Eof directors’ Professional Development Seminar “Program Planning & Assessment”



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EOF Directors’ Professional Development Seminar “Program Planning & Assessment

  • June 13, 2013
  • Rider University
  • Creating and Using Rubrics to Assess
  • Program Level Student Learning Outcomes
  • Mildred A. Mihlon, Ph.D.
  • Saint Peter’s University
  • Associate Vice President, Academic Affairs & Assessment

Introductions

  • Who, What, Where &
  • Level of Familiarity with Assessment?

Assumptions

  • Effective program evaluation
  • must be grounded in a solid assessment plan that is inclusive of a clear vision/mission, relevant program goals and well-articulated student learning outcomes that can be evaluated through direct and indirect measures against defined standards of success.

Writing Student Learning Outcomes

  • Student Learning Outcomes…
  • Derived from the program mission and goals, student learning outcomes are identified actions that a student is expected to demonstrate in terms of knowledge, skills, and attitudes upon completion of a program, course, activity or process.
  • Student learning outcomes should be measurable, manageable, and
  • meaningful.

Writing Student Learning Outcomes

  • Ask Yourself…
  • What are the most important things a student should know, be able to do or demonstrate after completing my program or from utilizing my office/services?
  • What does the end result look like? How will you know the students have learned what you want them to learn? How will you identify it? What will they be able to do, say, think, care about, or value after this experience.

Writing Student Learning Outcomes

  • Transform these attributes into
  • measureable, action-oriented
  • student learning outcome statements.
  • Examples:
  • Students will…
  • Identify critical campus resources required for a successful transition to college life.
  • Demonstrate engagement through participation in campus life activities.
  • Develop effective self-management skills.
  • Employ the use of appropriate decision-making skills.
  • Apply the appropriate use of study skills and time management strategies.
  • Summer Bridge Programs Learning Communities
  • Peer Mentorships Service Activities
  • Transition Courses Workshops
  • Academic Advising Orientations
  • SLO 3
    • Direct Measure
    • Indirect Measure

Measuring Student Learning Outcomes

  • Indirect Measures = imply learning has occurred, but are not specific as to what has been learned; often subjective.
  • Direct Measures = tangible evidence that learning has occurred and to what extent through observed changes in skills, attitudes, values or knowledge base.
  • Middle States requires use of both!

Measuring Student Learning Outcomes

  • Indirect Measures
  • Assignments/Exams
  • Grades/GPAs
  • Papers/Essays
  • Persistence/Graduation Rates
  • Projects
  • Surveys (NSSE)
  • Portfolios
  • Attendance
  • Student Reflections/Discussions
  • Job/Internship Placements
  • Employers Ratings
  • Interviews/Focus Groups
  • Capstone projects
  • Scores on GREs/LSAT/etc…
  • Exhibits
  • Honors/Awards
  • Presentations
  • Participation Hours

Creating & Using Rubrics

  • Objectives:
  • Define Rubric
  • Rubric Features
  • Construct a Rubric
  • Aggregate Rubric Data

Definition & Rubric Purpose

  • A rubric is a scoring instrument for evaluating performance along a task-specific set of criteria rather than a single numeric score.
  • Purposes of rubrics:
    • Describe what “outstanding” or “satisfactory” or “inadequate” performance looks like
    • Articulate the criteria against which student learning is judged
    • Provide an objective guide for assessment

Basic Rubric Features

  • A Rubric: Basic Features…
    • Stated Objective or Purpose - title
    • Scoring Criteria – characteristics of good performance on the task
    • Levels of Performance – defined degrees of competency
    • Descriptors –briefly define what is expected at each level of performance
  • Presentation Rubric
  • http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=Z79XC8&sp=true&
  • Peer Evaluation: Group Work
  • http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=K78BBC&sp=true&
  • Self Evaluation for Group Participation
  • http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=B78BAA&sp=true&
  • Individual Portfolio
  • http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=K7369C&sp=yes&
  • Blog
  • http://www.rcampus.com/rubricshowc.cfm?code=N44XXC&sp=yes&
  • Student Participation
  • http://www.siue.edu/~deder/partrub.html
  • Team Work
  • http://course1.winona.edu/shatfield/air/team%20work.pdf
  • Journal
  • http://course1.winona.edu/shatfield/air/reflectionrubric-1.pdf

Steps to Creating A Rubric

  • Identify and define the assessment objective or purpose (title)
  • Select and write the needed number of scoring criteria (key attributes)
  • Select and write the desired levels of performance
  • Select and write the descriptors (features of scoring criteria)

Steps to Creating A Rubric

  • Identify and define the assessment objective or purpose (title); statements which identify the specific knowledge, skill, or attitude the learner should gain and display as a result of the instructional activity.

Steps to Creating A Rubric

  • 2. Select and write the needed number of scoring criteria (key attributes); broad concepts or specific tasks the student should demonstrate when performing the activity.  
  • Examples of dimensions for a group exercise analyzing a case study may include:  • Contribute to the group discussion  • Take responsibility for required work  • Value others viewpoints  • Analyze the study cooperatively • Present the outcome in a given format

Steps to Creating A Rubric

  • 3. Select and write the desired levels of performance; descriptive levels of quality starting with the worst quality up to the best quality. --Example of a 3 level gradation: poor, average, excellent  --Example of a 4 level gradation: beginning, developing, accomplished, exemplary --Example of a 5 level gradation: poor, fair, average, very good, excellent

Steps to Creating A Rubric

  • 4. Select and write the descriptors (features of scoring criteria); Start with the best quality of each dimension. Simply list the specific expectations you have for the student. Then, for each level below the best quality, identify the flaws or missing elements which will cause the student to lose points off the best quality performance.

Creating A Rubric

  • Students are asked to write
  • a 5-page reflection paper documenting their level of college readiness following participation in summer transition program.

Creating A Rubric

  • Beginning 1
  • Developing 2
  • Accomplished 3
  • Exemplary 4
  • Engagement
  • Study Habits
  • Resource Knowledge
  • Self-Efficacy

Creating A Rubric

  • Group Activity:
  • Develop a rubric to be used to evaluate students’ leadership skills at the conclusion of a peer mentorship program.

Aggregate Rubric Data

  • N = 75
  • Beginning 1
  • Developing 2
  • Accomplished 3
  • Exemplary 4
  • Writing Quality & Organization
  • 15 (20%)
  • 25 (34%)
  • 30 (40%)
  • 5 (6%)
  • Engagement
  • 10 (13%)
  • 15 (20%)
  • 35 (47%)
  • 15 (20%)
  • Study Habits
  • 15 (20%)
  • 15 (20%)
  • 40 (29%)
  • 5 (6%)
  • Resource Knowledge
  • 5 (6%)
  • 5 (6%)
  • 60 (57%)
  • 5 (6%)
  • Self-Efficacy
  • 5 (6%)
  • 10 (13%)
  • 40 (54%)
  • 20 (27%)

CONTACT

  • Mildred A. Mihlon, Ph.D.
  • Associate Vice President, Academic Affairs & Assessment
  • mmihlon@saintpeters.edu


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