard essay form, type, and double-space. You may be asked to revise.
#4. Read chapters 20 and 21 in your textbook to make sure you have the correct format for your research paper. Take notes on these chapters. Note the sample research paper on pages 339-436. “Works Cited” page for research paper due. See sample “Work Cited” on page 393-5.

#5. The First In-Class Exam is based on one of the selections you have read for assignment #2. You will be given the title of the selection and a specific question to answer when you come in to write this essay. Bring a blue book, blank scratch paper, a dictionary and/or thesaurus, and pen. (Bring these materials for each in-class essay.) YOU MAY NOT USE THE TEXTBOOK WHEN WRITING THE IN-CLASS ESSAY SO MAKE SURE YOU HAVE CAREFULLY READ ALL THE ESSAYS!

#6. Read the 16 essays on pages 509 - 565 in your textbook and take notes. Make sure you read all essays, as you may be assigned to write about any one of the essays when you come for your in-class essay exam, (assignment # 9).

#7. Reread Catton’s essay “Grant and Lee: A Study in Contrast.” At home, write a 700-word essay comparing and contrasting the values embodied by Grant and Lee. Review pages 214-215 and 217-218 of your text regarding the organizational structure of comparison/contrast essays. At the end of your essay discuss briefly whether you believe these values are reflected in our modern society, specifically our politicians. Use specific examples from the essay to support your answer. As in assignment 3, this assignment should be typed, double-spaced, and in essay format.

Assignments – Cont..



#8. RESEARCH PAPER

#9. Write the Second In-Class Essay Exam. Make sure you have read all assigned essays in assignment #6. You will be given the specific assignment, based on the readings in assignment #6 when you come in to write the essay. Bring the same materials as you did for the first in-class essay.

#10. Read the 8 essays on pages 565 - 605 in your textbook and take notes. Make sure you read all essays, as you may be assigned to write on any of the essays when you come for your in-class essay exam, (assignment # 11).

#11. Write the Third In-Class Essay Exam. You will be given a specific topic based on the readings in assignment 10. Make sure you have read all the essays in assignment 10. Bring the same materials as for the two previous in-class essays.

NOTE: Assignments and in-class essays that are below the minimum word count will be graded accordingly.

All final assignments become the property of the Independent Studies Department and will not be returned to students.

MLA RESEARCH PAPER PROJECT

Objectives: The purpose of this project is to help you develop and practice the skills of finding and reporting information in an academic setting. Researchers are intellectual explorers going out to seek information and reporting that information in a specific format, so that others who want to cover the same ground can easily follow the trail. In completing this project, you will learn how to focus on a topic that is both interesting to you and appropriate to the assignment. You will learn to use library and other resources (including computer indexes) effectively, and to bring the information home via notes and photocopies. Finally, you will learn to write your research paper so that your ideas and conclusions derive logically from the evidence presented.

Step One: Read chapters 20 and 21 in Strategies for Successful Writing.

Step two: The general research topic for this semester is any topic that is directly or indirectly linked to your major. Narrow (restrict) that general topic to a subject that both interests you and can also be researched appropriately -- that is, a subject on which there is adequate information. This may entail some research time just to make sure there will be enough resources available.
For this project, only a short paper of approximately 1,000 words (about four typed pages) is required. Keep in mind that the subject needs to be restricted enough so that it can be appropriately dealt with in a short paper.

Step Three: Have your research topic approved by your instructor. Do not proceed until your topic has been approved. No paper will be accepted without prior approval of the topic.

Step Four: Make a general survey of all the information available. Use only information from the last four years. This process of making a preliminary “works cited” page lets you know what your possibilities are, so that you can most efficiently choose the references that will be most useful.
Step Five: Begin your research. Find the best and most promising sources from those you located in Step Four. Your completed paper must use a minimum of five recent references/sources. At least two of those five references must date from the previous or current year.

Step Six: If appropriate to your subject, you may wish to locate and interview an expert on your topic, or someone who has had some personal experience with the subject or issue. Consult your instructor if there is any question about the appropriateness of your chosen expert.

Step Seven: Write your research paper, using the MLA format for citing references. Be certain you understand how to avoid plagiarism, and be careful that you cite all the information obtained, even when that information is in your own words. This is a good time to review chapters 20 and 21 which you read in Strategies for Successful Writing and to utilize the sample research paper on pages 384-395. Make sure your final paper is presentable with the correct font, margins and resolution.
ELEMENTS OF ORGANIZATION
All practice papers and in-class essays must follow the guidelines in this handout.

FORM: All papers must be typed.


In-class essays should be written in blue exam books, in ink, on one side of a page only. On the title page or bluebook cover please write:
Your name and the date

Professor's name

Course, assignment, and topic
Papers that are not labeled are set aside and no grade is awarded. It is impossible to grade a paper without knowing the assignment and topic.

LENGTH: 500 - 600 words, five paragraphs

TITLE: Papers should have a title that is short and interesting. Avoid the obvious (e.g. "My Dad"), and try to think of something that will interest the reader or show some creativity (e.g. “Fast Eddie,” ”A Pool Shark,” or “Mork’s Revenge”).
INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH:
The first paragraph must have two parts: an introduc­tion of at least three sentences and a one-sentence thesis that follows logically from the introduction. The introduction should interest the reader in some way, perhaps by showing the importance of the topic or why it is timely. An introduction should NOT simply state the points of the thesis. For example, if your paper were about abortion, your introduction might discuss the recent Supreme Court cases that are challenging Roe versus Wade. The material in the introduction does NOT get developed later in the paper; development is of the thesis.
The thesis has two parts: the main idea or opinion and the main

points which will be developed in the body paragraphs to

support/develop the main idea of the thesis.
--Continued--

INTRODUCTORY PARAGRAPH (Cont…):


For example: Abortion is justified (opinion) only in cases of

incest, rape or probable deformity (the three main points).


Compassion and patience (two main points) are the most

important charac­teristics of good parenting (main idea).


BODY PARAGRAPHS:
The second, third, and following paragraphs of the paper develop the main points of the thesis in the same order they were mentioned in the thesis. The key to effective support/development is to go back and forth from general to specific. If you say, "Communication in a marriage is important," you need to follow that with specific examples.
CONCLUDING

PARAGRAPH: The final paragraph is a concluding paragraph. You may restate your main ideas, perhaps emphasizing the most important point. Do not introduce new ideas in the conclusion.


TRANSITIONS: Use transitions to connect paragraphs. Avoid the obvious such as "first" and "next". A good transition shows the relationship between two paragraphs, e.g. "the problem of alcoholism has led to many social and economic hardships for families." This transition sentence would link a paragraph about the prevalence of alcoholism to the next paragraph about the problems caused by alcoholism. If one paragraph gives information that contradicts or challenges information in the previous paragraph, you might have a transition such as, "contrary to the belief that the death penalty is effective, many people believe..." etc.
TOPIC SENTENCES:
Body paragraphs need a clear topic sentence. A topic sentence has two functions: it identifies the subject of the paragraph, and it limits the paragraph to that topic. If your topic sentence is about the causes of alcoholism and a paragraph mentions the effects of alcoholism, your paragraph will lack unity. The topic sentence usually comes first in a paragraph, and it specifi­cally refers to the point in the thesis that will be developed.

ENC 1102 - Record of Assignments

_______ Assignment #1 -- Think about Research Paper Topic

_______ Assignment #2 -- Reading selections (maximum 2.5 points)

_______ Assignment #3 -- At-home essay (10 points)

Research Paper Topic Approved

_______ Assignment #4 -- Work Cited Page and Readings (maximum 2.5 points)

_______ Assignment #5 -- In-class essay exam (15 points)

_______ Assignment #6 -- Reading selections (maximum 2.5 points)

_______ Assignment #7 -- Second at-home essay (10 points)

_______ Assignment #8 -- Research Paper Due (20 points)

_______ Assignment #9 -- Second in-class essay exam (15 points)

_______ Assignment #10 -- Reading selections (maximum 2.5 points)

_______ Assignment #11 -- Third in-class essay exam (20 points)


__________ Total Points Earned

Final Grade ____________
Independent Studies Contract
I have received and agree to all requirements, deadlines, policies, etc. stated in this term’s Student Contract for the course in which I am enrolled.

SIGNATURE _________________________________________


Student Number __________________________________
Printed Name _________________________________________
Today’s Date ____________________________________
COURSE __________________________
Course Title _________________________________________
Course Ref. # __________________________
Term __________________________
Address _________________________________________
_________________________________________
Telephone (Home) ________________________________
(Work) ____________________________________
E-mail ____________________________________

Please complete and leave with your professor no later than the first week of classes.





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