Board of Studies I and II semesters B. Tech



Download 208.83 Kb.
Page1/2
Date02.02.2019
Size208.83 Kb.
#79532
  1   2


School of Engineering


Board of Studies
I and II Semesters B. Tech.

(Common to all B. Tech. Programmes)

Academic Programme

February, 2018

School of Engineering

B. Tech. (common to all disciplines) I Year

Course Structure for 2018-2022 Batch

Semester I/II



Subject Code

Subject

Contact Hours

L-T-P

Credits




BMC120C

BMC121B

English

Communication Technique Lab

2-0-0

0-0-2

4

F

BAS001C

Engineering Mathematics-I *

3-1-0

4

F

BAS010B

Applied Physics

3-1-0

4

F

BES001B

Basic Electronics Engineering

3-0-0

3

F

BES011A

Computer Programming-I*

3-0-0

3

F

BAS012A

Applied Physics Lab

0-0-2

2

F

BES002A

Engineering Graphics

0-0-2

2

F

BES012A

Computer Programming-1 Lab*

0-0-2

2

F

BES004A

Basic Electronics Engineering Lab

0-0-2

2

F




Environmental Sciences/Indian Constitution




NC







TOTAL

14-2-10

26




* In semester I common to all sections

NC- Non Credit Course, It is mandatory to clear for completion of degree.

Semester I/II


Subject Code

Subject

Contact Hours

L-T-P

Credits




BAS002C

Engineering Mathematics-II **

3-1-0

4

F

BAS011B

Engineering Chemistry

3-1-0

4

F

BES005A

Basic Electrical Engineering

3-0-0

3

F

BES013A

Computer Programming II**

3-0-0

3

F

BES007A

Engineering Mechanics

2-1-0

3

F

BES003A

Engineering Workshop

0-0-2

2

F

BES008B

Basic Electrical Engineering Lab

0-0-2

2

F

BAS015A

Chemistry Lab

0-0-2

2

F

BES014A

Computer Programming II Lab**

0-0-2

2

F

BES010A

Engineering Mechanics Lab

0-0-2

2

F




Essence of Indian Traditional Knowledge/Indian Constitution

NC







TOTAL

14-3-10

27




** In semester II common to all sections

NC- Non Credit Course, It is mandatory to clear for completion of degree.
B. Tech. (common to all disciplines)-I/II Semester

Contact Hours (L-T-P): 2-0-2

BMC120C

English

2-0-0 2



Objectives

  1. To enhance Professional competence in reading, writing, listening and speaking.

  2. Switch the approach from providing information about the language to use the language.

  3. Minimize the Grammar Translation Method of ELT while trying to replace it with Direct Method.

  4. Introduce Communicative Method of ELT and focusing the teaching pedagogy on the student-centred learning rather than on the teacher-centred learning.

  5. Ability to master three major forms of communications which are vital in academic and professional settings namely professional presentations, interviews and group communications respectively.

  6. Providing a deep insight into the techniques for delivering effective presentations, winning job interviews, and actively participating in various forms of group communication.




UNIT 1

Vocabulary Building: Word-Classes, Word Formation, Affixes, Synonyms, Antonyms and Standard Abbreviations

UNIT 2

Basic Writing Skills: Sentence Structure, Tenses, The Voice, Narration, Punctuation

UNIT 3

Identifying Common Errors: Articles, Prepositions, Concord, Modal Verbs, Conditional Sentences

UNIT 4

Nature and Style of Sensible Writing: Dialogues Writing, CV/Resume, Writing, Letter Writing, Report Writing

UNIT 5

Writing Practices: Comprehension, Precis Writing, Essay Writing, E-mail Writing, Listening Comprehension, Phonetic Symbols and Transcription, Stress Patterns, Intonation and Pronunciation, Job Interviews, Group Discussion, Formal Presentation


Course Outcomes (CO):

At the end of this course students will have:

CO1: Ability to design a language component or process to meet desired need within realistic, Constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, scenario

CO2: Ability to analyze the usage of English words in different contexts.

CO3: An understanding of technical and academic articles’ comprehension.



CO4: The ability to present oneself at multinational levels knowing the type of different standards of English


MAPPING COURSE OUTCOMES LEADING TO THE ACHIEVEMENT OF PROGRAM OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES:


Course Outcome

Program Outcome

Program Specific Outcome




PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PSO1

PSO2

PSO3

CO1







H




L










L




CO2







L




M










H




CO3




M






















M

CO4













H







H








H = Highly Related; M = Medium L = Low
Suggested Readings:

  1. Practical English Usage. Michael Swan. OUP. 1995

  2. Remedial English Grammar. F.T. Wood. Macmillan. 2007

  3. On Writing Well. William Zinsser. Harper Resource Book. 2001

  4. Study Writing. Liz Hamp-Lyons and Ben Heasly. Cambridge University Press. 2006.

  5. Communication Skills. Sanjay Kumar and Pushp Lata. Oxford University Press. 2011.

  6. Exercises in Spoken English. Parts. I-III, Hyderabad. Oxford University Press.


Communication Techniques Lab


BMC121B

Communication Technique Lab

0-0-2 2




  • Listening Comprehension

  • Phonetic Symbols and Transcription

  • Stress Patterns, Intonation and Pronunciation

  • Job Interviews

  • Group Discussion

  • Formal Presentation

B. Tech. (common to all disciplines)-I/II Semester

Contact Hours (L-T-P): 3-1-4



BAS001C

Engineering Mathematics-I

3: 1: 0 4


OBJECTIVE:

The objectives of this course are to make the students:

  • To increase the student's appreciation of the basic role played by mathematics in modern technology.

  • Incorporate the knowledge of advanced mathematics to support their concurrent and subsequent engineering studies.

  • To develop the concepts and tools that will serve as building blocks towards tackling more advanced level of mathematics that they are likely to find useful in their profession when employed in the firm/industry/corporation in public or private sector




UNIT 1

Asymptotes (Cartesian coordinates only), curvature, convexity, concavity, point of inflexion and curve tracing.

UNIT 2

Limit, continuity and partial derivatives, Euler’s theorem on homogenous functions, total derivative, approximate calculations; Maxima and minima of two and more independent variables; Method of Lagrange multipliers.

UNIT 3

Beta and Gamma functions and their properties. Surface and volumes of solids of revolutions. Double integrals, change of order of integration in double integrals, Change of variables (Cartesian to polar), Applications: areas and volumes.

UNIT 4

Vectors covering, laws of vector algebra, operations- dot, cross, triple products; Vector function- limits, continuity and derivatives, geometric interpretation; Gradient, divergence and cur- formulae.

UNIT 5

Line integrals, simple connected regions, Line integrals, surface integrals, volume integral, Green’s theorem, Stokes theorem and Gauss theorem.





Text Books:

  1. B.V.Ramana, Higher Engineering Mathematics, Tata McGraw Hill, 2011.

Reference Books:

  1. Erwin Kreyszig , Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Wiley 9th Edition, 2008

  2. Maurice D. Weir and Joel Hass, Thomas Calculus, Pearson, 11th Edition, 2005.

  3.  Higher Engineering Mathematics- B. S. Grewal, Khanna Publications.

Course Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Understand the concepts of Asymptotes, curvature and curve tracing.

  2. Understand the functions of more than one independent variable and calculate partial derivatives along with their applications .Also obtain an idea for finding the extreme values of functions of more the one variable.

  3. Will able to integrate a continuous function of two or three variables over a bounded region and able to trace the curves.

  4. Understand the representation of vector and its properties.

  5. Understand line integral, surface integrals, volume integral, Green’s theorem, Stokes theorem and Gauss theorem

MAPPING COURSE OUTCOMES LEADING TO THE ACHIEVEMENT OF PROGRAM OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES:

Course Outcome

Program Outcome

Program Specific Outcome




PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO9

PO10

PO11

PO12

PSO1

PSO2

PSO3

CO1

H

H







M




M













M

H

L




CO2




M




L

M




H










L

M

M







CO3

H

H




M

M




H







L




M

M

M




CO4

H

M




M

L




M













M




M




CO5

H

H







M




H













M

H

M




H = Highly Related; M = Medium L = Low
B. Tech. (common to all disciplines)-I/II Semester

Contact Hours (L-T-P): 3-1-2


BAS 010B

Applied Physics

3:1:0 4


OBJECTIVE:

The Objectives of Applied Physics are:

  1. An ability to apply profound understanding of Quantum Mechanics and its applications.

  2. An understanding of free electron gas model

  3. An ability to design a Laser system and its component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as health and safety, manufacturability

  4. The broad education necessary to understand special theory of relativity.

  5. A knowledge of upcoming technologies like photonics

UNIT 1

Quantum Mechanics: Compton Effect and quantum nature of light. Compton Profile: Applications in material Science. Schrödinger’s Equation: Time dependent and time independent cases. Physical interpretation of wave function and its properties, boundary conditions. Particle in one-dimensional box.

Applications of Quantum Mechanics: Schrödinger’s Equation and its Solution for Particle in three-dimensional boxes. Degeneracy. Barrier penetration and tunnel effect. Tunnelling probability, Alpha Decay. Scanning and Tunnelling Microscopes.

UNIT 2

Sommerfeld’s Free Electron Gas Model and its Applications: Density of energy states, Fermi energy levels. Determination of Specific Heats of solids. Band Theory of solids: Understanding Semiconductors. Band Gap in solids. Conductivity and Mobility due to electrons and Holes. Solar Cells.

UNIT 3

Quantum Optics: Coherence: Spatial and temporal coherence, Coherence length, Coherence time. Q- factor for LASER. Visibility as a Measure of Coherence. Spatial Coherence and Size of the Source. Temporal Coherence and Spectral Purity.

Applications of Quantum Optics: LASER, Holography and Optical Communications

LASER: Theory of LASER action: Einstein’s coefficients, Threshold conditions for LASER Action. Method and Mechanism of production of He-Ne LASER. Semiconductor LASER. Elementary ideas of Q-switching and Mode Locking. Holography: Holography versus photography. Basic theory of Holography. Applications of Holography in Microscopy and Interferometry.

Optical Communication: Optical fiber as optical wave-guide. Numerical Aperture and Maximum Angle of Acceptance.

UNIT 4

Special Theory of Relativity (STR): Idea of Relativity and Frames of References. Postulates of STR. Lorentz transformations. Relativity of length and time. Relativity and GPS. Velocity transformations. Variation in mass with speed. Mass-Energy equivalence principle. Relativistic Energy and momentum. Sagnag’s formula and Optical gyroscope.

UNIT 5

Applications of Optical Technologies: Determination of thickness of thin films using interference technique. Elementary idea of anti-reflection coating. Optical filters. Applications of Diffraction: Bragg’s law of X-Ray Diffraction. Polaroids and their industrial applications.

Overview of Upcoming Technologies

* Photonics * Spintronics * Quantum Computers * Nanotechnology and Nano-materials. Carbon Nano-tubes (CNTs).


Course Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
CO-1 Students would be able to describe the Quantum Mechanics and its applications.

CO-2 Students would be able to write down the band theory of Solids.

CO-3 to enable student to learn and to apply concepts learnt in Quantum optics in Industry and in real life.

CO-4 to enable students to learn the idea of Global Positioning System (GPS) and to explore its further applications and importance in advancement of technologies

CO-5 To identify the applications of electrodynamics using Maxwell equations
Suggested Books

1. Arthur Beiser, Perspectives in Modern Physics, McGraw Hill International.

2. H. S. Mani and G. K. Mehta, Modern Physics, East-West Press.

3. A. K. Ghatak, Optics, TATA McGraw Hill.

4 D. K. Bhattacharya and A. Bhaskaran: Engineering Physics, Oxford University Press.

5. A. K. Ghatak and Thyagrajan, Fiber Optics, Oxford University Press.

6. S. O. Pillai, Solid State Physics,Wiley Eastern
MAPPING COURSE OUTCOMES LEADING TO THE ACHIEVEMENT OF PROGRAM OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES:


Course Outcome

Program Outcome

Program Specific Outcome




PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PO8

PO 9

PO10

PO11

PO12

PSO1

PSO2

PSO3

CO1







H




L




H




L













L




CO2







L




M




L




M

H




L




H




CO3




M






















L




M







M

CO4













H






















H







CO5







H










M
















H







H = Highly Related; M = Medium L = Low


B. Tech. (common to all disciplines)-I/II Semester

Contact Hours (L-T-P): 3-0-2


BES001B

Basic Electronics Engineering

3-0-0 3


Objective


  • To understand basic concepts required in understanding electronic circuits

  • To understand the concept of Semiconductor Diode and their applications.

  • To understand the concept of Opto-Electronic Devices.

  • To understand the concept of BJT and their configurations. As well as the concept of Field Effect Transistor with their various configuration.

  • The student will be able to understand fundamental circuit analysis techniques and basic electronics backgrounds, including PN Diode, BJT and MOSFET.

  • The student will be able to understand the concept of Various Binary Number Systems and conversions.

  • To understand Logic Gates and Logic Circuit focussing on basic and universal gates.




UNIT 1

Comparison of Insulator, conductor and semiconductor with energy band diagrams. Semiconductor materials-Intrinsic and Extrinsic semiconductor (P-type and N-type SC), Crystal structures of p-type and Ntype materials, resistivity, conductivity, mobility.

UNIT 2

Semiconductor Diode, PN diode-construction, working and V-I plot, Diode as a Rectifier, Half Wave and Full Wave Rectifiers with and without Filters with calculation of ripple factor and efficiency, Breakdown Mechanisms, Zener Diode – construction, Operation, characteristics; Opto-Electronic Devices – LEDs, Photo Diode, SCR.



UNIT 3

Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) – Construction, Operation, Amplifying Action, Common Base, Common Emitter and Common Collector Configurations-(construction, Properties, Input and output graphs), Operating Point, Biasing configurations: Fixed Bias, Emitter bias and Voltage Divider Bias Configuration;


UNIT 4

Field Effect Transistor (FET) – Construction, Characteristics of Junction FET,

Depletion and Enhancement type Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) FETs (Construction, Input characteristics and transfer characteristics).


UNIT 5

Number Systems: Binary system, Hexadecimal System, Octal system, Decimal system, Code conversions, Basic Logic Gates(AND, OR , NOT), Universal Gates(NAND and NOR) and other gates(EX-OR,EX-NOR),Truth Tables, Boolean Algebra, De Morgan’s Theorems, Realization of other gates using NAND and NOR.


Course Outcome (CO):

At the end of this course students will have:

CO1-Ability to understand the physical properties of different types of semiconductors used in fabricating devices.

CO2- Ability to understand the functioning of PN junction diode and explains its main application as rectifiers and opto-electronic devices.

CO3-Ability to understand the surprising action of BJT and explains its working and biasing in three configurations

CO4-Ability to understand the working of JFET and MOSFET.



CO5-Ability to understand the concept of Various Binary Number Systems and Codes, Logic Gates and Logic Circuit.
MAPPING COURSE OUTCOMES LEADING TO THE ACHIEVEMENT OF PROGRAM OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES:


Course Outcome

Program Outcome

Program Specific Outcome




PO1

PO2

PO3

PO4

PO5

PO6

PO7

PSO1

PSO2

PSO3

CO1

M

H



















L




CO2

M

H
















L

H

L

CO3







H

M

L













M

CO4










H

H







H







CO5
















H

H







M


H = Highly Related; M = Medium L = Low
Text Books:

R. L. Boylestad& Louis Nashlesky (2007), Electronic Devices &Circuit Theory, Pearson Education
Reference Books

SantiramKal (2002), Basic Electronics- Devices, Circuits and IT Fundamentals, Prentice Hall, India

David A. Bell (2008), Electronic Devices and Circuits, Oxford University Press

Thomas L. Floyd and R. P. Jain (2009), Digital Fundamentals, Pearson Education

R. S. Sedha (2010), A Text Book of Electronic Devices and Circuits, S.Chand& Co.

R. T. Paynter (2009), Introductory Electronic Devices & Circuits – Conventional Flow Version, Pearson Education

B. Tech. (common to all disciplines)-I/II Semester

Contact Hours (L-T-P): 3-0-0


BES011A

Computer Programming-I

3: 0: 0 3



Download 208.83 Kb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2




The database is protected by copyright ©www.sckool.org 2023
send message

    Main page