French Business studies and French Bess (French option) Soc. Soc. Pol. (French option) Business and Law (French option) Junior Freshmen fr1040 bsf, bess, Soc. Soc. Pol., Business and law French Language and Civilisation 1



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Junior Freshmen FR1040 Dates for your diary
MT MCQ vocabulary and grammar – Wednesday 12th December @ 2pm room 2039

HT MCQ vocabulary and grammar – Wednesday 27th March 2013 @ 2pm room 2039

Oral exams: Trinity Week

Aural exam (mini-lecture in French followed by questions in English on the lecture; answer questions in English) – Wednesday 3rd April 2013 @ 2pm room 2039

End of year written exam during exam period.
Information above is correct at the time of publication.

Table of contents





  1. A Note on this Handbook


  1. Introduction


  1. Staff Contacts


  1. General Information


  1. The European Credit Transfer System (ECTS)


  1. Description of Module FR1040


  1. Description of Module FR1050


  1. Peer Learning


  1. General Programme Regulations


  1. Useful Guidelines


  1. Student Supports




1. A Note on this Handbook

This handbook applies to all first year students of Business Studies and French; Bess, Soc.Soc.Pol and ‘Business and Law’ students who chose French as an option. The two modules, FR1040 and FR1050 are taught by the French department, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies (SLLCS). The handbook provides a guide to what is expected of you on this programme, and the academic and personal support available to you. Please retain for future reference.

The information provided in this handbook is accurate at time of preparation. Any necessary revisions will be notified to students via e-mail and notices on the notice board. Please note that, in the event of any conflict or inconsistency between the General Regulations published in the University Calendar and information contained in course handbooks, the provisions of the Calendar’s General Regulations will prevail.

2. Introduction

Welcome to the French Department, School of Languages, Literatures and Cultural Studies, in Trinity College.


Business Studies and French will be taking 2 French modules during their first year (Junior Freshmen). Other students will be doing one French module (FR1040) only.
FR1040, BESS French Language and Civilisation is also open to students studying BESS, Business and Law, Sociology and Social Policy or Social Studies. Law and French students will take FR1040 only during the first semester (Michaelmas Term or MT).
This module is part of what we often describe as the BESS French programme and has been specifically designed for students taking the above courses and Business Studies and French.
FR1050, BSF French Writing Skills, is specific to Business Studies and French students.
We hope that you will enjoy these modules. They aim to provide you with a better understanding of many aspects of contemporary France, to help you improve your oral and written French and develop your language learning skills so that you can become independent learners.
The approach used is based on the principle that the best way to learn a language is to use it. This means that we expect you to participate fully in the range of activities on offer. The modules are delivered through French, so as to maximise your contacts with the language. For some of you, this may be a new approach; others will already have a similar experience. Don’t worry, we know that it will take time for some of you to adjust, but we can guarantee that if you engage fully with us and with all the facets of the course (including the self-guided and self-access components), you will benefit from it and find that by the end of the first semester, attending a lecture in French, listening to a television broadcast, writing essays and discussing aspects of French society with other students will have become much easier.
If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact the module coordinators.
We wish you all the best for your first year in Trinity.

Claire Laudet

Paule Salerno

Florence Signorini


3. Staff Contacts
Course coordinator

  • Dr. Paule Salerno-O’Shea

Email: psalerno@tcd.ie, tel: 01 896 1472, Room 4113, French Department, Arts Building. Office hours will be posted on the door of Room 4113.


Lectures for FR1040

Michaelmas Term



  • Dr Claire Laudet

E-mail: claudet@tcd.ie , tel.: 01 896 2313, Room 4108, French Department, Arts Building
Office hours: Office hours will be posted on the door of Room 4108.

Hilary Term



  • Dr. Paule Salerno-O’Shea


Tutorials for FR1040

  • Dr. Paule Salerno-O’Shea

  • Ms Florence Signorini, fsgnorni@tcd.ie

  • Ms Soukayna Mniai soukayna.mniai@gmail.com



Tutorials for FR1050

  • Paule Salerno-O’Shea psalerno@tcd.ie


BESS/BSF French Office

  • Tracy Corbett, e-mail: tcorbett@tcd.ie , tel.: 01 896 1333, room 4089, Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays only. The office is open to students from 9.30 a.m. till 11.00 a.m. and from 2.30 p.m. till 3.30 p.m.

4. General Information


The BESS/BSF French notice board is located next to room 4094 on level 4 of the Arts Building.

Below the notice board, you will find pigeon holes where spare copies of handouts may be found.

The staff pigeon holes are located under the main French Department notice board, near room 4111.
Course materials will be available :

Michaelmas Term: See Dr Laudet’s instructions during the first teaching week.

Hilary Term: Dr Salerno-O’Shea will send you course materials every week by e-mail sent to your TCD e-mail address only
Computers, language laboratories and satellite TV/video workstations: you are entitled to use the facilities of the Centre for Language and Communication Studies (CLCS) located on level 4 of the Arts Building. To use the facilities, you must have a CLCS ID card valid for the current year (available on registration in the CLCS office, Room 4091).


  • Audio Language laboratory
    For self-access use: Room 4074.

  • Video/satellite TV
    Self-access use only: Room 4074.

  • Computers/DVD playback
    Self-access use: Room 4074.
    Self-access and occasional class use: Room 4073.

You may also use the computers in the Public Access Computer rooms.


CHECK YOUR TCD E-MAIL TWICE A WEEK.
Teaching term dates and timetable
FR1040 Michaelmas term

Lectures and tutorial: check your timetable on-line or the BESS/BSF board near 4089.

Lectures start during the first teaching week.

For Michaelmas Term, Tutorials for FR1040 will start during the second teaching week.



Please check your timetable after the Christmas holidays as there might be time and/or room changes. Please note that after Christmas, lectures and tutorials will both start in the first teaching week of Hilary term.
FR1050 (BSF only) Michaelmas term

2 hr class – Classes start during the first teaching week

Please check your individual timetable.

Please check your timetable after the Christmas holidays as there might be time and/or room changes.


Tutorial attendance is compulsory and will represent 5% of the end-of-year mark for FR1040.


Socrates – Erasmus
All BSF students spend their 3rd year abroad, on successful completion of their second year (Senior Freshmen)

5. The European Credit Transfer System (Ects)


The European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) is an academic credit system based on the estimated student workload required to achieve the objectives of a module or programme of study. It is designed to enable academic recognition for periods of study, to facilitate student mobility and credit accumulation and transfer. The ECTS is the recommended credit system for higher education in Ireland and across the European Higher Education Area.

The ECTS weighting for a module is a measure of the student input or workload required for that module, based on factors such as the number of contact hours, the number and length of written or verbally presented assessment exercises, class preparation and private study time, laboratory classes, examinations, clinical attendance, professional training placements, and so on as appropriate. There is no intrinsic relationship between the credit volume of a module and its level of difficulty.

The European norm for full-time study over one academic year is 60 credits. 1 ECTS credit represents 20-25 hours estimated student input, so a 10-credit module will be designed to require 200-250 hours of student input including class contact time, assessments and personal study.
ECTS credits are awarded to a student only upon successful completion of the course year. Progression from one year to the next is determined by the course regulations. Students who fail a year of their course will not obtain credit for that year even if they have passed certain component courses. Exceptions to this rule are one-year and part-year visiting students, who are awarded credit for individual modules successfully completed.

6. Description of Module FR1040
BESS FRENCH LANGUAGE & CIVILISATION 1 (FRENCH SOCIETY AND ECONOMY)
10 ECTS credits (250 student-input hours)
This is a year-long module, delivered during both Michaelmas and Hilary terms.

It is compulsory for JF BSF students.


Course overview
The course will introduce students to social and economic issues in contemporary France context and make them aware of the specificity of France in these areas. The program has been designed to help students identify and develop language-learning skills they will then be able to use on their own.
Michaelmas Term (first semester)

Contemporary French Society


Week 5: Introduction – Geography of France

Week 6: Demography: the population of France

Week 7: The Family in France

Week 8: Immigration

Week 9: Social groups and social classes in France

Week 10: Inequalities

Week 11: Study Week (no lectures, no tutorials)

Week 12: Reducing inequalities: French social policies

Week 13: Primary and secondary education in France

Week 14: Third level education in France

Week 15: Religion in France

Week 16: Revisions and MCQ test



Hilary Term (second semester)

The French Economy


Week 1: Agriculture

Week 2: Industry

Week 3: The service sector

Week 4: French international trade

Week 5: Employment and unemployment in France

Week 6: The budget

Week 7: Study Week (no lectures, no tutorials)

Week 8: State intervention in France

Week 9: The economy of France: recent developments 1

Week 10: The economy of France: recent developments 2

Week11: Revisions and MCQ test

Week 12: Revisions and MCQ test

Note: Due to bank holidays, it might be necessary to hold one of the MCQs during week 10.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:


  • make connections between events and facts from French current affairs and the wider French societal and economic framework outlined during the course;

  • follow lectures on these topics in French and take notes using an outline of the lecture;

  • read, identify and understand the structure and main points of French textbooks and articles from specialized periodicals and newspapers on the above topics;

  • read the same materials to locate and retrieve specific information;

  • understand a French native speaker presenting factual information on these topics;

  • discuss these topics with a French native speaker;

  • make short and structured oral presentations on aspects of French society and the French economy;

  • use authentic sources and course materials to develop their vocabulary and other language competencies;

  • describe, compare and contrast the situation in France and Ireland in the context of a discussion with French native speakers;.

Teaching Information
The module is delivered through a number of structured components. We advise you to follow the order below as each component builds on the skills, knowledge and vocabulary learnt in the previous component.
Every week you are expected to do the following:
1. In the early part of the week, you should do some preparatory lexical work on the theme for the week. The activities also include grammar and language points. Most teaching materials will be available electronically, either by e-mail or by other electronic means (2 hours/week).
2. A listening comprehension activity, usually web-based. Worksheets will be sent to you by e-mail or made available in some other electronic form. You can use the CLCS computer facilities, any public access computer room if you have your own headphones or you can do this at home (but you may need to download additional software or up-dates to be able to view some documents). Please ensure you bring your worksheet to your tutorial every week.

(1 hour/week)


3. Attend the weekly lecture. Handouts will be available for downloading and printing or will be sent to you by e-mail. Please print (for example select option handout, 6 slides per page) and bring them to the lecture. Alternatively, you can bring your laptop to the lecture. The lectures are delivered in French on a topic related to the theme for the week.

(Lecture: 1 hour/week; reviewing and updating notes: 1 hour/week)


4. A reading comprehension task to be completed before your tutorial. A document will be available for downloading and printing or will be sent to you by e-mail. Print the document, do the various tasks and bring it to your tutorial class every week.

(1 hour/week)


5. Attend your weekly tutorial, starting in week 2 of Michaelmas term and week 1 of Hilary term. Check your individual timetable at my.tcd.ie and/or the BESS/BSF French notice board next to room 4094. Relevant handouts will be distributed during your tutorials. Tutorials aim to give you the opportunity to apply and practice with your fellow students what you have learnt during the week, under the guidance of a French native speaker.

(1 hour/week)


6. Personal work: review your notes, organise and learn new vocabulary, learn the grammar points, check the answers for the listening and reading comprehension activities, do some additional reading and listening, practice French conversation with a friend. Additional resources may be made available .

(1hour and a half per week at least)


Total: 8 hours and a half per week.
If this sounds a lot, remember that a 10 ECTS credits course is defined as requiring between 200 and 250 hours/year, including attendance, personal study and reading, assessments and exams, etc. You are studying for 60 credits this year; this is a total number of between 1200 and 1500 student-input hours. Assuming you study for 30 weeks (22 weeks of lectures, 2 reading weeks, 5 weeks of exams and revisions and 1 week over the Christmas period), and that the exams themselves will represent approximately 18 hours of student-input, you should be studying (in the broad sense) for 39 to 50 hours per week in total (so between 6.5 and 8.5 hours per week, per subject). This is what College thinks it takes to be successful! Keep this in mind when organising a part-time job or your social life!
Module timetable
Please check the noticeboard near 4094 and my.tcd.ie for timetable information.
Teaching methods

The course combines lectures, listening and reading comprehension activities, sessions, guided private study, tutorials and personal work. All lectures and tutorials are conducted in French. Each week’s teaching is centred on a specific topic.


Key texts

A one-volume bilingual dictionary, such as Robert-Collins or Oxford-Hachette or on-line equivalent. Pocket dictionaries are not sufficient.


Lecture handouts and other course materials are either sent by e-mail to your TCD e-mail account or made available in another electronic format. Materials for the tutorials are handed in during the tutorial class.
A €5 photocopying levy must be paid to the BESS French office (room 4089) before the Wednesday of the third teaching week (Michaelmas term), to cover the cost of the handbooks and handouts. No further handouts and documents will be distributed to students who have not paid the levy by the due date.
Assessment methods
Continuous assessment

MCQ tests will take place during the 12th teaching week of MT, and at the end of HT(weeks10 or 11 or 12), depending on bank holidays and room availability. (7.5% of overall FR1040 mark each).

Failure to sit MCQs will result in a mark of 0/100 unless a medical certificate is presented to the BESS French Office in room 4089. Students are expected to be available during term time for continuous assessment tests.


The MCQs comprise questions on both vocabulary and grammar. There is no negative marking for the MT test but in Hilary term, you will receive 1 point for a correct answer, 0 for a blank and -0.25 for a wrong answer.
Sample MCQ questions (MT):

1. Le taux de ................. exprime le nombre de décès pour 1000 habitants.

A - décès B - mortalité C - morbidité D - mort


2. Une famille formée de 2 parents et de leurs enfants est une famille ...............

A – atomique B - nucléaire C - normale D- biparentale


3. La 1ère personne du pluriel de l’imparfait du verbe “finir” est .......

A - nous finirions B - nous finissons C- nous finissions D - nous finissiont


4. Autrefois, les enfants .......... toujours à l’école à pied.

A - vont B - allaient C - sont allés D - ont allé


Attendance at tutorials is compulsory. Attendance Marks are allocated on a sliding scale, thus:

Attendance at 19 tutorials or more out of 21: 5 points

Attendance at 17 or 18 tutorials: 4 points

Attendance at 15 or 16 tutorials: 3 points

Attendance at 13 or 14 tutorials: 2 points

Attendance at 12 or less tutorials: 0 point

(5% of overall FR1040 mark).

An absence can only be excused if a medical certificate is presented to the BESS French Office in room 4089.


In addition, students will be deemed unsatisfactory if they miss more than a third of their course of study or fail to submit a third of the required course work in any term. If a student is returned as non-satisfactory (NS) in accordance with the general regulations governing attendance and course work in Calendar H5-H6 for two consecutive terms, the Senior Lecturer may refuse him/her permission to take his/her annual examinations and may required him/her to repeat the year in full. Students who have been returned NS should contact their tutor as a matter of urgency.
The MCQ and attendance marks are included in the calculation of the overall mark for the summer examinations.
Examinations
Summer examinations:

  • 3-hour written paper (reading comprehension), 35 % of final mark. See http://www.tcd.ie/Local/Exam_Papers/ for past papers

  • An oral examination during Trinity Week, 25 % of final mark.

  • An aural test, during week 10 or 11 or 12 (depending on bank holidays and room availability) of Hilary Term, 20 % of final mark.


Overview of the Summer Examination breakdown of marks
Written exam paper 3 h 35 %
Oral examination (Trinity Week) 10 min. + 10 min. 25 %
Listening Comprehension 1 (note taking) 1h. 20 %
Tutorial attendance 5%
MCQ MT 7.5%
MCQ HT 7.5%
Students must satisfy the examiners with respect to both oral and aural assessments and written examinations.

You will be permitted to take the Supplemental examinations in late August/early September only if the court of examiners is satisfied that you have made a serious attempt at the annual examinations. Please check carefully the exam results lists and the exam conventions and contact your College Tutor if you have any queries.


Supplemental examinations:

  • 3-hour written paper (reading comprehension), 50 % of final mark.

  • An oral examination, 25 % of final mark.

  • An aural test, 25 % of final mark.

The results of the supplemental examinations are only based on the components above. Neither the MCQ nor attendance marks are included.

Students must satisfy the examiners with respect to both oral and aural assessments and written examinations.

Students must be available during the whole supplemental examination period.

The examinations will be graded using the following scale:




1 First

Excellent

70-100%

2.1 Upper Second

Good

60-69%

2.2 Lower Second

Quite good

50-59%

3 Third

Adequate

40-49%

F1 Fail 1

Weak

30-39%

F2 Fail 2

Extremely weak

0-29%



Grading Criteria
• The following grade profiles are general and typical: a candidate may not fit all aspects of a profile to fall into that grade band.

• The criteria set out below are applied in a manner appropriate to the Junior Freshman year.

• Allowance is made for work that is written under examination conditions, i.e. where time is limited and there is no access to dictionaries or other resources.
Written and aural comprehension papers
In FR1040, whereas in written comprehension papers both content and productive language competence are assessed, aural comprehension is judged predominantly on content, according to the requirements of the different questions:


  • For multiple choice questions, gap filling and re-ordering exercises, content only tested;

  • For summary of points of content in English, correctness and completeness as well as cohesion are assessed.

The ‘language’ specifications which follow apply only to questions where French productive competence is required. Where answers in English are required, clear, correct English and coherent structure are prerequisites for a II.2 mark or higher.
I (70+)

Language

  • Near-native competence in conveying communicative intention fully;

  • Very high degree of fluency in appropriate style and register;

  • (Near-) perfect grammatical precision.

  • Within scope of exercise, ability to employ complex language and varied structures and a wide range of appropriate lexis and idiom;

  • Highly successful balance between independent formulation and accurate content.

.

Content

  • Precise understanding and well-focused answer to question;

  • Consistently renders factual content with almost flawless accuracy.

  • Shows high degree of awareness of sophisticated rhetorical strategies.

  • Thorough and subtle comprehension of implied points with a high degree of accuracy.

II.1


Language

  • High degree of fluency in appropriate style and register;

  • High degree of grammatical accuracy, ability to convey communicative intention clearly, with minor errors only;

  • Within scope of exercise, ability to command and vary language structures, appropriate lexis and idiom, with minor errors only.

  • Some attempt at balance between independent formulation and accurate content.

Content

  • Good understanding and clear answer to question;

  • Consistently renders factual content with high degree of accuracy, avoiding major misunderstanding of the original;

  • Shows some awareness of sophisticated rhetorical strategies.

  • Accurate comprehension of implied points.

II.2


Language

  • Fluent, at an acceptable level of complexity in appropriate style and register;

  • Satisfactory communicative ability, but with a number of major grammatical and lexical errors, which do not impair communication significantly;

  • Within scope of exercise, largely successful attempt to employ appropriate language structures, with predictable range of lexis and idiom;

  • Some attempt at own formulation, but over-reliance on text of the original.

Content

  • Adequate understanding and solid answer to question;

  • Renders factual content accurately with a fair degree of consistency, but with some major lapses of understanding;

  • Shows some basic awareness of rhetorical strategies or implied points.

III


Language

  • Intelligible, though not always accurate or at an appropriate level of complexity in style and register;

  • Basic communicative ability, but with many major grammatical and lexical errors, which impair communication in places;

  • Within scope of exercise, unsuccessful or no attempt to employ appropriate language structures, with very basic range of lexis and idiom;

  • No attempt at reformulation, imbalance between own simple phrasing and almost verbatim quotation from the original.

Content

  • Basic, sometimes inadequate understanding and unfocused answer to question;

  • Factual accuracy either defective or only in the simplest form, significant confusion and problems of understanding;

  • Shows no awareness of rhetorical strategies or implied points.

F 1


Language

  • Predominantly inaccurate usage, at an inappropriate level of style and register;

  • Lacks basic communicative ability, high incidence of basic grammatical and lexical errors, which frequently impair communication;

  • Within scope of exercise, inability to employ appropriate language structures; serious errors even within very limited range of lexis and idiom;

  • No attempt at reformulation of quotation from the original; inaccurate quotation.


Content

  • Inadequate understanding and failure to answer question;

  • Completely inaccurate or confused reproduction of facts, little grasp of content;

  • Poor grasp of lexis and structures leads to major failure in comprehension;

  • Shows no awareness of rhetorical strategies or implied points.

F2


Work in the F2 range will reveal some or all of the weaknesses noted under F1, but to a greater, perhaps extreme, extent. Almost complete failure to comprehend original; grammatical and lexical deficiencies entirely impede intelligibility.


Oral Examinations
The following elements are taken into account to assess a student’s performance:
Performance of the task (30%), pronunciation/intonation (10%), fluency (10%), accuracy (10%), risk-taking and argumentation (20%), overall impression (20%).
• The following descriptions relate to a non-native learner of the language.

• The grade profiles are general and typical: a candidate may not fit all aspects of a profile to fall into that grade band and there may be elements that do not apply to every oral presentation.

• The criteria set out below are applied in a manner appropriate to the year of the degree programme.
I 70+ This grade indicates work of exceptional quality. A first-class oral performance will demonstrate some, though not necessarily all, of the following:
• Excellent level of fluency and accuracy: the language is spoken with few mistakes in lexis, syntax, morphology and pronunciation

• Rich, complex and idiomatic language, employing a wide range of appropriate lexis correctly;

• Tone, register and style wholly suited to the setting and task

• Confidence and ability to discuss a range of topics at an appropriate level of abstraction

• Very high level of strategic competence

• No comprehension difficulties in an interactive situation

• Can respond very fluently to questions on the subject matter and engage effortlessly in dialogue with the examiners.

II.1 60-69 This grade indicates a very competent standard of work. Oral performance in this range will demonstrate some, though not necessarily all, of the following:
• Very good level of fluency and accuracy: the language is spoken with minor mistakes in lexis, syntax, morphology and pronunciation

• Attempts complex and idiomatic language, employing a range of appropriate lexis with minor errors only

• Tone, register and style consistently suited to the setting and task

• Confidence and ability to discuss a range of topics

• High level of strategic competence

• Only minor comprehension difficulties in an interactive situation

• Can respond with a high level of fluency to questions on the subject matter and engage confidently in dialogue with the examiners.
II.2 50-59 This grade indicates work of acceptable competence. The candidate’s oral performance will demonstrate some, though not necessarily all, of the following:

• Good level of fluency and accuracy, although the language is spoken with more frequent mistakes in lexis, syntax, morphology and pronunciation

• Less ambitious in attempting complex and idiomatic language and when choosing lexis. Greater likelihood of error and of anglicisms when using more complex syntax.

• Tone, register and style not always suited to the setting and task

• Confidence and ability to discuss a range of topics at a lower level of abstraction and with simplification

• Some evidence of strategic competence

• Some comprehension difficulties in an interactive situation

• Where appropriate, can respond at a satisfactory level of fluency to questions on the subject matter and engage satisfactorily in dialogue with the examiners


III 40-49 Work in this grade will demonstrate some limited ability to express oneself orally in the L2, but contain major weaknesses.
• Low level of fluency and accuracy, with frequent mistakes in lexis, syntax, morphology and pronunciation

• Can only use limited and basic vocabulary and syntax. Extensive evidence of anglicisms.

• Tone, register and style frequently not suited to the setting and task

• Confidence and ability to discuss a range of topics only at a very low level of abstraction and with significant simplification

• Little evidence of strategic competence in the L2 and, hence, tendency to revert to English

• Frequent comprehension difficulties in an interactive situation

• Where appropriate, can respond at only a basic level of fluency to questions on the subject matter and can only engage in a very limited way in dialogue with the examiners


F1 30-39 This grade indicates insufficient evidence of serious academic study. The potential of the candidate to proceed to the next year is an important consideration in this grade
• Very low level of fluency and accuracy, with very frequent mistakes in lexis, syntax, morphology and pronunciation, which can result in unintelligibility.

• Cannot use even limited and basic vocabulary and syntax with any degree of accuracy. Extensive evidence of anglicisms.

• Tone, register and style not suited to the setting and task

• Lack of confidence and ability to discuss a range of topics at even the lowest level of abstraction and with significant simplification

• No evidence of strategic competence in the L2 and, hence, frequent recourse to English

• Significant comprehension difficulties

• Responds inadequately to questions on the subject matter and cannot engage satisfactorily in dialogue with the examiners
F2 0-29 Oral communication skills in the F2 range will reveal some or all of the weaknesses noted under F1, but to a greater, perhaps extreme, extent.
• Fluency and accuracy lacking completely; mistakes in lexis, syntax, morphology and pronunciation render the speaker unintelligible

• Cannot use even limited and basic vocabulary and syntax with any degree of accuracy. Extensive evidence of anglicisms.

• Tone, register and style not suited to the setting and task

• Inability to discuss a range of topics at even the lowest level of abstraction and with significant simplification

• No evidence of strategic competence

• Very significant comprehension difficulties

• Responds wholly inadequately to questions on the subject matter and is incapable of engaging in dialogue with the examiners




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