Advanced colloquium for graduate students the french revolution



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SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
HISTORY 211
ADVANCED COLLOQUIUM FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
THE FRENCH REVOLUTION

Dr. Mary Pickering Class Number: 48610

Office: DMH 218 Fall 2012

Office Phone Number: 924-5516 Thursdays, 18:00-20:45

Home Phone Number: (415) 921-3157 Clark 318

(no calls after 9:30 p.m.)

E-mail address: mpickeri@email.sjsu.edu

Office Hours: Tues., 5:00-6:00; Thurs., 5:00-6:00, and by appt.


It is impossible to reign and be innocent.

Saint-Just


O Freedom, what crimes are committed in thy name!

Madame Roland



Faculty Web Page
Some course materials, including the syllabus, may be found on my faculty web page at http://www.sjsu.edu/people/mary.pickering
Course Description and Objectives
This course offers student an in-depth examination of one of the most exciting and controversial occurrences in history, the French Revolution. This event has attracted the attention of many brilliant historians, whose innovative approach to the past has profoundly influenced the entire historical profession. Students will have the opportunity to read the works of the leading historians of the Revolution of the past fifty years. They will gain not only insights into the major debates surrounding this period but an introduction to many of the new topics that are being explored by historians today: the body, language, gender and the public sphere, and the problems of representation. In addition, students will acquire skills in oral presentations and written communication.

Books


You can purchase the books listed below at the Spartan bookstore or at Roberts bookstore.
Lynn Hunt and Jack Censer eds., Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution, (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2001).

David Garrioch, The Making of Revolutionary Paris (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002).

Georges Lefebvre, The Coming of the French Revolution (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005).
Timothy Tackett, When the King Took Flight (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2004).
Lynn Hunt, Politics, Culture, and Class in the French Revolution (Berkeley: University of

California Press, 2004)


François Furet, Interpreting the French Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,

1981).
Lynn Hunt, The Family Romance of the French Revolution (Berkeley: University of California

Press, 1992)

David Andress, The Terror: The Merciless War for Freedom in Revolutionary France (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006 ).

Hubertus Kohle and Rolf Reichardt, Visualizing the Revolution: Politics and Pictorial Arts in Late Eighteenth-century France (London: Reaktion Books, 2008).

David Bell, The First Total War: Napoleon's Europe and the Birth of Warfare as We Know



(Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2007).
Laurent Dubois, Avengers of the New World, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard/Belknap Press, 2004).

Course Requirements and Grading Policy
This course is a three-unit, graded course, satisfying GWAR (Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement). To meet this requirement, all papers must be individual projects.
This class is not a lecture course; it is a seminar for graduate students. By signing up for this course, each of you has made a commitment to attend the class regularly, read the assignments on time, and participate actively in discussion. In particular, you will be expected to debate the strengths and weaknesses of the assigned readings. In order for the course to succeed, you must fulfill these requirements. Please let me know in advance if an emergency will oblige you to skip class. Class participation will count heavily in the final grade.
In addition to participating in class discussions around a common reading, you must do the following assignments:
1. Write a three-page paper evaluating the origins of the French Revolution. It must have footnotes and a bibliography, following the guidelines of Turabian (The Chicago Manual of Style). This paper is due September 20.
2. You must present two documents to the class and explain their context and significance. They can be taken from the Hunt and Censer collection or CD-ROM, the internet, or a book on reserve: Laura Mason and Tracy Rizzo, The French Revolution: A Document Collection (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999). Please write a two-to-three page analytical essay and photocopy it and the document(s) to enable everyone to discuss your findings. The paper will be due the week whose readings most pertain to the topic you have addressed. It must have footnotes and a bibliography, following the guidelines of Turabian (The Chicago Manual of Style). You must hand in the paper the day you present the documents.
3. You must present two images that you analyze in a two-to-three page paper with footnotes and a bibliography, following the guidelines of Turabian (The Chicago Manual of Style). Please photocopy the images for the class and your paper. This paper is due whenever we touch on a topic related to your images.
4. You must write a ten-to-twelve-page historiographical essay on any topic that appeals to you. For example, you could write a paper on Lynn Hunt’s or François Furet’s contribution to the historiography of the French Revolution. You could write a critique of intellectual historians’ approach to the French Revolution. You could compare and contrast two social historians. The paper should be emailed to me the day on December 20 by midnight. It must have footnotes and a bibliography, following Turabian (The Chicago Manual of Style).
We will meet periodically throughout the semester to discuss your progress, especially on the large paper. You may call me, visit me during my office hours, or make an appointment to see me if you are experiencing difficulties of any sort.
Final grades will be based on the following:

Class Discussion on the Common Reading: 25%

3 Short papers: 15% each

1 ten-to-twelve-page paper : 30%


Grades are calculated according to the following percentages:

A: 93-100; A-: 90-92; B+: 87-89; B: 83-86; B-: 80-82; C+: 77-79; C: 73-76; C-:70-72; D+:67-69; D:63-66; D-:60-62; F: anything below 60.



Also, please note that the course schedule and assignment due dates are subject to change with fair notice. So please make sure you attend each class because dates could change.
Success in this course is based on the expectation that students will spend, for each unit of credit, a minimum of forty-five hours over the length of the course for instruction or preparation/studying or course-related activities.

INCOMPLETES
Incompletes are given only if the student has completed in a satisfactory manner at least half of the course requirements and cannot finish the course because of illness, an accident, or some event beyond his or her control.

UNIVERSITY POLICY ON DISHONESTY

Your own commitment to learning, as evidenced by your enrollment at San José State University, and the University’s Academic Integrity Policy, requires you to be honest in all your academic course work. Academic integrity is essential to the mission of San José State University. As such, students are expected to perform their own work (except when collaboration is expressly permitted by the course instructor) without the use of any outside resources. Students are not permitted to use old tests or quizzes when preparing for exams, nor may they consult with students who have already taken the exam. When practiced, academic integrity ensures that all students are fairly graded. Violations to the Academic Integrity Policy undermine the educational process and will not be tolerated. They also demonstrate a lack of respect for oneself, fellow students and the course instructor and can ruin the university’s reputation and the value of the degrees it offers. We all share the obligation to maintain an environment which practices academic integrity.



Cheating:

At SJSU, cheating is the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for academic work through the use of any dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent means. Cheating at SJSU includes but is not limited to:

1. copying in part or in whole, from another’s test or other evaluation instrument

2. submitting work previously graded in another course unless this has been approved by the course instructor or by departmental policy

3. submitting work simultaneously presented in two courses, unless this has been approved by both course instructors or by departmental policy

4. altering or interfering with grading or grading instructions

5. sitting for an examination by a surrogate, or as a surrogate

6. committing any other act in academic work which defrauds or misrepresents, including aiding or abetting in any of the actions defined above.



Plagiarism:

At SJSU plagiarism is the act of representing the work of another as one’s own (without giving appropriate credit) regardless of how that work was obtained, and submitting it to fulfill academic requirements. Plagiarism at SJSU includes but is not limited to:

1. the act of incorporating the ideas, words, sentences, paragraphs, or parts thereof, or the specific substances of another’s work, without giving appropriate credit, and representing the product as one’s own work;

2. representing another’s artistic/scholarly works such as musical compositions, computer programs, photographs, painting, drawing, sculptures, or similar works as one’s own.

Violators of the Academic Integrity Policy will receive a zero on the test or paper and will risk failing the course. Faculty members are required to report all infractions to the Office of Student Conduct and Ethical Development. Disciplinary action could result in suspension or expulsion from San José State University.

The policy on academic integrity can be found at http://sa.sjsu.edu/student_conduct.



DISABILITIES

The following SJSU policy is in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act:


“If you need course adaptations or accommodations because of a disability, or if you need special arrangements in case the building must be evacuated, please make an appointment with me as soon as possible, or see me during office hours. Presidential Directive 97-03 requires that students with disabilities requesting accommodations must register with DRC to establish a record of their disability.”

DROPPING AND ADDING

Students are responsible for understanding the policies and procedures about add/drop, grade forgiveness, etc. Refer to the current semester’s Catalog Policies section at http://info.sjsu.edu/static/catalog/policies.html.

Add/drop deadlines can be found on the current academic calendar web page located at http://www.sjsu.edu/academic_programs/calendars/academic_calendar/.

The Late Drop Policy is available at http://www.sjsu.edu/aars/policies/latedrops/policy/. Students should be aware of the current deadlines and penalties for dropping classes.

Information about the latest changes and news is available at the Advising Hub at http://www.sjsu.edu/advising/

COURSE SCHEDULE

*I. Thurs., Aug. 23 -- INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

Movie: Ridicule



*II. Thurs., Aug. 30 - THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ORIGINS OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION

Lynn Hunt and Jack Censer eds., Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Exploring the French Revolution,

(University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2001), 1-21, 49-66.

Bring book to class to discuss documents at the end of chapter one.

Paul R. Hanson, Contesting the French Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), 1-34

Alexis de Tocqueville, The Old Regime and the French Revolution (Garden City: Doubleday, 1955), vi-xv, 19-32, 203-211.

Georges Lefebvre, The Coming of the French Revolution (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005).

François Furet, Interpreting the French Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981),

81-63.

Jack A. Goldstone, The Social Origins of the Revolution Revisited,” in From Deficit to Deluge: The Origins of the French Revolution, ed. Thomas E. Kaiser and Dale Van Kley (Stanford: Stanford University Press,, 2011), 67-103.



John Markoff, "Peasant Grievances and Peasant Insurrection: France in 1789," Journal of Modern History 62 (September 1990): 445-476. JSTOR

Colin Lucas, "Nobles, Bourgeois and the Origins of the French Revolution," Past and Present 60:

(1973): 84-126. JSTOR

Recommended:

G. V. Taylor, "Noncapitalist Wealth and the Origins of the French Revolution," American Historical Review 72 (1965): 469-496.

Henry Heller, The Bourgeois Revolution in France, 1789-1815 (New York: Berghahn, 2009).

Betty Behrens, "Nobles, Privileges, and Taxes in France at the End of the Ancien Régime,"



Economic History Review 15 (1962\63): 451-75.

W. Doyle, "Was There an Aristocratic Reaction in Pre-Revolutionary France?" no. 57 Past and Present (1972), reprinted in Douglas Johnson, ed. French Society and the Revolution (Cambridge, 1976), 3-20.

George T. Taylor, "Revolutionary and Nonrevolutionary Content in the Cahiers of 1789: An Interim Report," French Historical Studies 7 (1972): 479-502.

Elizabeth L. Eisenstein, "Who Intervened in 1788? A Commentary on The Coming of the French Revolution," American Historical Review 71 (October 1965): 77-103.

Alfred Cobban, The Social Interpretation of the French Revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1964).

C. B. A. Behrens, "Professor Cobban and His Critic," The Historical Journal (1966).

Albert Soboul, "Classical Revolutionary Historiography and Revisionist Endeavors," in Understanding the French Revolution (New York, 1988), 255-273.

Albert Soboul, "The French Revolution in the History of the Contemporary World," in Gary Kates, The French Revolution: Recent Debates and New Controversies (London: Routledge, 1998), 23-40.

Peter Jones, “Georges Lefebvre and the Peasant Revolution: Fifty Years On,” in Peter Jones, ed., The French Revolution in Social and Political Perspective (London: Arnold, 1996), 131-164.

Hilton Root, "The Rural Community and the French Revolution," in Keith Michael Baker, ed.,



The Political Culture of the Old Regime, vol. 1 of The French Revolution and the

Creation of Modern Political Culture (Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1987), 141-153.

Peter McPhee, “The Misguided Greed of Peasants"? Popular Attitudes to the Environment in

The Revolution of 1789,” French Historical Studies 24 (2001): 247-269.

D.M.G. Sutherland, Peasants, Lords, and Leviathan: Winners and Losers from the Abolition of

French Feudalism, 1780-1820,” Journal of Economic History 62 (2002): 1-25.

John Markoff, The Abolition of Feudalism: Peasants, Lords, and Legislators in the French



Revolution (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996).

Michael P. Fitzsimmons, The Night the Old Regime Ended: August 4: 1789, and the French



Revolution (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2003).

Gilbert Shapiro and John Markoff, ed., Revolutionary Demands: A Content Analysis of the



Cahiers de Doleances of 1789 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1998).

P. M. Jones, The Peasantry in the French Revolution (New York: Cambridge University Press,1988).

James Livesey, "Agrarian Ideology and Commercial Republicanism in the French Revolution,"

Past and Present, no. 157 (Nov. 1997): 94-122.

Michael Kwass, Privilege and the Politics of Taxation in Eighteenth-Century France: Liberté, Égalité, Fiscalité (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000).

Bryant T. Ragan, Jr., "Rural Political Activism and Fiscal Equality in the Revolutionary Somme," in Bryant T. Ragan, Jr. and Elizabeth A. Williams, eds., Struggles for Political and Cultural Authority in Revolutionary France (New Brunswisck: Rutgers University Press,, 1992), 36-56.

David Hunt, "Peasant Politics in the French Revolution," Social History 9 (1984): 277-299.

Jay M. Smith, “Social Categories, the Language of Patriotism, and the Origins of the French

Revolution: The Debate over noblesse commercante,” The Journal of Modern History 72 (2002): 339-375.

Eric Hobsbawm, "The Making of a 'Bourgeois Revolution,'" in Ferenc Fehér, The French Revolution and the Birth of Modernity (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990):30-48.
*III. Thurs., Sept. 6 – URBAN CULTURE AND CONSUMERISM: WORKERS AND THE BOURGEOISIE

Daniel. Roche, France in the Enlightenment, trans. Arthuer Goldhammer (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998) 641-73

David Garrioch, The Making of Revolutionary Paris (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002), 1-206, 244-302.

Colin Jones, "Bourgeois Revolution Revivified: 1789 and Social Change," in Gary Kates,



The French Revolution: Recent Debates and New Controversies (London: Routledge, 1998), 157-191.
Colin Jones, “The Great Chain of Buying: Medical Advertisement, the Bourgeois Public Sphere, and the Origins of the French Revolution,” American Historical Review 100 (1996): 13-40. JSTOR

Sarah Maza, The Myth of the French Bourgeoisie (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003), 1-68.



Recommended:

Sarah Maza, "Luxury, Morality, and Social Change: "Why There Was No Middle-Class Consciousness in Prerevolutionary France," Journal of Modern History 69 (1997): 199-229.

Michael Kwass, “Big Hair: A Wig History of Consumption in Eighteenth-Century France,”American Historical Review 111 (2006): 631-59.

Michael Kwass, “Ordering the World of Goods: Consumer Revolution and the Classification of Objects in Eighteenth-Century France, Representations, no. 82 (2003), pp. 87-116.

David A. Bell, "Class, Consciousness, and the Fall of the Bourgeoi Revolution," Critical Review, nos. 2-3 (2004), pp. 323-51.

William H. Sewell , “The Empire of Fashion and the Rise of Capitalism in Eighteenth-Century France,” Past & Present, no. 206 (2010), 81-120.

Alan Forrest, Paris, the Provinces and the French Revolution. London: Arnold, 2004,

Alan Forrest and Peter Jones: Reshaping France: Town, Country, and Region during the French Revolution (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1991).

Steven G. Reinhardt and Elisabeth A. Cawthon, Essays on the French Revolution: Paris and the Provinces (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1992).

Albert Soboul, The Sans-Culottes (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980).

Richard Cobb, "A Mentality Shaped by Circumstance" and "A Critique," in Frank Kafker and

James M. Laux, The French Revolution: Conflicting Interpretations, 4th ed. (Malabar: Robert E. Krieger, 1989), 205-219, 259-269.

George Rudé, The Crowd in the French Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1959).

Gareth Stedman Jones, “An End to Poverty: The French Revolution and the Promise of a World Beyond Want,” Historical Research 78 (May 2005): 193-207.

Colin Lucas, "The Crowd and Politics between the Ancien Regime and Revolution in France,"Journal of Modern History 60 (1988): 421-457.

Bryant T. Ragan,”Urban Politics in the Age of the French Revolution,” Journal of Urban History

25 (1999): 287-293.

Gail Bossenga, "City and State: An Urban Perspective on the Origins of the French Revolution,"in Keith Michael Baker, ed., The Political Culture of the Old Regime, vol.1 of The French Revolution and the Creation of Modern Political Culture (Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1987), 115-140.

R. B. Rose, The Making of the Sans-Culottes: Democratic Ideas and Institutions in Paris, 1789- 1792 (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1983)

Ted. W. Margadant, Urban Rivalries in the French Revolution (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992).

William Sewell H., Work and Revolution in France: the Language of Labor from the Old Regime to 1848 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1980)

Judith Miller, "Politics and Urban Provisioning Crises: Bakers, Police, and Parlements in France, 1750-1793," Journal of Modern History 64 (June 1992): 227-262.

*IV. Thurs., Sept 13 – ON THE PROBLEM OF THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND THE INTELLECTUAL AND CULTURAL ORIGINS OF THE REVOLUTION
Alexis de Tocqueville, The Old Regime and the French Revolution (Garden City: Doubleday, 1955), 138-48.

Robert Darnton, "The High Enlightenment and the Low-Life of Literature," in The Literary Underground of the French Revolution (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1982) 1-40.


Robert Darnton, "The Forbidden Best-sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France," in The French Revolution: The Essential Readings, ed. Ronald Schechter (Oxford, 2001), 106-137.
Roger Chartier, "Do Books Make Revolutions?" from his The Cultural Origins of the French

Revolution, reprinted in Peter Jones, ed., The French Revolution in Social and Political

Perspective (London, 1996), 166-88.


Keith Michael Baker, “Enlightenment Idioms, Old Regime Discourses, and Revolutionary

Improvisation,” in From Deficit to Deluge: The Origins of the French Revolution, ed.

Thomas E. Kaiser and Dale Van Kley (Stanford, 2011), 165-197.
Jonathan I. Israel, Democratic Enlightenment: Philosophy, Revolution, and Human Rights 1750-

1790 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011), 897-951.

Sarah Maza, “Innocent Blood Avenged,” in Private Lives and Public Affairs: The Causes



Célèbres of Pre-revolutionary France (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993),

212-63.
Recommended:



Dangerous Liaisons- Movie with Glenn Close, John Malkovich
Harvey Mitchell, "Alexis de Tocqueville and the Legacy of the French Revolution," in The French Revolution and the Birth of Modernity, ed. Ferenc Fehér (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990), 240-265.

Thomas E. Kaiser, "This Strange Offspring of Philosophie: Recent Historiographical Problems in Relating the Enlightenment to the French Revolution," French Historical Studies 15 (1988), 549-562.


Jay Smith, “Between Discourse and Experience: Agency and Ideas in the French Pre-Revolution,” History and Theory 40 (2001), 116-143.
Dena Goodman, "Public Spheres and Private Life: Toward a Synthesis of Current Historiographical Approaches to the Old Regime," History and Theory, 1992: 1-20.
Dena Goodman, The Republic of Letters: A Cultural History of the French Enlightenment (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994).
Daniel Gordon, Citizens without Sovereignty: Equality and Sociability in French Thought, 1670-1789 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994).
Keith Baker, “On the Problem of the Ideological Origins of the French Revolution” in The Revolution: The Essential Readings, ed. Ronald Schechter (Oxford: Blackwell, 2001), 52-74.

Keith Baker, “Transformations of Classical Republicanism in Eighteenth-Century France,” Journal of Modern History 73 (2001): 32-53.



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