Fables Genre Unit Seventh Grade engl 409 William Tucker



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Fables Genre Unit
Seventh Grade

ENGL 409

William Tucker


By: Rebecca Olah


Unit Plan Rationale

Fables have been teaching children morals for years. The stories are perfect for any age level but middle school aged students will learn more from analyzing these tales. Teenage years are a detrimental time for students to relearn right from wrong and a time when they stop listening to their parents and start learning from their own mistakes. The fables are examples of mistakes that may be made by teenagers and the goal is for them to learn their lessons through the morals of the story instead of having to learn them in real life.

The students will learn what a fable is, how they are structures and what the point of them are. They will be able to follow the standards R.NT.07.02 analyze the structure, elements, style, and purpose of narrative genre including mystery, poetry, memoir, drama, myths, and legends, and R.NT.07.04 analyze author’s craft including the use of theme, antagonists, protagonists, overstatement, understatement, and exaggeration.

The students will understand the standard R.NT.07.01 identify how the tensions among characters, communities, themes, and issues are related to their own experiences in classic, multicultural, and contemporary literature recognized for quality and literary merit. The first type of fable that the students will study is Aesop’s fables. They will learn about Ancient Greek morals and the key concepts of these fables.

They will then learn about African Fables, Chinese Fables, Native American Fables and Contemporary fables. From each type of fable, they will learn the similarities and differences between the key concepts of these fables. The students will learn what is needed to make a fable. They will also write numerous fables throughout the unit.

The summative lesson meets the standard W.GN.07.01 write a cohesive narrative piece such as a memoir, drama, legend, mystery, poetry, or myth that includes appropriate conventions to the genre employing literary and plot devices (e.g., internal and/or external conflicts, antagonists/protagonists, personification), which is each student, will write their own fable, is important because they will be relaying moral lessons that they have learned on their own. The morals that the students write for each other will be more modern and relatable to other students their age. The will have to read their fables aloud to the classroom and explain what morals they are trying to enforce through the tale. The students are also required to turn in a final portfolio so that the teacher can see the progress that the students have made throughout the unit.

The lesson plan is developed for a seventh grade classroom at Brownstown Middle School where I will be student teaching this fall. The school contains approximately 150 7th graders. Approximately 93% of the students are Caucasian, 2.3% are African American, .05% are Native American, and 2% Asian. It is mostly a middle class area with 60% of the students that have both parents in their households. Only 1.5% of the families were under the poverty line.

These specific fables are used because the morals in the story that Aesop wanted to be found are relevant to the age group, but it is also important to allow students to find their own interpretations of the morals in the fables. The ultimate goal is to not only introduce the students to the genre of fables but to learn from the morals of each story to better their lives.



Week 1- Introduction to Morals and Fables
Day 1- Introduction of Morals

Purpose-

To introduce the goal of the unit

To learn the students prior knowledge

To connect morals with students everyday life

To familiarize the students with morals

To familiarize the students with moral codes


Preparation-

Students will take a pre-assessment true and false quiz on what aspects they believe are needed in order to make a fable a fable. The quiz will also include questions about morals and morality. This will not be graded but will be used to alter the lesson plan as needed to best reach all of the students needs. It will help the teacher know how in depth they will need to go with each lesson.


The students will also be required to have a journal which they will have already obtained and written in previous to this unit. They will write in their journals on a daily basis.

Procedure-

At the beginning of the class the students will answer the following questions in their journals. They will be given five minutes to discuss and then 3 minutes to talk to their neighbor.

Journal Entry- What do you think a moral is? Why do you think morals are important? Do you think that they affect society? Why or why not?
After the journal is given, the pre-assessment is given. Then the students will be asked to share their answers with the person next to them. They will learn whether or not the answers are true or false throughout the lessons.
What is a moral- Ask the students what their definition of morals are. Write them on the board. When the students are done giving their definitions, write the definition from the dictionary on the board.

Definition of Moral

Adjective: Concerned with the principles of right and wrong behavior and the goodness or badness of human character.



Noun: A lesson, esp. one concerning what is right or prudent, that can be derived from a story, a piece of information, or an experience.
Show the students two videos that show morals in them. The movies are based on the moral code.
Videos- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vu99mJyzfVw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5cA47m_y-Y&feature=relmfu


Discuss as a class what morals were shown in these videos. What do you infer from this video about morals affecting society? Why is it important that people follow these moral codes?
Give the students the portfolio instruction sheet. Go over it out loud with the class. Have the students ask any questions that they may have.
Journal Entry- The students will be given 5 minutes to write in their journals at least three morals they remember learning from their childhood and the story they learned them from if they remember. When the 5 minutes are up they will compare their morals with their neighbors for a few minutes. Then as a class, we will write some of the common morals down on the board. A few students will be asked to relate a moral on the board to their own life.

Assessment-

Homework-

The students will look up five stories that contain morals. They will change any answers that they got incorrect on their pre-assessment, if they find information on it while researching.


Students will write a short two-three paragraph response to the clips that they watched in class, discussing why the golden rule is important, comparing the two different clips and relating the clips to their own lives.

Name: _____________

Date: _____________
True or False Pre-Assessment
Answer each question to the best of your ability. Write True if you think that the statement is True. Write False if you believe that the statement is False. This is not a test and it will not be graded!
________ 1. Morals should not include what is right and what is wrong.
________ 2. African fables could be called folktales.
________ 3. A fable often includes personification of animals.
________ 4. Morality is the differentiation of intentions, decisions and actions between those that are good and those that are bad.
________ 5. Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism should play a role in Chinese Fables.
________ 6. A fable is a genre.
________ 7. Aesop should be credited for some of the most famous fables.
________ 8. Native American Fables should include animals.
________ 9. Aesop is from Greece.
________10. Fables are typically written for children and adolescents.


The Golden Rule Essay
Write a 2-3 paragraph response to the clips that were watched today in class on the Golden Rule. In the paragraphs, you should discuss why the golden rules are important, compare and contrast the two different clips and relate the clip to your own life. Each paragraph should be at least five sentences long and you should have few to no grammatical errors.
Here are the links to the clips that we watched in class in case you would like to watch them again.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vu99mJyzfVw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5cA47m_y-Y&feature=relmfu


You will also have to look up FIVE stories that contain morals. Write down the titles of the morals or print out the morals. Remember that you can include some of these in your final portfolio.
This assignment is due tomorrow!

Final Portfolio
For the end of the unit you will required to turn in a final portfolio. We will be working on this portfolio for the next month or so. Make sure that you keep all of the work we do for the next month! Any of this may be chosen or needed for your final portfolio.
By the end of the unit, you will have all the necessary pieces to complete your portfolio.
The final portfolio will include-


  • Five fables that we have read outside of class

  • Three of your favorite journal entries

  • The script for your final presentation

  • Three written fables

    • One African Fable of your choice

    • One Chinese Fable of your choice

    • One Native American Fable of your choice

  • Reflection

The reflection should answer the questions-



  • What is a fable?

  • What are the similarities and differences across culture?

  • Which fable that you wrote is your favorite? Why?

  • What did you learn about fables?

  • Why did you choose the journal entries and fables that you chose?



Day 2-Introduction to Aesop’s Fables
Purpose-

To introduce Aesop’s Fables

To familiarize the students with the different elements of a fable

Preparation-

Students should have looked up five stories that contain morals for homework. They also were asked to change any answers on their pre-assessment that they found that was incorrect while researching. The students were required to write a short response to the clips shown in class. They should now understand what a moral is.


Procedure-

Journal Entry- The students will respond to the quote “‘In the first place, the fable must exhibit the animals as being endowed with human reason, and initiated into all the customs and conditions of our mode of living, so that their behavior has nothing at all odd in it.’ -- Jacob Grimm” in their journals and how they believe that the quote relates to what we have been learning about morals.


Ask the students what they think the main elements of a fable are. Write everything the students say on the board.
Read the example of the fable- The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf as a class
Divide the students into groups of three or four and have them try to figure out the main elements of the fable using the Fable Dissection Chart.
Discuss as a class. Were there any elements that were missed in the initial discussion of elements?
Give the students the second Aesop Fable- The Bird, the Beast and the Bat. Have them fill out the Dissection Chart on their own for this fable.
Discuss what we have found for the last five minutes of class.
Hand out Dissection Charts for homework.

Assessment-

Reflect on what we think that the students have learned about what a fable is. The students will go home and find three of Aesop’s fables on their own and fill out the dissection charts for homework.


The Shepherd’s Boy and the Wolf

A SHEPHERD-BOY, who watched a flock of sheep near a village, brought out the villagers three or four times by crying out, "Wolf! Wolf!" and when his neighbors came to help him, laughed at them for their pains. The Wolf, however, did truly come at last. The Shepherd-boy, now really alarmed, shouted in an agony of terror: "Pray, do come and help me; the Wolf is killing the sheep"; but no one paid any heed to his cries, nor rendered any assistance. The Wolf, having no cause of fear, at his leisure lacerated or destroyed the whole flock.



The Birds, the Beasts, and the Bat

THE BIRDS waged war with the Beasts, and each were by turns the conquerors. A Bat, fearing the uncertain issues of the fight, always fought on the side which he felt was the strongest. When peace was proclaimed, his deceitful conduct was apparent to both combatants. Therefore being condemned by each for his treachery, he was driven forth from the light of day, and henceforth concealed himself in dark hiding-places, flying always alone and at night.



Name:  _______________________________________

 

 



Fable Dissection Chart

 

Fable:  ___________________________________________

 

 


Exposition(Characters and Setting)

Rising Action (Events leading to conflict)

Conflict

(Struggle in the Story)



Falling Action(Events Resulting from Conflict)

Moral

(Lesson)


 

 

 

 

 

Dissection Chart
Find three Aesop fables either online or in a book. Make sure that you find a fable! Not a myth or legend. Read the fable carefully and fill in the dissection chart for each fable, just as we did in class. This is due tomorrow and will be counted as a grade.
Name:  _______________________________________

 

 



Fable Dissection Chart

 

Fable:  ___________________________________________

 

 


Exposition(Characters and Setting)

Rising Action (Events leading to conflict)

Conflict

(Struggle in the Story)



Falling Action(Events Resulting from Conflict)

Moral

(Lesson)


 

 

 

 

 


Day 3-Introduction of Aesop
Purpose-

To introduce Aesop’s fables to the students

To introduce Aesop as the creator of these fables

To help the students understand the importance of fables


Preparation-

The students will have dissected fables for homework the night before. Now they will be introduced to Aesop, one of the influential fable writers.


Procedure-

Journal Entry- At this point in time, write at least two questions you have about fables, the structures of fables or morals.


Tell the students that they are going to be introduced to one of the most influential fable creators of all time.
Divide the students into groups of 4 people. Each person in the group will receive a different part of the information on Aesop. Each student will read their own section and then educate the other students in their group about the information that they have read.
For the last 15 minutes of class, we will discuss as a class what we have learned about Aesop and why we think it is important.
Assessment-

For homework, the students will write in their journals reflecting on the lesson- Why were you introduced to Aesop? Do you think this is important? What was your favorite piece of information that you have learned?




Person 1

Aesop

Little is known about the ancient Greek writer Aesop (c. 620 B.C.E.–c. 560 B.C.E.), whose stories of clever animals and foolish humans are considered Western civilization's first morality tales. He was said to have been a slave who earned his freedom through his storytelling and went on to serve as advisor to a king. Both his name and the animist tone of his tales have led some scholars to believe he may have been Ethiopian in origin.

Freed from Slavery

Aesop never wrote down any of the tales himself; he merely recited them orally. The first recorded mention of his life came about a hundred years after he died, in a work by the eminent Greek historian Herodotus, who noted that he was a slave of one Iadmon of Samos and died at Delphi. In the first century C.E., Plutarch, another Greek historian, also speculated on Aesop's origins and life. Plutarch placed Aesop at the court of immensely weighty Croesus, the king of Lydia (now northwestern Turkey). A source from Egypt dating back to this same century also described Aesop as a slave from the Aegean island of Samos, near the Turkish mainland. The source claims that after he was released from bondage he went to Babylon. Aesop has also been referred to as Phrygian, pointing to origins in central Turkey settled by Balkan tribes around 1200 B.C.E. They spoke an Indo-European language and their communities were regularly raided for slaves to serve in Greece.

The name "Aesop" is a variant of "Acthiop," which is a reference to Ethiopia in ancient Greek. This and the trickster nature of some of his stories, where humans are regularly outwitted by a cleverer animal figure, has led some scholars to speculate that Aesop may have been from Africa. The link was discussed in aSpectator essay from 1932 by the critic J. H. Driberg. There are two tales from Aesop in which a man tries to come to the aid of a serpent, and Driberg noted that such acts mirror "the habitual kindness shown to snakes by many tribes: for snakes are the repositories of the souls of ancestors and they are cherished therefore and invited to live in the houses of men by daily gifts of milk."
Person 2

Tales Reflected Human Folly

Anthropomorphism, or animals with human capabilities, is the common thread throughout Aesop's fables. The most famous among them are "The Tortoise and the Hare," in which the plodding turtle and the energetic rabbit hold a race. The arrogant hare is so confident that he rests and falls asleep halfway; the wiser tortoise plods past and wins. "Slow but steady wins the race," the fable concludes. These and other Aesop fables, wrote Peter Jones in the Spectator in 2002, often pit "the rich and powerful against the poor and weak. They stress either the folly of taking on a stronger power, or the cunning which the weaker must deploy if he is to stand any chance of success; and they often warn that nature never changes."

Several phrases are traced back to the fables of Aesop, such as "don't count your chickens before they are hatched," which concludes the tale of the greedy "Milkmaid and Her Pail." In "The Fox and the Grapes," a fox ambles through the forest and spies a bunch of grapes. Thirsty, he tries in vain to reach them but finally gives up and walks off muttering that they were likely sour anyway. From this comes the term "sour grapes."

Person 3

Thrown from Cliff

According to myth, Aesop won such fame throughout Greece for his tales that he became the target of resentment and perhaps even a political witch-hunt. He was accused of stealing a gold cup from Delphi temple to the god Apollo and was supposedly tossed from the cliffs at Delphi as punishment for the theft. His tales told of human folly and the abuses of power, and he lived during a period of tyrannical rule in Greece. His defense, it is said, was the fable "The Eagle and the Beetle," in which a hare, being preyed upon by an eagle, asks the beetle for protection. The small insect agrees, but the eagle fails to see it and strikes the hare, killing it. From then on, the beetle watched the eagle's nest and shook it when there were eggs inside, which then fell to the ground. Worried about her inability to reproduce, the eagle asks a god for help, and the deity offers to store the eggs in its lap. The beetle learns of this and puts a ball of dirt there among the eggs, and the god—in some accounts Zeus, in others Jupiter—rises, startled, and the eggs fall out. For this reason, it is said, eagles never lay their eggs during the season when beetles flourish. "No matter how powerful one's position may be, there is nothing that can protect the oppressor from the vengeance of the oppressed" is the moral associated with this particular fable.

The first written compilation of Aesop's tales came from Demetrius of Phaleron around 320 B.C.E.,Assemblies of Aesopic Tales, but it disappeared in the ninth century. The first extant version of the fables is thought to be from Phaedrus, a former slave from Macedonia who translated the tales into Latin in the first century C.E. in what became known as the Romulus collection. Valerius Babrius, a Greek living in Rome, translated these and other fables of the day into Greek in the first half of the 200s C.E. Forty-two of those, in turn, were translated into Latin by Avianus around 400 C.E. There is also a link between Aesop and Islam. The prophet Mohamed mentioned "Lokman," said to be the wisest man in the east, in the 31st sura of the Koran. In Arab folklore, Lokman supposedly lived around 1100 B.C.E. and was an Ethiopian. His father, it was said, was descended from the biblical figure Job. Some of his tales may have been adapted by Aesop some five centuries after his death.
Person 4

Censored for Children's Sake

The Latin translation of Aesop's fables helped them survive the ages. Their enduring appeal, wrote English poet and critic G. K. Chesterton in an introduction to a 1912 Doubleday edition, might lead back to a primeval allure. "These ancient and universal tales are all of animals; as the latest discoveries in the oldest prehistoric caverns are all of animals," Chesterton wrote. "Man, in his simpler states, always felt that he himself was something too mysterious to be drawn. But the legend he carved under these cruder symbols was everywhere the same; and whether fables began with Æsop or began with Adam … the upshot is everywhere essentially the same: that superiority is always insolent, because it is always accidental; that pride goes before a fall; and that there is such a thing as being too clever by half."

Aesop's tales were known in medieval Europe, and a German edition brought back to England by William Caxton, along with the first printing press in England, was translated by Caxton and became one of the first books ever printed in the English language. A 1692 version from English pamphleteer Roger L'Estrange A Hundred Fables of Aesop was popular for a number of years, and the Aesop fables began to be promoted as ideal for teaching children to read. A discovery by contemporary scholar Robert Temple and his wife Olivia, a translator, resulted in a 1998 Penguin edition that contained some ribald original tales they found in a 1927 Greek-language text. As David Lister explained in an article for London's Independent newspaper, "many of the never before translated fables were coarse and brutal. And even some of the most famous ones had been mistranslated to give them a more comforting and more moral tone. What the Temples began to realise was that the Victorians had simply suppressed the fables which shocked them and effectively changed others."

Books

Chesterton, G.K., in an introduction to Aesop Fables, translated by V.S. Verson Jones, Doubleday & Co., 1912, reprinted in Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism, Vol 24.



Major Authors and Illustrators for Children and Young Adults, 2nd ed., 8 vols. Gale Group, 2002.

Richardson, Samuel, in a preface to Aesop Fables, 1740, edited by Samuel Richardson, Garland Publishing, Inc., 1975, reprinted in Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism, Vol 24.



Periodicals

Independent (London, England), January 15, 1998.

Spectator, June 18, 1932; March 16, 2002.

Day 4-Introduction to African Fables
Purpose-

To introduce students to African Fables

To connect morals to everyday life

Preparation-

Students have been introduced to what a fable is and now will be introduced to fables from African literature.


Procedure-

Read How Anansi Became a Spider as a class.

Give a copy to each student to read by themselves. Have them do their journal entry.
Journal Entry- What are some similarities between this How Anansi Became a Spider and Aesop’s Fables? What are some differences?

Have the students turn this journal entry in when they are done.


When the students are done with the journal entry, give them How Anansi Tricked God to read.
Give the students the Fable Worksheet. They will start on this in class and continue it for homework if they do not complete it in class.
Assessment-

The students will complete the fable worksheet if they did not complete it in class.



How Anansi Became a Spider

There was once an African king who had the finest ram in the world. 

When this ram happened to be grazing on Anansi's crops one day, Anansi threw a rock at it, hitting it between the eyes and killing it. 

Anansi knew that the king would punish him for what he had done to the prize ram, and he immediately schemed how to get out of the situation. Needless to say, Anansi resorted to trickery. 

Anansi went to sit under a tree to think of an escape when, all of a sudden, a nut fell and struck him on the head. Anansi immediately had an idea. First, he took the dead ram and tied it to the nut tree. Then he went to a spider and told it of a wonderful tree laden with nuts. 

The spider was delighted and immediately went to the tree. Anansi then went to the king and told him that the spider had evidently killed the prize ram; the ram was hanging from a tree where the spider was spinning webs. The king flew into a rage and demanded the death penalty for the spider. 

The king thanked Anansi and offered him a great reward. Anansi returned to the spider and warned it of the king's wrath, crying out to the whole world that the spider had killed the ram. The spider was very confused. 

Anansi told the spider to go to the king and plead for mercy, and perhaps the spider's life would be spared. Meanwhile, the king had gone home for lunch and told his wife what happened. The wife laughed and said, "Have you lost your mind? How on earth could a little spider make a thread strong enough to hold a ram? How in the world could that little spider hoist the ram up there? Don't you know, Anansi obviously killed your ram!" 

The king was angry that he had been deceived and told his court to fetch Anansi immediately. When the king's men came for him, Anansi assumed that it was to bring him to the palace for his reward for turning in the spider. So Anansi went along willingly. He walked into the palace as if he owned the place and then said to the king, "Well, what is my reward for the killer of your ram?" This enraged the king so much that he kicked Anansi, splitting him into two pieces; he was no longer a man, but a spider with long legs. 

How Anansi Tricked God

Anansi was terribly conceited after the whole affair of the ear of corn. God found Anansi entertaining, but his bragging was growing tiresome. 

So God gave Anansi a sack and said, "I have something in mind; figure it out and bring it back to me in the sack." Anansi asked questions, but God would give no further clues as to what that "something" might be. God sent the mortal on his way, saying that if he were only half as clever as he boasted he was, then he should have no problem figuring out what "something" God wanted. 

Anansi was puzzled. How was he to know what God wanted in the sack? He left heaven and went down to Africa, where he had a meeting with the birds, explaining his predicament. The birds were sympathetic, but had no clues to offer. However, each agreed to give Anansi one feather, enabling Anansi to fly. Anansi made these feathers into a beautiful cloak, and then flew up to heaven, where he perched in a tree next to God's house. 

Some of the people of heaven saw this strange "bird" and began talking about it. They asked each other what kind of bird this might be. Even God himself did not recall making any sort of creature that looked like that. 

One of those present suggested that, if Anansi were clever, he might know what sort of bird this was. Anansi, in the tree, heard all of this. 

God's attendants were speaking among themselves when one said, "Good luck finding Anansi - God sent him on an impossible mission. How was Anansi to know that God wanted the sun and the moon brought to him in a sack?" 

Overhearing this, Anansi went out to fetch the sun and the moon. He went to the python, the wisest of all things, and asked how one might capture the sun and the moon. The python advised him to go to the west, where the sun rests at night. The moon could be found in the east around the same time. So Anansi gathered the sun and the moon, placed them in the sack, and took them to God. God was so pleased with Anansi's ingenuity that he made Anansi his captain on earth. 

Name: __________

Date: __________


Fable Worksheet
Fill in the following worksheet answering the questions about FOUR different African Fables. You can find the fables on the website http://www.gateway-africa.com/stories/ but are not limited to this website as long as you make sure you find an African Fable. You will have time to do this in class. If you do not finish this in class, you will have to finish it for class tomorrow.

  1. Title of the Fable-



  1. Non-human characters and their descriptions-



  1. Human characters and their descriptions-



  1. Problem to be solved-



  1. Solution



  1. The moral of the fable or lesson learned-



  1. How the moral relates to everyday life or society-



  1. Why this moral is important-


Day 5-Continuation of African Fables
Purpose-

To continue to familiarize the students with African fables

To familiarize the students with the elements of African Fables

To relate morals to their everyday lives


Preparation

The students have read at least six African fables at this point. They should have a general understanding of the elements of an African Fable.


Procedure-

The students will write three African Fables in class today. They will be allowed to use examples that we have seen in class and the fables that they have researched previously. They will be given a worksheet to help them decide in which direction that they want to write their fables.


Assessment-

If the students do not finish their fables in class, they will have to finish them for homework.

Name ­­­­­­___________________
Use this worksheet to help you organize your African Fables. Answer the questions for all three of your fables.

What is the moral of your fable going to be?


Who are the characters in your fable going to be?

How does the moral of your fable affect your everyday life?

How do you think the moral of your fable affects society?

What elements of fables are you making sure to include in your fable?



Week 2- Continuation of Fables

Day 6-Comparison of Aesop’s Fables and African Fables
Purpose-

To compare and contrast Aesop’s Fables and African Fables

To find similar elements in different types of fables

To find different elements in different types of fables

To relate morals to their everyday lives.
Preparation-

The students have read numerous Aesop’s Fables and African Fables. The students have also written their own African Fables.


Procedure-

A few students will read their African Fables out loud to the class. The class will decide what the moral of the fable was and how discuss how it affects their everyday life.


The students will fill out the Venn Diagram in groups of 3 or 4 comparing and contrasting the fables.
When the students are done filling out the Venn Diagram, we will discuss as a class the similarities and differences between the fables.
Journal entry- The students will write in their journals, what type of fable do you prefer (African or Aesop’s)? Why?

Assessment-

For homework, the students will answer in their journal, Even though there are differences between the two types of fables, why are they still fables?



Name ­­___________________

Aesop’s Fables African Fables



Day 7-Introduction to Chinese Fables

Purpose-

To introduce the students to Chinese Fables

To familiarize the students with the elements of a Chinese Fable

To connect morals to everyday life


Preparation-

The students have been introduced to different types of fables. Now they will begin to learn about the elements of a Chinese fable.


Procedure-

A few students will be asked to share their journal entries with the class. We will discuss the differences between Aesop Fables and African Fables.


Then Chinese Fables will be introduced with A Foolish Man Buys Shoes.


Read as a class A Foolish Man Buys Shoes. Discuss as a class what the moral of the fable is.
For the rest of the class period the students will be required to find between 5-7 fables online or in a book and read them. They will need to fill out the Dissection Worksheet (they have used this before).
If the students are not working on this assignment properly, the number of fables read will be upped to 10 fables minimum.
Assessment-

For homework- The students will finish finding fables if they have not found them. In their journals, they will write how the moral of each fable they found can be seen in their everyday life and who taught them that moral, if applicable. (For example, my mother taught me this…)



A Foolish Man Buys Shoes

In the past there lived a foolish man in a small kingdom called Zheng. One day he wanted to buy himself a pair of new shoes. He measured his feet with a ruler first and wrote down his size. But he was in such a hurry to set out that he left it at home.

When he arrived at a shoe shop, he felt in the pocket only to find that it was not there. So he said apologetically, 'I have left the measurement at home and don't know the size. I'll fetch it in one minute.' With these words he hurried off as fast as his legs could carry him.

He ran back home, found it and then to the shop again. But still it took him quite a while and the shop was already closed then. He had gone to all this trouble for nothing and did not get his shoes.

Then someone asked him, 'Did you buy the shoes for yourself or someone else?' 'For myself, of course.' he answered. 'Then why don't you try the shoes on by yourself?'

Dissection Chart
Find 5-7 fables either online or in a book. Make sure that you find a fable! Not a myth or legend. Read the fable carefully and fill in the dissection chart for each fable.
Name:  _______________________________________

 

 



Fable Dissection Chart

 

Fable:  ___________________________________________

 

 


Exposition(Characters and Setting)

Rising Action (Events leading to conflict)

Conflict

(Struggle in the Story)



Falling Action(Events Resulting from Conflict)

Moral

(Lesson)


 

 

 

 

 

Day 8-Continuation of Chinese Fables


Purpose-

To continue to familiarize the students with Chinese

To familiarize the students with the elements of Chinese Fables

To relate morals to their everyday lives


Preparation

The students have read numerous Chinese Fables. They should understand these fables and their elements by this point.


Procedure-

The students will write three Chinese Fables in class today. They will be allowed to use examples that we have seen in class and the fables that they have researched previously. They will be given a worksheet to help them decide in which direction that they want to write their fables.


Assessment-

If the students do not finish their fables in class, they will have to finish them for homework.




Day 9- Comparison of All Learned Fables
Purpose-

To familiarize the students with the differences between fables

To familiarize the students with the similarities between fables
Preparation-

The students have read many different examples of Aesop’s Fables, African Fables and Chinese Fables. They have also written their own African and Chinese Fables. They should know the main elements of each fable.


Procedure-

Students will be divided into six groups. Each group will be assigned Aesop’s Fables, African Fables or Chinese Fables. Each group will be responsible to find all of the key elements to the type of fable they were assigned. They will be given the examples of fables we have read in class and will be allowed to use their previous work.


After about 30 minutes of discussing and finding the key elements. The students will write their findings on the board.
We will discuss as a class all of the similar findings and different findings from each group.
At the end of class, if students want to share their Chinese fables, they will be able to do so.
Assessment-

Students will write the lists of elements down in their journals. They will be expected to turn this in.



Day 10- Introduction of Native American Fables
Purpose-

To introduce students to Native American Fables

To familiarize students with the key concepts

To relate morals to everyday life


Preparation-

The students have read numerous other fables. They should know the similarities and differences between all of the studied fables.


Procedure-

Students will be given the first 30 minutes of class to research Native American Fables.


Then the students will be put into groups of 3 of 4 to discuss the elements found in the Fables that they have found and read. The groups will be required to inform the class of what they have discovered from their fables.
Assessment-

For homework, the students will read five fables and write the morals of the fable in their journal.




Week Three- Continuation of Fables
Day 11- Continuation of Native American Fables
Like with the African Fables, the students will write three Native America Fables in class. They will be given the same worksheet to help them organize their thoughts. At the end of the class period, if any student wants to share their fable, they will be allowed to do so. If no one wants to share, then they will be given the class period to work on finishing their fables.
Homework- Finish fables if they were not finished in class.
Day 12- Comparison of Fables
Journal Entry- Write which type of fable is your favorite and why?
Write a five paragraph essay comparing and contrasting two of the types of fables that we have learned about so far.
Homework- Finish essay if it was not finished in class. This will be due on Day 17.
Comparison Essay
Write a five paragraph essay comparing and contrasting two different fables that we have discussed so far (Aesop’s Fables, African Fables, Chinese fables or Native American Fables).
Your essay must include-

  • 5 paragraphs

  • Common elements in the fables you decide to use

  • Similarities and differences in these fables

  • Examples/quotes to prove evidence


This will be due on Day 17

Day 13- Introduction to Contemporary Fables
Tell students that there are still fables being written today. Read The Ant and the Cricket as a class. Discuss as a class what the moral of the fable is. Read The Fox and the Grape.
Discuss how the similarities to Aesop’s Fables as a class.
Journal Entry- Are fables written today similar or different from fables written in the past? Which type of fable do you like the most?
THE ANT AND THE CRICKET”

The careless cricket


Sang the summer away
Just to find herself
Poor and with nothing to eat
No fly, no bread
In the winter to have.

Hungry and whining


To the ant she went
Begging for something to have
Just out of kind heart
As to be able to eat
Till the good season comes:
Swearing by her faith
Next August she would refund
With interests and capital sum.

The frugal ant, who double thinks


Before anything she lends
-“How did you spend your summer away?”
Thus asks straight out.
And the cricket:-“My dear friend,
I did nothing but sang day and night”-
“Well done, my dear friend,
Now you can also dance”

(Fable by Jean de la Fontaine)

"THE FOX AND THE GRAPES"
Jean de La Fontaine's fable

A fox, from Gascogne or from Normandy,


we don't know,
almost dying with hunger, going around
saw a vine-branch with grapes on
so beautiful and ripe to all appearances,
that he thought of reaching and eating them.
But after uselessly jumping and jumping
As the vine was too high for him to reach
He had a second thought, 
“They're sour, I can see it,
These grapes are good just for loirs and squirrels!”
I leave for you what I can't have.

Day 14- Continuation of Contemporary Fables
Like with the African, Chinese, and Native American Fables, the students will write three Contemporary Fables in class. They will be given the same worksheet to help them organize their thoughts. At the end of the class period, if any student wants to share their fable, they will be allowed to do so. If no one wants to share, then they will be given the class period to work on finishing their fables.
Homework- Finish fables if they were not finished in class.

Day 15- Commonalities of All Fables

Students will compare and contrast all of the types of fables we have learned about. They will do the Comparison Worksheet during class. When they are done, the students will list all of the elements that they believe are key concepts needed in a fable. The list will be written on the board as the students say the concepts by the teacher. The elements will be discussed as a class. The students will be advised to write down these elements because they will need it later.



Name ____________

Comparison Worksheet
Aesop’s Fable Key Concepts-

African Fable Key Concepts-

Chinese Fable Key Concepts-

Native American Fable Key Concepts-


Week Four- Summative Assessment

Day 16- Start Summative Assessment
Students will be given the final summative assessment project. Today in class they will begin working on writing their own fable. Remind the students of the list of the concepts that they wrote in the previous class period.
Journal Entry- What is the moral of your fable going to be? Are your main characters going to be animals or humans?
Homework: Work on fable. They will be due 20 minutes into the next class period.


Write Your Own Fable
For the end of this unit we will be doing a two part assignment. In the first part, you will be working alone. For the second part, you will work in groups of three to four people.


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