1. Everyone in the bank-including the manager and the tellers, ran to the door when the fire alarm rang



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2015 Editing and Grammar Review

Grammar, Punctuation, and Word Usage

http://pmhs.ucps.k12.nc.us/Academics/EOC_Review.php

1. Everyone in the bank-including the manager and the tellers, ran to the door when the fire alarm rang.

A. tellers, ran 
B. tellers: ran 
C. tellers, had run 
D. tellers-ran 
E. tellers' ran"

2. To no ones surprise, Joe didn't have his homework ready.

A. no ones surprise 


B. noones surprise 
C. no-ones surprise 
D. no ones' surprise 
E. no one's surprise

3. If he would have read "The White Birds," he might have liked William Butler Yeats' poetry.

A. would have read 


B. could have read 
C. would of read 
D. could of read 
E. had read

4. After the hurricane, uprooted trees were laying all over the ground.

A. were laying 


B. lying 
C. were lying 
D. were laid 
E. was laid

5. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), the great transcendentalist philosopher, wrote in his essay "Self-Reliance" of the need for an individual to develop his capacities.

A. essay "Self-Reliance" 


B. essay, "Self-Reliance" 
C. essay: Self-Reliance 
D. essay, Self-Reliance 
E. essay; "Self-Reliance"

6. The recently built children's amusement park has been called "a boon to the community" by its supporters and "an eyesore" by its harshest critics.

A. and "an eyesore" by its harshest 


B. and, "an eyesore," by its harshest 
C. and, an eyesore; by its harshest 
D. and-an eyesore-by its' harshest 
E. and-"an eyesore"-by its' harshest

7. I always have trouble remembering the meaning of these two common verbs, affect (to change" or "to influence") and effect ("to cause" or "to accomplish)."

A. "to accomplish)." 


B. "to accomplish"). 
C. "to accomplish). 
D. To accomplish. 
E. "to accomplish.")

8. My class just finished reading-"The Fall of the House of Usher", a short story by Edgar Allan Poe.

A. reading-"The Fall of the House of Usher", 


B. reading, The Fall of the House of Usher, 
C. reading "The Fall of the House of Usher," 
D. reading, "The Fall of the house of Usher," 
E. reading: The Fall of the House of Usher-

9. After it was repaired it ran perfect again.

A. ran perfect 


B. ran perfectly 
C. could run perfect 
D. could of run perfect 
E. would run perfectly

10. "Are there two E's in beetle," asked Margo?

A. there two E's in beetle," asked Margo? 


B. their two E's in beetle?" asked Margo. 
C. their two E's in beetle," asked Margo. 
D. there two E's in beetle?" asked Margo. 
E. there two E's in beetle, asked Margo?

11. The circus audience received a well-deserved round of applause for the perfectly timed acrobatic stunt.

A. audience received a well-deserved 


B. audience gave a well deserved 
C. audience did receive a well deserved 
D. audience gave a well-deserved 
E. audience did get a well-deserved

12. Looking directly at me, Mother said, "These are your options: the choice isyours."

A. Mother said, "These are your options: the choice is 


B. Mother said-these are your options, the choice is 
C. Mother had said, These are your options; the choice is 
D. Mother had said, "These are your options; the choice is 
E. Mother said, "These are your options; the choice is

13. Porcupine is from Latin porcus, "pig," and spina, "spine."

A. porcus, "pig," and spina, "spine." 


B. Porcus-pig and spina, "spine." 
C. Porcus-pig, and Spina, "spine." 
D. Porcus-Pig-,Spina-spine. 
E. Porcus, "pig," and spina "spine".

14. Seeing the dolphins, some sharks, a killer whale, and a Moray eel made the visit to the marine park worthwhile.

A. a killer whale, and a Moray eel made the visit 


B. a killer whale, and a moray eel made the visit 
C. a killer whale and a moray eel makes the visit 
D. a killer whale and a Moray eel makes the visit 
E. a killer whale and a moray eel made the visit

15. Still, the fact that a planet exists outside our solar system encourages hope that other solar systems exist, and in them, perhaps, a planet that supports life.

A. that a planet exists outside our solar system encourages hope that other solar systems exist, and 


B. that a Planet exists out side our solar system encourages hope that other solar systems exist and 
C. could be that a planet exists outside our solar system encourages hope that other solar systems exist, and 
D. that a planet exist outside our solar systems encourage hope that other solar systems exist, and 
E. that a planet does exists out side our solar system encourages hope that other solar systems exist, and

16. Mail-order shopping can be convenient and timesaving with appropriate precautions, it is safe as well.

A. can be convenient and timesaving 


B. can be convenient and timesaving; 
C. should be convenient and time saving; 
D. could be convenient and time saving; 
E. can be convenient and time-saving;

17. Among the many fields of science, no matter what turns you on, there are several fields of study.

A. science, no matter what turns you on, 


B. Science, no matter what turns you on, 
C. Science, no matter which you chose
D. Science, no matter which of these you chose- 
E. science, no matter which you choose,

18. The fact that boxing is known to cause head injuries and brain damage should lead us to inform the public and push for a ban on boxing.

A. should lead us to inform 


B. could lead us to inform 
C. should of led us to inform 
D. will lead us to inform 
E. should have led us to inform,

19. The first part of the test was on chemistry, the second on mathematics, and the third on english.

A. on mathematics, and the third on english. 


B. on mathematics; and the third on English. 
C. on Mathematics; and the third on English. 
D. on mathematics, and the third on English. 
E. on mathematics: and the third on English.

20. The Diary of Anne Frank showed a young girl's courage during two years of hiding.

A. showed a young girl's courage 


B. shows a young girl's courage 
C. did show a young girls courage 
D. has shown a young girl's courage 
E. showed a young girls courage

21. In August my parents will be married for twenty-five years.

A. will be married for twenty-five years. 


B. shall have been married for twenty-five years. 
C. will have been married for twenty-five years. 
D. will be married for twenty five years. 
E. will have married for twenty-five years.

Answers and Explanations

1. D: The modifying phrase inserted between subject and predicate should be set off on both sides by dashes, not just one. Non-matching punctuation marks, like a dash before it but a comma after it [sentence, (A), (C)], or a dash before but a colon after it (B), are incorrect and asymmetrical. An apostrophe (E) indicates possession and is incorrect in a non-possessive plural noun. There is no reason for the incorrect, extraneous close-quotation mark after the verb (E) either.

2. E: "No one's is a possessive pronoun and needs the apostrophe." Omitting it [sentence, (A), (B), and (C)] is incorrect. "No one" is spelled as two words, not one (B) or one hyphenated word (C). An apostrophe after the s (D) denotes a possessive plural, not a possessive singular.

3. E: The past unreal conditional should consist of "if" plus the past perfect of "to read" (auxiliary verb "had" with "read"). Adding "would" or "could" to the past perfect [sentence, (A), (B), (C), and (D)] is incorrect. In the "If...then" past unreal conditional construction, "would have" is only used in the second ("then" understood) clause, never in the first "If" clause. Also, "of" [(C), (D)] is a preposition, an incorrect substitute for the auxiliary verb "have."

4. C: The correct past progressive tense of the verb "to lie" is "were lying." "Were laying" (A) is acting on an object, e.g. "Workers were laying uprooted trees on the side of the road." Without the auxiliary verb "were," "lying" (B) is incomplete and does not form a predicate for the subject "trees." "Were laid" (D) means somebody/something laid them there, not that the trees themselves were lying there. "Was laid" is singular, not plural as "trees" are.

5. A: A comma (B), colon (C), or semicolon (E) is incorrect and unnecessary between the noun and its proper name.

6. A: No punctuation other than the quotation marks is required or correct after "and" and around "an eyesore." Commas [(B), (C)], semicolons (C), or dashes [(D), (E)] are incorrect. Omitting quotation marks (D) is incorrect since the sentence is quoting people; and the first phrase has them, so the second also should. The apostrophes [(D), (E)] are incorrect: the irregular possessive pronoun "its" does not have an apostrophe.

7. B: The end quotation mark should come after the word but inside the end parenthesis. Putting it after the period, outside the end parenthesis (A) is incorrect. Omitting the end quotation mark (C) is incorrect. Omitting parentheses and capitalizing the infinitive verb example (D) are both incorrect. Omitting the open parenthesis (E) is incorrect. Both quotation marks and parentheses always come in pairs.

8. C: There should not be any punctuation between the verb and its object, even if the object is a title in quotation marks as it is here. Therefore, a dash (A), comma [(B, (D)], colon (E), or any combination of two [(A), (E)] is incorrect. Additionally, omitting quotation marks around the title [(B), (E)] is incorrect.

9. B: The verb is modified by the adverb "perfectly," not "perfect" [(A), (C), (D)], an adjective for modifying a noun. "After it was repaired" indicates past tense, so for agreement, the verb should also be the past tense "ran." "Could run" (C) and "would run" (E) are not past tense but unreal subjunctive mood. There is no such construction as "could of" (D), which incorrectly substitutes the preposition "of" for the auxiliary verb "have," part of the past perfect tense.

10. D: The question mark comes after the question, inside the quotation marks. A line of dialogue or a quotation normally has a comma [(A), (C), (E)], but inside the end quotation mark when it is a statement. When it is a question it has a question mark, which should NOT go at the end of the sentence [(A), (E)] containing the question, when that sentence is a statement. Also, the adverb "there" is misspelled as the possessive plural third-person pronoun "their" in (B) and (C).

11. D: From the context, we assume the circus acrobats performed the stunt and received the applause that the audience gave. For the audience to receive applause makes no sense in this context [sentence, (A), (C), (E)]. Omitting the hyphen in "well-deserved" [(B), (C)] is also incorrect.

12. E: A comma, not a hyphen (B) introduces dialogue/quotations. A semicolon, not a comma (B) separates two independent clauses. A colon (A) is incorrect, because the first clause does not introduce the second clause and is not explained by it. (C) omits quotation marks. Past perfect (D) is not incorrect in itself, but past tense in the original sentence was not incorrect and required no change.

13. A: A comma after each italicized Latin word and after each English translation, inside the quotation marks surrounding the latter, is correct. Separating any of these terms with dashes is incorrect [(B), (C), (D), and (E)]. A dash followed by a comma is always incorrect, as is separating a pair with a hyphen (D). Both pairs should be separated by commas; (E) omits the comma from the second pair.

14. B: Each item in a series of three or more is separated with a comma. Omitting the last comma before "and" [(C), (D), (E)] is incorrect. The term "moray eel" is not a proper name but a common name for many types of eels and thus is not capitalized [(A), (D)] (unless it begins a sentence). Present verb tense [(C), (D)] is not incorrect, but these choices also include the identified punctuation [(C), (D)] and capitalization (D) errors.

15. A: "A planet" is not a name, hence not capitalized; a comma should separate the independent clause from the following phrase (B); "outside" is one word [(B), (E)]. Adding "could be" (C) changes the meaning and is also ungrammatical, creating two unconnected predicates "...the fact could be...encourages..." requiring ", which" before "encourages" or changing "encourages" to ", encouraging..." "Fact" and "planet" are both singular nouns; "exist" and "encourage" (D) belong with plural nouns. The words "...does exists..." should be "...does exist" (E).

16. E: A semicolon separates independent clauses. Omitting punctuation (A), including that semicolon and the hyphen from "time-saving" [(A), (B)], is incorrect. Spelling "time-saving" as two separate words [(C), (D)] is also incorrect. Substituting "should" (C) or "could" (D) for "can" alters the meaning.

17. E: The word "science" is not capitalized [(B), (C), (D). The phrase "what turns you on" is slangy and not preferred. (If it ended the sentence, it would also be incorrect for ending a sentence with a preposition.) "Which you choose" is preferable. "Chose" [(C), (D)] is past tense, disagreeing with the present-tense predicate "are." "Of these" (D) is redundant. The interrupting modifier "no matter..." is enclosed by commas on each side, not a comma and dash (D).

18. A: Substituting "could" (B) or "will" (D) for "should" changes the sentence meaning. "Should of" (C) incorrectly substitutes the preposition "of" for the auxiliary verb "have;" there is no such construction. Even the correct form "should have led" (E) is subjunctive mood, past tense, disagreeing with the present-tense sentence context ("...boxing is known...lead..."); and a comma after "inform" is incorrect.

19. D: English is capitalized because it is a proper name as well as a school subject. Uncapitalized names (A) are incorrect. However, mathematics, like chemistry, is a school subject but not a proper name and hence, not capitalized (C). Semicolons [(B), (C)] only separate independent clauses, or phrases containing internal commas, but not several phrases in a series. A semicolon (E) introduces lists or explanations but never separates phrases in a series.

20. B: Present tense is preferable when referring to an existing book rather than past tense [(A), (C), (E)] or present perfect tense (D). The author wrote it in the past, but the book still exists in the present. The possessive noun "girl's" has an apostrophe, which is incorrectly omitted in (C) and (E).

21. C: "In August" is the future, requiring the future-tense auxiliary verb "will." "Have been married" is present perfect. Adding "will" to "have been married" makes the tense future perfect. Simple future tense "will be married" [(A), (D)] with "for twenty-five years" literally means they will get married in August and will be married for 25 years thereafter. "Will have married" (E) cannot be "for 25 years": being married is a continuous process; marrying is not.

by Enoch Morrison


Last Updated: 03/25/2015

Grammar Practice Questions

131231.2K

1. The word boycott derives from the name of Charles C. Boycott, an English land agent in Ireland that was ostracized for refusing to reduce rent.

A. that was ostracized for refusing 


B. who was ostracized for refusing 
C. which was ostracized for refusing
D. that had been ostracized for refusing
E. who had been ostracized for refusing

2. As a result of his method for early music education, Shinichi Suzuki has been known as one of the world's great violin teachers.

A. has been known as one 


B. had been known as one
C. is seen as one
D. is being seen as one
E. has been one

3. Last night the weather forecaster announced that this is the most rainy season the area has had in the past decade.

A. this is the most rainy season the


B. this has been the most rainy season the
C. this was the most rainy season the
D. this is noted as the most rainy season the 
E. this is the rainiest season the

4. Although Mandy is younger than her sister, Mandy is the tallest of the two.

A. is the tallest of the 


B. is the taller of the
C. has been the taller of the
D. is the most tall of the
E. is the more taller of the

5. When Katherine Hepburn's play came to town, all the tickets had sold out far in advance.

A. had sold out far


B. have sold out far
C. were sold out far
D. had been sold out far
E. had been sold out for

6. The origins of most sports is unknown.

A. sports is unknown


B. sports have been unknown
C. sports are unknown
D. sports has been unknown
E. sports are now unknown

7. Neither of the Smith brothers expect to be drafted by a major league team this year.

A. expect to be drafted


B. expects to be drafted
C. has expected to be drafted
D. is expecting to be drafted
E. was expecting to be drafted

8. Has any of the witnesses been sworn in yet?

A. Has any of the


B. Is any of the
C. Will any of the
D. Are any of the
E. Have any of the

9. TheLusitania sunk on May 7, 1915.

A. sunk
B. did sink


C. was sunk
D. did sank
E. sank

10. Whos in the office now?

A. Whos in


B. Whose in
C. Who is in
D. Who's in
E. Whose' in

11. There are now many kinds of dictionaries, such as a dictionary of synonyms and antonyms, a biographical dictionary, and a geographical dictionary with pronunciations given.

A. with pronunciations given


B. that has pronunciations given
C. with pronunciations' given
D. that have pronunciations given
E. that do have pronunciations given

12. Towering 700 feet above the valley floor, Mount Rushmore National Memorialwas an impressive site.

A. was an impressive site


B. is a impressive sight
C. is an impressive sight
D. was an impressive sight
E. is an impressive site

13. San Francisco lays southwest of Sacramento.

A. lays southwest


B. has laid southwest
C. is lying southwest
D. lain southwest
E. lies southwest

14. Did they know that Labor Day always came on the first Monday in September?

A. came on


B. comes on
C. has come on
D. had come on
E. has came on

15. Eating, drinking, and to stay up late at night were among her pleasures.

A. to stay up late


B. to remain up late
C. staying up late
D. she liked staying up late
E. trying to stay up late

16. Each night when night came and the temperature fell, my parents lit the fire in the bedroom.

A. and the temperature fell,


B. and that the temperature did fall
C. and that the temperature fell
D. and because the temperature fell
E. and when the temperature fell

17. Frances promised to bring the Papago basket that she bought in Arizona.

A. bought in


B. had bought in
C. has bought in
D. did buy in
E. purchased in

18. He has lain his racquetball glove on the beach.

A. has lain


B. has laid
C. have lain
D. have laid
E. is lying

19. I would have lent you my notes if you would have asked me.

A. would have asked me


B. could of asked 
C. could ask
D. had asked
E. had of asked

20. Many scientists are still hoping to have found life on another planet.

A. to have found


B. to find
C. two find
D. to have been found
E. too have found

21. Because she had an astounding memory, Sue has never forgotten an important equation.

A. had an 


B. could have had
C. has
D. did have
E. has had

Answers and Explanations

1. B: When referring to a person, use "who," not "that" [(A), (D)] or "which" (C). The past perfect "had been" [(D), (E)] is inappropriate in this context: simple past "was ostracized" refers to the historical event itself. Past perfect would only be used with something identified as leading up to the past event, e.g. "...who had been refusing to reduce rent for years and finally was ostracized."

2. C: Present perfect (A) implies Suzuki is not still known thusly. Past perfect (B) implies he stopped being known thusly in the past. Also, "known" is less accurate than "seen": the former suggests fact; the latter connotes perception/view/opinion, the case here. Present progressive (D) is awkward and suggests the opinion is only current and short-term. "Has been" without "seen" (E) changes the meaning from public opinion to fact-and past, not present, fact.

3. E: "Rainiest" is the superlative form of the adjective "rainy." ("Rainier" is the comparative.) Using "most"/"more" plus the original adjective instead of its superlative/comparative form when it has one is incorrect with one-syllable adjectives and usually awkward with two-syllable adjectives.

4. B: When comparing two things/people, use the comparative (-er/more), not the superlative (-est/most), only used when comparing three or more. "Has been" (C) is only correct when sentence context warrants, e.g. "...has been the taller of the two for three years." Here it is extraneous. "Most tall" (D) is doubly incorrect: once for using superlative, not comparative; and again for using "most"(/"more") instead of "-est"(/"-er") with a one-syllable adjective. "More taller" (E) is an incorrect double/redundant comparative.

5. D: Though common, using "sold out" in active voice with "tickets" as the subject is undesirable since tickets cannot literally sell themselves, so passive voice is more appropriate. Also, past perfect "had been sold out" is more correct than simple past tense "were sold out" (C) since the selling out preceded when the play came to town (past tense). "For" (E) instead of "far" in advance is the wrong preposition/word choice for the meaning and makes no sense.

6. C: Subject-verb agreement: The subject "origins" is plural, so the verb must agree with "are." The singular "is" (A) or "has been" (D) is incorrect. Present perfect "have been" (B) only applies if the context dictates it, e.g. "have been unknown until recently." Adding "now" (E) changes the meaning, implying they were previously known.

7. B: "Neither" is singular, so "expects" is correct. "Expect" (A) is plural. Present perfect "has expected" (C) is superfluous and awkward, as are present progressive "is expecting" (D) and past progressive "was expecting" (E). These would only apply if followed by (e.g.) "...until now" for (C) and (E) or "...until next year" (D).

8. E: "Any" can be singular or plural; in this context, plural is more appropriate. When asking questions with plural count nouns, use "any" as plural. For singular, "Has any one of the witnesses...?" is better. "Is" (B), "will" (C), and "are" (D) are not correct auxiliary verbs in past perfect with "been."

9. E: The past tense of "sink" is "sank." "Sunk" (A) is part of the present perfect ("has sunk"/"is sunk"/"has been sunk"- passive voice) and past perfect (had sunk"/"was sunk" (C)]/"had been sunk"- passive voice) tenses. "Did sink" (B) is awkward and unnecessary. "Did sank" (D) is incorrect: past-tense auxiliary verbs are never used together with past-tense main verbs (doubling).

10. D: An apostrophe is required in "who's," a contraction of "who is." No apostrophe (A) is incorrect. "Whose" (B) is the possessive (i.e. belonging to whom). Its irregular spelling differentiates it from the contraction "who's" (like "its" vs. "it's"). "Whose" is never spelled with a final apostrophe (E). "Who is" (C) is not incorrect, but expanding the contraction to full form avoids correctly identifying the contraction's correct spelling.

11. A: This is the most economical wording of the modifying prepositional phrase. "That has" (B) is unwieldy and superfluous. The plural "pronunciations" is not possessive and thus should not have an apostrophe (C). "Have" [(D), (E)] is plural, disagreeing with the singular subject.

12. C: Present tense is more correct when describing something that currently still exists. Also, from the sentence context, "sight," i.e. something to see, is the desired meaning whereas "site" [(A), (E)] means a location. Past tense [(A), (D)] would only be correct in context, e.g. "...was an impressive sight when we visited it last year." The article "a" (B) is incorrect before a vowel ("an" is correct).

13. E: The present tense of "to lie" is "lies." "Lays" is the present tense of the transitive (taking a direct object) verb "to lay," e.g. "We lay books on this table." "Has laid" (B) should be "has lain," but present perfect makes no sense here: San Francisco's location has not moved. Present progressive "is lying" (C) is similarly misleading regarding a non-temporary location. "Lain" (D) is present perfect/past perfect, not present-and moreover lacks its auxiliary verb (has/had).

14. B: Although the predicate is past-tense ("Did they know...?"), something that is still true, like a national holiday, "always comes on" the same day in present tense. "Always came on" (A) implies it no longer does, as does "has come" (C) and "had come" (D). "Has came" (E) is never used: the present perfect (has) and past perfect (had) both take the form "come."

15. C: The series of gerunds ("-ing"-participial verbals used as nouns) require parallel structure. To agree with "eating" and "drinking," "staying up late" is correct. The infinitive "to stay/remain" [(A)/(B)] disagrees with the gerunds "eating, drinking." Adding "She liked..." (D) incorrectly places the third verbal into an independent clause with another subject and verb, contradicting the sentence structure-and redundant with "were among her pleasures." "Trying to stay up late" (E) changes the meaning.

16. A: A comma between a modifying phrase/clause and the clause it modifies is correct. Inserting "that" [(B), (C)] is incorrect: "the temperature fell," along with "night darkness came," is introduced by the adverb "when." It is not a restrictive relative clause introduced by "that." Past tense "fell" is preferred over the awkward "did fall" (B). "Because" (D) is incorrect: the clause was already introduced by "when." Past-perfect "had fallen" (E) disagrees with past-tense "darkness came" and "my parents lit..."

17. B: Past perfect is correct because Frances promised (past tense) to bring what she had bought before she promised. Present perfect "has bought" (C) disagrees with the past-tense predicate "promised." "Did buy" (D) is just an awkward or archaic version of past tense "bought" (A); "purchased" (E) is simply a past-tense synonym for "bought"-all incorrect here. (Frances did not buy the basket at the same time that she promised to bring it.)

18. B: The correct present-perfect of transitive verb (i.e. it always takes a direct object) "to lay" is "has laid." "Has lain" (A) is intransitive, e.g. "He has lain on this bed before." "Have lain" (C) uses not only the wrong verb/tense, but also a plural auxiliary verb with a singular subject, like "have laid" (D). "Is lying" (E) should be "is laying" with the object "racquetball glove;" but even corrected, changing the tense changes the meaning here.

19. D: In conditional-subjunctive constructions, "if..." introduces the conditional clause/phrase, and the corresponding "then..." subjunctive uses "would have." Using "would have" in the conditional is incorrect. There is no such construction as "could of" (B) or "had of" (E); these incorrectly substitute the preposition "of" for the auxiliary verb "have." "Could ask" (C) is wrong in both tense and meaning.

20. B: "Hoping," like "planning"/"dreaming"/"expecting," etc., is future-oriented and in the present participle ("-ing"), requires the infinitive in modifying verbs, i.e. "hoping to find." Scientists cannot hope "to have found" [(A), (E)] something already that they are "still hoping" to find. "Two" (C) is the spelling of the number 2, and "too" (E) is the adverb meaning "also," not the preposition "to." "To have been found" errs doubly, using both present-perfect tense and passive voice incorrectly here.

21. C: With present-perfect "has never forgotten," present-tense "has an astounding memory" is correct. "Had" (A) and "did have" (D) are past-tense; and "has had" (E) is present-perfect tense, all implying Sue no longer has an astounding memory, contradicting the statement that she still "has never forgotten." "Could have had" (B) completely changes the meaning and also contradicts "has never forgotten."

Grammar Practice Questions

20231.3K

Each of the following sentences contains an error of some kind. Read each sentence and select the option that correctly identifies its error.

1. David was known for belching; and telling inappropriate jokes in public.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

2. Graduation from High School is considered a momentous occasion by many.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

3. Nurses plays a vital role in the healthcare profession.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

4. After having his tonsels removed, the child was listless for a few days.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

5. The park was serine at twilight.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

6. Was the patient's mind lucid during the evaluation.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

7. The bachalor never married. Most people thought it was because of misogyny.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

8. The intricacy of the mathematical equation, drove the student trying to solve it crazy.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

9. The hybrid tomatoes is immune to most common diseases.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

10. The professor was humiliated when his students reported him to the Dean for verbal abuse.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

11. The con artist hoodwinked the old lady when he sold her fradulent insurance.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

12. The movie star was accused of a misdemeanor, when she stole $15 worth of merchandise from the store.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

13. The congregation sang a comtemporary hymn.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

14. The wound were necrotic when examined.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

15. The defendint exhibited a peevish appearance.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

16. The band director was scheduled to play the piccolo on tuesday.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

17. The renter was remiss; about the rent.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

18. The old man was know for his sapient knowledge.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

19. The inventor create several specious ideas to solve the problem.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

20. The teacher identified the troublemakers, in her classroom.

A. Capitalization 


B. Punctuation 
C. Spelling 
D. Grammar

Answers and Explanations

1. B: The semicolon is incorrect punctuation here. With the coordinating conjunction "and," no punctuation is needed between the two gerunds. A comma is permissible to indicate David did not necessarily do both things simultaneously; however, semicolons are for separating two independent clauses, or separating dependent clauses/phrases containing internal commas.

2. A: "High School" is incorrect capitalization. These words are not names/proper nouns and should not be capitalized.

3. D: The singular form of the verb ("plays") disagrees with the plural noun subject ("Nurses"), representing incorrect grammar.

4. C: "Tonsels" is an incorrect spelling of the word "tonsils."

5. C: "Serine" is an incorrect spelling of the adjective "serene," meaning peaceful (indicated by sentence context), confusing it with the noun serine, meaning the amino acid.

6. B: Ending this question with a period is incorrect punctuation. It should end with a question mark.

7. C: "Bachalor" is an incorrect spelling of "bachelor."

8. B: The comma is incorrect punctuation. No punctuation mark is needed here.

9. D: A singular predicate with a plural subject is incorrect subject-verb agreement, i.e. grammar.

10. A: The noun "dean" is not a name/proper noun, so the capitalization is incorrect.

11. C: "Fradulent" is incorrect spelling of the adjective "fraudulent."

12. B: The comma before the adverbial clause ("when...") is incorrect punctuation; it should not be there.

13. C: "Comtemporary" is an incorrect spelling of "contemporary."

14. D: The plural verb "were" with the singular noun subject "wound" lacks subject-verb agreement, constituting incorrect grammar.

15. C: "Defendint" is an incorrect spelling of the word "defendant."

16. A: The lower-case initial "t" in "Tuesday" is incorrect capitalization: names/proper nouns are capitalized.

17. B: The semicolon here is incorrect punctuation. The only punctuation mark this sentence needs is its final period.

18. D: The correct past-perfect form here is "was known." "Was know" is incorrect grammar.

19. D: "Create" is incorrect grammar here. The singular subject noun "inventor" requires either the singular verb form "creates" or the past-tense "created" for correct construction.

20. B: It is incorrect punctuation to place a comma between the noun and its modifying prepositional phrase. No punctuation mark should be used, except for the final period.

by Enoch Morrison


Last Updated: 03/25/2015

Writing Practice Questions

422318

Each underlined section corresponds to an answer choice. The first underlined section corresponds to choice A, the second to choice B, and so forth. Select the answer choice that either contains an error, or select choice E, which is "No error."



1. Are you all ready for theEnglish exam?" asked mom. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

2. According to the firemarshall's statistics, smokingcigarettes in bed are the cause of many tragic fires. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

3. Signs of decay that should be recognized by every citizen includes oil spills along the shoreline as well as the absence of wildlife. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

4. Either Philip or Joe will always finish their trigonometry homework in class. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

5. Who else beside Jim Smith won a scholarship? No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

6. I appreciate your helping me in the kitchen when my mom is at work. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

7. I am certain that the English scholarship winner will be hear. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

8. Talking with my grandfather about World War II effected me more than Ithought it would have. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

9. The president is all together opposed to the bill. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

10. Tsetse flies, which carry the dreaded disease called sleeping sickness attacksboth human and cattle. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

11. According to Aunt Grace, this kind of a sweater is the warmest for the winter months. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

12. Many reading lists for high-school students include translations fromScandinavian writers such as Lagerlog, Undset, and Ibsen. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

13. Will they ascent to our proposal? No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

14. Earlier synthetics, such as Bakelite, have went the way of the dinosaur. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

15. After the attack by the U-boat, the Lusitania sunk in 18 minutes; over 1000 people drowned. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

16. The teacher discussed the rule that the compliment of thirty degrees is sixtydegrees. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

17. As you approach the intersection, drive as cautious as you can. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

18. The queen's counsil could not agree on the correct policy. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

19. Scury, one of the diseases of modern science has conquered result from a lack of vitamin C. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

20. Some people say that compact discs offers a brighter treble and truer basethan conventional records. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

21. I learned about the Roaring Twenties from my great-grandmother and he. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

22. Mrs. Jones was formally head of the history department at Center High School. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

23. The British navy, members of which are called "limeys," were responsible for first using limes to prevent scury during long sea voyages. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

24. Please write and tell my mother and I about your trip to San Francisco. No error.

A. A 
B. B 


C. C 
D. D 
E. E

Answers and Explanations

1. D: When used as a name, as it is here, "Mom" should be capitalized. When used as a noun, e.g. "Our mom told us," it is lower-case. Spelling, capitalization, and punctuation are correct in the other underlined parts.

2. D: The incorrectly plural verb "are" should be "is" to agree with the singular subject "smoking."

3. B : The singular verb "includes" should be plural here to agree with the plural subject "signs."

4. C: The possessive pronoun modifying "trigonometry homework" should be the singular "his" here to agree with the singular "Either Philip or Joe," not the plural "their."

5. C: The preposition here should be "besides," meaning except or in addition to, not "beside," meaning next to or alongside of.

6. E: This is correct as written. The speaker appreciates the helping, not you, so the object is "helping" and "your" modifies "helping." Using "you" here is a common error.

7. D: The correct spelling of the adverb indicating location is "here." "Hear" is the spelling of the verb meaning to perceive sound.

8. B: The correct spelling is "affected," meaning to influence or have an impact on. "Effected" means caused or accomplished, e.g. "Our conversation effected a change."

9. C: To modify/describe "opposed," the correct spelling is the adverb "altogether" (one word), meaning entirely/completely/wholly. The two words "all together" have a different meaning, e.g. "The committee members were all together yesterday."

10. D: The plural subject "flies" requires the plural verb "attack," not the singular "attacks."

11. B: "This kind of sweater" is correct; adding the article "a" is incorrect. When describing something as a "kind of/type of," this expression places the described thing into a category. The category itself does not refer to a specific individual of that type (in this example, sweater).

12. E: The sentence is correct as it is written.

13. C: The correct spelling of the verb meaning to agree is "assent." The spelling here, "ascent," is a noun meaning a climb or upward progress, literally or figuratively.

14. C: The correct plural present perfect tense of "to go" is "have gone," not "have went," which is never a correct construction in any context.

15. B: The past tense of the verb "to sink" is "sank," not "sunk," which is the present perfect or past perfect (e.g. is or are sunk, has or have sunk, was or were sunk).

16. B: The correct spelling is "complement," meaning in math (as it does here), the angle that, added to a given angle, produces a right angle (here, 30+60=90). In modern English, complement means the full amount required; or something that completes, perfects, or goes well with something else. The spelling "compliment," incorrectly used here, means praise or flattery.

17. B: The verb "drive" should be modified here by the adverb "cautiously," not by the adjective "cautious," which should only modify a noun (e.g. "Cautious behavior is advised.")

18. B: The correct spelling is "council," meaning an assembly of persons or an executive, legislative, or administrative body assisting or advising a leader. "Counsel," meaning attorney at law, could also be correct here. There is no such word as "counsil."

19. D: The subject "scurvy" is singular; to agree, the verb "results" is required, not the plural "result."

20. B: The plural subject "discs" requires the plural verb "offer," not the singular "offers."

21. D: The third-person personal pronoun is the indirect object of the verb "learned" here (with the preposition "from"), so it should be the objective case "him," not the subjective case "he," which is only used as a subject. He taught me; I learned from him.

22. A: Context indicates the correct meaning here is "previously," i.e. "formerly." "Formally" means officially (e.g. "She was just formally designated head of the department this year").

23. D: "British Navy" is a singular collective noun. To agree, the verb should be "was" rather than the plural "were."

24. C: Because it is the indirect object of the verb "tell" here, the first-person singular personal pronoun should be the objective case, "me," not the subjective "I." Tell my mother and tell me, not "tell I."

by Enoch Morrison


Last Updated: 03/25/2015


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